Education

BG schools task force warned about spinning its wheels

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News The citizens group charged with finding the best solution for school buildings in Bowling Green was cautioned Wednesday evening to not get lost in the weeds. The facilities task force has been assigned the duty of selecting the best option for school structures. That means deciding whether the district should renovate existing buildings, build new ones, or do a combination of the two. They are also to determine the best locations for the buildings – on existing school sites or a new campus. The school facilities task force doesn’t need to design the buildings – only decide which building option is the best fit for the community, according to the task force facilitators from the firm of Fanning Howey, architects Steve Wilczynski and Dan Obrynba, plus former school superintendent Tim Hamilton. But the facilitators warned the task force about spinning its wheels if members continue to stray from their assignment. The evening started with a tour of Kenwood Elementary School, the second largest elementary in the district, with 384 students. Principal Kathleen Daney pointed out some of the school’s deficiencies. The inconsistent classroom temperatures were noticeable – with some rooms being uncomfortably hot for those touring. School maintenance director Chuck Martin answered some questions over speaker phone for task force members gathered in a classroom. When the outdoor temperatures stay above 25 degrees, the heat is turned off in the building over the weekends. It is turned on again early Monday morning, but some rooms take a long time to warm up. The kindergartners at the end of the hall wear their coats all day on Mondays and many Tuesdays, teachers said. The boiler system suffers from pipe leaks, which are blamed for mold on carpeting in some rooms. The district replaced about 20-feet of pipe under the building last year, Martin said. Boiler room at Kenwood Elementary When carpeting is replaced by tile, the asbestos beneath it must be abated. The heating pipes and the hallway ceilings also contain asbestos, which poses no risks unless it is disturbed. Many classrooms lack storage…


State funding options for schools can be slippery issue

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News A glimmer of hope has gotten dimmer for one state funding option for Bowling Green City Schools. During a presentation last month, one of the state funding options for school facilities looked promising … until a task force member asked more questions. The Bowling Green district is at least a decade down on the list for funding from the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission. So when Steve Roka, senior planning manager with the OFCC, met with the district’s finance task force and presented the option of funding through the state’s Exceptional Needs Program, it sounded worth pursuing. However, when Roka answered follow-up questions through email from task force members, the chance for funding anytime soon looked more remote. Roka said during the meeting that ENP funding typically covers only the very worst buildings in the state – such as those with dangerous electric systems. The funding can only be used for new buildings, not renovations. David Conley, the district’s consultant through Rockmill Financial, referred to the ENP as a “beauty contest,” with the ugliest building in the state winning. Roka presented the ENP option as a way Bowling Green could accelerate possible state funding. And many felt that at least one building in the Bowling Green district might be in poor enough shape to be worthy of those funds. “It sounded like we could apply for and get funding in that program,” Conley said. “It sounded good to me, too.” But when task force members asked further questions about the Exceptional Needs Program, the chances of that funding seemed to disappear. One task force member asked about the pending applications, the deadline for submission, and the timeline for a project. Roka responded that there are currently no ENP applications pending review. Roka added that the OFCC is not seeking new applications for the ENP. “Because of the number of districts eligible for funding through our primary program – the Classroom Facilities Assistance Program – ENP applications are not being received by OFCC for the current planning cycle. No determination has been made as to…


Rodney Rogers is a man on a mission to lead BGSU forward in difficult times for higher education

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Since Rodney Rogers became Bowling Green State University’s 12th president early this year, he has stressed that public universities have a special mission to serve their communities. So it was no surprise when he delivered his first State of the University address Wednesday that  he took that as his theme. Rogers punctuated his address with the exhortation: “That is what a public university does.” Much of the  emphasis of the speech was on what BGSU is doing to accomplish that mission in a difficult period. “There is no question that, today, we live in the most challenging time that higher education has ever seen.” Not only do universities face a demographic shift that will see “a significant decline in the number high school graduates across the state and in the Midwest” starting in 2024, but they also face a loss of public support. “Along the way, and though it was never our intention, I fear, higher education has lost the trust of a large percentage of the public,” Rogers said. Some people question whether the cost, and the resulting student debt, is worth it. Others question the purpose of a college degree. Should students pursue higher education to prepare for a career and drive the economy? Or is the aim of higher education “to produce a broadly educated person” who can participate in democracy and help create “a more just society?” Rogers argued BGSU must do both. “Bowling Green State University needs to act to support a productive society, a good society and a just society,” he said. “If we do that we will regain the public trust,” he said. “We must prepare graduates to live meaningful and productive lives.” Rogers touted the university’s drive to have more students involved in internships, co-ops, study abroad, undergraduate research, learning communities and service learning. He called for an expansion of these efforts. “It is essential that we require every student to complete an interdisciplinary signature project that addresses an important issue.” Rogers also called for greater outreach to post-traditional students.  “We need to reach these new student…


