Visual art

Kazuki Takizawa’s glass breaks the silence surrounding mental illness

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News Kazuki Takizawa urges the visitor to break the art gallery taboo against touching the art. “Pull it,” he urges. “A little more.”  The visitor gently tugs at the edge the large oval frame that has about six dozen glass bowls suspended from it. The frame starts to swing. The glass bowls jangle against each other, ringing out through the River House Gallery. That sound is as central the work fittingly titled “Breaking the Silence II” as the sweep of the frame or the translucent colors of the bowls.  The frame is shaped like a tree branch and looks like it was executed with a brush stroke. In calligraphy, a complete circle signifies unity, Takizawa said. “This is an incomplete circle that needs audience participation to start the dialogue and break the silence,” the artist said. The silence he wants to break is the silence surrounding suicide and mental illness. “Stopper Driven” by Kazuki Takizawa Takizawa suffers from bipolar disease. But it was when his younger brother slumped into a suicidal depression that he became more forthright about addressing these issues. His family flew to be with his brother in Tokyo. This marshaling of family love was “empowering,” he said. But “it was painful, super painful. The death was so close. That’s when I really started learning about suicide, and how we can go about preventing that.” He continued: “This is around the time when I started making pieces around suicide prevention and speaking about being bipolar and started telling people that my work is about mental illness.” That’s the central theme of his exhibit of glass work, “Infinite Spectrum,” now on display at River House Arts, 425 Jefferson Toledo. Takizawa’s education in suicide prevention included volunteering as a lifeline counselor on the National Suicide Prevention hotline. “I got a chance to be on the other side of the line with people who are in a critical state,” he said. More people die from suicide than homicide, he said. And the problem gets worse every year. Takizawa tackled his own issues of depression when he was a student at the University of Hawaii Manoa where he studied glassblowing. A shy child, art had been his outlet. Takizawa, 33, grew up in Hong Kong “in a weird bubble” of Japanese residents. He never learned to speak Cantonese. When he was 16 his family moved to Bangkok…


Art Walk, set for April 27 in BG, seeks exhibitors

From BOWLING GREEN ARTS COUNCIL Bowling Green Arts Council, in partnership with Downtown Bowling Green, is proud to announce Art Walk 2019, an art show in which businesses though out historic downtown Bowling Green will host artists’ displays and performances. Art Walk will occur on Saturday, April 27 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. This year, the Art Walk will feature an exhibition of one piece by each individual artist at the Wood County District Public Library in addition to the displays at businesses, so visitors will have a chance to start out with a tempting preview. Artists living within 50 miles of Bowling Green are eligible to participate and may display works in any size or medium as space and amenities of the chosen venue allow. Artists are encouraged to find a venue, but help will be provided if needed by contacting BowlingGreenArtsCouncil@gmail.com The entry fee for individual artists is $20. Non-profit organizations can pay one entry fee of $20 for any number of affiliated artists if profit from any sales exclusively benefits the organization and not the individual artists. No commission or fee on sales is taken. Brochures with all artist locations will be distributed throughout the area. Entry procedures – online, by mail, or in person – are available on the BG Arts Council Website  www.bgartscouncil.com or from the Downtown BG office in the Four Corners Center, 130 S Main St, Bowling Green The deadline for registration and payment is April 1st. All paid Art Walk participants (excluding non-profits) will be eligible to receive one of six monetary awards: three Juror’s Awards and three People’s Choice Awards.  The awards sponsors are Jeff and Inge Klopping, Alice and John Calderonello, the BGSU School of Art, Dick and Nadine Edwards, and Bowling Green Arts Council. Awards will be announced at the After Art Walk Party, 3:30-4:30pm at the Wood County District Public Library, 251 N Main St, Bowling Green. Art Walk is sponsored by Downtown Bowling Green and the BG Arts Council.


