Family

Toledo Museum to celebrate Family Reunion for Frans Hals’ portrait

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART Organized by the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Brussels, Frans Hals Portraits: A Family Reunion was prompted by TMA’s acquisition in 2011 of Frans Hals’s Van Campen Family Portrait in a Landscape, as well as the recent conservation of Brussels’ Three Children of the Van Campen Family. These two works originally formed one composition, separated for unknown reasons likely in the late 18th century or early 19th century. The exhibition reunites the sections of the Toledo/Brussels painting and a third fragment from a European private collection, where they will be shown with the three other family portraits painted by the artist and related works. Frans Hals Portraits: A Family Reunionincludes loans from the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, the National Gallery in London, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the Cincinnati Art Museum and other distinguished collections. The exhibition will travel to the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels, and Collection Frits Lugt, Paris, France following its Toledo debut. A scholarly publication accompanies the exhibition. Frans Hals Portraits: A Family Reunion is supported in part by Taylor Cadillac, KeyBank, and the Ohio Arts Council with additional support from 2018 Exhibition Program Sponsor ProMedica. Museum members are invited to a special members-only preview of the exhibition Friday, Oct. 12 from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Admission to Frans Hals Portraits: A Family Reunion is free for Toledo Museum of Art members and children under 5. Tickets are $10 for adult nonmembers; $7 for seniors, college students and military personnel; and $5 for youth ages 5-17. From 5 to 9 p.m. on Thursdays, visitors can enjoy free admission to the exhibition. A wide range of programs will be offered around the exhibition’s theme of the evolving nature of families today. Among the planned events will be genealogy workshops, a TV situation comedy festival, a Baroque music concert, family storytelling and film series, a special Masters Series presentation featuring Toledo family stories, family-centered tours, art-making activities and more. Frans Hals Portraits: A Family Reunion Related Programs Special Events and Presentations Lecture: Larry Nichols, Frans Hals Portraits: Bringing to Life “These Perishable Things” Sunday, Oct. 21: 3 p.m., Little Theater Lawrence W. Nichols, the William Hutton senior curator, European and American painting and sculpture before 1900 and co-curator of the exhibition Frans Hals Portraits: A Family Reunion, will address what makes the portraiture of Frans Hals so extraordinary. The painter’s compositional strategies as well as his technique will be examined. Hals Community Program: Family-Themed Open Mic Poetry Thursday, Oct. 25: 7 p.m., Levis Gallery Join the Museum for an evening of poetry about family. If you have a poem suitable for an all-ages audience, please arrive by 6:30 p.m. to reserve your spot at the microphone! Hals Community Program: Capturing Your Family History Thursday, Nov. 1: 7 p.m., Levis Gallery Have you found yourself to be the de-facto family historian, but aren’t quite sure what to do with all this information? If so, join us for a presentation by TMA archivist Julie McMaster. She will talk about the joys and challenges of preserving the Museum’s institutional history and how that translates into preserving your own family’s history. Get tips for how to evaluate your own treasures, as well as resources…

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More grandparents take over raising their grandchildren

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Parenting children the first time around is hard enough. Doing it again as a grandparent is even more daunting and exhausting. But more grandparents are finding themselves in the role of parent with their grandchildren. So on Wednesday, Bowling Green City Schools hosted a Grandparent Resource Night at Kenwood Elementary. “We have a lot of grandparents out there in the district raising their grandchildren,” said teacher Jonelle Semancik. “They don’t know where to turn for help.” Kenwood Principal Kathleen Daney said she previously worked in Lucas County, where a Kinship Caregiver program exists to help grandparents who find themselves as parents again. “There’s nothing here to support the grandparents,” Daney said. “And every year there are more and more.” So Daney asked Judy Paschalis, who previously coordinated the Kinship program in Lucas County, to share her expertise in Bowling Green. “It’s desperately needed everywhere,” Paschalis said of support for grandparents. “It’s one of the most complex family situations.” Paschalis said in 2010, an estimated 10 to 15 percent of children were being raised by their grandparents. That number has continued to increase, she said, with drugs and alcohol being the cause 99 percent of the time. “I can say I know what you’re going through – because I really do know what you are going through,” Paschalis told the audience of grandparents. She and her husband have been raising their 9-year-old granddaughter since she was 4. The job is tough for so many reasons, one being emotional. “It’s no fun having a grandchild cry because she wants her mommy,” Paschalis said. “She’s really angry at me because I’m not her mommy.” And when parents don’t show up for planned visits, the grandparents are left picking up the pieces again. So these children have lots of “trauma” and more “worries” than most children. There’s also the expense of becoming a parent again in later life, when incomes are fixed. “And then, of course, you have to buy new clothes and shoes every three months,” Paschalis said. Then, there’s the stigma that comes with raising grandchildren – as if their failures with their own children caused them to desert the grandchildren. “You didn’t do so hot with your children,” Paschalis said. “People can make them feel bad about that if they let them.” But Paschalis urged grandparents to disregard that judgment. “You have no reason to be ashamed,” she said. Paschalis stressed that services are available to grandparents parenting again. There may be cash benefits, Medicaid and child support. If they can’t get custody, they at least need power of attorney. “There is help out there that you may need,” she said. And since school has changed a lot since they first parented, they need to be persistent in asking questions. Don’t let educators use acronyms. “It’s intimidating to people,” she said. Paschalis said her granddaughter’s grades are poor, so she has learned to ask for assessments and seek help. Paschalis suggested a support group be formed for grandparents and another for the grandchildren they are raising. “They need something to help them through their pain and suffering,” she said of the children. Even something as simple as an occasional spaghetti dinner can be good for the kids and save the grandparents from having…


