Visual art

BG high senior Emily Wittig has indy book design covered

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News At 18, Emily Wittig has already put the faces on more than 100 books. Wittig operates her own business Emily Wittig Designs. A photographer as well as a designer, Bowling Green High School senior creates book cover designs for independently published authors, giving their work a more distinctive look than they otherwise may have. A serious illness helped to launch the enterprise. When she was 11, she was diagnosed with severe scoliosis, curvature of the spine, and required surgery. Her recuperation involved a year of no physical activity. A librarian at the middle school recommended she check out Goodreads.com as a way of discovering new books. Through the site, Wittig connected with author Micalea Smeltzer. They hit it off. Wittig loved her “Fallen” series of vampire romances. Smeltzer was 18 at the time. “She was the first indy writer I read,” Wittig said. Their conversations didn’t turn to business until Wittig launched her enterprise a few years later when she was 15. Smeltzer had reformatted the inside of her books, and wanted new covers. Wittig took on the job. Typically self-published authors use templates provided by online publishers. Wittig can offer something distinctive. At first, the designer said, she tried to read some of each book she worked on, but that’s no longer possible. Smeltzer “has pretty good idea for what she wants to do with covers. She can be picky. For her it’s easy to get an initial concept because she has an idea of what she wants.” Smeltzer remains one of Wittig’s favorite writers. She finds herself rereading the “Fallen” books. “I really like her style of writing.” She has covers done for two forthcoming Smeltzer books. But most of the other writers “don’t have anything written or aren’t confident enough to share it. They give me a little synopsis.” And “some people have no idea what might work,” she said. Asked what she’s taken away from her business she said: “I think learning to work with people especially the ones that don’t know what they want. Having the patience to work with people who have different ideas and different ways of doing things, it’s a little tricky even now.” Wittig doesn’t get to read as much now because of her academic schedule. She’ll graduate this May having earned 42 credits at Bowling Green State University. That’s where she’ll continue her career studying Visual Communications Technology, a mix of graphic design, interactive media, photography, and print. She’s already taken a couple courses in her major though most…


BG Art Walk seeking artists & exhibitors for April 28 event

From the BOWLING GREEN ARTS COUNCIL Bowling Green Arts Council, in partnership with Downtown Bowling Green, is proud to announce Art Walk 2018, an art show in which businesses though out historic downtown Bowling Green will host artists’ displays and performances. Art Walk will occur on Saturday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artists living within 50 miles of Bowling Green are eligible to participate and may display works in any size or medium as space and amenities of the chosen venue allow. A list of businesses interested in hosting is posted on the BG Arts Council Website www.bgartscouncil.com  Updates will be made as new venues are identified. It is the artist’s responsibility to find a venue, but help can be provided if needed by contacting BowlingGreenArtsCouncil@gmail.com The entry fee for individual artists is $20. Non-profit organizations can pay one entry fee of $20 for any number of affiliated artists if profit from any sales exclusively benefits the organization and not the individual artists. Entry procedures – online, by mail, or in person – are available on the BG Arts Council Website  www.bgartscouncil.com. The deadline for registration and payment is April 1st. All paid Art Walk participants (excluding non-profits) will be eligible to receive one of six monetary awards: three Juror’s Awards and three People’s Choice Awards.  The awards are sponsored by Jane Steinert, Jeff and Inge Klopping, BG Arts Council, John and Alice Calderonello and Judy Miller. Awards will be announced at the After Art Walk Party, 4:30-5:30 p.m. at the Four Corners Center, 130 S. Main Street Bowling Green.   For more detailed information regarding this show and the application and payment process, please consult the BG Arts Council website at www.bgartscouncil.com Art Walk is sponsored by Downtown Bowling Green and the BG Arts Council.


