Visual art

BGHS senior studio culminates in exhibit & awards

Graduating art students recently celebrated completing their Senior Studio, the culmination of four years of study in the Bowling Green High School Art Program. The students last week stage a one-day show of their work at Four Corners in downtown Bowling Green. At the high school awards assembly May 15 the annual honors were awarded. Senior studio, said Claire Wells-Jensen, “ allows you to explore what you want to do. It’s more exploratory.” The studio time also gives students a chance to more broadly try out ideas that may be used in outside projects. Wells-Jensen said her experience in senior studio played into her stage design work for the Drama Club’s production of “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe,” in the fall. She was the lead designer for the giant puppet of Aslan, the lion. Meghan Worthy, who with Wells-Jensen helped organize the senior studio exhibit, said the studio gave her a chance to explore different media. Students, she said, must often rely on their own research because teachers won’t necessarily have a lot of experience in a particular medium. Worthy said that the self-reliance, time management skills, and organization that senior studio encourages are skills that carry through to other non-art activities. Other students in senior studio were: Breann Burkhart, Ryan Cox, Alysa Grabowski, Logan Mannin, Tim Oakley, Madeleine Ross, Peter Wishart, Frances, Zengel, Alexandria Coppeler, Trevor Craft, Haily Kirchner, Kaila Miller, and Bryn Parker, Claire Wells-Jensen, and Meagan Worthy. Awards went to: Senior Studio T-Short design: Alexandria Coppeler PTO Award; Trevor Craft, “Tieing the Nation Together,” nails…


BG Arts Council invites artists to get some fresh air

From BG ARTS COUNCIL The Bowling Green Arts Council and Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Department will host Art in the Park on the grounds of Simpson Garden Park, 1291 Conneaut Avenue, on Friday, June 9th from 4:30-7:30 p.m. Artists of all ages are invited to bring their easels and art supplies to the park to paint in the gardens for this event. Artists can register to participate by sending an email to blair@surrealogic.com. No sales can be made on Park premises; however, artists may bring a sample finished work and are encouraged to bring business cards to distribute. To encourage artist participation, The Art Supply Depō in Bowling Green has donated a $100 gift certificate for the artist voted “People’s Choice” by those in attendance. In addition to the artists at work, Art in the Park will feature hands-on arts activities for children. There will also be local musicians, music by students of the BGSU College of Musical Arts and performances by the Black Swamp Players and Horizon Youth Theatre. Some light refreshments will be provided.


Recreation center gets funky & functional glass mosaic

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Artist Gail Christofferson is proud of her most recent work. While being interviewed near the track on the second floor of the Bowling Green Recreation Center, she asks those passing by what they think of the new glass mosaic above the lobby. The walkers approve. Christofferson shares that sense of pride with hundreds of others. Almost 800 Bowling Green residents, kids through seniors, had a hand in creating those 40 glass quilt squares. They helped sort and trim the bits of glass and place them within the designs. Those designs were created not just by Christofferson, but also by Bowling Green High art students, the Conneaut Art Club and members of the Black Swamp Quilters Guild. On Tuesday, May 9, at 4 p.m. a celebration of the installation will be held. Those “funky quilt squares” were appropriate for the project, Christofferson said. “A quilt was made by the community. It was an heirloom that was valued. I like that concept.” And like a quilt, the mosaic is functional art. Parks and Recreation Director Kristen Otley approached Christofferson about creating the mosaic to help moderate the sunlight that would pour into the lobby at certain times of the day during mid-summer. Those rays left those working at the front desk literally blinded by the light. The “funky quilt” idea worked because the artist wasn’t sure how many mosaic panels she’d have to work it. Besides forming the artistic vision, she had to martial the community forces to work on it. Christofferson said she could have…


Portraits in friendships between BGSU student photographers & Wood Lane individuals exhibited at Toledo Museum

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News To find the Wood Lane photo exhibition at the Toledo Museum of Art, walk toward Matisse’s “Apollo” on the ground floor, then take a left. Just down the hall from that masterpiece, images of people served by Wood Lane line the walls of the Community Gallery. Most of the photos were taken by students in Lynn Whitney’s Community Projects class at Bowling Green State University. Some were taken by the Wood Lane individuals themselves. The exhibit, “Speaking of,” is the culmination of semester long project through which a dozen BGSU student photographers were teamed up with Wood Lane individuals. This is the project’s fifth year. At the opening, Whitney said this was “a project that seeks to bring a voice and alternative vision to a community of especially wonderful people.” In the beginning the Wood Lane individuals were the subjects. The photographers worked with them to depict their lives. This year, though, they were also given cameras and with the guidance of their student partners also made photographs. They went out bowling, shopping, for ice cream, and talked, said Lisa Kaplan, a BGSU graduate and a professor at Adrian College who has watched the project develop. And they came to the museum both for a visual literacy workshop and to view the Kehinde Wiley exhibit. This kind of partnership is especially needed now, Kaplan said. “We face a nation that’s increasingly suffering in many ways from a terrible lack of empathy. The struggle continues to get to a place where people with disabilities are…