Park district celebrates winter & the holidays throughout December

From WOOD COUNTY PARK DISTRICT Poinsettia Tour Tuesday, December 4; 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Bostdorff’s Greenhouse Acres 18862 N. Dixie Hwy, Bowling Green Take a tour of new premarket poinsettia varieties at Bostdorff’s Greenhouse. Evaluate these new varieties and vote on the one you like best. You may be one of three lucky people to take one of these “winter roses” home with you! Leader: Stewardship department   EcoLit Book Group Meeting Thursday, December 6; 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. W.W. Knight Nature Preserve: Friends’ Green Room 29530 White Road, Perrysburg For this meeting, please read The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks by Terry Tempest Williams. Discussion leader: Cheryl Lachowski, Senior Lecturer, BGSU English Dept. and Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist (OCVN) Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897   A Heritage Holiday December 8; 1:00 – 4:00 pm Carter Historic Farm 18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green Join us to share some seasonal cheer at the farm’s open house. We’ll have carols played on the player piano, cookie decorating, ornament making, and other activities for the whole family. This festive community event is open to all.   Winter Reptiles Wednesday, December 12; 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. W.W. Knight Nature Preserve: Friends’ Green Room 25930 White Road, Perrysburg When the weather turns white and chilly, what do all of our scaly neighbors do? Migrate, hibernate, or put on a sweater? We’ll learn these things and more as we meet two of our animal ambassadors. Leader: Craig Spicer Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897   The Geminid Meteor Shower Thursday, December 13; 9:30 – 11:00 p.m. Cricket Frog Cove Area 14810 Freyman Road, Cygnet The Geminids are considered one of the best annual meteor showers because they are easily and frequently seen. Bring a thick blanket or reclining folding chair and appropriate clothing for an evening under the stars. Emerge: This shower peaks around 2 a.m., but meteors will be visible beginning between 9-10 p.m. Cancelled if skies are cloudy.  Leader: Bill Hoefflin Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897   Homeschoolers: Old Time Games Friday, December 14;…


BG School staff to be trained for active shooter scenario

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   While Bowling Green City School students get off a day early for their holiday break, their teachers will be learning how to handle school intruders. The Board of Education voted on Wednesday to start winter break for students on Dec. 21 – a day earlier than originally planned. But the entire school district staff of more than 400 people will have to report to the Performing Arts Center at 8 a.m. on Dec. 21. So as students are snug in their beds dreaming of Santa and his elves, the staff will be practicing for active shooters. The training, led by Bowling Green Police Division, will shift at 10:30 a.m. from the PAC to simulated attacks. All the staff will go to the high school, where the high school teachers will be stationed in their classrooms and the rest of the staff will be throughout the building. “We want to put our staff in a situation where they have to practice,” Superintendent Francis Scruci said. “That really brings it home.” The attack scenario, which is still being designed, will not be revealed to staff ahead of the simulation, Scruci said. The school district has done training before, but there are new staff members and there have been changes in the training, Scruci said. “We’ve done a lot of things physically to add safety to the buildings,” he said. The district has added “boots” to all the classroom and office doors, cameras have been installed, plus ballistic shields and 3-M film have been added to windows. Those changes were all made to keep intruders out of the buildings, out of the classrooms, and to allow law enforcement to better see the situation. But the training of personnel is also important, Scruci said. “Regardless of what you have done physically, your staff has to be trained,” he said. “And hopefully, they never have to use it.” The staff will be trained in the ALICE (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate) program, designed to enable people to better prepare and plan for an aggressive intruder or active…


