Visual art

Law’s exhibit celebrates nature & the flowering of community

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Painting wasn’t enough for Rebecca Louise Law when she was an art student. As much as she loved the richness of painting, she longed for something more immersive. She tried installations, including some horrendous efforts involving food. Law found what she was looking for in her father’s garden – dahlias. Fifteen years after that first flower-based installation, “Dahlias,” the English artist has created an installation that she said most fully realizes her vision. Law’s “Community” opened Saturday in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Canaday Gallery. The site specific work was created over the past several weeks by Law, her four-member team, and more than 400 local volunteers. It uses 520,000 dried flowers. Of those 10,000 were harvested locally, including some from the museum’s grounds. The rest are the flowers used in her previous 51 installations. She saves everything. After an installation’s run, everything is boxed up for future use, even the dust that the flowers eventually become. These are encased in glass. She will return to Toledo in September for a residency at the Glass Pavilion working with that dust. On Saturday, Law discussed the evolution of her work with the museum’s Director of Curatorial Affairs Halona Norton-Westbrook who curated “Community.” Growing up in the countryside near Cambridge, England, she spent her time in the fields and fens. If it wasn’t raining her mother sent her and her siblings out to play. If they were inside often it was among the dried flowers in the attic. Law went on to study painting. “I felt incredibly frustrated. I wanted to work outside the canvas. I couldn’t figure out how to paint in the air.” Then she had her epiphany. Law started to “paint” with flowers. That led her to discover and study a whole new world of botany. “Personally I’m blown away by nature,” Law said. “That’s my ultimate inspiration. The more I know, the less I know.” The flowers are draped across the Canaday’s ceiling and hang down to the floor. From the entry the effect is a shimmering tableau. Then the viewer walks into the scene to be among the blossoms. During a press preview on Friday Law explained that she stands back while others arrange the flowers at her direction. The arrangement is guided by mathematics and aesthetics. Saturday Law said of the effect she seeks: “I suppose it’s spiritual, the presence of the beauty of what we have here on earth.” Last December Law visited the museum to finalize the details for the exhibit. She was shown several possible locations for the installation. When she saw the Canaday she decided: “I’ll take that space, thank you very much.” She said the lighting arranged by Claude Fixler, exhibition designer, was the best for any of her installations, brighter and more open. Also, during her initial visit to Toledo she met with museum staff and the members of the Apollo Society and Ambassadors group. Many of them were among the volunteers who spent 1,600 hours helping to realize Law’s vision. That intimate connection with the city is an important part of the work, she said. Part of the team with her for the installation was her husband, Andrew, and their son Alexander, who celebrated his first birthday here, as well as the artist’s…


Art in the Park shines even under cloudy skies

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Rain couldn’t dampen the spirit of the fourth Art in the Park Friday at Simpson Garden Park. It did deter some, but not all, plein air artists. But others came out in force to entertain the attendees, who grew in number as the two-hour event progressed. The rain that arrived mid-afternoon was receding just as folks arrived. So a trio of musicians were heading out to the gazebo. Alice Calderonello, of the BG Arts Council which staged the event with the city Parks and Recreation Department, said the performers took the changes necessitated by the weather in good spirits, even if it meant they were playing in odd corners, and for a shorter period of time. Still by the time the event was wrapping up, musicians had ventured outdoors, and some visitors had wandered off into the garden to admire the garden’s blooms, which are delayed a bit by the cool, wet spring. Phil Hollenbaugh, the volunteer who tends the extensive hosta garden, was on hand checking the plants. Mayor Dick Edwards said that Bowling Green is second only to Dubuque, Iowa, in the number of hosta varieties in its municipal garden. Hollenbaugh said he has 50 more varieties to plant. But he laughed off any competition between the two cities. He’s always happy when people come into the garden to enjoy the plants. Painter Kim Sockman, one of the three artists to arrive to paint outside in the garden, was as close to the outside as she could be while still being inside. The retired art teacher was near the doorway to the Children’s Discovery Garden. With an eye on the weather Thursday, she came out and snapped a photo of the wooden arch in the area. She worked from that image as well as glancing out at the scene. It was good she got a head start on her work because so many people, including her former art students, stopped to chat she wasn’t get a lot of work done. “This is Bowling Green,” she said. “It’s a blast.” That sense of community also attracted newer arrivals to town. Rachel and Phil Beskid were there with their daughters Sylvia and Lucy, who were busy working on a craft project. The family moved to BG about a year ago, and Art in the Park was a way to connect with the community and feel at home, Phil Beskid said. Holli and Jeremy Luring and their children also moved here in the past year. Holi Luring said they came because of the art and music, and the activities for the kids was a bonus. A variety of art activities were provided by the parks department, the Montessori School of Bowling Green, and Jules Webster, owner of Art Supply Depo. They live nearby, she said. “These are beautiful gardens.” Jeremy Luring said the event with its small town feel was a good way to meet people. Flutist Hong-Da Chin returned to have a chance to improvise music with some friends before he moves out of Bowling Green.  He graduated with his doctorate in contemporary music in December and has a teaching position at Western Illinois University. “I just wanted to improvise with them one last time for a long time.” He was joined in the…