Art brightens a dreary day as downtown BG hosts 25th Art Walk

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Art work filled a variety of nooks and crannies in shops downtown Saturday for the 25th Art Walk. The annual event offers people a chance to view the work of a variety of artists, from school kids to elders, and visit shops downtown they may never have been in. That was the case at the Painted Clover on South Main Street. One woman walked in, exclaiming “I haven’t been here since it was Art-a-Site!” as she looked around. The shop’s manager Morgan Savage said traffic was better than a usual Saturday and a number of those who came into shop were there specifically for Art Walk. For many, it was their first time in the store that sells hand painted furniture and home décor. Painted Clover was displaying silk-screened prints of birds created by Savage, a graduate of the Bowling Green State University School of Art. Savage was happy to have the opportunity to show her work. A few doors down in Encore Bridal, Michael Neal, son of the owner, said “a lot of people came strictly for that, for the art.” Foot traffic ebbed and flowed during the day. “I think the weather kept a lot of people away,” he said. Still Mary Dennis said she was pleased with the number of people who stopped by her display inside Grounds for Thought. This was the first time she’d exhibited and was glad she did. Across the room painter Randy Bennett was at work. He didn’t have paintings out for sale. Instead he set…


Works inspired by nature win top prizes at Art Walk

By BG INDEPENDENT NEWS With the gray dreary weather for Art Walk in Bowling Green, Carole Kauber’s paintings of brilliant Southwestern landscapes certainly had an added appeal “She’s not afraid to use striking colors,” Sara Busler, one of the jurors, said. With the large paintings set up in a back space in Coyote Beads, “I felt really small around them.” “It’s like you were there,” fellow juror Lauren Canavan said Her abstract realistic work won the top juror’s prize at the 25th Art Walk. The top People’s Choice honor went to a fixture at Art Walk, Tom Roller for his nature-inspired metal sculpture. Roller has been a frequent award winner. Last year, he won both the top jury prize and the top People’s Choice honor. Roller said this will be his last appearance at Art Walk. He’s already stopped doing other art fairs. This was the only show he did this year. Not that he’ll stop sculpting at his Clark Street workshop. “I have to do something to keep busy.” Other winners were: Ann Beck, jewelry, Ginny’s Inspired Fashion, second place, Jury Award. Mary Dennis, ceramics, Grounds for Thought, third place, Jury Award. Diana Bibler, sculpture, Mode Elle Boutique, second place, People’s Choice. Victoria Thompson, body painting, Encore Bridal, third place, People’s Choice. (BG Independent News will post an expanded story later.)


Angelwood Gallery opens new show FLUX

Submitted by ANGELWOOD GALLERY Angelwood Gallery is pleased to present FLUX celebrating our 24 years in business. The show opens on April 29 and runs until June 18. There will be a weekend long Open House to kick off the show on Saturday, April 29 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday, April 30 from noon to 5 p.m. The weekend will also feature pottery demonstrations, specialty food tasting and refreshments. Angelwood Gallery, which has featured regional artists since its inception, will continue that tradition with a wonderful line up of talented artists. The artists will include, gallery owner and potter Julie A. Beutler. She will be featuring over a 100 new pots with a strong emphasis on functional/kitchen ware as well as garden inspired pottery. Her work will feature finishes from wood kiln as well oxidation and raku firings. Other artists featured are mixed media artists Andrea Feller and Shannon Eis who both work with found objects to create funky animal sculptures, jewelry and wall work. They use common household goods, pieces of wood, found objects and other interesting finds to make these cool sculptures and 2D works. Glass artists joining the show are: Lars Glass, Beth Ziss, and Peg Briggs featuring home and garden glass as well as jewelry. Potters Brandon Knott, Joyce Donahue, Maggie Trzcinski, Rachel Burks and Scott Jones will be have an impressive collection of functional pottery as well as some sculpture. Metal artists will include furniture, wrought iron wall pieces and sculptures by Mike Leady of Southpaw Metal Studio and silverware jewelry, kitchen ware and…