Students of children’s literature creating books of their own

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The spirit of Dr. Seuss and other masters of the picture book was alive in the Bowling Green State University’s Technology and Resource Center in the Education Building. The students in the Literature for Young Children course taught by Elizabeth Zemanski and Amanda Rzicznek were busy writing, cutting, and drawing as they created their own picture books. They draw inspiration from the needs of the children they’ll be teaching, from their own favorite books, and from a talk given by published children’s author Lindsay Ward. The goal is to give them insight into the way picture books come to be. Their work will be exhibited for all to see at the Picture Book Showcase Thursday, Nov. 29 from 5:30-7 p.m. in the Pallister Room of the Jerome Library. Samantha Aukerman, an early childhood major, was a little nervous about the prospect of having her work on display. Still the project was fun, she said. Her book is about a shy cactus’ efforts to find a friend. Because of the cactus’ limited mobility, that’s difficult, until he meets a hedgehog. All this stems from the landscape of Aukerman’s life. She has cacti in her room, and her roommate collects stuffed hedgehogs. That was one of the lessons students took away from a talk in October from  Ward. She spoke about all the odd places she found inspiration for her books. Her series on the neurotic dinosaur named Dexter came from her husband’s discovery of a toy dinosaur abandoned in a doctor’s office. In her talk Ward quipped that speaking to the college students was a rare treat. She usually didn’t speak to audiences who were her size and who could read their own books. Aukerman is also drawing Ward’s attention to material. Ward, who works in cut paper, talked about collecting various types paper. For “Please Bring Balloons” she used vintage paper that had discolored around the edges because of oxidation  to create the landscape of New York City. Aukerman is using sponged paints for her minor characters and the landscape, but is using cut…


Band director from Stoneman Douglas High School to visit BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Alex Kaminsky, the band director at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, will visit Bowling Green State University’s College of Musical Arts Nov. 29-30. The high school is the site of a February 2018 shooting, which left 17 dead and more than 15 wounded. Kaminsky uses music therapy to help people heal from this tragedy. Kaminsky’s visit will include four events open to the public, beginning with a talk at 1:30 p.m. Nov. 29 in 1002 Moore Musical Arts Center. At 4 p.m., he will speak with members of the Falcon Marching Band and the Ohio Student Collegiate Music Educators Association Chapter in the Kelly Rehearsal Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. At 8 p.m. Nov. 29, the BGSU Concert Band will premiere a work written in honor of the students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets are $3 for students/children, $7 for adults in advance and $10 all tickets, day of the performance. BGSU students get in free with their ID. Tickets are available at BGSU.edu/Arts. Dr. Katherine Meizel, an associate professor of musicology in the College of Musical Arts, will interview Kaminsky at 9 p.m. Nov. 29 in Kobacker Hall in a talk-back session. Meizel recently helped release an album of young people singing their songs about the impact of gun violence and the need for change. The songs are part of an album called “Raise Your Voice: The Sound of Student Protest.”


Bus safety – dealing with defiant & distracted motorists

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Local bus drivers fear their routes are just accidents waiting to happen. One driver, whose route travels U.S. 20, decided to keep track one year of the vehicles that illegally passed her bus when it was stopped for students. “I quit counting at 77,” she said. Bowling Green school bus drivers have reported 44 motorists illegally passing so far this year. Perrysburg has reported 38. “It’s just a blatant disregard for the law,” one bus driver said. State Senator Randy Gardner, R-Bowling Green, met on Friday with local school superintendents, school transportation directors and bus drivers at Bowling Green High School. Gardner had heard concerns about drivers illegally passing stopped buses, and decided to talk to the people who deal with it daily. “We ought to talk to the people on the roads,” he said. Attending the meeting were representatives of Bowling Green, Eastwood, Elmwood, Otsego, Lake, Perrysburg, Rossford and Anthony Wayne school districts. They discussed changes that might make drivers more likely to comply with the law – stiffer penalties, cameras catching them in the act, or more education. School buses are a safe mode of transportation, according to the National Highway Safety Board, Gardner said. School buses log about 5.7 billion miles a year, and are 50 to 70 times safer than other forms of transportation, he said. “It’s the safest way to transfer your children to school and home again,” Gardner said. However, defiant and distracted drivers sharing the road are posing risks for buses. “Obviously, it’s a nationwide problem. Everybody here knows it,” said Toby Snow, transportation director for Bowling Green City Schools. Bus drivers talked about motorists that speed up to pass buses preparing to stop. “They don’t want to wait, so they increase their speed and run your yellow lights,” one driver said. Another driver said it’s almost a daily problem – and she’s too busy watching the road and children to identify the offending vehicles. “I don’t have time to look at that license plate.” The offenders range in age from 16 to 96. They…