BGSU ceramics, historical center team up to fight food insecurity

From  WOOD COUNTY HISTORICAL CENTER & MUSEUM The first annual Artists vs. Hunger: Empty Soup Bowl Fundraiser event to benefit the Brown Bag Food Project is planned for Saturday, April 13, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wood County Historical Center & Museum. The project is sponsored by the BGSU Ceramics Department and the Wood County Historical Center & Museum. The goal is to raise funds to help fight food insecurity in Wood County. The BGSU Ceramics Department donated handmade bowls for this event. Tickets for the fundraiser are $15 and include a beautiful handmade bowl and free admission to the Wood County Historical Museum. The meal will be a free will donation. Tickets can be purchased on Brown Bag Food Project’s Facebook page.  The Brown Bag Food Project is a local non-profit that seeks to address issues of food insecurity in Wood County, Ohio.  Brown Bag Food Project provides individuals with a 5-7 day supply of food and vital hygienic items, as well as pet food and supplies, to help meet their immediate needs, along with a resource guide to connect people to additional community resources for long-term support. The Wood County Historical Museum will be open for self-guided tours Monday – Friday, 10 AM – 4 PM and weekends from 1 PM – 4 PM (closed on government holidays). Admission is $7 for adults and $3 for children, with discounts for seniors, students, and military. Historical Society members receive free admission as well as a gift shop discount. The museum offers free admission to all visitors on the first Friday of each month, courtesy of the Bowling Green Convention & Visitors Bureau. The museum is handicap accessible and group tours are welcome. All events detailed at woodcountyhistory.org or by following the Wood County Historical Museum on social media. The museum is located at 13660 County Home Road in Bowling Green. 


BGSU arts events through March 27

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 7 – The Prout Reading Series presents creative writing MFA students Lucas Fulton, poetry, and Christina Stump, fiction, teaching associates in the English department. Their reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. FreeMarch 7 – The BGSU Concert Band, under the direction of Dr. Bruce Moss, will perform a concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults; all tickets are $10 on the day of performance. Tickets are available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. March 7 – The BGSU Department of Theatre and Film continues performances of “The Wolves,” the debut play by Sarah DeLappe about a girl’s indoor soccer team that navigates big questions and wages tiny battles with all the vim and vigor of a pack of adolescent warriors. The play, which earned DeLappe the 2015 Relentless Award for Playwriting and was a finalist for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, runs at 8 p.m. on March 7-9, and at 2 p.m. on March 9 in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Advance tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for students and children; all tickets on the day of the performance are $20. Tickets are available at bgsu.edu/artsor by calling the Wolfe Center box office at 419-372-8171. March 9 – The College of Musical Arts hosts the annual Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition for BGSU voice and piano students. The semifinal round will start at noon and the final round at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 10 – Members of the BG Philharmonia in the College of Musical Arts will present a chamber orchestra concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults; all tickets are $10 on the day of the performance. Tickets are available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. March 11 – The BGSU University Band will present a spring concert. Directed by Dr. Bruce Moss, the band will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults; all tickets are $10 on the day of the performance. Tickets are available at bgsu.edu/arts or by…


