Education

Black Swamp Fine Arts School expands music offerings with ensembles for kids & adults

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Both Sophia Schmitz and Betsy Williams discovered a passion for music at an early age. Schmitz, of Perrysburg, started playing violin at 3, and was gigging when she was 11. “My mom’s an artist and my family is very musical so I was surrounded by that.” Williams, the youngest of six children, grew up in northern Kentucky with a musical mother who had the entire family singing every morning. Schmitz started teaching when she was in high school, but even before that had a goal in mind. “Since I was 12 it’s been my vision to open a studio.” For her part as the youngest of six, Williams got a late start on violin lessons. The cost of lessons was an obstacle. Her mother had taught her piano and the musical basics. “I taught myself several instruments before I settled on violin.” Those experiences and passion have now taken shape in their new endeavors. Schmitz founded the Black Swamp Fine Arts School in January, realizing her dream of opening a studio. Williams teaches violin, viola and cello at the school. Both are graduate students in the Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts. As a BGSU undergraduate Schmitz had a minor in entrepreneurship, and in one class she had to put together a proposal for a business. When she started figuring out how much it would take to open a music studio, she realized she could make it work.  So last fall she met with lawyers and accountants, and with help pulled together a studio in space at 500 Lehman Ave. in Bowling Green where she could teach violin, piano and dance, as well as offer a space to other professional musicians associated with the university to teach. She’d already been teaching in the area, but finding a space for lessons was always a chore. Students are not allowed to use university facilities. Williams was teaching as well. She’d already been working with orchestra students at the Bowling Green High and Middle schools. Schmitz said most teachers rent space, similar to what stylists do in a salon. Others, including Williams and the two dance teachers, were hired as independent contractors. The school now has 10 teachers and about 100 music and dance students. Now they want to make…


BG students salute veterans for their service

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   With patriotic band music playing and a sea of more than 400 American flags waving, the veterans marched into the auditorium. Some rather slowy, with canes. Some in uniform. All with dignity. One by one, they walked to the microphone, introduced themselves and gave shout-outs to the student audience members who invited them to the Veterans Day program. And one by one, the children, grandchildren or neighbors who brought the soldiers to the program, stood up, beaming with pride. “It melted my heart,” Mike Meeker, an Army veteran, said after the program as he hugged his daughter, Jasmine. “It means a lot.” Meeker was one of nearly 70 veterans honored during the annual Veterans Day program hosted by Kenwood Elementary on Thursday. “It was nice to have the recognition of my service,” Navy veteran Jeremy Prisk said as he reunited with his children in the lobby. “It was nice that my children got to take part.” Army veteran Chad Smith agreed. “It’s a really good celebration of a lot of hard work. It’s good to know that people still celebrate this.” Retired Kenwood teacher Kent McClary introduced the veterans before they paraded in. “These are the people, men and women, who when called to duty for their country, they all went,” he said. These were the fortunate ones who made it home, he reminded the children. “They all gave of themselves. They all love their country.” McClary spoke of the value of military service members. “We’ve needed help to maintain our freedom. When we needed them, they were there,” he said. “I’m surrounded by heroes,” McClary said as he looked at the stage full of veterans. “It’s a great honor to have you here today.” To show their appreciation, the kindergartners sang “You’re a Grand Old Flag,” and the band and all the students performed an armed forces medley of songs for Air Force, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard and Army. A few students went to the podium, climbed up a step stool, and read poems or stories for the veterans. One read a letter to a World War II nurse. “I’m inspired by your courage. Your courage helped us be free,” the student said. “It allows kids like me to go to school and be happy. Thanks…