Bianca Garza’s photos rooted in concern about our relationship to the soil

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Photographer Bianca Garza knows in her gut that something is wrong in humanity’s relationship to their environment. She suffers from the effects. Growing up, she consumed processed and artificial food. She drank pop instead of water. Then with the encouragement of her boyfriend, Aaron Pickens, and his family, Garza started eating a “practical paleo” diet, based on foods grown sustainably. She ate traditional foods like those people ate before chronic diseases began taking their toll. Now, Garza said, she was “hiking and biking.” That is until gum surgery in 2016 threw her back, and triggered chronic fatigue syndrome. During that time of convalescence she looked at some of the photographs she’d been taking, and she saw they coalesced around a theme. Garza had captured odd juxtapositions between the natural world and artificial representations of the natural world. That breakdown, Garza believes, was manifesting itself in her own health issues. She’d worked briefly for Don Schooner at Schooner Farms, and that enhanced her appreciation for sustainable and regenerative agriculture – the belief that healthy soil produces the nutritious foods needed to nourish a healthy body. And depleted soil depletes our health. People become like the wheat stock in one of her photos, “Unyielding,” trying to break its way through cracked and dry ground. “I really believe many of our health issues come from replacing what we’re supposed to get from the earth with something artificial that no longer holds that energy.” A photo of abandoned truck trailer parked in an abandoned lot with a cornucopia decorating it cut to the core of the problem. “We have a lot of food stuff but we don’t have food with a lot of nutrition, and that’s what matters.” That image, “Abundantly Clear,” is one of a baker’s dozen photographs now on display at Art Supply Depo, 435 East Wooster, Bowling Green. The exhibit remains up until March 25. A reception with the artist will be held Saturday, March 24, from 5-7 p.m. The 2012 graduate of Bowling Green State University with a bachelor’s degree in visual communication technology with a specialization in photography, had not taken any photographs until she arrived on campus. Her intent was to major in popular culture and become a writer. But she took an intro to photography course with Jeff Hall, and he spotted a talent, and encouraged her. Craig Bell and Brad Phalin, the photographers in the BGSU Office of Marketing and Communications, also recognized that, and hired her the next semester. She continues to work as a…


Exhibit of photos by Bianca Garza looks at authentic versus synthetic

Submitted by ART SUPPLY DEPO Test Plot: An Exhibition of Medium Format Photography by Bianca Garza is now on exhibit at he Art Supply Depo, Bowling Green. 435 East Wooster, Bowling Green. A reception with the artist will be held   Saturday, March 24, 2018 from 5-7 p,m. The show continues through March 25. Sustainable, locally sourced light finger foods from Fowl and Fodder will be served at the reception, as well as locally sourced beverages. Test Plot is meant to serve as visual commentary regarding our society’s tendency to replace the real with the synthetic. Greatly inspired by the effects of industrialized agriculture on soil, plant, animal, and human health, the photographs in this body of work aim to ask, ‘has our movement towards a culture that places an emphasis on the surface and the short-term fix been worth it?’  As we move further away from a deep understanding of that which truly sustains us and towards greater magnitudes of industrialization, what are we losing? Bianca Garza is a photographer currently living in Grand Rapids, Ohio along the Maumee River. In 2012, she received her bachelor’s degree in Visual Communication Technology from Bowling Green State University. As a contracted photographer, she now works with BGSU’s Office of Marketing & Communications, creating images for their website, magazine, social media, and other various marketing materials. Outside of her commercial freelance work, she maintains a practice of traditional medium- format photography, alongside passions for regenerative agriculture and ancestral wisdom. More of her photographs can be found on her website and blog at www.BiancaGarza.com.