BGSU marches into spring with full slate of arts events

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition:The 20th annual competition highlights talented vocalists and collaborative pianistsMarch 9 | Bryan Recital Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center Kevin Bylsma, coordinator of the Conrad Art Song Competition, gets ready to announce the winners in 2017. The annual Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song competition features talented undergraduate and graduate singers and pianists working together to present a selection of art songs in various languages, ranging from the classical period, all the way to songs by living composers. The first round of competition takes place March 9 from 1-5 p.m., with the finalists announced around 6 p.m. The final round of competition, presented as a formal concert, begins at 8 p.m., with winners announced at the conclusion of the performance. Both the preliminary and final rounds are free and open to the public in Bryan Recital Hall. For more information, visit our website. Saxophonist Dayna Stephens headlines jazz week:Enjoy jazz performances each eveningMarch 12-15 | Bryan Recital Hall and Kobacker Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center The jazz department welcomes tenor saxophonist Dayna Stephens for our annual jazz week, March 12-15. Recent recipient of the number-two spot for the 2017 DownBeat Critics Poll in the category “Rising Star—Tenor Saxophone” Stephens has garnered critical acclaim over the years for his playing, compositions and arrangements. He will be featured in a concert with BGSU jazz faculty at 8 p.m. March 14 in Bryan Recital Hall, and as a soloist with Jazz Lab Band I on March 15 at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall. Other events throughout the week include the vocal jazz ensemble March 12 at 8 p.m., and student chamber ensembles March 13 at 8 p.m., both in Bryan Recital Hall. All events in Bryan Recital Hall are free. Tickets for the March 15 Jazz Lab Band I performance are available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling the box office at 419-372-8171. Admission is free for all BGSU students with ID card at the door. Wendy and Lucy: Film celebrates Women’s History MonthMarch 26, 7:30 p.m. | 206 Bowen-Thompson Student UnionThis award-winning film is an intimate character study of a young woman, Wendy, and her dog Lucy. On her way to find work in Alaska, Wendy’s car breaks down in a small town and she finds herself stranded and unable to pay for repairs or even food. Directed by Kelly Reichardt and starring Michelle Williams, this American drama…


BGSU Arts Events through March 13

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS At the galleries – The Annual Undergraduate Art and Design Exhibition, a juried selection of art in all media by students in the BGSU School of Art, will be displayed in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries in the Fine Arts Center. The exhibition runs through March 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Feb. 25 – Current Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) students will perform a showcase recital during the College of Musical Arts’ DMA auditions. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Feb. 26 – The spring series of Tuesdays at the Gish presents “Marshall,” the 2017 film directed by Reginald Hudlin. Starring Chadwick Boseman, the film is about Thurgood Marshall, the leading NAACP lawyer from 1938-1961 whose victories include the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education Topeka decision and who became the first African American Supreme Court Justice in 1967. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in 206 Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Free Feb. 27 – Piano faculty member Yevgeny Yontov will perform a recital in the College of Musical Arts’ weekly Faculty Artist Series. Yontov, one of the most promising Israeli pianists of his generation, was a finalist in the 2017 Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Master Competition and received the prize for Best Performance of Chamber Music and for Best Israeli Pianist. He has performed chamber music in Israel, Europe, Asia and North and South America in venues that include Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center. He joined the BGSU faculty in 2018 as an instructor of piano. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Feb. 28 – The weekly Prout Reading Series features readings by MFA students Shay Hawkins, poetry, and Matthew Stewart, fiction. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Feb. 28 – The BGSU Department of Theatre and Film presents “The Wolves,” the debut play by Sarah DeLappe about a girls’ indoor soccer team that navigates big questions and wages tiny battles with all the vim and vigor of a pack of adolescent warriors. The play, which earned DeLappe the 2015 Relentless Award for Playwriting and was a finalist for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, runs…


Full range of colors on display in 50+ Shades of Grey

Carol Kaenel won the People’s Choice Award at this year’s 50+ Shades of Grey exhibit at the Wood County Senior Center in downtown Bowling Green. Carol Kaenel with her drawing of Jacqueline Kennedy. The drawing won the People’s Choice Award. Kaenel’s winning art was a drawing of Jacqueline Kennedy. The competition for the prize, the only one given at the show, was tight, said Jacqui Nathan, of the Bowling Green Arts Council. The award was determined by  ballots cast by those attending the opening reception on Friday (Feb. 22). The show features 54 paintings, drawings, fabric work, ceramics, and photographs by 23 senior artists from Northwest Ohio.  The exhibit will be on view through March 28. Kaenel received a $50 gift certificate from The Art Supply Depo. The exhibit is a collaborative effort of the Bowling Green Arts Council and the Wood County Committee on Aging.