‘Lunch bunch’ cooks up calmer cafeteria time for kids

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Elementary school cafeterias can be chaotic places. Kids tend to let loose in the unstructured environment after spending the morning at their desks. So Conneaut Elementary cooked up the idea for the “lunch bunch.” The program creates a calmer cafeteria while adhering to the school’s commitment to stressing positive behaviors, according to Principal Jim Lang. The program started with parents being invited to come in and spend lunchtime with their children. That helped, but Lang knew the program could be even better. So parents were asked to spend lunchtime with more children – up to all six lunch periods. “It really has taken off this year,” Lang said to the board of education Tuesday evening. The Conneaut “lunch bunch” includes Sara Meyer, Jane Fawcett, Katie Burris, Jessica Lincoln and Jamie Alt. The parents are helpful in several ways, the principal said. First, they help little fingers open up tricky food packaging. “Gogurt is one of the worst things to open,” Lang said. Then there are those fruit cups that are full to the brim, and juice boxes that “squirt all over” when the straw is stuck in. They help students in line for lunch with condiments – and try to help keep the line moving, especially when the menu includes something popular like pizza. Second, the parents have formed positive relationships with the students – by being helpful and engaging them, not just telling them to keep the noise down. “They have started building relationship with students,” Lang said. “It’s about talking with children, finding out what’s going on.” Instead of clapping hands to quiet the children, the “lunch bunch” uses harmonicas – an idea used by some of the teachers at Conneaut. They also use wireless microphones and headsets, purchased by the PTO. “They don’t have to raise their voice, they don’t have to yell,” Lang said. Just having parents in the lunchroom changes the dynamics, the principal said. “If an adult comes in the room and sits down, the demeanor changes,” he said. And third, the parents help clean up…


School task forces study state fund options for buildings

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green City Schools is low on the waiting list and low in the percentage it would get from the state for new or renovated buildings. But the interest is high among the task force members charged with finding a way to pay for school buildings. The theory is – some money at some point is better than no money at all. Steve Roka, senior planning manager with the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission, met Wednesday evening with members of the finance and facilities task forces. The OFCC is responsible is dispersing state funding for a program that helps school districts pay for renovating or constructing new buildings. School districts are ranked for funding based on a formula of their enrollment divided by the assessed property valuation. That puts Bowling Green’s ranking at 506 – meaning funding would likely not be available for at least another 10 years. The formula puts the district in the 83 percentile – meaning the state would pick up 17 percent of the construction costs and the district would be responsible for 83 percent. There are currently about 100 other school districts already waiting in line for the OFCC funds. “You’re at least 10 years away,” Roka said. “That can change. It could increase, it could decrease.” Dave Conley, the consultant advising the school district’s finance task force, used the timeline of 10 to 15 years. To some, that may seem like a long wait for the state picking up a small portion of the cost. But to others, that wait is not long considering it takes at least two years to complete building designs. And 17 percent can add up to a lot when it’s helping to fund a multi-million dollar project. The average school district using the OFCC funding gets 20 to 40 percent of the construction costs from the state, according to Rick Savors, spokesperson for OFCC. “Why not get something from the state,” Savors said on Thursday. Task force member Ben Otley asked about the certainty of the funding in years to come. “It’s…