Airing out the arts in Simpson Garden Park

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Art in the Park allows the arts to blossom right along with the flowers in Simpson Garden. For the fourth year, the festival of arts will take place at the garden, at the intersection of Conneaut and Wintergarden, Friday, June 8 from 5 to 7 p.m. The event packs in a lot of activity into a two-hour span. It features plein air art – artists working in the open air, as well as strolling musicians, theater, at every turn, and children’s activities in the Simpson Building. That’s where performances will happen if the rain comes. But Alice Calderonello, of the Bowling Green Arts Council, urged people not to give up on the weather. Last year the rain threatened all afternoon, but then the skies cleared just in time for art walk. “For some reason heaven smiles on us,” she said. This year, said her husband, John Calderonello, there are more performers than ever. They will be spread from the upper healing garden where strolling performers from the university’s doctorate in contemporary music will do their musical version of plein air art, improvising to suit the mood. Also, new to the event will by the vocal ensemble Inside Voices, also near the healing garden. Down the way in the peace garden the Kaze No Daichi Taiko drum ensemble will perform. In stages closer to the building singer Tom Gorman, the old time ensemble Root Cellar Band, Irish tunes by Toraigh an Sonas, and the Black Swamp Drum Circle will entertain. In the amphitheater, Horizon Youth Theater will stage a preview of its summer musical, “Dorothy in Wonderland,” at 5:15 and 6:30 and in between the Black Swamp Players will read a section of Scott Regan’s original play “Peanuts and Crackerjacks.” The play will be part of the Players’ 51st season. Spread throughout the garden will be artists at work, though not so intently that they won’t take a time to chat with guests. Last year eight artists took part, but organizers are always hoping for more. Jules Webster of Art Supply Depo is again sponsoring a $100 gift certificate to go to one artist voted the favorite by those attending. While artists can sign up on the day of the event, Alice Calderonello encouraged them to register in advance to make sure the council can get their names on the ballot and has contact information should they win. Artists should contact Craig Blair at blair@surrealogic.com. Art Depo is also giving young artist a chance to do plein air painting just like their elders. That will be offered in the children’s garden. The Bowling Green Montessori School and BG Parks and Recreation will have children’s activities inside the Simpson Building. Arts council member Nancy Stonerock is busy baking cookies for the event. Alice Calderonello said that this year the council has trimmed Art in the Park down to two hours. Most people come after work and before supper, so the 5 to 7 time frame fits well. Prudence Brott of Sunset Bistro is offering 15 percent for the arts council that evening for those who want to catch supper after the event. Putting on such a festival takes many hands. Art in the Park involves a collaboration. Calderonello praised the help that Ivan Kovacevic and the…


Toledo Federation of Art Societies celebrates its tradition & looks to the future