Glass artist promotes understanding of mental illness through work

From RIVER HOUSE ARTS River House Arts is pleased to present INFINITE SPECTRUM, an exhibition of works in glass by the Los Angeles-based, Japanese artist Kazuki Takizawa. The exhibition opens with a public reception on March 15, from 6-8 pm and runs through April 13.  As an artist who lives with bipolar disorder, Takizawa has been using glass to investigate his inner reality, to give shape to the invisible, and help destigmatize mental illness for nearly a decade.  Through finely crafted, elaborate vessels and installations, the artist aims to create objects and opportunities for honest dialogue around mental health.  INFINITE SPECTRUM is a continuation of several series Takizawa has been exploring since 2009, as well as an introduction to two new bodies of work he is currently discovering.   In his ongoing series Containers, Minimalist ,Guardian, and Breaking the Silence II , Takizawa attempts to create an inclusive space for increasing awareness and conversation around mental illness while the two developing series focus more directly on uncovering bipolar disorder.  Two Words, addresses established themes with a more pointed and personal perspective while also examining the space in which binary topics merge in the physical world. In contrast, his newest work from a currently Untitled series delves into the singularity of mania and what that world may encompass.  Kazuki Takizama was born and raised in Hong Kong, attended high school in Bangkok, Thailand, and now lives and works in Los Angeles where he runs his glassblowing studio, KT Glassworks. Since graduating from the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 2010, Takizawa has taught at Pilchuck Glass School and Public Glass and has lectured at institutions such as the Tokyo Glass Art Institute, Craft in America Center, the Museum of Fine Arts, and Bowling Green State University, among others.  His work has been exhibited nationally at numerous museums and art centers including Craft in America, STARworks, and Museum of Contemporary Craft and has been featured in New Glass Review and American Craft.  His work around mental illness has been highlighted on NBC and many publications. _ Located in the historic Secor Hotel in downtown Toledo, Ohio, River House Arts has been presenting works by contemporary artists since 2009.  Exhibitions are free and open to the public. 


BGSU Undergrad Art Show is a launching pad for young talent

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News The opening of the annual Undergraduate Exhibition is one of the busiest days for the galleries at Bowling Green State University. The annual exhibit features work by 100 artists, and the awards ceremony draws a large contingent of family, friends, fellow artists, faculty, and staff. Sunday’s opening was no exception. For Charles Kanwischer, the director of the School of Art, the turnout is fitting. Harking back to the first time his work was shown, he said, this is a milestone in these young creators’ careers. “To win a prize, to be acknowledged some way, is to start believing in yourself, and that’s the most important function of this show,” Kanwischer said. Work exhibited in the Bryan Gallery There were many awards — some determined by faculty, and five determined by the panel of three outside jurors. Yuna Ahn, a junior from Perrysburg, won the Medici Circle Best of Show Award  for her painting “I Swallowed the Red Pill,” which was also selected for first place in painting. Also honored by the jurors were: Jacob Church, Main Street Photo and Portrait Studio Award, for his photo “Slide.”Trent Clayton, Marietta Kirschner Wigg Print Award, for his print “South Michigan Ave.”Chloe Arch, Ringholz Art Supply Award 2D, for her drawing “Autism 6-8th.”Hannah Zitzelberger, Ringholz Art Supply Award 3D, for her jewelry “Cicadas.” (Click to see a full listing of awards.) Best of Show honoree, Ahn said she relies on art to tell her story. A native of South Korea, her family moved to Perrysburg seven years ago. Her English isn’t fluid enough to convey her ideas. “I’m always struggling to communicate. I can express myself truly through my art.” Her painting speaks volumes. “I Swallowed the Red Pill” has layers of imagery. The painting employs a popular ancient Korean painting as the background to the scene, just as the painting appears in many restaurants in Korea. That traditional painting, she explained, shows two men spying on a woman bathing outdoors. Ahn connects that to the problem prevalent in Korean of social media voyeurism using spy cams.  The title of her painting is a reference to the “Matrix” movies. The red pill makes you see the truth, Ahn said, and that’s not always pleasant. “It’s going to be something you don’t want to know, but it’ll be the truth.” In the foreground is a double self-portrait of the…