Past, present, & future live in the art of indigenous activist Dylan Miner

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In the language of the Metis one word refers both to ancestors and descendants. The word means both great-grandparents and great-grandchildren. For indigenous people the past, present, and future are not a continuum but ever present, said Dylan Miner, an artist, activist, scholar and educator from Michigan. “All are intimately connected in a being that is myself,” he said. And all that’s connected in the art he creates. Miner, who teaches at Michigan State, was the guest for the opening talk in the Homelands and Histories Speaker Series presented by the Institute for the Study of Culture and Society at Bowling Green State University. He spoke Tuesday at the Wood County District Public Library. Miner’s art is deeply rooted both in the history of indigenous peoples and their current struggles, which are fought to secure the future. Miner is Metis on his father’s side. The Metis are a people that trace their ancestry back to the descendants of indigenous people and French and English fur traders. Miner’s people lived on Drummond Island until removed. The land of the Metis stretches from the Georgian Bay to through western Canada, straddling the border with the United States. The Metis language, Michif, is a mix of French nouns and Cree verbs and grammar. Miner introduced himself in Michif and then in Ojibway, which he learned from Ojibway elders living in Lansing. The first art work Miner discussed was a fire bag, called colloquially an “octopus bag,” which his grandfather’s grandmother had, and which still remains in his family. It was used to carry the herbs for medicine. Miner continues to use natural materials for some of his own art. In a piece celebrating Louis Riel, a Metis who led two insurrections against the fledgling Canadian government in the late-19th century, Miner altered archival photos by covering Riel’s image in birch bark. The legal systems that ended in the executions of Riel in Canada or 38 Dakota men in Minnesota in 1862, the largest mass execution in U.S. history, persist to this day, he said. It was around 1862, Miner noted, that his Scandinavian ancestors on his mother’s side arrived in the Midwest, availing themselves of free land offered by the government. Pointing out a photo of his ancestor’s farm, he said: “Even when individuals are not actually participating in a system of mass violence, the benefits are passed to them.” In 2015, 110 years after his grandfather’s grandfather was arrested for poaching when he went to harvest a deer on traditional tribal…


Hard work & inspiration on display at BGSU undergrad art exhibit

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Laura Dirksen was 7 years old, she went digging for clay. She’d just learned about the material and was intrigued that it could be found in her back yard. She was so intent on her search and digging the hole that she almost got stuck. Her father had to come out to get her. In truth, Dirksen admits now, mostly she found mud. She rediscovered clay about a dozen years later in her second year studying art at Bowling Green State University.  She started as a painting major. “I fell into the ceramics program my sophomore year,” she said, “and things really shot up from there.” And it made her feel her nostalgic for her childhood adventure. Dirksen’s ceramic sculpture “Degrade” won the Medici Circle Best of Show Award at the Undergraduate Art Exhibition, which opened Sunday in the University Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. The show continues through Feb. 19. “Degrade” is her reflection on the tendency to denigrate people, especially women. The form reflects her own shape, and features the admonition: “Why do you always degrade Tom?” “Tom,” she explained, is a stand in for society. While “a lot of people tear things down … I try to bring out the best.” Dirksen, who grew up in Maria Stein in Mercer County near the Indiana border, wasn’t sure she’d ever make it to college. “In high school my academic level wasn’t exactly the best, but my art stuff was always what kept me going.” After high school she ended up working two jobs and realized that’s not what she wanted. Dirksen recommitted herself to her art. She came to BGSU as a painting major. In her sophomore year, she was introduced to ceramics. Working with clay heightened her sense of touch. “It’s really intense. You’re always working. It’s humbling,” she said. “You work constantly at something, and you’re not going to get your best results unless it’s something you’ve done 1,000 times over.” Seeing a completed piece is “a reminder of how hard you work, and that’s the most rewarding thing ever.” Dirksen credits Professor John Balistreri with instilling that kind of work ethic into his students. “He teaches us in a very disciplined manner. It’s intense. I’ve never had to work as hard. I’ll be better off having worked with him.” Dirksen has returned to painting. That offers a different look at the use of color, which she employs in her ceramics. One of her paintings, “Materiality #2 (6022)” won second place honors in…


Visiting photographer Osamu James Nakagawa captures intimate images of life & death within his family

