Education

BG Middle School ‘Ending the Silence’ on mental health

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Silence can be soothing – but not if it allows warning signs and the stigma surrounding mental health issues to go unnoticed. Bowling Green Middle School counselors Debra Ondrus and Alyssa Santacroce presented a program to the board of education Tuesday evening about “Ending the Silence at BGMS.” The school partnered with the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Wood County to focus on emotional and mental health. National statistics show that one in five Americans suffer from mental health issues, Santacroce said. For students, those problems can affect their academics and daily lives. Bowling Green Middle School is the first school in Wood County to work with NAMI to offer this for students, Ondrus said. Staff and students worked together to recognize the signs of mental health problems. Through the program, they tackled the topics of: Decreasing the stigma Identifying warning signs Finding positive coping skills Treating the problem Recognizing signs of suicide Students not only talked about how to help themselves, but also how to help others who are suffering. “I was amazed,” Ondrus said of the ideas students came up with to help others. One student vowed to stop calling other people “crazy.” Another wanted to start reaching out to those in obvious distress. The students learned that mental illness is not a life sentence, Ondrus said. “Just like a physical illness, mental illness is treatable.” One area that Santacroce and Ondrus found especially lacking was the area of positive coping techniques. When students were asked to identify how they cope with life stresses, their answers primarily focused on playing video games, watching TV or using their cell phones. Students were given ideas of other stress relievers, given information on area resources and were reassured, “there is help,” Ondrus said. A video called “If we all speak loud enough,” stressed that mental illness needs to be talked about in the open. To understand the impact of the “Ending the Silence” program, all the students were given pre- and post-tests…


School board ponders whether, what, and when of new bond issue request

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Back in November when the Bowling Green school bond issue went down in defeat, board members insisted that they would return with the same $72 million plan that would consolidate the district’s three elementary schools and extensively renovate and expand the high school. Early Monday morning, two months later, they met to discuss whether that was the best option. The workshop session was part post mortem of the election and part a free-wheeling discussion about what other options there may be to address the district’s building needs. In the end, the board seemed poised to return to the ballot, possibly as early as May, with the same plan. The board, which meets in regular session Tuesday, set another special meeting for Friday, Jan. 19 at 7:30 a.m. to further discuss the next step. It is possible a decision on whether and what to put on the ballot and when will be determined then. They must decide by Jan. 31 if the board is to put the issue on the May ballot. Board member William Clifford, who said on election night that the board would return with the same plan, asked Monday whether there was any way to trim the cost of the project. His fear, he said, was that coming back with the same amount would tell the voters they weren’t being listened to. “We weren’t asking for any more than we needed,” board member Ginny Stewart said. “We were so far behind we needed to catch up.” Norm Geer, who was elected to the board in November, said that those who voted against the levy weren’t “anti-education.” Many factors were at play, including the loss of neighborhood schools as well as the cost. “We have to convince people it’s money well spent,” he said. “It’s money that can save money in the future.” Superintendent Francis Scruci said that consolidating the elementary schools would save the district $100,000 a year in transportation costs, and eliminate three routes. That would mean the district would not…


Kids’ Tech infects students with a love of science

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Maybe it takes something creepy like a parasite that controls its host to hook children on science. That’s what Dr. Kelly Weinersmith, of Rice University, hopes when she presents “When Sci-Fi Comes to Life: Parasites that Control Host Behavior” at Kids’ Tech University @BGSU. The program for children, 9-12, will be presented at Bowling Green State University in four Saturday sessions, starting Feb. 3 and continuing through March 24, when Weinersmith will present. This is a way, she said, to show “students there’s all kinds of crazy stuff in nature, mind blowing stuff, and you can spend a lifetime asking interesting questions and let them know how much fun it is to be a scientist.” Kids’ Tech is open to 150 students. The cost is $90. For more information visit http://kidstechuniversity-bgsu.vbi.vt.edu/ “We want the children to feel that the study of science is something that they should consider, and that they can be comfortable in a university environment,” said Dr. Paul Morris, who adopted the program from one developed at Virginia Tech. The daylong sessions begin with presentations by the guest scientists in the morning. In the afternoon, the students assisted by BGSU graduate and undergraduate students participate in hands-on, activities that relate to the morning presentation. Working with the university students in the campus labs and classrooms gives them a feel for life as a university science student, Morris said. “We are able to provide them with a true university experience, by directly introducing them to distinguished scientists that they can relate to talking about their work. … The speakers in our program, are chosen for their ability to reach this audience, and their effectiveness is seen in the sea of hands that are raised during their morning presentations.” Weinersmith, who has her bachelor and master degrees from BGSU, said that talking about parasites with elements that could come from a science fiction film helps engage the students. “It gets them excited and interested in how the brain and immune system can help…