BG studies school building options and costs

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green City Schools is taking baby steps toward putting a bond issue for buildings on the ballot. Before school officials take the plunge – maybe as soon as next November – they want to know what district voters want for children, and what expense they are willing to support. “I don’t like to go to the ballot with a hope and a prayer,” Superintendent Francis Scruci said Wednesday evening to a group of parents, teachers and community members gathered in Kenwood Elementary School’s gymnasium. This was one in a series of meetings Scruci is holding throughout the district to present information on the school building needs. While the audience had questions of the superintendent, he also had questions for them. Before putting any issue on the ballot, the district needs to know: Is there support for consolidating the three elementary schools into one building? How much are citizens willing to pay for improving school facilities? “We’re all ears at this point,” Scruci said. After community meetings earlier this year, the district is leaning toward paying for any building renovations or new construction with local funds. “Accepting state money doesn’t make a lot of sense for us,” Scruci explained since the state share would be 11 to 14 percent. “We’d have to play by their rules,” he added. “If we do this project as a community, we make all the decisions,” Scruci said. School officials are also favoring building a new consolidated elementary building on district land north of the middle school, rather than renovating the three existing elementaries. Another option is renovating Crim and Kenwood, and building a new Conneaut where it stands now. The final option is do nothing, and risk the chance of costs escalating more. The earliest a bond issue would appear on the ballot is November 2017. If it passes, the new school could be open three years later. For the first time in these community meetings, the district had calculated estimated bond millage and costs to homeowners for several of the building options. The options ranged from the lowest estimate of $37 million for renovating the schools, to the highest estimate of $75 million for building a new consolidated elementary and a new high school. The cost to an owner of…


Keith Guion is a master of family entertainment

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Keith Guion wryly admits to being a bad influence on his three children. Guion is a theater devotee, as a director and writer, especially children’s theater. And all three of his children have followed his footsteps, and the Horizon Youth theatre and other troupes have been the beneficiaries. His daughter, Cassie Greenlee of Bowling Green, remembers when she was in fourth grade and had been offered the part of Annie in “Annie Warbucks.” She was concerned about taking the part, so she discussed it with her father and mother, Wendy Guion. They didn’t push her, rather discussed the pros and cons. She took the part. “That was the beginning of the end,” she said while waiting for a preview of her father’s current show, “The Fabulous Fables of Aesop.” Horizon Youth Theatre will stage the show Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. at Otsego High School. Tickets are $5 and available at the door and at horizonyouththeatre.org. Guion wrote the “Fabulous Aesop” script a number of years ago while working in the Ashland area. That’s where his children, including two sons Matthew and Jeffrey Guion, grew up and picked up the love of all aspects of theater. “I never really encouraged them to get involved,” their father said, “they just sort of did.” That included acting, all the theater crafts and writing. The play references 21 of the more than 600 fables attributed to Aesop, the storytelling slave from ancient Greece. Eight of them are acted out, while the rest are mentioned in passing. “The fables are about universal themes we all recognize,” he said. The behavior of the characters whether animal, human or even plant, are recognizable. “And most of the lessons are still pertinent today.” This amounts to a double dose of Aesop for the Horizon troupe. The older members staged “The Great Cross Country Race,” based on “The Tortoise and The Hare” in October. That was directed by Greenlee, and featured the human characters talking in “gibberish,” which was penned by Guion. Now the younger troupe members, those in grades second through sixth, will try their talents on these ancient tales. He selected the tale, including less known ones such as “The Oak and the Reed,” using the story theater form….


BG High troupe conjures magical world of Narnia

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News On a gray autumn morning fourth and fifth graders from Bowling Green schools got to visit a magical land of Narnia. They came on school buses, accompanied by teachers. The heroes of the play “The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe” that they’d come to see arrive in Narnia through a wardrobe in an English country home. For the BG students this was a release from the humdrum; for the quartet of British school kids, this was a life and death adventure, involving evil and redemption. The Bowling Green High School Drama Club opens the stage adaptation of the C.S. Lewis philosophical fantasy “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe” tonight (Nov. 3) at 7 p.m. continuing with shows Friday, Nov. 4 at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 2 p.m. in the Bowling Green Performing Arts Center. These children – Peter (Michael Martin,), Edmund (Bob Walters), Susan (Megan Carmen), and Lucy (Lily Krueger) – are transported into a land in the grip of eternal winter. The wicked White Queen (Claire Wells-Jensen) has cast a spell over Narnia. Unbeknownst to the children, their coming has been foretold as a sign of the return to the rule of Aslan (Martin Simon) the just, kindly, giant lion. Narnia is populated by magical forest creatures, who are largely on the side of Aslan and the evil magical creatures, the specters, ghouls and ogres who rally to the witch. The high school troupe brings this world to life. Mr. and Mrs. Beaver (Alexis Reinbolt and Moe Kellow) lumber about as you’d expect of creatures more at home in water. The costumes and the way the characters move in character with them do much to create the world, which is otherwise represented by a few large, but simple set pieces. This enables the action to flow smoothly from scene to scene. The biggest technical accomplishment is representing Aslan. Martin Simon appears within a large wooden puppet that moves majestically about the stage. Amid all the spectacle, the human element remains at the forefront. Edmund’s story as one tempted and lured by the White Witch gives this an emotional dimension beyond a simple battle of good against evil. The actors playing the children form a believable band, each a distinct personality that complements the group as…


