Visual art

“Glorious Splendor” pulls Toledo Museum visitors into the wonder of early Christian Era art

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Toledo Museum of Art’s new exhibit Glorious Splendor” comes in a small package. Don’t let that fool you. The 27 objects dating from 200 to 700 A.D. tucked into the museum’s Gallery 18, live up to the grand title of the show. They are a dazzling array of gold and silver object encrusted with jewels that draw the visitor in with their intricate detail. The objects, both sacred and secular, have historical significance that matches their physical beauty. “Glorious Splendor: Treasures of Early Christian Art” will be on exhibit through Feb. 18. A few of the items are from Toledo’s own collection but most are from private collections in North America, which curator Adam Levine has brought together for this exclusive exhibit. Once the show closes the objects will be returned to their owners. “If you do not see this show, you’ll never see them again,” Levine said during a press preview last week. Levine, the museum’s associate director and associate curator of ancient art, said he’d developed relationships with the private collectors. It took about a year to pull the show together. “The donors just want to make sure their objects look as beautiful as they can,” he said. The pieces have been at the museum of several months so custom mounts could be made to show them in the most advantageous light.  Levine did further research about each piece, so the donors learn more about their objects. The museum’s reputation for collecting “only the highest quality works” and maintaining that high standard in its exhibits is also important to the donors, he said. “Collectors are honored when we tell them their collections are the same caliber as our permanent collections.” The period covered by the exhibit is one of great historical significance, as the Roman Empire, evolved from a pagan entity to a Christian one. While scholars have written extensively about it, Levine said, it is difficult to bring together objects that tell that story. That’s the mission of “Glorious Splendor.” “The theology of early Christian Era was very unsettled. … There was a lot of debate about the nature of Christ and the nature of the gospels.” Some objects depict Roman gods and heroes. Others celebrate the emperor. And others feature the iconography of emerging Christianity. “Christianity emerged out of a cultural matrix, images of emperors and non-Christian deities were still being produced and still being circulated,” he said.  So Christian artists drew on the aesthetics of pagan iconography to illustrate Christian beliefs. “There are…


Art 4 Animals show on exhibit at Four Corners

From BOWLING GREEN ARTS COUNCIL The Bowling Green Arts Council and Four Corners Center is hosting Artists 4 Animals 5 at the Four Corners Center, 130 S. Main Street, from November 10 through November 28th. Thirty-two artists of all ages, kindergarten through adult, are exhibiting their animal-themed work in the show, which is free and open to the public during regular Four Corners hours of 9am to 5pm Monday-Friday. The show features selected top winners in each age category as well as best domestic and wild animal. Several of the artworks depict dogs and cats currently at the Wood County Humane Society, as depicted by Eastwood High School students. First place award winners are: Best Domestic Animal, Anna Gerken, “Begging for Treats” Best Wild Animal, Jean Gidich-Holbrook, “Iguana” Adults, Isabel Zeng “Bunny Ears K-4th Grade, Aya Aldailami, “Two Animals” 5th-8th Grade, Robbie Witte, “Racing Steeds” 9th-12th Grade, Hope Harvey, “Baybee” The winning images are reproduced on note cards that are available for purchase at the Four Corners Center.  Sales of the cards will benefit the Wood County Humane Society and the Bowling Green Arts Council.  This event is sponsored in part by The Copy Shop and Kabob it BG.  