County parks are busy places during March

From WOOD COUNTY PARK DISTRICT Native Bees and Bee Houses Wednesday, March 7; 6:30 – 8:30 pm J.C. Reuthinger Preserve 30370 Oregon Road, Perrysburg Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalists Suzanne Nelson and Dean Babcock will present on native bees and how to encourage them to visit your backyard. You will complete your own mason bee house with guidance from the program leaders. Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Native American Moccasin Making Workshop Series Tuesdays, March 6, 13, 20, and 27; 6:00 – 9:00 pm Carter Historic Farm 18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green Learn the skill of making authentic Native American moccasins over the course of four sessions. The Plains two-piece style will be featured. Attendance at all sessions is required. Cost: $20; FWCP $15. Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 EcoLit Book Group Meeting Thursday, March 8, 7:00 – 9:00 pm W.W. Knight Nature Preserve: Hankison Great Room 29530 White Road, Perrysburg For this meeting, please read The Boilerplate Rhino: Nature in the Eye of the Beholder, essays by David Quammen. Group meets once a month. Register for any or all. Discussion leader: Cheryl Lachowski, Senior Lecturer, BGSU English Dept. and Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist (OCVN). Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897   CPR Certification at the Park Saturday, March 10; 8:00 am – noon Park District Headquarters 18729 Mercer Road, Bowling Green Get certified in adult, child, and infant CPR and AED use and learn choking relief. This American Heart Association course is taught by certified Park District staff. Participants must be 14 years of age. Registration deadline is March 3. Card certification cost: $20. Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Community & Parks Open Forum Wednesday, March 14th  5:00 – 7:00 pm N Baltimore Public Library 230 N. Main Street, North Baltimore Learn about the new and exciting opportunities with the Wood County Parks. Your input matters. Share your thoughts with us to help shape the future of the parks. Light refreshments and good company provided. Archery Skills: M-Archery Madness! Friday, March 16; 6:00 – 7:30 pm William Henry Harrison Park 644 Bierley Ave, Pemberville Beginning archers build their skills in this fun and instructional program, where we’ll focus on body posture and aiming, eventually progressing to moving ball targets! All archery equipment provided, personal gear welcome (inspected at program). Must be 7 years of age or older. Cost: $5/$3 FWCP. Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Working with Black Swamp Soils Series                          Sundays, March 18, April 22, & May 20; 1:00 – 3:30 pm W.W. Knight Preserve 29530 White Road, Perrysburg Working with the soils of the Great Black Swamp can be a challenge. In this workshop series participants will learn how to identify the soils on their property; test soil for various properties and learn how to mitigate some of the challenges. Topics will include soil management, native plants, ways to attract wildlife and sustainability. Sign up for the March 18 session only and plan to attend the April and May sessions. Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Spring Solstice Woodcock Wander                          Tuesday, March 20; 7:30 – 9:00 pm Slippery Elm Trail: Cricket Frog Cove 14810 Freyman Road, Cygnet As the sun sets a very special bird begins preparing for one the best aerial courtship displays in North America. He goes by names such as: bogsucker, timberdoodle, mudbat and many more. This will be a twilight hike under a crescent moon. We will listen for nocturnal wildlife and gaze at a…