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For Osamu James Nakagawa photography is a matter of life and death. Nakagawa bookended his Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Lecture on campus last week with two images. One showed him still a baby being greeted by exuberant relatives on his family’s arrival back in Tokyo. It was the first time, they’d seen either him or his older brother, both of whom were born in New York City. He closed with a video of his mother on her death bed, close up images of her last breaths. This autobiographical streak runs through the photography he showed to the audience gathered in the Fine Arts Center at Bowling Green State University. It does not totally define him though. Nakagawa has won acclaimed for his series of photos of the cliffs and caves on Okinawa where people go to commit suicide. The cave shots are so dark that they barely registered on the screen. He shot them he said at a very slow shutter speed with a flashlight as the only illumination. Also, he photographed the areas around the U.S. military bases on the Japanese island. They are stark representations of an unwanted military presence that brings crime, including rape, to the province. Nakagawa studied painting and sculpture in Houston, and then returned to Japan to work as an unpaid assistant to his uncle who was a photographer. To earn some money, he worked with American photographers helping them find the subjects and locations their editors wanted. The lists of requests were always the same – geishas strolling down the street and Mount Fuji. He knew he wanted to photograph what they were missing. He returned to Houston to get a master of fine arts in photography. In 1998, Nakagawa said his life was a whirlwind. At the time his daughter was born, his father was diagnosed with cancer. The photographer was living in Indiana, where’d he’d just taken a position at the University of Indiana. “All these things were happening,” he said, “and I was taking photographs. I didn’t see it as a body a work. I needed to slow things down. Things were going so fast. I thought by taking photographs I would slow it down.” He studied the work of others who made their families the subject of their cameras, including Emmitt Gowin. So he found himself taking baby photographs, something he’d never imaged himself doing. And he found himself taking photographs of his father as he went through chemo therapy, losing 40 pounds, going bald. That, he…


Older artists invited to submit work for 50+ Shades of Grey exhibit

From BOWLING GREEN ARTS COUNCIL Bowling Green Arts Council is proud to announce 50+ Shades of Grey, an exhibit that will feature the work of artists who are 50 years of age or older. The show will occur February 23rd through March 28th, 2018 at the Wood County Senior Center, 305 N. Main Street, BG. All artists may submit up to two original works of art in any two-dimensional medium.  Members of Bowling Green Arts Council may submit up to three works. The entry fee for the show is $20 and the deadline for submission is February 5, 2018.  For more information regarding this exhibit and the application and payment process, please consult the BG Arts Council website at www.bgartscouncil.com, or you may obtain an entry form at the Senior Center. An opening reception at the Senior Center with refreshments and entertainment will be held from 5-7 pm on Friday, February 23. Guests will be able to vote for a People’s Choice Award to be announced at 6:45. The winner will receive a $50 gift certificate courtesy of The Art Supply Depo.  50+ Shades of Grey is sponsored by the BG Arts Council and the Wood County Committee on Aging.


