Visual art

BGSU art faculty honored for excellence by Ohio Arts Council

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Two Bowling Green State University faculty members, Charles Kanwischer and Lou Krueger, were among the artists to receive Individual Excellence Awards from the Ohio Arts Council. For Kanwischer, who was honored for his graphite drawings on panel, said that it is remarkable that Ohio continues to honor individual artists. “It’s such a statement that individual artists are valued. It’s such a nice validation.” Having a state give support to individual artists is becoming rare. Many arts councils only give grants to organizations. Some states have abolished their state arts councils, he said. Kanwischer and Krueger were among 77 artists to receive funding from among the 465 who applied. The council distributed $375,000 in grants, almost all for $5,000. “You have to give credit to the politicians, Republicans and Democrats,” he said. “It’s hard to complain about support for the arts.” Kanwischer’s portfolio features his landscapes. The settings can be rural, suburban or urban. He said he was interested in the cyclical change in the landscape. Some of the drawings now on display at Shaheen Modern and Contemporary Art in Cleveland, depict road construction. One drawing from 2010 “Route 24 Road Project – Support Columns” shows at once construction while also evoking images of ancient ruins. Kanwischer said his work has not undergone any dramatic shifts. Instead he feels he is able to get deeper and deeper into “landscape that reveals stories.” He’s appreciative that the arts council supports “long-term careers” not just the new and novel. This is his seventh grant in the 19 years since he joined the BGSU faculty. In return for…


BGSU arts events through April 28

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 13 – The International Film Series continues with the Swedish film “Force Majeure,” directed by Ruben Östlund. An award winner at the Cannes Film Festival, the Toronto Film Festival, and other internationally recognized venues, the film deftly explores the emotional dimensions of the legal term “force majeure,” an unexpected event (such as a hurricane) that releases both parties from the obligations of a contract. In this story, the ski vacation of a seemingly ideal family takes a sudden turn when an avalanche approaches them as they are having a pleasant lunch at the lodge. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 13 – Prout Readings conclude with B.F.A. student readings at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free April 13 – Bowling Green Opera Theater presents a variety of opera scenes. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 14 – The University Choral Society and Early Music Ensemble present Bach’s “St. John Passion.” The moving and sacred oratorio of Johann Sebastian Bach is a dramatic representation of the Passion as told in the Gospel of John for the Good Friday Vespers of 1724. Revel in the extravagant, expressive music of the season. The performance will begin at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, East Wooster St., Bowling Green. Free April 14 – The Toledo Museum of Art and BGSU’s College of Musical Arts present EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art. The performance and discussion…


Alarm Will Sound to perform “Ten Thousand Birds” in sculpture garden

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Area residents will have the opportunity to experience new music in a new way when acclaimed new music ensemble Alarm Will Sound gives a special performance of “Ten Thousand Birds,” a work commissioned from Pulitzer Prize-winning composer John Luther Adams. The performance will follow the cycle of a day, starting with bird songs heard in the morning, then afternoon, evening, night and returning to morning. The audience is encouraged to walk around to experience the music from multiple perspectives. The performance will begin at dusk (approximately 7 p.m.) April 21 in and around the sculpture gardens at the Toledo Museum of Art. The event is sponsored by Bowling Green State University’s MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music and the Toledo Museum of Art. Both Alarm Will Sound and John Luther Adams have appeared on BGSU’s annual New Music Festival at the College of Musical Arts. Alarm Will Sound is a 20-member band committed to innovative performances and recordings of today’s music. It has established a reputation for performing demanding music with energetic skill. Its performances have been described as “equal parts exuberance, nonchalance, and virtuosity” by the Financial Times of London and as “a triumph of ensemble playing” by the San Francisco Chronicle. The New York Times says that Alarm Will Sound is “one of the most vital and original ensembles on the American music scene.” The versatility of Alarm Will Sound allows it to take on music from a wide variety of styles. Its repertoire ranges from European to American works, from the arch-modernist to the pop-influenced. Alarm Will Sound has been associated since…


BGSU arts events through April 18

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 7 – The Collegiate Chorale and University Women’s Chorus will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. April 7 – The elsewhere theater season concludes with “Dying City,” written by Christopher Shin and directed by Tanner Lias. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. on April 8 and 9. Free April 8 – The Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition will take place in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Preliminaries will begin at noon, with finals following at 8 p.m. Free April 8 – An opening reception for the MFA I Thesis Exhibition will begin at 7 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Free Through April 18 – The MFA I Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free April 9 – The Sunday Matinee Series continues with the 1925 film “The Lost World,” directed by Harry G. Hoyt. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was not only the creator of Sherlock…