WCESC offering guidance to parents of strong-willed kids

Submitted by WOOD COUNTY EDUCATIONAL SERVICE CENTER Is life with your teen full of conflict? Do you dread that moment when your teen returns home from school, or when you return home from work, trying to guess what today’s argument and battle of wills is going to be about? We know how to put a stop to that. Most of us in the field, working with high-risk youth know that parent involvement is the key to behavior change with adolescents. Yet, effectively educating parents in basic behavioral strategies is time consuming and repetitive. The Parent Project® is a parent training program designed for parents of strong-willed adolescents. Since 2003, more than 250 parents and their adolescents have attended Parent Project in Wood County and they report that there is important information in Parent Project classes for parents of all teens. Topics include reducing family conflict and arguing, improving school performance and attendance, identifying and intervening with alcohol and other drug abuse, interceding with negative peer associations (including inappropriate dating relationships) and helping parents to set clear, consistent rules with enforceable consequences. Parents who attend the Parent Project® are more likely to see positive behavior changes as parents understand and practice powerful Parent Project interventions at home. The motto of the Parent Project® is “Parents are the answer … when they have the tools they need.” Presented in an educational format, parents are trained for a low fee of $20 for the accompanying 180-page workbook. Youth ages 12-18 are also invited to attend a separate class at no additional cost. If the entire course is completed and the parent has attended all of the required sessions, the $20 fee will be refunded. Parents attend 24 hours of instruction for a cost of less than one session of private counseling. A concurrent teen component will also be offered, where teens will learn similar skills. Youth ages 12 and older may attend. The next session will be held Monday evenings from March 5 through May 7 at Rossford United Methodist Church, 270 Dixie Hwy., Rossford, OH 43460. The first three classes will run from 6 to 9 p.m. The remainder of the classes run from at 6 to 8 p.m. For more information or to register, contact Greg Van Vorhis at 419-354-9010, or gvanvorhis@wcesc.org.


BGSU center has spent decade tracking changes in family life

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The last few decades have not been easy on the Norman Rockwell portrait of the American family’s holiday dinner. Those neatly delineated generations and family relationships are a thing of the past. The grandchildren may be the products of parents who live together without marriage. Or they may be the children of a same-sex couple. The grown son or daughter still lives at home with mom and dad, who may be contemplating divorce. Grandma has brought along her special friend. They are a committed couple, but live apart from each other, and have no intention of altering that arrangement. All this change, say Wendy Manning and Susan Brown, co-directors of the National Center for Family and Marriage Research at Bowling Green State University, may cause some observers to despair. Some take a dim view of the decreasing marriage rate and see it as a sign of the decline of the American family, said Brown. But “if you’re open to a diverse range of shapes a family can take, it has never been better because people can form the types of families they want to form. We’re more accepting of a wide range of family relationships, and people have the opportunity to build the kind of families they want to be part of.” “There’s a lot of trends that are ongoing that make this an especially exciting time to be studying the American family,” Manning, a distinguished research professor, said. The two researchers and their faculty colleagues and graduate students have had a front row seat, and even a role, in these changes through their research. Manning did research for the American Psychological Association’s amicus brief for the two Supreme Court cases that established same sex marriage in the United States. Her research found “overwhelming evidence that children fare as well in same sex families as in different sex families.” Manning said: “That research made a difference.” It demonstrated “the appropriate role for us to play in examining the literature.” This fall, the center marked the 10th anniversary of its founding. In July, 2007, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, put out a call for proposals for a national center for marriage research. Given BGSU was already the home for the Center for Family and Demographic Research, and that BGSU faculty were already heavily involved in studying a range of issues relating the family, this seemed a natural fit. “We felt we had the expertise to satisfy those goals,” said Brown, who chairs the Sociology Department. “We were in a position to articulate for scholars what the key questions were surrounding family structure, child well-being, adult well-being, community well-being. For us, it wasn’t a stretch. We felt we have the people and the critical mass here and the track record to be successful.” They had a month to respond with an application. Brown remembers it “as a whirlwind” with long nights of work reminiscent of her days as a graduate student. But in October BGSU learned it had the winning application. Though the federal funding has since gone away, the center continues to thrive. The center both analyzes federal data and collects its own. The center disseminates that data in profiles to more than 2,000 recipients and on its website (https://www.bgsu.edu/ncfmr.html). The center…