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Doug Adams-Arman remembers attending the “May” Show, the once annual Toledo Area Artists exhibition. Presented by the Toledo Federation of Arts Societies at the Toledo Museum of Art, it showcased the work of the best regional artists, from the elders who helped put Toledo on the artistic map to students from Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo. “To know that Toledo art could be in the museum was fantastic,” Adams-Arman, who has just be elected to his second term as the TFAS president, said recently. “It just gave me a sense of that I was living in a city with living artists. It was very exciting.” Now that show is history. Its tradition is celebrated in the current exhibit “Decades in the Making: Highlights from the Toledo Federation of Art Societies” at the museum through June 24. The show features more than 20 works, from the about 300 that the TFAS purchased from those shown in the area show. That collection is now being housed at the Toledo School for the Arts, where Adams-Arman works as a major gifts officer. The work spans almost 70 years of the show from early representational paintings, “Still Life with Pheasant” by Jeannette Doak Martin and “Spanish Girl” by Miriam Silverman to the most recent purchase, “Slaughter of the Innocents” by K.A. Letts, an Ann Arbor-based painter. Letts, Adams-Arman said, has a rising reputation in the art world and “it’s privilege” for TFAS to own one of her works. “Slaughter” was exhibited in the 95th annual show, and the last one presented. Change was afoot in 2014. The boundaries for entries were expanded, but fewer artists, just 28, were included. Those exhibiting got to show more work. The painting mixes Letts’ concern with current issues expressed through myth and primordial iconography. Religious iconography plays an understated role in Sister Jane Catherine Lauer’s 1952 painting “Afternoon Collation.” With its use of straight lines and geometric blocks of color, it evokes a stain glass window. Yet the scene it depicts is a slice of everyday life in the Ursuline convent. The piece Adams-Arman said was painted for the Toledo area exhibit. The show also has iconic names from the Toledo scene. That includes Edith Franklin, a ceramicist who also participated in the studio glass workshop at the museum that launched at the art glass movement. Adams-Arman, worked with Franklin and credited her with getting him involved in TFAS. Two of the driving forces behind the glass workshop have work displayed, glass pioneer Dominick Labino and ceramicist Harvey Littleton. The show, which was curated by Halona Norton-Westbrook, offers an excellent representation of the work exhibited over the years. While this marks an end to a tradition, Arman-Adams said that the relationship between TFAS and the museum is “still steadfast and strong.” “We’ll be working together on many things. There’s a lot of opportunities and exciting things coming next year.” The federation and the museum have a long history together. TFAS got started when George Stevens, the founding director of the museum, brought together three community arts groups. The next year the first Toledo Area Artists exhibition was staged. Now TFAS has about 25 organizational members. It now offers individual memberships. Adams-Arman said “we felt we needed to open…


Artist going ‘to paint in the air’ to create installation for Toledo Museum

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART British installation artist Rebecca Louise Law uses flowers and natural materials as her medium to “paint in the air.” The Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) has commissioned this vanguard contemporary artist to design and implement her largest site-specific installation to date exploring the relationship between humanity and nature. Sourcing approximately 150,000 plants and flowers native to the Toledo region and requiring 4,000 volunteer hours of assistance from community members over 15 days, Law will create an immersive environment that will thematically and literally represent northwest Ohio. A proponent of sustainability, Law also plans to reuse flowers from her previous installations around the world for the TMA project. Curated by TMA Director of Curatorial Affairs Halona Horton-Westbrook, Rebecca Louise Law: Community will be on view exclusively in Toledo from June 16, 2018, through Jan. 13, 2019. “We hope this installation will offer visitors a sensory experience, evocative of the people and places, natural history and landscapes of northwest Ohio,” said Brian Kennedy, TMA’s Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey director. “Law’s transporting vision wonderfully reflects the spirit and textures of our local and global communities.” Law uses both dried and fresh flowers in her work, and the process of decay is part of her time-based installations. Inspired by the dried flowers that hung in her attic as a child, Law’s “sculptures” are suspended from above and held together with copper wire. Drawing on the theme of community, the coordinated volunteer effort will begin in May, with local residents assisting with stringing together garlands of plants and flowers and taking some ownership over the ambitious installation, an aspect of the project that the artist feels passionate about. “I started out studying printmaking and painting, but I’ve always enjoyed nature. I come from seven generations of artists on my mum’s side, and seven generations of gardeners on my dad’s,” said Law. “My intention was to get others to physically experience a painting. I soon began to realize that color wasn’t what mattered as much; it’s about nature and preservation, processes of life and decay.” Based in London, Law has been commissioned to create installations at the Onassis Cultural Centre in Athens, Chandran Gallery in San Francisco, Kew Royal Botanic Gardens in London and in New York City’s Times Square, among other venues. Her work has been exhibited at a range of galleries and at major institutions, including the Royal Academy and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. “Law’s installations are powerful reminders of the need for us to be present in our everyday life – to stop and observe, to look closely and to appreciate the natural wonder that always surrounds us,” said Norton-Westbrook, who became familiar with the artist’s work in the years she spent living in London before moving to Toledo. Law recently released the book Life in Death, the most comprehensive collection to date of her career and concerns. Documenting Law’s earliest experiments to her most famous installations through evocative photography, the volume also offers a more personal glimpse of the contemporary artist’s life and inspirations. Life in Death will be available in the Museum Store for $35. Admission to Rebecca Louise Law: Community is free for members and $10 for nonmembers. Discounted tickets are available for seniors, college students, and military personnel ($7) and youth ages 5-17 ($5). Rebecca Louise Law: Community is sponsored in part by…