Tickets on sale for Black Swamp Players’ comedy “The Dixie Swim Club”

From the BLACK SWAMP PLAYERS Five Southern women, whose friendships began many years ago on their college swim team, set aside a long weekend every August to recharge those relationships. Free from husbands, kids and jobs, they meet at the same beach cottage on North Carolina’s Outer Banks to catch up, laugh and meddle in each other’s lives. “The Dixie Swim Club” focuses on four of those weekends and spans a period of thirty-three years. Sheree (Deb Weiser), the spunky team captain, desperately tries to maintain her organized and “perfect” life, and continues to be the group’s leader. Dinah (Deb Shaffer), the wisecracking overachiever, is a career dynamo. But her victories in the courtroom are in stark contrast to the frustrations of her personal life. Lexie (Nicole Tuttle), pampered and outspoken, is determined to hold on to her looks and youth as long as possible. She enjoys being married—over and over and over again. The self-deprecating and acerbic Vernadette (Monica Hiris), acutely aware of the dark cloud that hovers over her life, has decided to just give in and embrace the chaos. And sweet, eager-to-please Jeri Neal (Ellen Bean Larabee) experiences a late entry into motherhood that takes them all by surprise. As their lives unfold and the years pass, these women increasingly rely on one another, through advice and raucous repartee, to get through the challenges (men, sex, marriage, parenting, divorce, aging) that life flings at them. And when fate throws a wrench into one of their lives in the second act, these friends, proving the enduring power of “teamwork,” rally ’round their own with the strength and love…


Letts’ art speculates on future of humanity

From RIVER HOUSE ARTS Ann Arbor based artist KA Letts will present new or in the exhibit TransHuman, opening Thursday, April 20, with a reception from 6-9 p.m. in River House Arts, in the Secor Building, 425 Jefferson, Toledo. The exhibit continues through May 14. In this work, Letts speculates on the promising and terrifying future of our species. Using paper and paint, Letts re-works and reclaims myths of origin drawn from ancient cultures and cultural memory. Letts has shown her work regionally and nationally and in 2015 won the Toledo Federation of Art Societies Purchase Award while participating in the Toledo Area Artist Exhibition at the Toledo Museum of Art. She is a graduate of Barnard College (BA History) and Yale Drama School (MFA Set and Costume Design). In addition to her exhibition at River House Arts, she is preparing for a solo show at Firecat Projects in Chicago (Winter 2017). Gallery hours are 4-9 p.m, Tuesday through Friday. Appointments available daily by calling 419-441-4025. Formore information visit: riverhousearts.com.


Art history students survey the lost heritage of the Syrian city of Palmyra

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Syrian city of Palmyra was a crossroads in the ancient world’s global economy. In the second century A.D. the city called The Bride of the Desert sat astride the major trade route from Rome to the east. It was a place where cultures met. Now Palmrya is in the crosshairs of global conflict that’s taken thousands of lives. Another casualty of the war in Syria and the emergence of ISIS is the ancient’s city’s cultural heritage. An exhibit in the School of Art, Palmyra: Exploring Dissemination, looks at the city though the lens of the ancients but also through that of the Europeans who visited its ruins in the 17th and 18th centuries. The exhibit, in the lobby gallery of the Bryan Gallery in the School of Art, is the work of students in the graduate art history course, Iconoclasm: Ancient and Modern taught by Sean Leatherbury. In its heyday the city showed the cultural influences of the Romans and the Persians. When Europeans started visiting the ruins again they were enthralled. The images shows panoramas of the ruins, some with stylishly dressed Europeans strolling about, and another with fancifully costumed inhabitants. The cultural influences came together in the Temple of Bel, and that had an impact of European tourists. “The Temple of Bel influenced architecture of that time,” Leatherbury said. “You go to a manor house in England and you can see ceilings influenced by the Roman Temple.” But these ties to Western culture and to ancient pagan religion made them particular targets of ISIS. ISI blew up the temple a few…


BGSU Arts Events through April 12

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 31 – Jazz Week continues with a trombone performance from Jazz Lab Band I with Grammy-nominated guest artist Alan Ferber. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. April 1 – Bravo! BGSU celebrates the very best of the arts. Experience a magical evening of vocal, instrumental and theatrical performances, plus exhibitions and demonstrations by student and faculty artists in glass, ceramics, metals and digital arts. Enjoy a festive atmosphere and an array of appetizers and tasty treats. The celebration will begin at 7 p.m. in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. To purchase tickets to the event, contact Lisa Mattiace in the President’s Office at 419-372-6780 or by email at lmattia@bgsu.edu April 1 – Students from BGSU’s College of Musical Arts will be featured in an afternoon chamber music concert at 1 p.m. at the Way Public Library, 101 E. Indiana Ave., Perrysburg. Hosted by Pro Musica, friends of music at the college, the program will feature students who have received travel grants from the organization. The concert is free and open to the public. April 2 – The Gish Sunday Matinee series kicks off with the 1945 film “And Then There Were None,” directed by René Clair. Agatha Christie’s celebrated who-done-it “Ten Little Indians,” under the deft guidance of French director…