Toledo Youth Orchestras to perform at Peristyle

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Toledo Symphony Youth Orchestras (TSYO) are composed of the most talented young musicians from various areas of Northwest Ohio and Southern Michigan. The opportunity to perform with a group of musicians who share a similar dedication to musicianship and quality of performance is a great supplemental experience for serious young artists. On February 4, at 2 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater, the Toledo Symphony Youth Orchestras will perform their second concert of the season. The performance on Sunday afternoon will feature the TSYO’s Symphonic Orchestra and Concert Strings ensemble, conducted by Patrick Barrett and the Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Wasim Hawary. Winners of the Toledo Symphony Youth Orchestras Solo Competition, Erin Gardiner and Cole Habekost, kick off the program with pre-concert music beginning at 1:40 p.m. Ms. Gardiner, a senior at Perrysburg High School, will perform the second movement of Barber’s Violin Concerto and Mr. Habekost, a Toledo School for the Art senior at Waterville, will perform the first movement of Wieniawski’s Concerto No. 2, both accompanied by Clint Fox. The TSYO will perform selections by eminent composers Jean Sibelius, Modest Mussorgsky, William Rand, principal horn player of the Philharmonic Orchestra, and more. On February 10, the TSYO Concert Strings will travel to Columbus, Ohio to perform at the 2018 Ohio Music Education Association Professional Development Conference. Additional upcoming TSYO performances include a Side by Side concert with the Toledo Symphony on March 4, at 4 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater, and a Pops concert on April 30, at 7 p.m. at Maumee High School’s Performing Arts Center. To become a member of the Toledo Symphony Youth Orchestras, students must audition to be placed in one of three ensembles, the Philharmonic Orchestra, Symphonic Orchestra, or the Concert Strings ensemble. The Philharmonic and Symphonic Orchestras serve as full orchestral experiences while the Concert Strings ensemble is dedicated to preparing string students for more complex repertoire. The Toledo Symphony Youth Orchestras concert on February 4 at 2 p.m. at…


BG school board to discuss going back on ballot

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green Board of Education will hold a workshop next week to discuss the direction the district should take as it prepares to go back on the ballot. The meeting will be held Monday at 7 a.m., in the central administration office on Clough Street, and will be open to the public. The board faces a Feb. 7 deadline if it decides to try again to pass a levy for school buildings. “We have not made a decision,” Superintendent Francis Scruci said Tuesday evening after the school board’s organizational meeting for 2018. Voters rejected the district’s request last November for a 6-mill bond issue for a new consolidated elementary building and improvements to the high school. Last year, school officials said if the levy failed, the district would return in 2018 with the same request. The need will still exist, they stressed. That will be part of the discussion on Monday. The only new school board member, Norm Geer, said he supported the levy last fall. “I voted for it,” he said. As part of his orientation for the board, Geer has toured all the district buildings – which reinforced his support of the levy. “Seeing the kids cramped in rooms,” with some classes in modular units, and with uneven student levels at the three elementaries, further reinforced his belief, he said. “I’m also aware of the concerns,” Geer said. “There’s a reason it went down and we have to address it.” Though the building project is expensive, consolidation of the elementaries will be a long-term savings, he said. And “the case can be made very convincingly” that the educational opportunities are superior in a consolidated elementary, he added. “There’s a real savings in doing that consolidation,” Geer said. “There are lots of good reasons to do it. The only problem is the cost.” Meanwhile Defiance School District opened its new school building this week, after receiving 78 percent of the funding from the state. Due to a state formula questioned by…