Marissa Saneholtz makes her mark as a woman artist to watch

By DAVID DUPONT BG independent News Marissa Saneholtz only has two smallish tattoos. The women she depicts on her jewelry, though, are covered with ink. Yet these women are depictions of the artist, proud assertions of her feminism. The copper and enamel broaches with decals fired into the surface that mix of social commentary, aesthetic grace, and technical mastery, have earned the Bowling Green native a place in Women to Watch Ohio – 2018. The show is now on exhibit in the Riffe Gallery in Columbus. The exhibit, which features the work of 10 women artists working in metals, is a collaboration of the Ohio Arts Council and the Ohio Advisory Group of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. Saneholtz honed her skills close to home, first in the Bowling Green High and then at Bowling Green State University, before heading to East Carolina University to earn her Master of Fine Arts. After stints in Italy, Vail, Colorado, and at Appalachian State University, she’s back home as an instructor in the metals and jewelry program at BGSU’s School of Art. Saneholtz, 32, said her art activity started from the time she came out of the womb. Her mother, Karen, did the arts projects for Plan, Do, and Talk. And when her daughter was a preschooler, she served as her “Guinea pig.” If she could do a project, the other kids could as well. When Saneholtz was older, she’d help her mother by demonstrating the projects. At Bowling Green High School, she started in art inspired by teacher Becky Laabs. As a freshman, Saneholtz won a prize in a state competition. She thought, “I can do this.” Academics came easily for her. “Art was good because I could challenge myself and research anything I wanted and turn it into art.” Metalsmithing was a good fit. The process jibed with her talents in science and math. It takes logic and organization. It’s “very planned out,” Saneholtz said. Science meets art as she deals with patinas, melting temps and alloys. “That’s all really exciting.” Using glass for enameling, she also has to consider fusion temperatures and expansion rates. “Not everyone wants to think about those things when they’re making art.” When it came to going to college, she didn’t consider BGSU at first. “I didn’t want to be a townie.” But looking around at metal and jewelry programs, BGSU’s program, directed by internationally recognized artist Tom Muir, rose to the top. Saneholtz enrolled as an art education major. “I wanted to be exactly like Becky Laabs.” But Muir talked her switching her major to metals. Muir’s sense of humor and penchant for telling stories were a good fit for Saneholtz, who displays the same qualities in her work. That’s evident in the three broaches on display in Columbus, and it’s part of what attracted Ann Bremner, who curated the show with Matt Distel, to her jewelry. Bremner said she did a lot of searching and research to find a jeweler in the show. She was attracted to Saneholtz pieces. “I found humor and craft. … I was really impressed with her and her work. This somebody I really want to talk to” especially given Saneholtz was an artist “just coming into her mature work.” So the curator traveled to Bowling Green…



Graduating BGHS art students showcase their work in Senior Studio Show

Submitted by BGHS ART The 22nd Annual Bowling Green High School  Senior Studio Show featured 23 students displaying their work in the Four Corners Center Gallery on May 10. Award winners are: Best 3D award courtesy of Black Swamp Arts Festival: MEGAN CARMEN for her horseshoe crab sculpture Best 2D award courtesy of Black Swamp Arts Festival: IAN BRACKENBURY for his colored pencil salamander Judge Reger Award courtesy of Judge Matt Reger: TRISHA STICHLER for her river painting Technical Merit Award courtesy of Waddington Jewelers: ELIZABETH MCCONNELL for her deer pin PTO Award courtesy of BGHS PTO: KELLY HAYDEN for her bubbles painting and DANA KLEMAN for her ceramic branch bowls Superintendent Award courtesy of Mr. Francis Scruci, BGCS Superintendent: NATALIE AVERY for her Finder’s painting. (This piece will be displayed permanently in the Central Administration.) The Board of Education Award courtesy of the BGCS Board of Education: ABBY FOX for her Wintergarden Woods painting (This piece will be displayed permanently in the BGHS Conference room). People’s Choice Award courtesy of Mr. Craft, Ben Franklin: NOVA CULLISON for his plastic bag chandelier. This award was voted on by those attending the show. Also exhibiting work were: Chloe Beeker, Nicholas Breen, Angel Chapman, Jordan Ely, Krista Evans, Ethan Fletcher, Sara Foster, Dea Kukeli, Lucie Moore, Rebecca O’Hare, Alex Peterson, Skye Sloane Kayla Schrader, and  Margo Utz. A string quartet from the high school orchestra entertained.  


