Visual art

BGSU Arts Events through April 12

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 31 – Jazz Week continues with a trombone performance from Jazz Lab Band I with Grammy-nominated guest artist Alan Ferber. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. April 1 – Bravo! BGSU celebrates the very best of the arts. Experience a magical evening of vocal, instrumental and theatrical performances, plus exhibitions and demonstrations by student and faculty artists in glass, ceramics, metals and digital arts. Enjoy a festive atmosphere and an array of appetizers and tasty treats. The celebration will begin at 7 p.m. in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. To purchase tickets to the event, contact Lisa Mattiace in the President’s Office at 419-372-6780 or by email at lmattia@bgsu.edu April 1 – Students from BGSU’s College of Musical Arts will be featured in an afternoon chamber music concert at 1 p.m. at the Way Public Library, 101 E. Indiana Ave., Perrysburg. Hosted by Pro Musica, friends of music at the college, the program will feature students who have received travel grants from the organization. The concert is free and open to the public. April 2 – The Gish Sunday Matinee series kicks off with the 1945 film “And Then There Were None,” directed by René Clair. Agatha Christie’s celebrated who-done-it “Ten Little Indians,” under the deft guidance of French director Clair, becomes a delightful, sly, topnotch film noir. The skillful adaptation boasts a strong cast of Hollywood’s most memorable character actors, with a score by esteemed Italian composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco. The program will also include a Technicolor cartoon. The screening begins at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 2 – The A Cappella Choir and University Men’s Chorus will perform at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. April 3 – Pianist Phyllis Lehrer is the next performer in the Guest Artist Series. Known internationally as a performer, teacher, clinician, author and adjudicator, Lehrer has enjoyed an active concert career as a soloist and collaborative artist in the United States, Canada, Central America, Asia and Europe. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts center. Free April 4-6 — The College of Musical Arts at Bowling Green State University will host a residency on the rare, snakelike, historical horn called the serpent, featuring Douglas Yeo, the leading scholar on the instrument. Events include a free public concert, a seminar and a lesson on playing the serpent, plus master classes with college students and faculty members on the serpent and the trombone. The serpent master class, led by faculty member David Saltzman, will take place from 9:30-10:20 a.m.April 5 in 2002 Moore Musical Arts Center, and is open to the public….


BGSU arts events through March 29

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 16 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features visiting writer Dustin M. Hoffman. Author of the story collection “One-Hundred-Knuckled Fist” and winner of the 2015 Prairie Schooner Book Prize, Hoffman earned his MFA in fiction from BGSU.  The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free March 17 – The Brown Bag Music Series continues with Opera! The performance will begin at 11:45 a.m. in the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free March 17 – Elsewhere productions continue with “Jimmy and Sally.” The show will begin at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. on March 18 and 19. Free March 18 – The ARTalk series presents “Where Next: The Future of Art.” Prominent artists and scholars will discuss the future of art in work, education and careers. Featured speakers include Cynthia Crow, program officer for the Fulbright Scholar Program in New York; Regin Igloria, multidisciplinary artist and arts administrator in Chicago, and John Jennings, graphic designer and associate professor at the University of Buffalo. The ARTalk will begin at 4 p.m. in room 204 of the Fine Arts Center. Free March 18 – The opening reception for the BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition will begin at 7 p.m. in the Bryan and Wankelman Galleries located in the Fine Arts Center. Free Through March 31 – The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Bryan and Wankelman Galleries, located in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m.Sundays. Free March 19 – The 10th annual Douglas Wayland Chamber Music Competition concludes with the Student Chamber Competition Finals. The finalists will perform at 3 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 21 – Tuesdays at the Gish presents the 2002 film “Far From Heaven,” directed by Todd Haynes. Julianne Moore is the perfect wife, Dennis Quaid is her husband, and Dennis Haysbert her gardener. The score by Elmer Bernstein, cinematography by Edward Lachman, and design by Mark Friedberg recreate the feel of Douglas Sirk’s melodramas; Haynes’ script updates the critique to include a look at normative views of race and sexuality. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater in Hanna Hall. Free March 23 – Visiting writer Claire Vaye Watkins, author of “Gold Frame Citrus,” will share her work as part of the Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free March 24 –Bowling Green Opera Theater presents Kurt Weill’s “Street Scene.” The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Advance tickets are $5 for students and children and $15 for adults. All tickets are $20 the day of the performance. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center at 419-372-8171, or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. An additional performance will be at 2 p.m. on March 26. March 24 – EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art explores the relationship of contemporary music and art through music performances in response to…


Michael Harris finds BGSU much improved for black students since his days on campus