BG high students breaking in ‘Newsies’ musical for school productions

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The young thespians and their adult mentors at Bowling Green High School are ready to set the pace for their peers across the country by piloting the Broadway musical, “Newsies.” Their mission, shared by about a half dozen other schools, is to stage the popular show. Director Jo Beth Gonzalez and the rest of the staff will then share their insights into what it takes to produce the musical with a high school cast. That could result in the production company, Musical Theater International, tweaking certain aspects that prove too difficult for young actors and crews. Their input will also be shared in production notes that will be included when other high schools rent the script. The Bowling Green High School theater is no stranger to this process. They did their first pilot production with “Mary Poppins” in 2014, followed by “Peter and the Starcatcher.” Those projects gave choreographer Bob Marzola an idea. He loved the musical “Newsies.” He became a fan of the original 1992 film starring Christian Bale when he saw it on television. Hat film was a flop at the time of its release, but became a cult classic when it was added to the Nickelodeon rotation and was released on video. Later as a fourth grade teacher at Conneaut Elementary, Marzola used the film and its story about a strike by young newspaper peddlers to talk about labor and the Industrial Revolution. “I got my students hooked on the movie,” he said. Disney turned the movie into a Broadway musical where it was a Tony Award-winning hit. Marzola wondered when Disney would release the performance rights for high schools and if Bowling Green could pilot it. He asked Gonzalez, and she asked MTI, the umbrella organization for Disney musicals. Not yet, she was told. He asked again. She asked again. Not yet. Then last spring, just as the musical theater team at the high school was starting to discuss what musical to stage in spring 2018, Gonzalez was offered the…


‘Trivia Night’ raises questions and money for schools

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   These teams better be smarter than fifth graders. They will face obscure questions like: Where is the only royal palace in the United States? Whose state animal is the sperm whale? What was first patented in Britain in 1750 with a recipe consisting mostly of fish and fish bones? What movie director played the Cook County Assessor’s Office clerk in “The Blues Brothers?” What European country produces more hydroelectricity per capita than any other in the world? The competition is again expected to be fierce at the seventh annual “Trivia Night” to raise money for the Bowling Green Schools Foundation. “It’s a loud and boisterous evening,” especially when the answers are revealed, said Paul Reinhart, president of the school foundation and fifth grade teacher at Conneaut Elementary. “It’s a great time.” Teams of eight people will compete on Feb. 10, in the Simpson Garden Park Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Doors open at 7 p.m., with the trivia starting at 7:30 p.m. The trivia night is “friendly competition,” but there are rules, said Dana Nemeth, a member of the school foundation. “There’s no cheating. You aren’t allowed to use your smart phone.” Topics range from music and history, to geography and math, and countless other subjects. At the end of each round, names are drawn from the audience, with the winner getting to decide what school program or teacher will receive grants of $200 or so. Nemeth formed her own team last year. Since most of the members were librarians, the team dubbed itself “Dana’s Dewey Decimators.” There is no way to study for such a competition, she stressed. Teams are allowed to discuss the questions. “Your team huddles together and gets answers. It’s all in fun.” Victory goes to the team exhibiting the most trivia knowledge – with the prize being the glory of beating the competition. “The team who wins at the end of the night gets bragging rights,” Nemeth said. Nemeth is putting together another team for this…