School facility meetings set for community

Bowling Green City Schools will hold two Facility-Community Workshops in the next two weeks as the district continues to move toward making a decision on the future of the Bowling Green City School buildings.  Local citizens are invited to attend so the district can share the most current information and get feedback. The dates are Nov. 9 at Kenwood Elementary at 6:30 p.m., and Nov. 15 at Conneaut Elementary. The Board of Education regular meeting will start at 5 p.m. and the workshop will begin at approximately 6:15 p.m.


Horizon Youth Theatre presents ‘The Fabulous Fables of Aesop’

Submitted by Horizon Youth Theatre Horizon Youth Theatre is pleased to announce its 2016 winter production, The Fabulous Fables of Aesop, adapted and directed by Keith Guion. Performances are at Otsego High School, 18505 Tontogany Creek Road, on Friday November 11 and Saturday November 12 at 7:00 pm; and Sunday November 13 at 2:00 pm.  Tickets are $5.00 and will be available at HorizonYouthTheatre.org or at the door. There will also be a preview at Wood County District Public Library on Saturday, November 5 at 10:30 am, which is free and open to the public. An excerpt will also be performed for John Zibbel’s Foundations of Inclusive Early Childhood class at BGSU on Tuesday evening to help demonstrate the benefits of theatre for elementary-age children. Actors aged 6 to 12 from six area schools are featured, as well as online / home schooled: BG Middle School, Conneaut Elementary, Otsego Elementary, Montessori School of Bowling Green, Maumee Valley Country Day School, and Ohio Virtual Academy.  The play involves a company of twelve young players who arrive to share the fables of Aesop. Since Aesop wrote as many as 600 fables, this is an enormous undertaking. Several players try to accomplish this challenging task by sharing different fables at the same time, speaking over one another to be heard. When this method isn’t effective, the remaining players explain, through one of Aesop’s fables, exactly why it didn’t work. Then all the players collaborate to share several additional fables, some of them familiar, others not as well known. By using very simple costumes and set pieces, and the players themselves in multiple roles as well as occasionally becoming inanimate objects to represent certain props, this unique version of Aesop’s classic fables will surprise and delight audiences of all ages. Keith would like to emphasize the importance of the entire ensemble in this production, stating “the production team is as much a part of the ensemble as the actors.” Therefore, the stage crew members are also being listed, which is unusual for a pre-show press release. Cast members: Player 1          Gavin Miller Player 2          Lauren Carmen Player 3          Elijah Marx Player 4          Rose Walters Player 5          Alice Walters Player 6…


Author tells BGSU the best answer ends with a question mark

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Warren Berger travels around telling people they should ask more questions. In some circles that could get him labeled as troublemaker; elsewhere, he’d be considered an innovator. As a journalist Berger asks questions for a living, and he’s made them the focus of his work. His book “A More Beautiful Question,” is the common read for Bowling Green State University this year, and the self-described “questionologist” visited campus Wednesday to further proselytize about the importance of questioning. Asking questions, he quipped, “has allowed me to go without a job for 25 years.” Trained as a journalist at Syracuse University, he chafed at the notion of working in a newsroom where his inquiry would be subject to assignments handed out by an editor. So he ventured down the route of independent journalist. And while he asked questions that whole time – “as a journalist questions are the only tool you have,” it has only been in the last few years that the full import of the subject has revealed itself to him. He learned that questioning is not always valued. It challenges the status quo. And over time, people ask fewer and fewer questions. “If you ask questions you can be seen as disruptive,” Berger said. That’s especially true of students in inner city schools. But people are born to ask questions. It starts at age 2, he said, and peaks at about age 4. “A 4-year-old girl is the ultimate question-asking machine,” he said. She averages 300 a day, and boys that age are not far behind. Though questioning falls off afterward, creative people continue ask them, and those questions, he discovered, have shaped our world. The genesis of innovation, whether the internet or Airbnb, the cell phone or Gatorade, is a question. It starts with why? – to understand the problem. Then what if? – to generate ideas. And then how about? – to start solving the problem. These questions unleash a steady stream of what he calls beautiful questions leading to change, big and small, revolutionary and incremental. In Silicon Valley, Berger said, “questions are the new answers.” The questioning doesn’t stop once the product is developed, he said. “It is the most effective to keep the company innovating.” Answers, he said, have “a short shelf life.”…