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 31

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Through Nov. 9 – “Milestones: A Celebration of BGSU School of Art Alumni Featuring Studio Arts, Design and the 25th Anniversary of the Digital Arts Program” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit is part of the 38th annual Bowling Green State University New Music and Art Festival. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m.Sundays. Admission is free. Oct. 20– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents Concert 6, featuring the mixed-chamber group Latitude 49 (L49), whose focus on commissioning and supporting living composers has resulted in more than 30 works written for them. Their performance will begin at 8 p.m. at Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents a panel discussion at 10:30 a.m. at the Marjorie E. Conrad, M.D. Choral Room, located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents Concert 7, featuring electroacoustic works by Kong Mee Choi, Asha Srinivasan, Mike McFerron, Scott Miller, Jay C. Batzner and Konstantinos Karathanasis. The performance will begin at 2:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents the final concert, Concert 8, featuring the Bowling Green Philharmonia and Percussion Ensemble in a performance of a series of orchestral and percussion works. Tickets are $7 in advance and can be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. The concert will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Oct. 22 – The Sunday Matinee Series presents“Scott of the Antarctic”(1948, England, 110 minutes, directed by Charles Frend with John Mills, Derek Bond and Diana Churchill), with an introduction by film historian Dr. Jan Wahl. The harrowing race to the South Pole between Captain Robert Scott and Roald Amundsen of Scandinavia was a battle for survival. Which man would be the first to win fame and glory for his country, enduring the cold, the blizzards, the mountains and horrendous hardships? This adventurous docudrama in Technicolor is based on the true story of their expedition. The screening will begin at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater, located in Hanna Hall. Free Oct. 22 – Composer and pianist Jake Heggie, the 2017 BGSU Creative Series artist in residence, will give a keynote address highlighting his creative process and life story. Composer of operas such as “Dead Man Walking,” “Moby-Dick,” “It’s A Wonderful Life” and more, Heggie has also composed nearly 300 art songs, as well as concerti,…


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING  & COMMUNICATIONS Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison. Murchison is known as a varied performer, composer, arranger, educator, conductor and producer. He was a member of the River City Brass in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 2002-15, and was the principal solo euphonium for the last nine of those years. Since then, Murchison has performed solo and chamber music concerts across the U.S. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 13 – The BGSU Concert Band will perform as part of Homecoming festivities. The band will perform traditional repertoire and new compositions by the world’s leading composers, conducted by Dr. Bruce Moss. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and $7 for adults and available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. Oct. 15 – The Sunday Matinee Series presents “Bedroom, Parlor and Bath” (1931, U.S.A., 85 minutes, directed by Edward Sedwick, with Buster Keaton, Charlotte Greenwood and Reginald Denny), with an introduction by film historian Dr. Jan Wahl. It very well may be that Buster Keaton’s greatest achievements lay in the silent era when he was allowed to control the making of each film. Yet his was a genius that could not be entirely diminished, even by the bosses at MGM. Keaton was able to adapt to this new medium, so now we were able to hear the unique voice that went with the clown’s body. The screening will begin at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater, located in Hanna Hall. Free Oct. 17 – Tuesdays at the Gish presents “Seconds” (1966, U.S., 106 minutes, directed by John Frankenheimer) with an introduction by William Avila, doctoral student in American culture studies. “Seconds” is about a middle-aged banker who makes a Faustian bargain to get a new life and becomes (after cosmetic surgery) a painter, played by matinee-idol Rock Hudson. A dystopian slow-burner, “Seconds” is…