HYT Presents Winter Workshops

Submitted by HORIZON YOUTH THEATRE Horizon Youth Theatre is pleased to announce our 2018 Winter Workshops. Registration is open for the following three classes, the first of which begins January 6. Cassie Greenlee’s Directing Workshop, which will guide high schoolers through directing the panel-chosen one act plays written by students and their mentors, is full. The Festival of Shorts will be performed at Otsego Elementary School April 13-15. DEVISING Cost: $75.00 Ages: 10-18 Years Old Dates and Times: Saturdays, January 6, 2018 to April 15, 2018,  9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Place: First Presbyterian Church, 126 S. Church Street, 2nd floor classroom Instructor: Keith Guion Description: Students will create their own characters and craft a one-act play from the original idea through performance in April with the guidance and direction of instructor Keith Guion. Participants in the devising workshop are guaranteed a spot in completed play which will be performed at HYT’s Festival of Shorts, April 13-15, 2018 at Otsego Elementary School.  The class will span 15 weeks and has two sections. The creating portion of the class will last approximately eight or nine weeks, meeting each Saturday. When the play is finished, the rehearsal portion of the class will meet more than once a week. This is a wonderful opportunity for students interested in multiple aspects of theatre, including writing. To register for the Devising Workshop, click here. INTRO TO THEATRE Cost: $40.00 Ages: 6-12 Years Old Dates and Times: Saturdays, January 13th through March 17th (nine weeks – no class March 3rd), 2:00 to 3:30 pm Place: St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, Bowling Green (2nd floor classroom) Instructor: Haven Bradam is a graduate of Bowling Green State University, where she received her Bachelors degree in Communications with a major in Theatre and a double specialization in Youth Theatre / Puppetry and Acting / Directing. She has extensive experience with youth theatre through the Toledo Repertoire, the Children’s Theatre Workshop, and the Treehouse Troupe. Through her work with the CTW, Haven tours area schools as a member of The Imaginators. Description: This workshop is perfect for newcomers to Horizon Youth Theatre or…


BG School District ends year with academic successes

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   After losing its first attempt to pass a bond issue for school buildings earlier this fall, the Bowling Green Board of Education ended the year on a positive – even award-winning – note. During Tuesday evening’s meeting, the school board recognized recent three district successes. The district and middle school received “momentum awards” from the state. The Bowling Green Preschool program at Crim Elementary earned the top five-star rating from the Ohio Department of Education. And the district drastically improved its third grade reading scores. “It’s a lot of good news tonight,” Superintendent Francis Scruci said. “It’s a great way to end the year,” said School Board President Ellen Scholl. It was just earlier in the afternoon that the district got word that its most recent “third grade reading guarantee” passage rate had jumped up to 72 percent this fall, compared to 48 percent the year before. “We have done an amazing job,” Scruci said, giving credit to the curriculum and teaching staffs. Scruci acknowledged the district’s disappointing grades on the state report cards in the past. But he also repeated his complaint that “it’s a flawed system.” However, the district is still making strides, he said, announcing the straight “A” scores for graduation rates and growth measures – which earned the district and the middle school “momentum awards” from the Ohio Department of Education. “We are certainly on an upward swing,” Scruci said. “Hats off to our teachers and our curriculum department.” Middle School Principal Eric Radabaugh said the scores show the district is meeting the needs of all of its students. “We aren’t letting kids slip through the cracks,” he said. Then came Melanie Garbig’s turn to talk about the district’s preschool program, which was recently given the state’s top five-star rating. The rating was based on factors such as the number of staff per child, the staff qualifications and the lesson plans. “We have this great team,” said Garbig, executive director of pupil services. Tuesday’s meeting was also a…


‘Little Free Library’ makes books available 24/7

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   A new library opened in Bowling Green on Tuesday. No library cards are necessary. And there is no closing time. A “Little Free Library” was christened at Kenwood Elementary School by students reading their personal odes to books. The tiny library sits on the front porch of the elementary, and is open round the clock to children or neighbors of all ages. “It’s open 24/7. They can come up anytime and take a book. It’s free,” said Shannon Lentz, a first grade teacher at Kenwood Elementary. “Maybe kids who don’t have access to books all the time can use them.” Lentz hopes to add a journal to the library, so readers can record their feelings about the borrowed book when they return it.   The library “building” was donated by Bowling Green State University students in the Service Learning program. Similar libraries were donated to each of the Bowling Green elementary schools. “The goal is to inspire reading,” Lentz said. “It’s not just for our students. It’s for the neighborhood as well.” The library operation is simple, she said. “If you take a book, you leave a book,” Lentz said. The “Little Free Library” program is international – with more than 60,000 of the lending libraries registered in 80 countries. Christine Englebrecht and her daughter Frances Chavez, who were present at Kenwood Tuesday for the ribbon cutting, are familiar with the tiny libraries in Colorado where they lived before coming to Bowling Green. “They were everywhere, in front of every public space,” Englebrecht said. “I’d love to see one in City Park here.” Frances said she was excited about having a Little Free Library in Bowling Green. “The best part is, it’s a library for everyone.” “Anything that provides books for kids and puts books in the hands of kids is great,” Englebrecht said. At the grand opening of the little library, Kenwood students professed their love for books with readings. Tess Challu, who always has a book in her hands, wrote…