Photo exhibit at Way Library brings those served by WCBDD into focus

Submittted by PRIZM “Lens on Learning; A Social Documentary of Developmental Disabilities,” a collaborative photography project completed this past year by BGSU students with individuals served by the Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities, is  on display through February 15 exhibit at The Way Public Library Gallery. The exhibit is presented by the library in collaboration with PRIZM Creative Community. The project not only brought awareness to the BGSU student who were paired with an individual served by the WCBDD and captured their story through photography,  but it helps the community at large to be aware of the community integration program administered by the WCBDD for our disabled citizens.   This five year old program has captured the life of many developmental disabled individuals who live, work and contribute in our community. (See related story http://bgindependentmedia.org/portraits-in-friendships-between-bgsu-student-photographers-wood-lane-individuals-exhibited-at-toledo-museum/) In 1990 the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act addressed the needs of people with disabilities and prohibited discrimination in employment, public services, and public accommodations. Thirty-five years before the ADA, The Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities, a county agency, began to support and assist Wood County residents with developmental delays in increasing their skills, capabilities and independence. “The camera provides a tangible means to connect with one another and the world,” writes Lynn Whitney, the BGSU professor of photography who directs the senior level Community Projects Class at BGSU. “This class challenges students to forge personal relationships and explore aspects of being human from a vantage different than their own. This year we offered the camera to our partners from Wood Lane allowing us to speak with not just for them. This year, governmental mandates to privatize many key services provided through WCBDD, influenced our seeing to reveal a fuller picture of the lives of individuals so often living and working at the margins.”   The exhibition pieces hung on the gallery walls at The Way Library documents the day to day life of disabled individuals served by WCBDD at home, work, and play as captured through their BGSU Student partner. This year a select number of those served by the program were also mentored by their BGSU friends to learn about photography, and then produced creative pieces with their new knowledge. Those photo pieces created by the disabled individuals were also framed and are on display as part of the “Lens on Learning,” exhibit inside the 3-D showcases on easels. The project inspires each of us to consider what skills we have to offer in mentoring others, and what our social responsibility in the community is.  Those…


BGSU Arts Events through Jan. 23

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Jan. 10 — BGSU’s Guest Artist Series welcomes back former faculty member and pianist Yu-Lien The. A prizewinner of the 12th International Piano Competition Viotti-Valsesia and the Deutsche Musikwettbewerb, The has performed at the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival and at Carnegie Hall, with the new music ensemble Opus21. Frequent collaborations with saxophonists Joe Lulloff and Henning Schröder have led to several world premieres of new commissions for both piano and saxophone. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 13 — Sigma Alpha Iota members will present a Winter Musicale at 6 p.m. in the Choral Rehearsal Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 14 — Praecepta, the student chapter of the Society of Composers, Inc., will present a performance of their work titled “24/24.” The group promotes new music activities in the Bowling Green community. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 16 — Violinist Harvey Thurmer is the next performer in the Guest Artist Series. Thurmer is active in the promotion and recording of new music. His recording of Kurtag’s “Kafka Fragmente” with soprano Audrey Luna, available on the Ars Moderno label, represents the first recording of this monumental work by American artists. The performance will begin at 8 pm in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical ArtsCenter. Free Jan. 18 — Visiting Writer Clifford Chase will read from his fiction. Author of “Winkie” and “The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir),” Chase teaches at Wesleyan University. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 18 — The Guest Artist Series presents Li-Shan Hung on the piano. She made her Carnegie Hall debut at Weill Hall in 2003 and was invited to present a second Weill Hall recital in 2005. The recipient of numerous music performance prizes, she has performed and taught around the world. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19 — BGSU presents EAR | EYE: Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art in conjunction with the Toledo Museum of Art. The performance series explores the relationship between contemporary music and art through performances in front of contemporary works of art, featuring BGSU doctoral candidates in music. The presentation will begin at 7 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Free Jan. 22 — The Guest Artist Series presents Sandra Shapiro on the piano. Shapiro has an active career as both performer and teacher throughout the United States and Europe, and she appears as a soloist in recitals and orchestras…