Ann Beck celebrates her paintings in first solo show

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ann Beck often sees her art hanging from people’s ears. Her handcrafted earrings are a familiar fashion statement in Bowling Green, where she sells them at the Black Swamp Arts Festival and at the Christmas Boutique hosted by Grounds for Thought, and elsewhere. Less common is a chance for her to see her paintings hanging from walls. Beck and art lovers have that opportunity this month during an exhibit at Grounds for Thought, 174 S. Main St., Bowling Green. The paintings are clearly by the same hand as the earrings with their bright colors and bold shapes, styled figures set in vivid landscapes. Though the paintings were created in the past three years, they represent a life in art that’s taken Beck, 49, from her native Colorado, to New Mexico, New Zealand and Bowling Green. The nature and myths of those places are all infused in the paintings. “I was one of those kids who always draws constantly,” Beck said of her start. In high school she had an inspiring art teacher. “I have a lot of success, and got a lot of awards.” But when she went to Western State College in Gunnison, Colorado, she hesitated about making art a career. She wanted to keep her art close to her and wasn’t willing to “work for anyone.” She’s still not sure what she was thinking. “I was just young and dumb,” she conceded. “I took a ton of art classes, and just dropped out.” She traveled always continuing to draw. “An artist doesn’t give up.” Then she planned to return to study art education. But became pregnant. She and Kurt Panter, her husband, decided to start a family.  She also worked in art galleries and apprenticed with a potter. “It was a different kind of journey for me.” That journey led her and her family to Bowling Green, where Panter teaches geology at Bowling Green State University. She continued to work on her art as she raised the children. She showed work at art affairs, including the Black Swamp Art Festival’s Wood County Invitational Show. Back then she painted snowmen and Santa Clause images. She grew bored with that. About 10 years ago, she traveled to New Zealand with her husband, who was on sabbatical. There she took courses and she was taken with the possibilities of “liquid glass” or resin. That gave rise to her signature ear rings, which are created by painting on water color paper with acrylic, ink or watercolor, then sealing those tiny paintings…


Afghan-American artist dials up the voices of immigrants

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A telephone booth sits on the edge of Promenade Park in Toledo. Inside the telephone rings. When I pick up the ringer a woman is speaking in a language I don’t recognize, never mind understand. She is in mid-statement. The passion in her voice pierces through the language barrier. When the translator comes on, I learn she is from Tibet, now living in New York City. She fled Tibet because the Chinese killed her family. She has freedom now. “If I was living in Tibet, I wouldn’t have freedom.” This is at once a voice from far away, yet speaking from the heart of America. The telephone booth is archaic, yet it gives voice to current concerns. The booth and two others in located around Toledo are part of “Once Upon a Place,” an art installation created by Afghan-American artist Aman Mojadidi. The telephone booths went up in Promenade Park, the library at the University of Toledo, and the main branch library of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library several weeks ago and will remain in place through Oct. 22. The installation was displayed earlier this year in Times Square in New York City, where it was created. Mojadidi recently spoke to students at the Bowling Green State University School of Art about the project, his life, and his career. “What I was interested in with this project was to show how cities small and large, including Toledo, have been built by people who came from other countries,” he said. As the United States’  “flagship city,” New York seemed the place to bring that idea to fruition. Almost 37 percent of its population is foreign born as is about 12 percent of the nation’s population. He started working on “Once Upon a Place” more than a year ago, just as the presidential campaign was heating up, and Donald Trump was stirring up his followers with anti-immigration rhetoric. It was also when New York City was removing the last of its public phone booths. Using a telephone booth involves “incredible intimacy,” Mojadidi said. People close themselves into the booth to converse. “It’s a full experience.” “I was interested in all the stories told through these phones booths in the past and bringing them back to tell a new kind of story, immigrant stories.” So Mojadidi traveled to different neighborhoods around the city, selecting those with the greatest diversity of immigrants. He reached out through synagogues, churches, mosques, and through labor and community groups. Mojadidi hung out in cafes and eavesdropped on…