BGSU Arts Events through March 6

Feb. 16 – The Bowling Green Philharmonia will present its 52nd annual Concerto Concert. Winners of the Competitions in Music Performance will perform concertos with the Philharmonia. The concert will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets for the event are $7 for adults, $3 for children and students. All tickets are $10 on the day of the performance. Tickets are available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling the box office at 419-372-8171. Feb. 17 – The Annual Undergraduate Art and Design Exhibition opens its two-week run with a reception from 2-4 p.m. A juried selection of art in all media by students in the BGSU School of Art will be displayed in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries in the Fine Arts Center. The exhibition runs through March 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Feb. 17 – Members of the BGSU College of Musical Arts faculty will perform at the Great Gallery of the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. The chamber music concert will begin at 3 p.m. The performance is free; onsite parking is $7 for nonmembers of the museum. Feb. 18 – The BGSU College of Musical Arts welcomes guest artist Robert Weirich on piano. Weirich, who recently retired from university teaching, has performed at venues including Alice Tully Hall, the Kennedy Center, Chicago’s Orchestra Hall, Tanglewood, Ravinia and Marlboro. He is a past president of the College Music Society and twice received the Educational Press Achievement Award for his writing. His piano recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. FreeFeb. 18 – The BGSU School of Art welcomes photographer Tim Archibald for a lecture about his book “Echolilia,” a collection of photographs that share the relationship between him and his son, who is on the autism spectrum. He will speak at 5 p.m. in 204 Fine Arts Center. Free Feb. 19 – Director Jordan Peele’s 2017 debut film “Get Out” is the featured screening at the Department of Theatre and Film’s Tuesdays at the Gish series. The 103-minute film is a jump-scare thriller and a masterpiece of social analysis. The screening will start at 7:30 p.m. in 206 Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Free Feb. 19 – The student Chamber Jazz Ensembles will perform at 8 p.m….


Toledo Museum to host National Geographic Live speaker series

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART National Geographic Live, National Geographic’s touring speaker series, and the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) are proud to announce an inaugural three-part speaker series that will take place the Peristyle Theater throughout 2019.   “We are excited to see the Peristyle stage come alive through a combination of first-hand accounts from National Geographic Explorers and their amazing imagery,” said Brian Kennedy, the Museum’s Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey director. “We believe the National Geographic Live series provides an engaging format for the community to learn about the world around them.” The three events for the inaugural series are: Birds of Paradise Revealed Saturday, April 27: 7 p.m., Peristyle Tim Laman, a renowned photographer and forest canopy researcher, and ornithologist Ed Scholes, authors of the major National Geographic book, “Birds of Paradise Revealed,” will take visitors deep into New Guinea to observe these astonishing avian creatures. Evolved to attract mates with their extraordinarily colorful feathers, which they display in dances executed with ballerina-like grace, these birds are a living laboratory of evolution. Meet all 39 species and enjoy their secret lives, bizarre displays, and dazzling courtship antics in breathtaking visuals. When Women Ruled the World Thursday, May 30: 7 p.m., Peristyle Dr. Kara Cooney, professor of Egyptology, explores the reigns of powerful ancient queens to illuminate a time when women ruled the world. Often neglected in the history books, these strong female leaders were considered exceptions to the rule, but their power and influence is undeniable. Standing at Water’s Edge Saturday, July 27: 7 p.m., Peristyle Cristina Mittermeier learned the concept of responsible earth stewardship from her indigenous nanny as a child growing up in Mexico, and she explores that calling through the ways of life of four communities and their individual relationships with water—the Kayapó in the Amazon, the Inuit of Greenland, the First Nations people of British Columbia, and native Hawaiians. “We are thrilled to be bringing some of National Geographic’s most dynamic and entertaining explorers to TMA,” said Yulia Petrossian Boyle, Senior Vice President for Global Media and Experiences at National Geographic. “National Geographic Live events are a unique opportunity for people in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan to meet these visionary individuals in person, and to be inspired by the fascinating stories and breathtaking images they will share from their expeditions to the far corners of our planet.” The National Geographic…