PRIZM brings art collection, including Haitian crafts, to Sam Bs

From PRIZM CREATIVE COMMUNITY PRIZM Creative Community is pleased to announce its  “Sun, Sand, Summer Exhibition” as the newest exhibit in Wood County.  On display thru July the 30th at the Sam B’s Restaurant in Bowling Green the exhibit pays homage to the pleasures of nature, outdoor life, and nostalgia enjoyed with warmer days. On display is a collection of over 150 new pieces, by 24 artists in all medias including jewelry, ceramics, glass, acrylics, oils, fiber, alcohol inks, wood, floral, and paper.  Many featured items would make great Mother’s Day, Graduation or Wedding Gifts this season while supporting local artisans. An informal Opening Reception with free drinks and appetizers and a chance to meet many of the artists will be held on Thursday evening May 10 from 7:30- 9:30 p.m. in the back bar area of the restaurant at 163 S. Main Street in Bowling Green.     New to the exhibit space is a special collection from The Circle of Life project sponsored by Missions International of America located in Perrysburg.   The Circle of Life project is a system in which local artisans and business people have mentored the Haitian people to develop their artistic skills, to make and market products that have given them a never before opportunity to make an annual income to feed their families.    Most of the products are made with recycled paper, but a generous donation to the non-profit has enabled the group to begin to develop leather products as well. These reasonably priced products include innovative jewelry, coasters, key rings, change bowls, pots, and decorative items. Also exhibiting for the first time is several new and innovative artists.   Just graduating BGSU student Regina Hilton is showcasing her beautiful hand crafted ceramics.  Each ceramic mug, and drinking glass or porcelain bowl is uniquely formed and glazed. Regina encourages customers to pick up each item, and select the one that fits their hand the best.  Also new this exhibit is the hot blown glass of retired Toledo attorney Cindy Tesznar who features three different series of her work including sandblasted vases, nautilus swirl designs, and floral vases, and décor items.  Sam B’s is also excited to feature designer floral items from The Exceptional Touch. Having designed custom Christmas trees for The Toledo Club, wedding events and private clients over the years, The Exceptional Touch offers distinctive and timeless floral designs for protected outdoor and interior environments.   Several past guest artists are returning to the gallery space with fresh and innovative work.  Randy Bennett features his nostalgic mixed media work capturing iconic nature and history such as his piece to honor The Midnight Cowboy.  Wendy Jenkins, a local fiber artist features decorative and useable fiber art to brighten your home environment. Artist Darlene Krohn features distinctive works using pen and ink with watercolor, while Photographers J.D. Jensen and David Ridenour feature unforgettable images some printed on metal.  Artist Mary Mascazine who is a master at Marbling introduces some of her newest Jewelry Designs. Perennial favorite artists are back with new stock. Eagle Glassworks features a new technique of embossed glass capturing seasonal silhouettes in stunning colored sheets of glass.     Melanie Stinson and Julie Spitler create beautiful works using alcohol ink on various substrates David Grabarczyk continues to offer quality wooden jewelry and keepsake boxes, while Kate…


Art Walk helps downtown BG blossom (updated)

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A Walbridge painter who stepped out for her first Art Walk in downtown Bowling Green won top honors in the annual spring event Saturday. Shirley Frater won the first place Juror’s Award. She said she decided to do the event after exhibiting in the 50+ Shades of Grey Exhibit at the Wood County Senior Center. The second place award went to photographer Flannery Murnen, a junior at Bowling Green State University, and another first time participant in the show. Richard Gullet won third place for his detailed pen and ink drawings. Gullet, who showed his work in Qdoba, also won the People’s Choice award. Emily Metzger’s charcoal self-portrait, shown in Murder Ink Tattoo Company, won second place in People’s Choice, and Gail Christofferson won third place for her art guitars, which were on display at Finder’s Records. Following the event, the judges Sara Busler and Lauren Canavan issued a statement, about their choices. Of Frater’s work they wrote: “Shirley draws inspiration from a variety of materials. These materials include found objects such as medallions, old book pages, napkins and photos. Through the use of these found objects she creates an intricate composition that tells a narrative. The arts pays attention to all the fine details of her work from production to presentation. Each frame is found and repurposed to complement the work enclosed within.” Frater said that exhibiting at the senior center inspired her to show her work more, as well as become more involved in the Bowling Green Arts Council, who co-sponsors Art Walk with Downtown BG. Frater said she was a little concerned that she was in Biggby’s Coffee, which is a block off Main Street. But foot traffic at the shop was good, and a couple of the pieces she sold were to people who had just stopped in a buy a coffee. O f Murnen’s work, the judges wrote: “Through the use of traditional film cameras, Flannery’s work is at the mercy of the moment. Pairing her love of history and talent in photography, she captures images for posterity. One photo captures a quick glimpse of the crowd on the Woman’s March on Washington, while another documents a woman in Cuba carrying clean water, a basic amenity often taken for granted in other countries.” Murnen is not a complete newcomer to the show. She works at Coyote Beads where her photos were displayed, and has worked during Art Walk. Also, while in high school, she participated in Art Walk projects, though she said she never had the time to actually attend. Now a junior at Bowling Green State University, Murnen is a double major in history and photography. The two merge in her work. She shoots film, not digital, and despite what some people think, this is not a waste of time. “There’s a glow in a silver gelatin print that you can’t get from an ink jet print,” she said. “So if you’re looking for real beauty put it in silver. … It’s great to meet people who also have passion for the craft. Film photography doesn’t get its due.” She likes exhibiting as a way to showcase her work but also to draw attention to the photography program at the BGSU School of Art. “The work Lynn Whitney…