WCESC presents an inspirational evening with LeDerick R. Horne

State Support Team 1, Wood County Educational Service Center, and Wood Lane present an evening at the Bowling Green Community Center with motivational speaker LeDerick Horne. The presentation will be on November 30 from 6:30 to 8:00 pm in the Dolores Black Gym, 1245 W. Newton Rd, in Bowling Green. LeDerick Horne was labeled as neurologically impaired in third grade.  He defies all labels.  He’s a dynamic spoken word poet, disability advocate, and motivational speaker.  His work addresses the challenges of all disabilities, uniting the efforts of diverse groups in order to achieve substantive, systemic change.  He is on the governing board of Project Eye-to-Eye, a national nonprofit that provides mentoring programs.  Learn more at http://www.lederick.com/ Supported by Wood Lane in collaboration with the Wood County Educational Service Center Parent Mentors Jennifer Vanlerberg and Jenny Myers. Registration Deadline is Nov 23rd!  To register call Jennifer or Jenny at 419-354-9010 or send an email to jvanlerberg@wcesc.org or jemyers@wcesc.org   Please include the number of people attending, their names, and the email address and/or phone number of a contact person with their registration request.  Seating is limited, so registration is required.   


Parents told not to just dump kids at football games

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Friday night football games are supposed to be loud and busy and energized. But they are supposed to be controlled chaos – not risky for young students. So at this Friday’s game, parents will not be allowed to drop off young students by themselves. And those who do, will be called to come pick up their children. After the last home Bowling Green High School varsity football game on Oct. 7, Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci expressed some concerns about the “free-for-all” atmosphere at the game. “Parents are dropping kids off at the game” as young as fourth-graders and not accompanying them. “Nobody’s watching these kids,” he said. Throughout the games, it turns into a “mosh pit of kids,” Scruci said. “There’s no supervision. There’s no accountability. We’ve got to tighten up what we’re doing.” Scruci was so troubled about the unsafe situation, that his normal jovial “Friday Message” videotape to students and parents took on a serious tone. “We want you kids to come to the game,” he said in the videotape. “But it’s important that they’re supervised by you, the parents.” When contacted after his video message was released, Scruci said that some changes would be enacted before the last home game, which is this Friday. The policies will continue to the next week if Bowling Green hosts a playoff game at home. Following is the letter being sent out today to school families: Dear parents and guardians, As I alluded to on the Friday Message two weeks ago, we have made some changes for student attendance at our home football game this Friday. This has been necessitated due to the growing concern for student safety and school liability. The following are the new procedures and expectations.  All students will only be admitted through the West Gate. Signs will be visible to direct them to the appropriate gate.  (The west gate is the gate on the left as you enter the stadium from the parking lot) Students will be prohibited from bringing balls, drinks, etc., into the stadium. Please leave balls at home as they will be confiscated.  Drinks and drink cups will be emptied and discarded.  Students 5th grade and younger must be accompanied by an adult and must be seated with parent or guardian….