K.S. Letts’ art explores ancient myth in the future tense

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ancient myths tell us what the future holds for humanity. That’s the underlining theme of artist K.A. Letts’ new show, Trans Human, at the River House Arts in the Secor Building in downtown Toledo. The exhibit opens with a reception tonight (Thursday, April 20) at 6 p.m. at the gallery at 425 Jefferson Ave. Regular gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 4-10 p.m., and by appointment by calling 419-441-4025). “I’m very interested in where we’re at as a species,” Letts said in a recent interview. “We’re at a point of being very close to the point of controlling our own evolution, and looking forward you wonder how the changes we make in ourselves will affect us as human beings.” Bio-engineering, including gene therapy and neuro-prosthetics, and robotics which threaten to make much human work obsolete, pose existential questions about where humanity is headed. One of the guides, Letts believes, “is through the stories we tell.” So the artist takes stories either from Ovid’s Metamorphosis or the Bible and uses “them to discuss what human beings are and what we’re going to be.” These are not illustrations, Letts said, “as much as making an image around the story.” She translates her vision of those stories in to bold, graphic designs. Her work draws a number of influences. The Chicago imagist school played a key influence as did Matisse and aboriginal art. She uses a limited palette. Black and white dominate. She uses silver and gold in a way that’s reminiscent of religious icons. Other tones…


BGSU art faculty honored for excellence by Ohio Arts Council

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Two Bowling Green State University faculty members, Charles Kanwischer and Lou Krueger, were among the artists to receive Individual Excellence Awards from the Ohio Arts Council. For Kanwischer, who was honored for his graphite drawings on panel, said that it is remarkable that Ohio continues to honor individual artists. “It’s such a statement that individual artists are valued. It’s such a nice validation.” Having a state give support to individual artists is becoming rare. Many arts councils only give grants to organizations. Some states have abolished their state arts councils, he said. Kanwischer and Krueger were among 77 artists to receive funding from among the 465 who applied. The council distributed $375,000 in grants, almost all for $5,000. “You have to give credit to the politicians, Republicans and Democrats,” he said. “It’s hard to complain about support for the arts.” Kanwischer’s portfolio features his landscapes. The settings can be rural, suburban or urban. He said he was interested in the cyclical change in the landscape. Some of the drawings now on display at Shaheen Modern and Contemporary Art in Cleveland, depict road construction. One drawing from 2010 “Route 24 Road Project – Support Columns” shows at once construction while also evoking images of ancient ruins. Kanwischer said his work has not undergone any dramatic shifts. Instead he feels he is able to get deeper and deeper into “landscape that reveals stories.” He’s appreciative that the arts council supports “long-term careers” not just the new and novel. This is his seventh grant in the 19…


BGSU arts events through April 28

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 13 – The International Film Series continues with the Swedish film “Force Majeure,” directed by Ruben Östlund. An award winner at the Cannes Film Festival, the Toronto Film Festival, and other internationally recognized venues, the film deftly explores the emotional dimensions of the legal term “force majeure,” an unexpected event (such as a hurricane) that releases both parties from the obligations of a contract. In this story, the ski vacation of a seemingly ideal family takes a sudden turn when an avalanche approaches them as they are having a pleasant lunch at the lodge. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 13 – Prout Readings conclude with B.F.A. student readings at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free April 13 – Bowling Green Opera Theater presents a variety of opera scenes. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 14 – The University Choral Society and Early Music Ensemble present Bach’s “St. John Passion.” The moving and sacred oratorio of Johann Sebastian Bach is a dramatic representation of the Passion as told in the Gospel of John for the Good Friday Vespers of 1724. Revel in the extravagant, expressive music of the season. The performance will begin at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, East Wooster St., Bowling Green. Free April 14 – The Toledo Museum of Art and BGSU’s College of Musical Arts present EAR | EYE Listening…


Alarm Will Sound to perform “Ten Thousand Birds” in sculpture garden

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Area residents will have the opportunity to experience new music in a new way when acclaimed new music ensemble Alarm Will Sound gives a special performance of “Ten Thousand Birds,” a work commissioned from Pulitzer Prize-winning composer John Luther Adams. The performance will follow the cycle of a day, starting with bird songs heard in the morning, then afternoon, evening, night and returning to morning. The audience is encouraged to walk around to experience the music from multiple perspectives. The performance will begin at dusk (approximately 7 p.m.) April 21 in and around the sculpture gardens at the Toledo Museum of Art. The event is sponsored by Bowling Green State University’s MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music and the Toledo Museum of Art. Both Alarm Will Sound and John Luther Adams have appeared on BGSU’s annual New Music Festival at the College of Musical Arts. Alarm Will Sound is a 20-member band committed to innovative performances and recordings of today’s music. It has established a reputation for performing demanding music with energetic skill. Its performances have been described as “equal parts exuberance, nonchalance, and virtuosity” by the Financial Times of London and as “a triumph of ensemble playing” by the San Francisco Chronicle. The New York Times says that Alarm Will Sound is “one of the most vital and original ensembles on the American music scene.” The versatility of Alarm Will Sound allows it to take on music from a wide variety of styles. Its repertoire ranges from European to American works, from the arch-modernist…