Mural embraces multi-dimensional view of health

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Artist Bonnie Cohen makes her living helping institutions celebrate. In synagogues, nursing homes, Jewish Community Centers, and schools all along the East Coast, her murals celebrate donors who funded those institutions and their missions. Those murals, she said, are not just generic listings of names, but reflect the good work that happens within those buildings. That’s the spirit with which the Akron artist took on a mural now in place in the lobby of the College of Health and Human Services at Bowling Green State University. Wednesday she and a crew of six were on campus to install the mural, which was funded through the Ohio Arts Council’s Percent for Art Program. That program allocates 1-percent for purchasing public art for any new building or renovation of $4 million or more funded by the state. The university wanted something that was abstract, but invoked the seven dimensions of wellness. What she has created is a mural made from sundry tiles, ceramic, recycled glass, marble, about 25 different types in all. It wraps around the wall across from a south facing window, so those tiles will catch the light and change with it. Two darkly shaded arms wrap around the wall. These represent the darkness those in need of help find themselves. The mural grows lighter in color as it moves to the center, a large circle with two hands along the edges. The circles evoke an all-embracing community and the variety of tiles, the diversity of those who make up that community. This, Cohen said, reflects what she was told by those on the 12-person panel that selected her work. “I have the feeling they really want their students to be aware of that the health issues, but also the total person and bringing them into wellness.” Cohen said the mural was influenced by a residency she had at a New Jersey center for those suffering from aphasia, difficulty in speaking because of brain injury, usually stroke. Her mother, who suffers from dementia, suffers from aphasia. Cohen said she worked with 70 patients at the center to create a mural. One story in particularly touched her. A man had lost his ability to speak because of a stroke. “At all his family gatherings, at parties, and dinner he felt like he was at the outer edges,” she said. “When he walked into this aphasia center, he felt like he belonged somewhere.” He joined the circle of community. Cohen has also include quotations from Albert Einstein, Mother Theresa and others…


Alli Hoag glass art takes wing at the intersection of technology & daydreams

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Inside the River House Arts gallery in the Secor Building in downtown Toledo, art lovers can find respite from the dreariness of winter. Projected on the wall is an image of glistening water with bubbles rising to the surface looking up through the surf at the Hawaiian sky. The water is reflected in the surfaces of the reflective concave domes spread across the gallery floor. The domes were salvaged from a failed solar panel plant. The projector is hidden beneath one of the domes. The work is part of “Alternative Beginnings,” a solo show of work by glass artist Alli Hoag. The exhibit continues in the gallery through Jan. 27. (For information on hours click.) The art in the show plays on Hoag’s fascination with nature and how we perceive it. In an age when so much is at a digital remove, Hoag wants to engage the viewer’s body in the act of understanding art. Most of the pieces use convex glass domes. Inside are cast glass images of moths, canaries, and hummingbirds. “Using the distorted lens makes them (the viewers) evaluate what they’re seeing,” the artist said. It’s as if they are “seeing with a new set of eyes.” “They have to be very present to understand the work, and the work changes as they move through the space.” People will view the work from a different angle depending on their height, or where they are standing in the gallery. As they move, that view changes. The glass domes at once magnify the image, and yet keep it at a distance. Hoag aims to give the viewer both this physical experience and the psychological experience of “being immersed in your own thoughts, your daydreams, your internal dialogue.” The creatures are set against mirrors. Sometimes the reflection completes the form. “It’s a really fun way to take these elements that I cast and make them a little more than themselves within this space,” she said. A living hummingbird could never be caught this still. The frame of the work includes parts of an old map, so it provides the intimate look at the bird and a wider view of a larger world. Neither of these views are possible without the intercession of art. A partial canary, set in industrial glass made by Pilkington, engages the idea of decay, and “the way we can resuscitate things we remember in daydreams, memories, and imagination,” Hoag said Hoag’s fascination with nature is rooted in her childhood. Hoag, 36, grew up in Palm…


Alli Hoag solo exhibit opens at River House Arts, Dec. 14

From RIVER HOUSE ARTS An opening for  Alli Hoag’s solo exhibition “Alternative Beginnings” will be held Thursday, Dec. 14 at River House Arts in the Secor Building, 425 Jefferson St., Toledo. This new collection of work investigates the translation of the real through the distorted lens. Sculptural compositions of glass and mixed media are created as a synthesis of both physical and mirage, manifesting in the same realm as one’s perception. Hoag has exhibited extensively across the U.S. and Europe and is currently serving as head of the Glass Program at Bowling Green State University. A graduate of Alfred University (MFA) and the University of Hawaii at Manoa (BFA), Hoag developed her work internationally through residencies at Cite des Arts International (Paris, France) and S12 Galleri og Verksted (Bergen, Norway). “Alternative Beginnings” runs through January 27.