BG Schools likely to try income tax renewal in May

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   In May, when Bowling Green School District Treasurer Rhonda Melchi showed the school board the five-year financial forecast for the district, the budget looked like a rollercoaster. Last week, when Melchi revisited the forecast, it looked more like a game of hide-and-seek – in a heavy fog. But one item was certain – the school district will need to renew its 0.5 percent income tax next year. After that, the forecast gets a little blurry again, but by 2020 the district could be $4 million in the hole unless something changes. “We will need some new revenue sources,” Melchi told the school board. “I’m very conservative. I don’t like to give you a best scenario.” The income tax for the district began in January of 1993 and has been renewed every five years since. It makes up 11 percent of the district’s general fund revenue. “That’s pretty significant,” she said. To place a renewal on the May 2017 ballot, school board members will need to take action at their December meeting. At that point, they will have to decide whether to stick with a five-year tax or ask for a continuing tax. Melchi predicted the district would receive an overall increase in foundation funding from the state. “We do expect to see a little more of an increase over last year,” she said. But doing accurate five-year planning is very difficult for the district, she added. “We really don’t know what’s going to happen.” The cost of supplementing charter schools continues to affect the district. Melchi explained that the state gives Bowling Green $1,907 per student each year. But for every student who chooses to leave Bowling Green for a charter school, the state takes $6,000 from the district to give to the charter school. Expenses are also up, with the district adding 12.35 staff positions due to increasing enrollment and a growing special needs population. “There have been factors that have forced us to make those decisions,” Superintendent Francis Scruci said. The annual budget is also greatly affected by the number of paydays each year. This year has 27, compared to 25 last year, which makes a big difference, Melchi said. That and the phase out of tangible personal property taxes will result in a revenue…


Ordinary citizens honored for extraordinary lives

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   They may have looked like an ordinary farmer, teacher, nurse and small town mayor. But the four were recognized for being so much more than that Sunday during the annual Spirit of Wood County Awards presented in the courthouse atrium. Recognized were Dan Henry, Janet Stoudinger, Brian Tucker and Jean Gamble. “So many times, we forget to recognize people who do outstanding things,” said Wood County Commissioner Doris Herringshaw at the beginning of the event. The Spirit of Wood County Awards changed that during the bicentennial of the Northwest Ordinance in 1987. And after that, the county commissioners decided to make the awards an ongoing effort to recognize ordinary citizens for doing extraordinary acts. Dan Henry, of rural Bowling Green, was given the Agricultural Leadership Award. Henry, a former industrial arts teacher at Anthony Wayne, worked part time at Riker Farm Seed starting in 1975, said Lesley Riker, who nominated him for the award. Upon retiring from teaching, Henry took over presidency and full-time management of Riker Farm Seed. He is active in the Ohio Seed Improvement Association, is on the educational committee, and is active in Ohio Foundation Seeds and Advanced Genetics. “Dan believes strongly in education,” Riker said. Riker Farm Seed hosts corn and soybean test plots, field days and hosts several hundred FFA members who come to the farm for education on hybrid corn and soybeans. Henry is now working closely with Farm 4 Clean Water, OSU Extension and Wood Soil and Water in hosting demonstration plots for cover crops and how they can help with water run-off and nutrient uptake. “We as farmers are doing something for water quality,” Riker said. “I don’t know what we could do without him,” Riker said about Henry. Janet Stoudinger, of Wayne, who passed away in January, was recognized with the Self Government Award. Tom Bentley, who presented the award, said it was fitting that the ceremony was being held in the Alvin Perkins Atrium, since there was so many similarities between Perkins and Stoudinger. “He gave back a lot more than he took in – the same as Jan,” Bentley said. Stoudinger held positions as a teacher, coach and mayor of Wayne. “Jan taught us a lot about restraining ourselves,” Bentley said. “She never disrespected anyone.”…


Gardner disputes ‘tax shift’ as mostly myth not math

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The “tax shift” cited by some in election seasons, is more of a myth than real math, according to State Senator Randy Gardner, R-Bowling Green. “You just hardly ever hear the other side of it,” Gardner said recently. So he decided to provide his own fact checking on the state budget and so-called tax shift. “Sometimes the truth becomes a casualty of the political season. Such is the case in 2016,” Gardner said. Across the state, citizens have been told the “tax shift” has required more schools to place levies on the ballot. Untrue, Gardner said. “In fact, in the past three years, fewer school levies for new operating money have been on Ohio’s ballot than any time in the past 51 years,” Gardner said.  According to the state senator, there have been an average of 42 such levies in the past three years. In 2010, Gov. Ted Strickland’s last year in office, a total of 173 new levies were on the ballot. In every year he was governor, more than 100 new levies were voted on in Ohio. Many people find those stats “unbelievable,” but Gardner pointed out the numbers don’t count bond issues or renewal levies. “There just hasn’t been the need for new operating money for quite some time,” he said, adding that increases in state funding in the past four years have helped many local schools. Of the 38 school districts in his senate district of Wood, Fulton, Lucas, Ottawa and Erie counties, only one district (Port Clinton) has had a net reduction in per pupil state funding in the past four years, and three districts are below the rate of inflation in state aid. A total of 25 districts have received greater than triple the rate of inflation increases in new state funding. Local school districts did lose state funding between 2009 and 2012. According to Gardner, the national recession affected Ohio’s budget and support for schools. Strickland’s last budget cut state revenues to local schools for two years – the first time that had happened in Ohio history – and Governor John Kasich’s first budget experienced similar reductions, Gardner said. “In fairness, for the most part, state aid has not been a partisan issue in Ohio,” Gardner said, “Governors and most legislators strive to…