BG School Board defends openness and discusses vision

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The Bowling Green Board of Education heard the good news first Tuesday evening. The new “Lunch Bunch” program at Conneaut Elementary is making lunchtime much less hectic. The improved district report cards have resulted in recognition from the state. And safety measures in buildings and training of staff are taking place. Then came the bad news. The board was accused of stripping the Constitution from the district’s core values, and not responding to requests for public records. The board president was chided for exaggerating the poor conditions of the older school buildings. Steve Bateson, a member of the school facilities task force, said the meetings have been very informational – with people on all sides of the issue engaging together. But he cautioned that the solution to the district’s building problems will not come quickly. “This is going to be a slow process,” Bateson said. Bateson was critical of School Board President Jill Carr making a comment during a previous meeting about watching “our buildings deteriorate before our eyes.” Bateson said Conneaut and Kenwood appear to be well maintained. After Tuesday’s meeting, Carr defended her statement of concern about the two oldest elementaries which were built in the 1950s. “I said that, and I stand by that,” Carr said. Another task force member, Brenda Pike asked the board about its “vision for the future” for students – whether that vision would include traditional classrooms or more open, flexible spaces. Board member Bill Clifford said his vision is for “all of the above,” with some more conventional classrooms and some creative spaces. Pike told the board it would be helpful to know the district’s philosophy as the task force is looking at options. Board member Ginny Stewart said she had hoped the task forces would be seeking input from district curriculum specialists. “I would hope you would engage the curriculum director,” Stewart said. While there are several teachers on the task forces, no administrative staff has yet been asked for input at the task force meetings. Ann McCarthy, executive director of teaching and…


Former BGMS teacher allegedly gave student alcohol

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News A police investigation of the Bowling Green Middle School teacher who resigned last month found that he reportedly gave a high school student alcohol at a downtown bar. Dylan Stark, who was an art teacher at the middle school, has been cited with a first degree misdemeanor for furnishing alcohol to an underage person. He allegedly provided an alcoholic beverage to a 17-year-old BGHS student on the night of Oct. 13, at Vice & Video, a bar at 153 N. Main St., Bowling Green. Bowling Green Deputy Chief Justin White said the investigation is now concluded. “There was a lot of speculation and a lot of rumors floating around,” but this is the extent of Stark’s wrongdoing, White said. Stark, 24, will have to appear in Bowling Green Municipal Court on the charge. He had been hired by the district in 2017. He also coached football. The police were first notified of possible criminal misconduct by Stark on Oct. 19, when Superintendent Francis Scruci reported concerns to the police division. The issue was turned over to the BGPD detective bureau. Over a period of several weeks, multiple witnesses were interviewed, as were Stark and his attorney.  A summary of the findings was presented to Bowling Green City Prosecutor Hunter Brown. On Monday, Nov. 12,  Bowling Green Police Division served Stark with the criminal citation. The school district had also conducted its own internal investigation. Stark, who was on administrative leave, had turned in his resignation to the school district after that investigation was completed, on Oct. 29. After the school board’s vote to accept Starks’ resignation, Scruci explained district officials had been given information from another teacher who had received information from students about Stark. At that point, Scruci said the investigation showed “behaviors that we wouldn’t accept in our district.” After the investigation was underway Scruci sent out an email to parents and staff asking the community to not spread rumors and to wait for the results of the investigation into Stark. Most of the allegations proved to be unfounded, but some…


School task force studies deficiencies at Conneaut

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   After showing citizens around Conneaut Elementary, Principal Jim Lang stood surrounded by the people who will decide the fate of the district’s school buildings. He made an impassioned plea. “I don’t care if you build individual schools. I don’t care if you build one consolidated school,” said Lang, who will be retired before any buildings are constructed. “But your children deserve better than this.” Then he added an admonition to the task force. “All I hear is the same bickering I’ve heard for the last two years,” he said. Lang had just pointed out problems in the building constructed in 1954 and currently serving 560 students. Along the tour, he expressed his frustration about those task force members most critical of the need for new schools lagging on the tour – talking in the hallway rather than listening as he pointed out deficiencies in the school building. Those problems, primarily due to a lack of space, included: A reading intervention specialist has to work with children in a small windowless room previously used by the janitor. Inadequate number of restrooms. A hallway with 150 students has three stalls for girls, two urinals and one stall for the boys. The restrooms are not ADA accessible. Inadequate staff restrooms. In that same hallway, the tiny adult restroom requires teachers to practically “do the limbo” to get to the toilet. Poor temperature control, with some rooms feeling like saunas. “They get pretty uncomfortable, pretty quick,” Lang said. The ceiling in the hallways has encapsulated asbestos, which is not hazardous unless it is disturbed. The same is true of some tile under the carpet. Some classrooms are beyond their student capacity, and have to bring in paraprofessionals to meet state standards. The projections for next year indicate there will be even more crowded classrooms. “That’s my biggest concern,” Lang said. The crowded classrooms leave little space for children to do much more than sit in their desks. Young children are not meant to sit at desks all day. “It’s not the best teaching experience,” the principal…