Charles Kanwischer ready to guide School of Art in times of change

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Charles Kanwischer steps into his new role as director of the Bowling Green State University School of Art ready draw on ample experience He assumed the new position in July, taking the reins over from Katerina Ray, who served in that role for 15 years. Kanwischer, 54, had been associate director for most of Ray’s tenure, and two years ago served as acting director when Ray was on leave. So when Ray announced she would leave the post and join the faculty, Kanwischer said he felt he was prepared for the job. “Everyone should be so lucky to succeed someone like Katerina,” he said. “The mechanics of the school are in really good shape.” Having a steady experienced hand will be needed as the School of Art navigates changing currents in the arts. The School of Art, Kanwischer said, “used to be closed place, focused on its own business of training painters and sculptors. We’ve had to learn to be a more open place while still maintaining that tradition our reputation is based on.” The school now has new art minors open to student from around campus, and it has removed some prerequisites to introductory studio classes. That also means developing programs in digital arts and graduate programs aimed at working professionals that blend online and studio work. This year, the school will offer a Master of Arts in art education, building on its successful art education program. Students, mostly working teachers, take courses online, and then in the summer come to campus for studio work. Next year, the school will launch a Master of Fine Arts in Graphic Design with a similar format. These both fall in line with the university’s push to create professional graduate programs that attract tuition-paying older students. Another trend is for better collaboration among the arts units on campus. This strategy was initiated by Dean Raymond Craig, of the College of Arts and Sciences. The first fruit of this initiative likely will be an integrated media arts program that would bring together elements from art, creative writing, theater and film, and music. The program would be centered on gaming and virtual reality. The development is in the early stages, Kanwischer said, but “we’d like to do it.” He sees it as “the next stage in the evolution of our digital arts offerings.” Also being considered in a program in graphic novels. Digital arts and graphic design, two applied programs, are responsible for much of the enrollment growth. Traditional studio disciplines have steady enrollment,…


Art expert unravels mystery of ancient Greek pots

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART The Toledo Museum of Art is offering an in-depth learning experience with Sanchita Balachandran, associate director of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. On Saturday, Sept. 23, Balachandran will present a lecture titled “CSI (Ceramics Scene Investigation), Ancient Athens: Investigating Greek Potters and Painters” in the Little Theater at 2 p.m. Admission is free. Balachandran’s talk will focus on her ground-breaking work to solve the 2,500-year-old mystery of how ancient Greek craftspeople fabricated their highly artistic and technologically significant red-figure ceramics. Based on her 2015 Johns Hopkins University undergraduate course, “Recreating Ancient Greek Ceramics,” Balachandran, an art conservator, will discuss the importance of collaborating with a professional potter and incorporating the expertise of art historians, archaeologists and materials scientists in teaching a hands-on class for college students to make their own “ancient” cups. In addition to the lecture, Balachandran will collaborate with the TMA Conservation Department on photographing a small selection of ancient works in a new way. “During her visit to Toledo, Sanchita Balachandran will discuss her latest research to identify the presence or absence of line drawings on red figure ceramics utilizing Reflection Transformation Imaging, a photographic-computer process that reveals low relief details of the artists’ design and handiwork,” said Suzanne Hargrove, head of conservation at the Museum. “She will highlight examples she has studied at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum, the J. Paul Getty Museum and other cultural institutions, and will include select artworks from the TMA collection of red-figure vessels to be imaged during her visit for this talk.” Both the “Recreating Ancient Greek Ceramics” course and some of the findings from the revelatory Reflection Transformation Imaging process will be addressed during the Sept. 23 discussion. The free lecture is open to the public and is recommended for anyone with interests in the arts and sciences. This event is part of the programming for The Berlin Painter and His World: Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early Fifth Century B.C., which runs through Oct. 1, 2017. Admission to the exhibition is free for Museum members and $10 for nonmembers. The Berlin Painter and His World: Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early Fifth Century B.C. has been organized by the Princeton University Art Museum. Major support for this exhibition has been provided by the Leon Levy Foundation and the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. The Toledo showing is made possible in part by Taylor Cadillac, Christies, the Ohio Arts Council, James and Gregory Demirjian, Princeton University Alumni of Northwest Ohio, an anonymous donor, and generous gifts received in memory of…