Toledo Museum exhibits works from 100 years of Toledo Area Artists exhibits

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART In 1917 the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) and three local artist collectives established the Toledo Federation of Art Societies (TFAS). The following year, the first Toledo Area Artists (TAA) exhibition sponsored by TFAS was held at TMA. Today TFAS is affiliated with more than 40 area art organizations—including artist clubs, galleries, college and university art departments —and hundreds of individual members within a 150-mile radius of the city of Toledo. This retrospective exhibition celebrates the 100th anniversary of TFAS and the century-long tradition of celebrating and recognizing the best artists in the region by TMA. It will showcase more than 20 works of art in a wide variety of media from the approximately 270 works purchased by TFAS for its collection over the last 60 years of TAA exhibitions at TMA. Decades in the Making will be on view at the Museum from April 28 through June 24. “The greater Toledo area has a history of incubating some of the most forward-thinking creative practitioners in the country,” said Brian Kennedy, TMA’s Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey director. “This legacy is in large part the result of the support provided by the Toledo Federation of Art Societies. Decades in the Making commemorates the 100th anniversary of TFAS and recognizes our joint commitment to the region’s outstanding arts and artists.” The works were selected by Halona Norton-Westbrook, Director of Curatorial Affairs at TMA. Among the featured artists will be Diana Attie (drawing), Edith Franklin (ceramics), Dominick Labino (glassblowing), and Kenneth Thompson (sculpture). “Since 1948 the Toledo Federation of Art Societies has been investing in Toledo-area artists while at the same time growing a permanent collection of some of the most dynamic works of art created in our region,” said Doug Adams-Arman, TFAS president. “We look forward to sharing highlights of these noteworthy acquisitions with the entire community as part of our 100th anniversary festivities.” Decades in the Making: Highlights from the Toledo Federation of Art Societies is on view in Gallery 6 from April 28 through June 24, 2018. Admission to the exhibition is free. For more information about the Toledo Federation of Art Societies, please visit tfas100.org # # # The Toledo Museum of Art is a nonprofit arts institution funded through individual donations, foundation grants, corporate sponsorships and investments. The Ohio Arts Council helps fund programs at the Toledo Museum of Art through a sustainability grant program that encourages economic growth, educational excellence and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. Glass Pavilion® and Toledo Museum of Art Glass Pavilion® are registered service marks. Admission to the Museum is free. The Museum is open Tuesday and Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Noon to 5 p.m.; and is closed Monday and major holidays. Thursday evening hours are sponsored by Huntington Private Client Group. Friday evening hours are made possible by Fifth Third Bank. The Museum is located at 2445 Monroe Street at Scottwood Avenue, just west of the downtown business district and one block off I-75 with exit designations posted. For general information, visitors can call 419-255-8000 or 800-644-6862, or visit toledomuseum.org.