BGSU Hosting Around the World Creativity Fair

Submitted by BGSU College of Education and Human Development BGSU’s Creative Learning Environments class will be presenting the Around the World Creativity Fair on Saturday, December 9 at First Presbyterian Church, 126 S. Church Street, from 1:00 – 4:00 pm for children ages 4 to 12. Upon arrival, children will receive a mock passport which they will get stamped at each location they visit. Stations representing sites from around the globe will feature hands-on educational activities based on cultural celebrations and customs, demonstrated and supervised by students from the College of Education and Human Development. Stations include decorating sugar skulls (Mexico); designing paper henna tattoos (India); building cardboard box pyramids (Egypt); stringing beaded necklaces (Nigeria); fashioning felt hats (Germany); making Carnivale masks (Brazil); and decorating (and eating!) traditional star cookies (Italy). Crafts, activities, games and snacks will allow your child’s creativity to flourish while they learn about cultures around the world in a warm, educational environment. Sponsored by HDFS 2300, Family and Consumer Sciences, and the College of Education and Human Development.


Conjecturing adds up to better learning, BGSU prof Gabriel Matney tells STEM teachers

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News One may have assumed a talk entitled “The Power and Promise of Developing a Conjecturing Modality” would be a bit on the dry side. The speaker, Gabriel Matney, an associate professor of math education at Bowling Green State University, would advise that rather than assume one should make a conjecture that the talk could instead be engaging and enlightening for the 300 or so teachers and students of mathematics in attendance at his keynote address for the Northwest Ohio Center for Excellence Symposium on STEM Teaching two weeks ago. “Rather than assuming that we know and acting on it,” he said. It’s better to engage in “conjecturing and testing those conjectures and see if they hold or not.” Could this talk be inspiring? Yes. Matney explained how he made a conjecture as a teenager in love. He was dating this girl, and he conjectured that even though he could barely afford a car for himself, he could one day get her the car of her dreams. So he asked her to describe her dream car. She detailed a purple, tricked-out Dodge Stealth. So 19 years later that girlfriend, now his wife, got that car. It did take a few years extra because it had to be specially painted purple. When delivered it was “an epic Valentine gift” born of early planning. Conjecturing, Matney said, as powerful teaching and life tool. Matney rooted his talk in his own life. He had the audience tackle problems that he had originally posed to his three daughters, now teenagers, when they grew up. He conjectured, he said, that “if I spoke academic language instead of common parlance, they’d be able to handle academic language.” So as a preschooler, his eldest child would spot a box and know it was a “rectangular prism,” even if she couldn’t quite get her tongue around all the syllables. A trip to the bank with his second daughter resulted in a lesson in negative numbers. She persistently questioned him about why they were…


BG Middle School earns state ‘Momentum Award’

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green City School District has taken some heat for low scores on the state’s testing. But the State Board of Education has notified the Bowling Green Middle School that it will be receiving an award for student growth in reading and math. Now in its third year, the “Momentum Award” is the state board’s effort to recognize districts that have received “A”s on each Value-Added measure included on Ohio’s school report cards. That means the middle school’s report card for the 2016-2017 school year showed students made greater than expected growth in reading and math. That’s a big deal, according to Principal Eric Radabaugh. “It really is meaningful for our school,” Radabaugh said Wednesday afternoon. The “A” grade means that Bowling Green Middle School students made more progress over the year than most other students in Ohio. “To me the most important measure of a school is the growth from one year to the next,” the principal said. “We are honored to receive the award.” Radabaugh praised teachers for making the difference. “I credit our dedicated staff,” he said. The teachers use a team approach. “We have a learning environment where teachers share ideas of what’s working and what’s not working.” Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci was pleased with the state recognition for efforts at the middle school. “This is another example of the great things happening in our district,” Scruci said. “We as a district are pleased and proud of the work being done at the middle school and for the hard work being recognized.” The “value-added” grades measure growth in all the sub-groups of students, including those with disabilities. That in itself is notable, Radabaugh said. The State Board of Education agreed. “Your accomplishment makes you part of an elite group of districts that are ensuring the academic growth of students from every background and ability level,” state board president Tess Elshoff wrote to the school. “This is especially admirable when your district is operating multiple schools with diverse…