Toledo Museum “Fired Up” over exhibit of glass art by women

Submitted by THE TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART The Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) has launched a celebration of the critical contributions made by generations of women glass artists. Drawn from the Toledo Museum of Art’s internationally renowned glass collection and with key loans from notable private collections, “Fired Up: Contemporary Glass by Women Artists” presents more than 50 stunning objects by women who now rank among the most innovative and celebrated glass artists in the world. The works, which range from small scale to life-size in a variety of glass techniques, document nearly six decades of unwavering dedication, from the art that helped women forge a path in the Studio Glass Movement of the 1960s to the ingenuity of 21st-century innovations. Fired Up: Contemporary Glass by Women Artists is on view at TMA from Sept. 2, 2017, through March 18, 2018. The discovery of glass as a serious artistic medium in the ‘60s – sparked during the Studio Glass Movement that originated at the Toledo Museum of Art – was important. Yet in its earliest decades, women faced an uphill battle in their demand for fair recognition of their significant impact, vision and work. The exhibition is co-curated by former TMA Senior Curator of Decorative Arts and Glass Jutta Page (now Executive Director of the Barry Art Museum at Old Dominion University) and Mint Museum Senior Curator of Craft, Design and Fashion Annie Carlano. “The illustrious achievement of women in glass can be more fully understood through this comprehensive and visually compelling exhibition,” said TMA Director Brian Kennedy. “These objects also bridge the fields of art, craft, design and sculpture in pathbreaking and exciting new ways.” “Fired Up: Contemporary Glass by Women Artists” is sponsored by O-I; Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick; the Ohio Arts Council and with funds received in the memory of Dr. Edward A. and Mrs. Rita Barbour Kern. Admission to the exhibition is free.


Afghan-American artist’s installation shares the stories of immigrants

From CONTEMPORARY ART TOLEDO Contemporary Art Toledo and artist Aman Mojadidi bring Once Upon a Place, a set of three interactive public art works that create a platform for immigrant voices, to Toledo beginning September 15. The work will be traveling from New York’s Time Square, where it’s been installed since late June to three Toledo locations: Toledo Lucas County Public Library, the University of Toledo, and Promenade Park, near the new downtown campus of ProMedica. The opening weekend of the exhibition coincides with both Momentum (a three day celebration of art and music in Toledo’s Promenade Park) and National Welcoming Week. He will speak on “Borderless: Art and Migration in Troubled Times,” Sunday, September 17 at 2 p.m. in the McMaster Center, Main Library Toledo Lucas County Public Library. Visitors to the installations will be invited to open the door of a repurposed telephone booth, pick up the receiver, and listen to oral histories of immigrants from across the globe. Visitors can also open the phone book inside each booth to read more about the storytellers’ communities – both in their current home and the countries they have traveled from. Individuals may also wish to leave behind a part of their own story if they choose. The installation includes 70 different stories that last between 2 and 15 minutes each. According to the Pew Research Center, by the year 2065 one in three Americans will be an immigrant or have immigrant parents. Locally, according to a 2015 report by New American Economy, Toledo’s immigrant community is increasing and partially offsetting local population loss. Furthermore, immigrants in Toledo hold close to $242 million in spending power and increased the total housing value in Lucas County by $45.9 million. In current political and social conversations about borders, bans, and citizenship, the word “immigrant” can be used as a monolithic block, sweeping under a single label people from a wide variety of backgrounds. By giving participants a platform to tell their individual stories, Once Upon a Place instead explores a rich variety of personalities and journeys. Listeners are drawn into the lives of current New York residents from Bangladesh, Belgium, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Gambia, Ghana, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Liberia, Mexico, Nigeria, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Russia, Sierra Leone, Spain, Sri Lanka, Tibet, and Yemen, bringing an intersection of experiences to the public. The stories featured in Once Upon a Place were recorded by Afghan-American artist Aman Mojadidi over the course several months. His goal was to create a safe environment for…