BGSU arts events through March 29

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 16 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features visiting writer Dustin M. Hoffman. Author of the story collection “One-Hundred-Knuckled Fist” and winner of the 2015 Prairie Schooner Book Prize, Hoffman earned his MFA in fiction from BGSU.  The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free March 17 – The Brown Bag Music Series continues with Opera! The performance will begin at 11:45 a.m. in the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free March 17 – Elsewhere productions continue with “Jimmy and Sally.” The show will begin at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. on March 18 and 19. Free March 18 – The ARTalk series presents “Where Next: The Future of Art.” Prominent artists and scholars will discuss the future of art in work, education and careers. Featured speakers include Cynthia Crow, program officer for the Fulbright Scholar Program in New York; Regin Igloria, multidisciplinary artist and arts administrator in Chicago, and John Jennings, graphic designer and associate professor at the University of Buffalo. The ARTalk will begin at 4 p.m. in room 204 of the Fine Arts Center. Free March 18 – The opening reception for the BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition will begin at 7 p.m. in the Bryan and Wankelman Galleries located in the Fine Arts Center. Free Through March 31 – The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Bryan and Wankelman Galleries, located in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m….


Michael Harris finds BGSU much improved for black students since his days on campus

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Michael Harris settled comfortably on the couch in the lounge that serves as home base for Bowling Green State University’s Arts Village in the basement of Kreischer Compton dorm. The 1971 BGSU graduate remembers the dorm well from his student days. His girlfriend lived in the dorm, and she became his wife, then his ex-wife. Looking around campus, Harris said, he saw a lot that hadn’t changed, including the School of Art where he studied with Bob Mazur, Willard Wankelman and Paul D. Running, and the baseball diamond where he played ball. He was the only black on the team, he recalled, and one of fewer than 100 African-Americans in the student body. Harris came back to campus last week as the keynote speaker for the Africana Studies Student Research Conference. His speech was on “Conjuring an Africana Aesthetic,” but now the talk was less formal. A handful of students spread through the launch as his host at the Arts Village art professor Joel D’Orisio occasionally asked a few questions. Harris lived in Harshman, which he was advised he better go see because it was slated to be razed. Harris said he found BGSU much improved from when he was here. He helped found the Black Student Union. Now there were offerings in ethnic studies that would have “brought tears to my eyes back then.” He’d come to BGSU hoping to escape the racism of his native Cleveland. Racism that left innumerable “papercuts and bruises” on his psyche. At BGSU though he couldn’t readily hear the music he grew up on. When he took…


BGSU arts events through March 1

From BGSI OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Feb. 16—The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Bridget Adams and Benji Katz. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Feb. 16—The Department of Theatre and Film’s production of “The Penelopiad” will open at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. “The Penelopiad” is Margaret Atwood’s version of Homer’s “Odyssey” told through the voices of Penelope and her 12 hanged maids. Speaking from beyond the grave, Atwood’s characters explore this mythic tale of love, betrayal, responsibility and power. Additional performances are at 8 p.m. Feb. 16-18 and Feb. 23-25, with matinees at 2 p.m. on Feb. 18, 19 and 25. Advance tickets are $15 and can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, 419-372-8171 or online at www.bgsu.edu/arts. All seats the day of the performance are $20. (See story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/bgsus-the-penelopiad-shows-the-tragedy-on-the-ancient-greek-homefront/) Feb. 17—The Brown Bag Music Series will present a musical extravaganza in celebration of Black History Month. Students and faculty from the College of Musical Arts will perform starting at 11:45 a.m. at the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free Feb. 17—The BGSU Wind Symphony will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 and can be purchased at the Wolfe Center for the Arts box office, 419-372-8171 or online at www.bgsu.edu/arts. All seats are $10 the day of the performance. Feb. 18—The University and Concert Bands will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 and can be…