Artists are squirreling away treasures for others to find

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Local artists have a gift for you. It’s up to you, though, to find it.  In January Kathy Pereira De Almeida hid five of her small paintings in locations around town and then posted enigmatic clues on social media. Kathy Pereira De Almeida hid these works for the first art drop. The first read: “Tucked away on a former pig farm is where you will find the first @artdropbg.” Within a day the package was found in Wintergarden Park near the pond in Tucker Woods. Art Drop BG was launched.  The project introduces people to local artists, and also gives them a chance to explore the community.  Early Saturday morning potter Mary Dennis will be out and about stashing five treasures in secret spots around town. “I was looking for something fun to connect the arts in our community with people,” Pereira De Almeida said. “I thought it was nice way to promote the arts, promote individual artists, and I love treasure hunts.” The idea for art drops was originated by Jake Parker, a comics writer and illustrator, who does it as he travels around the world. Pereira De Almeida also discovered that Arvada, Colorado, holds a monthly art drop, so she decided to give it a try here. “We hide original pieces of artwork,” she said. “It could be 3D. It could be 2D. It could be a poem, or a story … as long as it’s original.” The art is in clearly marked packages. Then they provide clues on the artdropbg Facebook and Instagram accounts. Whoever finds the item can then share their discovery on social media as well. They ask the people only keep one piece a month. “Don’t take all the treasure,” she said. Pereira De Almeida said four of the five pieces she hid were reported discovered. The fifth just disappeared. Work by Mary Dennis The first three months are lined up. Dennis said she’ll have some Valentine-themed work. “I wanted to include things that would be small and less likely to be broken, but also representative of things I make,” Dennis said. The art may be small, but still good quality. The artist’s contact information will be included. After Dennis in February, painter Kim Sockman will be featured. One piece is a drawing she did with glitter pen that she created while on a car trip. She’s already…


Family of artist who painted courthouse murals still treasures his private creations

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News The murals on the second floor of the Wood County Courthouse are public treasures. For Cheryl Windisch, of Bowling Green, they are family history. The murals that are undergoing preservation work were painted by her great-grandfather Isaac Moore Taylor.  Oil field mural Taylor, who was born 175 years ago on Feb. 5, 1844 in western New York close by the Pennsylvania oil fields, was an oil man drawn in middle age to Wood County, where he got involved in local politics, including a single term as mayor of Bowling Green. But his passion was painting.  “He loved doing that more than he enjoyed having real jobs,” his great-granddaughter said. “He was really kind of a wanderlust guy.” That wanderlust took him out west on oil business, before he settled in Bowling Green where he and his wife, Adella, raised their four daughters, including Windisch’s grandmother Mildred. His interest in art started when he was a child, and he studied with two master teachers in his youth. When he was 15 the Drake oil strike in Oil Creek, Pennsylvania, occurred, and that sparked his interest in the oil business. He became a leading authority whose advice was sought nationwide, according to a biographical sketch written by the family. The first Ohio well he drilled was in what is now the middle of Findlay. Then he started to explore in the Sand Ridge area of Bowling Green. All the while, his great-granddaughter said, he continued painting. His family settled in town in a home at 249 S. Church St. The house is still standing. The place where he painted, an old barn in the rear, was torn down when the post office was expanded and the drive-through added. That “paint shop,” both Windsich and her brother Scott Cunningham, the family historian, recall, was mostly off-limits for children. Their mother was allowed in a few times. “Usually kids weren’t allowed to go in there because there was too much stuff for them to get into,” Windisch said. Taylor created art in a variety styles and for a variety reasons. He did designs for business signs. He painted pictures with calendars attached as Christmas presents for his grandchildren. And he used whatever material scraps of paper, bed ticking, cardboard, and door panels was at hand. But he also did finely executed drawings and oil paintings including landscapes and…