BG’s Main Street transformed into art show

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Hardly five hours after the sound of Dwayne Dopsie’s accordion stopped reverbing around the Main Stage area, and throughout the city, dozens of volunteers were back downtown getting ready for the opening of the art show, and the second day of the Black Swamp Arts Festival. The Dawn Patrol, so dubbed by the late Bill Hann, a retired Air Force officer, had reported for duty. Their mission was to transform Main Street into a vibrant arts village. This begins well before dawn and continues until the art shows are ready to open at 10 a.m. There’s an air of anticipation as the metal framework of tents go up, top with roofs, and the sides. Stacked among these are carefully packed arts and crafts, just waiting to be displayed. It’s an art in and of itself the way the exhibitors packed their vehicles, knowing what they need to have out and up, before boxes are removed. It’s a puzzle that must be disassembled and then put together again in an entirely different form. There are numerous details to take care of – where to park when the unpacking is done, where to get coffee, where to find a rest room. Volunteers are there to show the way, intent on maintaining the festival’s reputation for treating artists well. Coffee was being delivered. Roaming through the art show in progress, I find many familiar faces from previous shows. Always happy to see them back, and to stop and briefly chat before they set back to the task at hand. A street that’s empty at 5, by 6 is a bustle of activity, and by 8 the outline has been largely filled in. Jewelry, jackets, pottery, woodwork, now appear on the shelves and on the fabric walls. Some of the artists have other things on their minds. Several from Florida were concerned about their homes and family as Hurricane Irma was bearing down on the Sunshine State. Brenda Baker, who chairs the visual arts committee, said Friday morning on WGGU-FM’s “The Morning Show with Clint Corpe” that the festival had several last minute cancellations related both to the impending storm as well as Hurricane Harvey which devastated parts of Texas and Louisiana. Certainly a hurricane puts the minor discomfort of temperatures in the upper 40s in perspective. The festival hosts three distinct art shows. The juried art show has 108 artists from around the country. The Wood County Invitational has 50 booths. The invitational was created to insure there’s a place for local…


After year of photographic success, Bell sidelined

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Black Swamp Arts Festival played a pivotal role in launching Jan Bell’s photographic career. In 2003, the long-time graphic designer for WBGU-TV had returned to photography. He had accumulated enough work that he decided to apply to enter the juried show. Bell was accepted, and then on the festival weekend, the judges returned and awarded him best of show honors. It was his first art fair. Since then he’s put up his tent, assembled his street gallery, greeted customers, taken it all down and moved on, on dozens of times. More importantly, he’s traveled thousands of miles on photographic adventures to national and provincial parks here and in Canada living in a camper, hiking with 40 pounds of equipment, and waiting for days for the right light on the right subject. When he won the top award so early in his career, one woman warned him about the dangers of such early success. Bell has not rested on his laurels. His work has been accepted in many shows and received numerous honors, and has continued to evolve. These past 12 months have been especially notable. One photograph, “Distant Island,” an image from Lake Superior was juried into nine exhibitions. “That’s crazy wild,” he said. Then it won first place in one of those shows the Allegany National Photography Exhibition in Cumberland, Maryland, as well as an honorable mention at the Crooked Tree Arts Center in Petoskey, Michigan in April. Then three works were included in a photo exhibit highlighting images of National Parks at the same gallery. The exhibit was being held in conjunction with a show of photographs by Ansel Adams, Bell’s idol. “Three Sea Stacks” won best of show and “Agave” won an honorable mention. Bell also got to work with Alan Ross, the only person with permission to print from a select set of Adams’ negatives. “Three Sea Stacks” came from what turned out to be a three-month residency at Olympic National Park in Washington. He ended up waiting out a spell of historically bad weather that closed the park for four days. For four days he waited out the storm in a recreational vehicle storage unit. Those four days were the worst, but the weather was consistently bad. “I was in rain all day long.” Still he worked. He trekked along the Pacific Coast in search of images that he could turn into striking art with a depth of emotion. His stay was funded by a M. Reichmann Luminous Landscape grant. Bell learned right…