River House Arts opening two exhibits in two weeks

Submitted by RIVER HOUSE ARTS River House Arts and Contemporary Art Toledo will present “Heterogeneous: States of American,”opening Tonight (Feb. 16) with a reception from 6-9 p.m. at the gallery in the first floor of the Secor Building, 425 Jefferson Ave., Toledo. In this provocative and timely new exhibition of paintings and mixed media, three Toledo artists, Josh Byers, David Cuatla Cuatl, and Faith Goodman express the fractures and symmetry of millennial life. The show remains on exhibit through March 4. Riverhouse Arts is also opening the Sien Collective’s “Sweeping Close… and Now”  Friday, Feb. 22, at 6:30 p.m. in the Owens Community College’s Walter E Terhune Gallery. The Sien Collective is Meagan Shein of Ann Arbor and Siobhan Arnold of San Diego. The two artists use historic photographic processes of Cyanotype and the paper negative, as well as drawing, encaustic and hand sewing to investigate the properties of trees and our place in the contemporary world. It continues through March 22. Also continuing in the Gallery 6 of River House Arts are the paintings of Croatian artist Nevenka Arbanas. Created in the early 1990s during the Bosnian War and its aftermath, the works were sourced from a local collector and are priced to sell. The gallery on the sixth floor of the building. River House Arts is a full service gallery offering exhibitions of modern and contemporary artists. Hours are Tuesday through Friday, noon to 8 p.m. and by appointment.


Kehinde Wiley’s portraits bring people from the street to museum walls

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Kehinde Wiley found his direction as a painter on a street in Harlem. He’d recently finished his graduate studies in art at Yale and had enrolled the Studio Museum of Harlem’s art residency program in 2001. At Yale he painted black males with extravagant hair styles. Thursday in a talk at the Toledo Museum of Art, he said that had completed his study “at the feet of the fathers,” and was in a crisis as to where to go next. There at his feet he found a piece of paper. A rap sheet. On it was the young man’s mug shot. Wiley said at that instant he thought: “This is a really cool portrait. I know that’s kind of screwed up. If you’re thinking like I think which is to use your life to tell a story about the world you live in, finding this piece of paper tells a story about the world we live in.” He turned the mug shot into a portrait, and that painting is now hanging in the Toledo Museum of Art’s exhibit Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic. The major retrospective of the Brooklyn-based artist’s career is now on exhibit through May 14. In the 15 years since finding that mugshot Wiley has achieved “super star status,” said Brian Kennedy, director of the Toledo Museum. That was evident by the standing-room-only crowd that gathered in the Peristyle on Thursday to hear the artist’s talk on his work. Wiley has achieved fame by both celebrating and challenging the notions of Western art. He has highlighted the lack of black bodies…


BGSU arts events through Feb. 8

From BGSU MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Jan. 25 – The Faculty Artist Series presents pianist Robert Satterlee. He has appeared on the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts in Chicago, San Francisco’s Old First Concert Series and the Schubert Club in St. Paul, Minn., among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 26 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Sam Adams and Dan Gualtieri. They will present their work at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 26 – BGSU’s Jazz Lab Band I will perform with guest artist and saxophonist, Loren Stillman. Stillman has received praise in such publications as The New York Times, Downbeat magazine, Jazziz, Jazz Times, and on National Public Radio,marking him as an innovative voice of modern jazz. His original recordings have received critical acclaim from The New York Times and four star recognition in BBC Jazz Review, Jazz Man magazine and Downbeat. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu/arts. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Jan. 27 – Students in the BGSU dance program will present a concert at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre of the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Tickets are $5 at the door. Jan. 27 – The College of Musical Arts Guest Artist Series features “Schubert, Songfulness and the Body,” a lecture/recital by pianist Arved…


Local readers pick their choice as best picture book (updated)

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News And the winner is… “What To Do With a Box” by Jane Yolen. That was the book selected about a dozen folks, kids through grandparents, who gathered to consider what should win the Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished picture book of 2016. The winner of the actual Caldecott Medal announced Monday morning at the American Library Association’s Midwinter Meeting is “Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat” by Javaka Steptoe. Kathy East, retired children’s librarian at Wood County District Public Library, said Sunday during the Mock Caldecott Election that the real committee has already made its choice. The press release was being drafted, and first thing in the morning the winner of the medal and honor books will get a telephone call. East has been through this before. She served  on the committee in 1987 when Richard Egielski won for “Hey, Al” and chaired the committee in 1998 when Paul Zelinsky won for “Rapunzel.” The award goes to the illustrator. The committee that awards the prize can start with a field of as many as 500 books. By the time they gather in January that’s been whittled down to 100 or so. Then each of those books must get a simple majority to stay in contention. East said usually 30 make the final draw. From there the best books rise to the top. The eventual winner, she said, must have more than a simple majority. It must have a significant margin of victory. That requires a number of rounds of balloting. “You want to make sure everyone on the committee is…