BGSU on track to take over Mercy College by fall

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University’s acquisition of Mercy College is on pace to be completed by fall. Interim Provost John Fischer told Faculty Senate Tuesday that BGSU officials have been meeting with the nursing and health  college’s officials and students. On Monday, he said, Mercy faculty and staff received letters from BGSU assuring them that they will remain employed when BGSU takes over operation of the college. Pending state approval that will occur next fall. Completing the integration of the two institutions is expected to take up to three years. BGSU soon will file its application to transfer Mercy’s operations to the Higher Learning Commission. That application process will involved site visits to both Mercy and BGSU. In June the HLC will vote on whether to approve the transfer, If it approves, the transfer will happen within 30 days. Mercy will then become part of BGSU. But then it will take years to integrate its operations — financial aid, billing, course registration, email, and more — with the university. Fischer said that Mercy students are “very passionate” about being part of that college. Many are post-traditional students. Mercy students expressed concerns about what their diplomas will say when they graduate. BGSU officials said one of the attractions of the deal is Mercy’s success working with non-traditional students, something that’s essential for the university’s future health given the decline in the number of high school graduates. Fischer said that one change will be that senators from Mercy College will be seated in Faculty Senate next fall. How that happens will be driven by the Mercy faculty.  Fischer said that given enrollment is up at Mercy College, the transfer of operations should benefit BGSU financially. The transfer of operations was first announced in September. Mercy College has 1,300 students in Toledo and another 200 in an associate’s degree program in Youngstown.  BGSU is ending its nursing education consortium with the University of Toledo. That arrangement was ended, officials said, so each institution could explore other options that will result in the education of more nurses. The nation,…


No mistake about it, BGHS Drama Club’s ‘Comedy of Errors’ is hilarious

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In presenting Shakespeare’s  “The Comedy of Errors”  the Bowling Green High School Drama Club has condensed it to its silliest. The plot involves the unlikely meeting of two sets of identical twins leading to humor from slapstick to clever wordplay. Think Groucho Marx joins the Three Stooges. Directed by Jo Beth Gonzalez, the play has been edited into version that runs about an hour with the tastiest bits left in.  “The Comedy of Errors” opens tonight (Nov. 1) at 7 p.m. in the BG Performing Arts Center, continuing at the same time and place Friday and Saturday. Tickets are $7 and $5 for adults. The play, set in the 1960s, opens with the trial of Egeus (Hailey Kozey), a merchant for Syracuse, captured in Ephesus, which is off-limits to traders from his city. In pleading his case to the duke (Lauren Clifford), he tells his sad tale of family separation. In a shipwreck many years before he and his twin son Antipholus and the infant purchased as the son’s servant, Dromio,, also a twin, were parted from his wife and the other twins, who have the same names. Don’t ask. It’s Shakespeare.   Now the Syracuse Antipholus (Terra Sloane) with the Syracuse Dromio (Charlotte Perez) have gone off to find their lost siblings, and the father has gone off seeking them, and they’ve unbeknownst to each other all landed in Ephesus. And Ephesus just happens to be where the lost siblings they are seeking live. That’s just the start. Now with the Syracuse twins set loose on the street of Ephesus — which seems about the size of Bowling Green given the way people just happen to run into each other — all manner of high jinks ensue. Now this involves a high degree of suspension of disbelief for the audience who are seated close up and personal on the stage. Antipholus of Ephesus (Maddy Depinet) and Dromio of Ephesus (Hudson Pendleton) bear no resemblance to their Syracuse counterparts. Yet no one, master nor friend, nor even wife, can tell them apart. Must be…