Photographer captures the hope & resolve of global refugees

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Alishia McCoy was so moved by the faces staring at her from the photographs on the wall at Jerome Library, and by the stories that accompanied them, that she just had to tell someone. She turned to the two men also looking at the display of images of refugees. Those photographs made her reconsider her life. Attending Bowling Green State University from Cleveland, McCoy was very aware that most students here have more than she has. Many receive gift cards from parents, she has to work for everything she needs. “I could write a book about things that could be better,” she said. But here was the image of a woman who gets a kilo of beans and two tablespoons of salt every two weeks. “These people have nothing,” she said. “Literally only their bodies.” As it turned out one of the men was Tariq Tarey, who was a refugee himself and now lives in Columbus. His mission is to capture the stories and images of refugees around the globe. These were his photographs. And just a photograph inside the study room nearby could be of an older man from Brooklyn, not from a Greek refugee camp, so could McCoy or either of the men be the subject of one of the photographs. All are humans. “Refugee Stories from Three Continents” opened at the library as part of the Immigrant Ohio Conference held earlier this month at Bowling Green State University, The photographs will remain on display through April in the first floor of the library, inside the study room adjacent to the Thinker’s Café and on the wall outside. Tarey is no stranger to the world. He was born in Mogadishu, the son of a Somali diplomat. He spent a good part of his youth in the Arabian Peninsula and in India before arriving as an asylum seeker in Columbus. That’s where he got involved in photography. He loved the craft, but more than just taking photos, he wanted to use his art to help people. Tarey he said he was “jealous” of the way European immigration was documented, but little is known about new refugees and immigrants from Africa like himself. At first that was documenting the Somali refugee community in Columbus, then to camps in east Africa and in Greece to visit others who have fled their homes. He uses a 4 by 5 sheet camera and makes black and white prints. This technology, he said, dates back to the American Civil War, so he knows…


BGSU Arts Events through Dec. 3

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Nov. 26 – Praecepta, the student chapter of the Society of Composers Inc. at BGSU’s College of Musical Arts, will give a performance at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 27 – The Graduate String Quartet will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 28 – The University Choral Society will perform a festive holiday program titled “Joyous Sounds: A Yuletide Celebration,” featuring the BGSU Graduate Brass Quintet and Michael Gartz, organist at First United Methodist Church. The performance will begin 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church of Bowling Green. Free Nov. 29 – Trombonist Brittany Lasch will give a Faculty Artist Series performance. Lasch was the winner of the 2015 National Collegiate Solo Competition hosted by the U.S. Army Band and the 2010 Eisenberg-Fried Brass Concerto Competition, and was the recipient of the Zulalian Foundation Award in 2014. Her trombone quartet Boston Based was just named the winner of the 2017 International Trombone Association’s Quartet Competition. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 30 – The Concert Band will give a concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $10 for other adults; tickets the day of the concert are, respectively, $10 and $13. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 6 p.m. weekdays at 419-372-8171. Dec. 1 – Celloist Deborah Pae will conduct a free master class at 3:30 p.m. in the Choral Rehearsal Hall and give a free performance at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, both at at the Moore Musical Arts Center.  Pae’s 2017-2018 season highlights include concerto performances of “Rhapsodies for Cello and Strings” by Jeffrey Mumford and Haydn’s Concerto in C as well as chamber music and solo recital tours in New York, San Francisco, Toronto, London, Brussels, France, Indonesia and Taiwan. Dec. 1 – The Men’s and Women’s Chorus will be in concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $10 for other adults; tickets the day of the concert are, respectively, $10 and $13. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 6 p.m. weekdays at 419-372-8171. Dec. 2 – The College of Musical Arts will hold a Music Audition Day for prospective students in the Moore Musical Arts center. Visit bgsu.edu/musical-arts for more information. Dec.  2 – ArtsX, the annual holiday extravaganza, offers a showcase of art across…