BGSU Arts Events through April 29

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS At  the galleries  — The School of Art will host its second MFA Thesis Exhibition April 21-29 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries in the Fine Arts Center. The opening reception is at 7 p.m. Friday, April 20. Exhibitors include Fernanda Ruocco, Jacob Nolt and Ericsson De La Paz Lugo. Gallery hours are 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursday and 1-4 p.m. Sunday. All exhibitions are free and open to the public. The galleries are wheelchair accessible with the exception of the upper level of the Wankelman Gallery. For more information, visit bgsu.edu/art. April 19 — The International Film Series presents “Dear Pyongyang” (2005, Japan/South Korea, 107 minutes, directed by Yang Hong-Hi), with an introduction by Dr. Ryoko Okamura from the Department of World Languages and Cultures. Filmed in both Osaka, Japan, and Pyongyang, North Korea, in 2004, this deeply moving and intimate documentary features Zainichi (North) Korean immigrants living in Japan and their complex allegiances to family, host country, and their “fatherland.” A daughter interviews her parents as they return to Pyongyang to celebrate her father’s 70th birthday with her brothers. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater, located in Hanna Hall. Free April 19-22 — The BGSU Theatre Department presents “The Threepenny Opera,” Bertolt Brecht’s “play with music.” Brecht turned John Gay’s 18th century “The Beggar’s Opera” into a biting commentary on the bourgeoisie and modern morality. Set in Victorian London, this tale of the outlaw Mack the Knife offers a socialist critique of a capitalist world. Advance tickets are $5 for BGSU students and $15 for other adults; all tickets the day of the concert are $20. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 5 p.m. weekdays at 419-372-8171. The show opens at 8 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances are scheduled for 8 p.m. on April 20 and 21, and 2 p.m. on April 21 and 22. See review. April 20 — The International Film Series presents “La Pirogue (The Dugout)” (2012, Senegal, 87 minutes, directed by Moussa Touré), with an introduction by Dr. Beatrice Guenther, International Studies program director. In this film, a group of African men leave Senegal in a pirogue captained by a local fisherman to undertake the treacherous crossing of the Atlantic to Spain where they believe better lives and prospects are waiting for them. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theatre, located in Hanna Hall. Free April 20 — The Concert Band and University Band will give a performance. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $10 for other adults; tickets the day of the concert are, respectively, $10 and $13. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 5 p.m. weekdays at 419-372-8171.The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. April 21 — Guest artist Brendan Ige will give a euphonium master class. Ige’s performance experiences range from performing orchestral music to playing the sousaphone in a roving “beach band” at Cedar Point. He has performed with the Toledo Symphony, the Perrysburg Symphony, and the University of Michigan Symphony Orchestra. The master class will begin at 9 a.m. in the Marjorie E. Conrad, M.D. Choral Room, located in…


BG high senior Emily Wittig has indy book design covered

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News At 18, Emily Wittig has already put the faces on more than 100 books. Wittig operates her own business Emily Wittig Designs. A photographer as well as a designer, Bowling Green High School senior creates book cover designs for independently published authors, giving their work a more distinctive look than they otherwise may have. A serious illness helped to launch the enterprise. When she was 11, she was diagnosed with severe scoliosis, curvature of the spine, and required surgery. Her recuperation involved a year of no physical activity. A librarian at the middle school recommended she check out Goodreads.com as a way of discovering new books. Through the site, Wittig connected with author Micalea Smeltzer. They hit it off. Wittig loved her “Fallen” series of vampire romances. Smeltzer was 18 at the time. “She was the first indy writer I read,” Wittig said. Their conversations didn’t turn to business until Wittig launched her enterprise a few years later when she was 15. Smeltzer had reformatted the inside of her books, and wanted new covers. Wittig took on the job. Typically self-published authors use templates provided by online publishers. Wittig can offer something distinctive. At first, the designer said, she tried to read some of each book she worked on, but that’s no longer possible. Smeltzer “has pretty good idea for what she wants to do with covers. She can be picky. For her it’s easy to get an initial concept because she has an idea of what she wants.” Smeltzer remains one of Wittig’s favorite writers. She finds herself rereading the “Fallen” books. “I really like her style of writing.” She has covers done for two forthcoming Smeltzer books. But most of the other writers “don’t have anything written or aren’t confident enough to share it. They give me a little synopsis.” And “some people have no idea what might work,” she said. Asked what she’s taken away from her business she said: “I think learning to work with people especially the ones that don’t know what they want. Having the patience to work with people who have different ideas and different ways of doing things, it’s a little tricky even now.” Wittig doesn’t get to read as much now because of her academic schedule. She’ll graduate this May having earned 42 credits at Bowling Green State University. That’s where she’ll continue her career studying Visual Communications Technology, a mix of graphic design, interactive media, photography, and print. She’s already taken a couple courses in her major though most of her course work was concentrated on getting her general education requirements out of the way. That means she should be able to do her first co-op placement during her first year. “Initially it was tough because college is so different,” Wittig said of going to BGSU as a high school student. But she’s ready. “Now I feel confident going in as an actual college student. I know how to interact with my professors and the people in my classes.” Wittig said her parents, Craig and Lisa, have been very supportive. She’s a middle child between older brother, Logan, and younger brother, Carter. She’s also found time to volunteer. Last summer she worked at the Wood County Library on science projects with elementary kids in…