BG Schools to arm doors with ‘Boots’ to keep out intruders

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   A brutal attack on Rob Couturier’s daughter led the Michigan man to invent a safety system being used in schools around the nation. That system, called the “Boot,” will soon be installed on 344 doors in Bowling Green City Schools. Couturier’s daughter, a petite college freshman, was attacked and almost raped. That was just over six years ago, and he still chokes as he talks about it. “I still remember her face,” Couturier said to the school board Tuesday evening. “She turned to look at me and couldn’t see me. Her face was beat to a pulp.” Couturier knew the perpetrator and located the man shortly after the attack. Couturier tried to break down the door, dislocating his shoulder in the process. He then kicked his way through drywall to get the attacker. He saw the man barricading the door with his boots wedged up against the door. That gave the father an idea. He created the “Boot,” a rectangular-shaped plate of quarter-inch thick industrial steel. With two steel pegs, the plate can withstand 16,000 pounds of pressure and keep doors closed to intruders. But the idea stopped there, with Couturier continuing his job as a school custodian, facilities employee and coach. A couple years later, after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Couturier’s daughter called her dad about his invention. “It would have saved every one of those children,” she said to him. “I was so mad, I was only thinking of my daughter,” and not about how his invention could help others, Couturier said. So he resigned his job, sold his summer home, and started working with law enforcement and other security experts on fine-tuning his invention. His mission became keeping kids safe in the event of an intruder. His business, called The Lockdown Co., started making the “Boots” by hand, and has since installed safety equipment in more than 100 public schools and 18 private schools. Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci recently saw Couturier make a presentation on the safety equipment, and immediately asked the inventor to walk the local school buildings with him. In addition to arming each door with the “Boot,” Couturier said the rooms need to be labeled more clearly to aid law enforcement when they arrive on the…


‘Drive to Save Lives Tour’ to visit local schools

The Wood County Educational Service Center, Safe Communities of Wood County, and The Wood County Prevention Coalition have partnered to bring Cara Filler, an internationally known speaker, to present four school assemblies and one community event entitled, “The Drive to Save Lives Tour: Empowering Youth to Make Good Choices Without Peer Pressure, Alcohol & Drugs.” On October 25 and October 26, as a part of Red Ribbon Week, Cara will present to assemblies in North Baltimore, Rossford, Eastwood and Penta Career Center. Also, from 7 pm to 8 pm, on October 26 th at Bowling Green High School, there will be a community night event that Ms. Filler will speak to which will be made available to all youth and parents throughout the county. “It is imperative that we teach our youth to be conscious of the decisions they make every day, whether behind the wheel, in the classroom, or with their friends,” said Sandy Weichman, Coordinator, Safe Communities of Wood County. “Partnering with Cara Filler will be a wonderful opportunity for our youth, as well as their parents, to hear her story and put her ideas to work in their lives.” “We’re excited to have such an entertaining, powerful, and dynamic speaker such as Cara Filler come to Wood County and come and talk to our students, parents and schools.” added Kyle Clark, Prevention Education Director of the Wood County Educational Service Center. “ We hope her message resonates with the youth in our community so that they may make the best choices for themselves and have a more fulfilling, resilient life.” Recently, the Wood County Prevention Coalition Podcast had the opportunity to interview Cara Filler, as a preview of the event, and it can be found here: http://www.podcastgarden.com/episode/cara-filler_89662