BG school board to revisit levy options next month

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green Board of Education is giving itself one month to heal from the school bond issue defeat – then it’s back to the drawing board. At Tuesday’s school board meeting, Superintendent Francis Scruci said defeat of the 6-mill levy was “disappointing.” But on the morning after the election, the focus had to shift – there were still 3,100 students to educate, he said. Scruci suggested the school board take a break from levy discussions, then reconvene in December to consider the district’s next steps. He also asked that newly elected board member Norm Geer be present during those discussions. Though the loss of the levy by 550 votes was discouraging, Scruci said he was most dismayed by the discourse from the levy opposition. “The most disappointing part was how divisive it became and how personal attacks occurred,” he said. The levy would have paid for the construction of a centralized elementary building north of the middle school, and an addition and renovations to the existing high school building. Scruci has stated that the district will not come back with a watered-down version – since that won’t meet students’ needs. But next month, the discussions will begin of where the district goes from here. “We have a difficult decision going forward,” Scruci said. Also at Tuesday’s meeting, the board hired Cathy Schuller as the new district treasurer. Schuller, who is currently the assistant treasurer at Rossford school district, will be taking the place of Rhonda Melchi, who is retiring after 22 years in the position. The board also voted unanimously to give Scruci merit pay of 2.25 percent for achieving the district’s goals during the 2016-2017 school year. Other business at Tuesday’s board of education meeting included recognition of outstanding efforts, like those of athletes Gracyn Amos, Zachary Applegate, Macy Hanus, Alli Fahy and Nicholas Jackson. Middle school lunch monitor Darlene Hecht was recognized for performing the Heimlich maneuver on a choking student in October. “I saw these kids pointing, and then…


Chemists honor STEM n the Park at BGSU as part of centennial celebration

Submitted by TOLEDO LOCAL SECTION OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY The Toledo Local section of the American Chemical Society (ACS) celebrated their centennial during a Chem-tennial Banquet on Saturday, November 11, 2017, at the Radisson Hotel at the University of Toledo with nearly 70 chemists and friends. The key note speaker was the esteemed, Toledo native, and former DuPont executive, Dr. Tom Connelly, Jr., Executive Director and CEO of the American Chemical Society. The Toledo Section of ACS (includes the NW OHIO counties of Fulton, Henry, Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky, Seneca and Wood; plus Lenawee County in SW Michigan) has existed since the charter was signed on April 10, 1917. A 100th Anniversary Proclamation, signed by current ACS President Allison Campbell, Ph.D. and 2015 ACS President Diane G. Schmidt, Ph.D., was presented to members of the section by ACS District 2 Director Dr. Christine Bodurow of Indianapolis. In addition, two awards were presented. Dr. Andy Jorgensen, retired Associate Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry at University of Toledo, received an ACS Salute to Excellence Award for his commitment to improving the public’s perceptions of chemistry by serving as a Climate Chemistry Educator/Ambassador (presenting over 170 invited talks) and serving as Section Councilor for nearly 18 years. The Northwest Ohio Center for Excellence in STEM Education at Bowling Green State University was also honored with an ACS Salute to Excellence Award for their commitment to improving the public’s perceptions of CHEMISTRY and other STEM fields by organizing and hosting the largest free, family-fun, hands-on STEM in THE Park event at Bowling Green State University for all of NWOhio and Southeastern Michigan. Associate Provost of BGSU, Dr. Bob Midden accepted the honor on behalf of all who work to bring STEM-in-the-PARK to our community every September. The Toledo Section ACS supports a positive reaction to chemistry in our community by offering a multitude of different outreach events throughout the year to engage the public’s awareness of the benefits of chemistry in their lives and community and to increase science literacy. In 2017 alone, Toledo…