BG Art Walk seeking artists & exhibitors for April 28 event

From the BOWLING GREEN ARTS COUNCIL Bowling Green Arts Council, in partnership with Downtown Bowling Green, is proud to announce Art Walk 2018, an art show in which businesses though out historic downtown Bowling Green will host artists’ displays and performances. Art Walk will occur on Saturday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artists living within 50 miles of Bowling Green are eligible to participate and may display works in any size or medium as space and amenities of the chosen venue allow. A list of businesses interested in hosting is posted on the BG Arts Council Website www.bgartscouncil.com  Updates will be made as new venues are identified. It is the artist’s responsibility to find a venue, but help can be provided if needed by contacting BowlingGreenArtsCouncil@gmail.com The entry fee for individual artists is $20. Non-profit organizations can pay one entry fee of $20 for any number of affiliated artists if profit from any sales exclusively benefits the organization and not the individual artists. Entry procedures – online, by mail, or in person – are available on the BG Arts Council Website  www.bgartscouncil.com. The deadline for registration and payment is April 1st. All paid Art Walk participants (excluding non-profits) will be eligible to receive one of six monetary awards: three Juror’s Awards and three People’s Choice Awards.  The awards are sponsored by Jane Steinert, Jeff and Inge Klopping, BG Arts Council, John and Alice Calderonello and Judy Miller. Awards will be announced at the After Art Walk Party, 4:30-5:30 p.m. at the Four Corners Center, 130 S. Main Street Bowling Green.   For more detailed information regarding this show and the application and payment process, please consult the BG Arts Council website at www.bgartscouncil.com Art Walk is sponsored by Downtown Bowling Green and the BG Arts Council.


Bianca Garza’s photos rooted in concern about our relationship to the soil

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Photographer Bianca Garza knows in her gut that something is wrong in humanity’s relationship to their environment. She suffers from the effects. Growing up, she consumed processed and artificial food. She drank pop instead of water. Then with the encouragement of her boyfriend, Aaron Pickens, and his family, Garza started eating a “practical paleo” diet, based on foods grown sustainably. She ate traditional foods like those people ate before chronic diseases began taking their toll. Now, Garza said, she was “hiking and biking.” That is until gum surgery in 2016 threw her back, and triggered chronic fatigue syndrome. During that time of convalescence she looked at some of the photographs she’d been taking, and she saw they coalesced around a theme. Garza had captured odd juxtapositions between the natural world and artificial representations of the natural world. That breakdown, Garza believes, was manifesting itself in her own health issues. She’d worked briefly for Don Schooner at Schooner Farms, and that enhanced her appreciation for sustainable and regenerative agriculture – the belief that healthy soil produces the nutritious foods needed to nourish a healthy body. And depleted soil depletes our health. People become like the wheat stock in one of her photos, “Unyielding,” trying to break its way through cracked and dry ground. “I really believe many of our health issues come from replacing what we’re supposed to get from the earth with something artificial that no longer holds that energy.” A photo of abandoned truck trailer parked in an abandoned lot with a cornucopia decorating it cut to the core of the problem. “We have a lot of food stuff but we don’t have food with a lot of nutrition, and that’s what matters.” That image, “Abundantly Clear,” is one of a baker’s dozen photographs now on display at Art Supply Depo, 435 East Wooster, Bowling Green. The exhibit remains up until March 25. A reception with the artist will be held Saturday, March 24, from 5-7 p.m. The 2012 graduate of Bowling Green State University with a bachelor’s degree in visual communication technology with a specialization in photography, had not taken any photographs until she arrived on campus. Her intent was to major in popular culture and become a writer. But she took an intro to photography course with Jeff Hall, and he spotted a talent, and encouraged her. Craig Bell and Brad Phalin, the photographers in the BGSU Office of Marketing and Communications, also recognized that, and hired her the next semester. She continues to work as a contractor for the office, as well as a freelance photographer. She had the eye, they told her. The technical parts she could learn. “I realized I was much better at visual storytelling,” she said. Garza does take a lot of time on her titles which resonate with the images. “Since my commercial work has to be so literal,” she said, “in my personal work, I like things to be abstract and quiet.” Garza works with a medium format film camera. She takes the film to Main Street Photo to be developed and scanned into a digital file, which she can then print. As soon as she was able she went on gentle walks carrying the bulky camera. These sometimes yielded images, most often did not….