At BGSU, Clarence Page reflects on Middletown & “Hillbilly Elegy”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Clarence Page is a story teller. That’s what all good journalists are, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner said. On Thursday at Bowling Green State University, though, he reflected on someone else’s story, J.D. Vance’s “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis.” Vance’s book has been selected as the university’s Common Read. Page was invited to BGSU to discuss Vance’s book. Meant to bring everyone together to read the same book and spark discussion, this year’s selection has done the trick. Social media is full of commentary on the book, and even its appropriateness as the Common Read. “Hillbilly Elegy” arrived at the same time as Donald Trump was elected to office, and many reviewers touted it as the book to read if you wanted to understand Trump voters. Vance takes a hard look at his people, who feel displaced in America and are plagued by dysfunctional families and unemployment. This demographic is the most pessimistic of any in the country.  Poor whites are more pessimistic than poor blacks. “Maybe because we’re used to it.” Page, who like Vance comes from Middletown, Ohio, said the book gave him a look at what was happening on the white side of town. Page noted he started out as “colored,” and has been a Negro, black, African-American, before now being a person of color. His family, he said, was “po’” because, according to his father, they were too poor to afford the “or.” But, he added, “ we were rich in spirit.” Page, 70, said he’s told Vance that save for the difference in age and race, it could be his story. But there were differences. Unlike Vance who chronicles a difficult family life, Page said his family was boring, a quality he’s come to appreciate as he’s gotten older. Like Vance’s grandfather, Page’s family moved north from the south to work in northern industry. Page’s people were part of the Great Migration that brought blacks north by rail seeking an escape from the segregated south and seeking greater opportunities. And Page remembers the lure of the railroad, looking down the tracks imagining an escape from Middletown. He succeeded in large part because of what he learned there.  He wanted to be an astronaut but his vision, “being four-eyed” ended that dream. But he was also captivated by seeing the reporters during a whistle stop in the 1960 campaign by then presidential candidate Richard Nixon. Others watched the vice president; Page had his eyes on the press. The high school newspaper advisor Mary Kindell recruited him for her staff. “Bless her heart, she saw some talent in me.” He did it to meet girls, but he found “I was pretty good at it. I enjoyed it.” He liked meeting people. He liked telling stories.  “What was important was somebody had faith in me.” When he won his first Pulitzer Prize in 1989, a former classmate called him to write a profile, and that sent Page back to the yearbook where he discovered Mrs. Kindell had written: “Remember me when you win your first Pulitzer. Don’t forget.” He looked up her number and called to remind her. She said he always had faith in him. He went on to Ohio University where, as he told…


Astronaut Mark Kelly was guided by the women in his life

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News To hear Mark Kelly tell it he’s lucky to be alive, never mind standing before an admiring crowd speaking. In his Ordinary People, Extraordinary Lives talk Tuesday at Bowling Green State University, he spoke glowingly of his wife, former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords, and his mother, and spoke with wry self-deprecation of his own failings and how he overcame them. Growing up in New Jersey he lacked motivation, he said. His father was a stereotypical Irish detective who’d come home about once a year cast on his hand. ”Fighting crime,” he would tell his twin sons, Mark and Scott. They would later learn that these were as much the results of bar fights as crime fighting. Kelly’s mother worked as a secretary and waitress before she decided she too wanted to become a police officer. A small woman she would have to scale a seven-foot, two-inch wall in nine seconds to qualify. Unbeknownst to her, her husband made it an inch taller. When it came time for the test, she scaled it in under five seconds, faster than most of the male candidates. She became one of the first female police officers in New Jersey. “That was the first time in my life I saw the power of having a goal and a plan and what it meant to work really hard for something,” Kelly said. “It certainly motivated for me.” He set a goal of becoming a Navy pilot and beyond that a test pilot and beyond that an astronaut. His ultimate goal was to be the first person to walk on Mars. After graduating from the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in 1986, he headed off for pilot training There were snags along the way. He was not a gifted pilot. After his first go at landing on an aircraft carrier, the instructor pilot asked him: “Are you sure this career is for you?” Still, “I did not give up,” Kelly said. “How good you are at the beginning of something you try is not a good indicator of how good you can become. I’m a prime example of somebody who’s able to overcome a serious lack of aptitude with practice, persistence, and just not giving up. Always remember effort, that counts twice” Later on his first combat mission during the Gulf War, he made an almost fatal decision. In order to avoid running a gauntlet of Iraqi missile defenses after attacking his target, he decided to return to his aircraft carrier by heading through Iranian air space. His navigator questioned the decision, but he continued anyways. As he flew back, he heard radio traffic about an enemy fighter heading out of Iranian air space and fighters on their way to intercept it.  That Iraqi plane had no chance, he thought to himself. Then he realized the plane’s coordinates matched his own. He was that “enemy” aircraft. “Do not shoot down the moron in Iranian air space,” Kelly hollered into the radio. “There’s never an excuse for not communicating with the people you work with. … That night I didn’t it, and it almost cost me my life.” That mission also provided another lesson. On the way to the target, a missile was headed directly for his plane.  He told his navigator, who…