BGSU arts events through Feb. 20

Jan. 30 – The Faculty Artist Series welcomes Brittany Lasch on trombone. Lasch is an assistant professor in the College of Musical Arts. As the second-place winner of the 2017-18 American Prize, she has appeared as soloist with numerous ensembles including the U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own,” the Queens Symphony and the Rodney Marsalis Philadelphia Big Brass. She also was a winner of Astral Artist’s 2017 National Auditions and the 2015 national Collegiate Solo Competition hosted by the U.S. Army Band. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free. Jan. 31 – The Prout Reading Series presents poet Julie Webb and fiction writer Ali Miller during the first reading of the semester. Both women are MFA students in the BGSU Creative Writing program. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free. Feb. 1 – The Center for Women and Gender Equity presents “Women, Gender and Poetry Open Mic,” featuring 1997 BGSU alumna Kayla William as the keynote speaker. The event, which runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in 207 Bowen-Thompson Student Union, includes collaborative poetry activities, blackout poetry tables and open mic time. Free Feb. 1 – The BGSU Department of Theatre and Film’s Elsewhere Productions presents “I Didn’t Want a Mastodon” by Halley Feiffer and directed by Melissa Snyder. The production will begin at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. A second performance will begin at 8 p.m. on Feb. 2. Free  Feb. 2 – The College of Musical Arts will host the eighth annual David D. Dubois Piano Competition, which features accomplished high school pianists competing for prizes. Mariana Lomazov, a Ukrainian-American pianist, is this year’s guest artist for the piano competition. One of the most passionate and charismatic performers on the concert scene today, she is the Ira McKissick Koger Professor of Fine Arts at the University of South Carolina School of Music, where she is founder and artistic director of the Southeastern Piano Festival. She will present a solo piano recital at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. The competition semi-finals take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 2, and the finals will be held from 8:30 a.m. to noon Feb. 3, both in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. For more information…


Arts beat: Rebecca Law looks back at ‘Community,’ & ahead to birth of a new installation

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Flower artist Rebecca Louise Law isn’t quite done with Toledo yet. “Community,” her installation at the Toledo Museum of Art, closed Jan. 13 and has now been taken down. The English artist was on hand for the disassembling — the first time she’s been able to participate in the removal of one of her installations. It’s sad to see the piece, which was in place since June, come down, Law said. “But it’s amazing doing the derig and realizing how precious each of these pieces is, to take it down and pack it up and treasure it as it ought to be treasured to go on to the next place.” Laws wastes nothing, not even the dust that is the fate of dried flowers. “Community” in the Canaday Gallery. This was swept up. Working in the museum’s glass hot shop that dust will be encased in four large panels donated by Pilkington. Law is also using her Guest Artist Pavilion Project  residency at the museum to create work for her next installation, scheduled to go up at the Frederik Meijer Garden and Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Michigan in September. Law admitted she’s relying on the skills of the technicians in the hot shop. Her abilities as a glass blower she said are “rubbish,” though she hopes to improve them in the last week of her residency.  She has been more focused on encapsulating flowers, and that got her thinking about how humans are themselves embedded in nature, “the cocoon experience.” So she started considering wombs and “where we come from.” So she will be creating glass wombs of all sizes, from gestation until just before birth. Though not a trained glass blower, she inspired by their work.“It’s like watching a dance,” Law said. “It’s like performance art because they are working with such a dangerous material yet they are moving so gracefully and creating such beautiful objects.” Those will be incorporated into the next show. That show will be more intimate than “Community.” The viewer will walk into an enclosed space. This idea has been gestating for five years, she said. And she’s made sketch after sketch. This is not usual for an installation. Law said she creates in a more improvisatory way shaping the work as it is installed.  Detail from “Community.” Teaming up with the glass artists is just the most…