BGSU arts events through April 18

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 7 – The Collegiate Chorale and University Women’s Chorus will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. April 7 – The elsewhere theater season concludes with “Dying City,” written by Christopher Shin and directed by Tanner Lias. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. on April 8 and 9. Free April 8 – The Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition will take place in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Preliminaries will begin at noon, with finals following at 8 p.m. Free April 8 – An opening reception for the MFA I Thesis Exhibition will begin at 7 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Free Through April 18 – The MFA I Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free April 9 – The Sunday Matinee Series continues with the 1925 film “The Lost World,” directed by Harry G. Hoyt. Sir…


Tickets on sale for Black Swamp Players’ comedy “The Dixie Swim Club”

From the BLACK SWAMP PLAYERS Five Southern women, whose friendships began many years ago on their college swim team, set aside a long weekend every August to recharge those relationships. Free from husbands, kids and jobs, they meet at the same beach cottage on North Carolina’s Outer Banks to catch up, laugh and meddle in each other’s lives. “The Dixie Swim Club” focuses on four of those weekends and spans a period of thirty-three years. Sheree (Deb Weiser), the spunky team captain, desperately tries to maintain her organized and “perfect” life, and continues to be the group’s leader. Dinah (Deb Shaffer), the wisecracking overachiever, is a career dynamo. But her victories in the courtroom are in stark contrast to the frustrations of her personal life. Lexie (Nicole Tuttle), pampered and outspoken, is determined to hold on to her looks and youth as long as possible. She enjoys being married—over and over and over again. The self-deprecating and acerbic Vernadette (Monica Hiris), acutely aware of the dark cloud that hovers over her life, has decided to just give in and embrace the chaos. And sweet, eager-to-please Jeri Neal (Ellen Bean Larabee) experiences a late entry into motherhood that takes them all by surprise. As their lives unfold and the years pass, these women increasingly rely on one another, through advice and raucous repartee, to get through the challenges (men, sex, marriage, parenting, divorce, aging) that life flings at them. And when fate throws a wrench into one of their lives in the second act, these friends, proving the enduring power of…


Letts’ art speculates on future of humanity

From RIVER HOUSE ARTS Ann Arbor based artist KA Letts will present new or in the exhibit TransHuman, opening Thursday, April 20, with a reception from 6-9 p.m. in River House Arts, in the Secor Building, 425 Jefferson, Toledo. The exhibit continues through May 14. In this work, Letts speculates on the promising and terrifying future of our species. Using paper and paint, Letts re-works and reclaims myths of origin drawn from ancient cultures and cultural memory. Letts has shown her work regionally and nationally and in 2015 won the Toledo Federation of Art Societies Purchase Award while participating in the Toledo Area Artist Exhibition at the Toledo Museum of Art. She is a graduate of Barnard College (BA History) and Yale Drama School (MFA Set and Costume Design). In addition to her exhibition at River House Arts, she is preparing for a solo show at Firecat Projects in Chicago (Winter 2017). Gallery hours are 4-9 p.m, Tuesday through Friday. Appointments available daily by calling 419-441-4025. Formore information visit: riverhousearts.com.


Art history students survey the lost heritage of the Syrian city of Palmyra

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Syrian city of Palmyra was a crossroads in the ancient world’s global economy. In the second century A.D. the city called The Bride of the Desert sat astride the major trade route from Rome to the east. It was a place where cultures met. Now Palmrya is in the crosshairs of global conflict that’s taken thousands of lives. Another casualty of the war in Syria and the emergence of ISIS is the ancient’s city’s cultural heritage. An exhibit in the School of Art, Palmyra: Exploring Dissemination, looks at the city though the lens of the ancients but also through that of the Europeans who visited its ruins in the 17th and 18th centuries. The exhibit, in the lobby gallery of the Bryan Gallery in the School of Art, is the work of students in the graduate art history course, Iconoclasm: Ancient and Modern taught by Sean Leatherbury. In its heyday the city showed the cultural influences of the Romans and the Persians. When Europeans started visiting the ruins again they were enthralled. The images shows panoramas of the ruins, some with stylishly dressed Europeans strolling about, and another with fancifully costumed inhabitants. The cultural influences came together in the Temple of Bel, and that had an impact of European tourists. “The Temple of Bel influenced architecture of that time,” Leatherbury said. “You go to a manor house in England and you can see ceilings influenced by the Roman Temple.” But these ties to Western culture and to ancient pagan religion made them particular…