Toledo Museum guest artist John Kiley smashes, remakes glass art

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART Shattered glass may seem like the opposite of what a renowned contemporary glassblower would work towards, but for American artist John Kiley, smashing and reconstructing glass is exactly the point in his recent series of work called “Fractographs.” Beginning with optical crystal blocks, Kiley shatters the glass once with a sledgehammer and then carefully pieces it back together. The Toledo Museum of Art’s Guest Artist Pavilion Project (GAPP) invites contemporary artists from around the world to create new work in glass and share their process with the public. Kiley has been appointed to the GAPP residency beginning this month, during which he will continue his shattered glass innovations. “John Kiley has had a fantastic career, and we are so excited he has chosen to explore some of his newest ideas with the staff here in the Glass Studio,” said Colleen O’Connor, Glass Studio manager at TMA. “This is a great opportunity for the public to interact with such a talented and dynamic contemporary glass artist.” Kiley’s GAPP residency will be take place at the Museum Aug. 23-30 in the Glass Studio. “I am looking forward to John Kiley’s residency and the many exploratory processes that he will be bringing to the studios here in the Glass Pavilion,” said Alan Iwamura, assistant studio manager at the TMA Glass Pavilion. TMA has planned several public demonstrations of Kiley at work in the Glass Pavilion throughout his residency. In addition, Kiley will discuss his recent series of work during a free GAPP artist lecture in the GlasSalon on Friday, Aug. 25 at 7 p.m. For more details, please visit toledomuseum.org.


Isaac Smith returns to hometown festival as reigning Best of Show winner

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When he was growing up in Bowling Green, Isaac Smith created his share of macaroni masterpieces in the Youth Arts area of the Black Swamp Arts Festival. He also liked wandering through the crowd and visiting the art booths. It didn’t occur to him that the day would come that he’d be one of those artists. That he would be displaying and selling his own highly detailed and realistic pen and ink drawings, and his artwork would named Best of Show. Smith, a 2011 graduate of Bowling Green High School, returns next month to the Black Swamp Arts Festival’s juried art show to be held Sept. 9 and 10 on Main Street in downtown Bowling Green. The festival begins with music on the Main Stage Friday, Sept. 8 at 5 p.m. Last year was Smith’s second at the festival. He had exhibited in 2015 in the Wood County Invitational Show. In awarding him Best of Show honors, festival juror Brandon Briggs praised the artist’s “penetrating vision” Smith, Briggs said, was able to pick up on subtle details in his subject matter that most other observers would miss. “That takes not only time and patience, but a certain amount of heart. … Most people are willing to go as far as good enough. You’re a real artist if you’re willing to go ‘good enough is not good enough. I’m going to take it farther.’” Smith said f drawing: “I enjoy the long process, and the patience it takes.” Even as a child he spend more time on drawing than other kids. “At the beginning of high school, it just clicked, and I realized this is what I want to do,” Smith said during a recent interview. He took the four year sequence at the high school culminating in the senior project. Then he attended the Kendall College of Art and Design at Ferris State University in Michigan, graduating in 2016. He remembers visiting Grand Rapids, Michigan, during ArtPrize and deciding he wanted to go there because here was a place that appreciated art. The art school was also a manageable size, about as many people as BG high. In both high school and college, he was encouraged to branch out to try other forms, and each has lessons to teach, he said. In particular at Kendall, he did some abstract paintings. That forced him to rely on the composition, and the interrelationship between elements to create a successful piece, concepts he applies to drawing. Smith always returns to his pencils…


BGSU undergrad wins NowOH Popular Choice Award

Yuanyi Wang won the Popular Choice Award at the 10th Annual Northwest Ohio Community Art Exhibit. Wang, an undergraduate student in the Bowling Green State University’s School of Art, was honored for her self-portrait “Perfect or Not Perfect.” The oil painting also received the Toledo Federation of Art Societies Award at the show, which was held in the Bryan Gallery in the BGSU School of Art. The exhibit, which was open to artists from 12 counties in Northwest Ohio, closed July29. At that point the ballots for the Popular Choice Award were counted. The $50 prize is sponsored by the Bowling Green Arts Council. Jacqueline Nathan, gallery director, said Wang’s margin of victory was definitive. See http://bgindependentmedia.org/nowoh-exhibit-surveys-local-art-scene/ for related story.