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Michael Harris settled comfortably on the couch in the lounge that serves as home base for Bowling Green State University’s Arts Village in the basement of Kreischer Compton dorm. The 1971 BGSU graduate remembers the dorm well from his student days. His girlfriend lived in the dorm, and she became his wife, then his ex-wife. Looking around campus, Harris said, he saw a lot that hadn’t changed, including the School of Art where he studied with Bob Mazur, Willard Wankelman and Paul D. Running, and the baseball diamond where he played ball. He was the only black on the team, he recalled, and one of fewer than 100 African-Americans in the student body. Harris came back to campus last week as the keynote speaker for the Africana Studies Student Research Conference. His speech was on “Conjuring an Africana Aesthetic,” but now the talk was less formal. A handful of students spread through the launch as his host at the Arts Village art professor Joel D’Orisio occasionally asked a few questions. Harris lived in Harshman, which he was advised he better go see because it was slated to be razed. Harris said he found BGSU much improved from when he was here. He helped found the Black Student Union. Now there were offerings in ethnic studies that would have “brought tears to my eyes back then.” He’d come to BGSU hoping to escape the racism of his native Cleveland. Racism that left innumerable “papercuts and bruises” on his psyche. At BGSU though he couldn’t readily hear the music he grew up on. When he took an African history course it was all about Stanley Livingston and the white colonizers and the treaties they used to divvy up the continent among themselves. Students didn’t learn about any Africans. Harris intended to be an English major, but he had antipathy toward 19th Century English literature, and “I didn’t get Shakespeare at the time,” he said. “African-American writers weren’t being highlighted.” Now the diversity of student population and the offerings “make this pretty nice,” he said. From BGSU, Harris went on to study art, art history and African American studies at Howard University and then Yale. Now on the faculty of Emory University, he built a distinguished career both as an artist and as an art historian. He’s been called one of the top scholars in his field and is an author of several books including the award-winning “Colored Pictures: Race and Visual Representation.” All that started at BGSU. He noted as he walked past the display of photographs of Arts Village students, past and present. This reminded him of The Wall of Respect, a mural created by AfriCOBRA, an Chicago arts collective. The mural celebrated activists, athletes, writers and musicians. Its significance has outlasted its short life. Painted in 1968, the building it was on was torn down by the Daley administration after a fire in 1971. “When Fascists get in power one of the first things they do is destroy the arts,” Harris said. “People don’t realize how powerful the voice of the artist is” in maintaining a sense of integrity. And artists themselves “often don’t realize the power we have in our hands.” Harris joined AfriCOBRA in 1980. This sparked a conversation with Yusuf Lateef,…


BGSU arts events through March 1

From BGSI OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Feb. 16—The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Bridget Adams and Benji Katz. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Feb. 16—The Department of Theatre and Film’s production of “The Penelopiad” will open at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. “The Penelopiad” is Margaret Atwood’s version of Homer’s “Odyssey” told through the voices of Penelope and her 12 hanged maids. Speaking from beyond the grave, Atwood’s characters explore this mythic tale of love, betrayal, responsibility and power. Additional performances are at 8 p.m. Feb. 16-18 and Feb. 23-25, with matinees at 2 p.m. on Feb. 18, 19 and 25. Advance tickets are $15 and can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, 419-372-8171 or online at www.bgsu.edu/arts. All seats the day of the performance are $20. (See story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/bgsus-the-penelopiad-shows-the-tragedy-on-the-ancient-greek-homefront/) Feb. 17—The Brown Bag Music Series will present a musical extravaganza in celebration of Black History Month. Students and faculty from the College of Musical Arts will perform starting at 11:45 a.m. at the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free Feb. 17—The BGSU Wind Symphony will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 and can be purchased at the Wolfe Center for the Arts box office, 419-372-8171 or online at www.bgsu.edu/arts. All seats are $10 the day of the performance. Feb. 18—The University and Concert Bands will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 and can be purchased at the Wolfe Center for the Arts box office, 419-372-8171, or online at www.bgsu.edu/arts. All seats are $10 the day of the performance. Through Feb. 20—The annual Undergraduate Art and Design Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m.­-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Feb. 21 – Tuesdays at the Gish continues with the 2001 film “Ralph Bunche: An American Odyssey,” directed by William Greaves. Narrated by Sidney Poitier, the film represents the first in-depth documentary on the life and legacy of this American legend. Dr. Ralph Johnson Bunche (1903-71) was a statesman, peace negotiator, leading intellectual, scholar and the first person of color to win the Nobel Peace Prize. He overcame poverty and racial prejudice to become Undersecretary General of the United Nations. His life offers a unique window on key historical events in the mid-20th century. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Feb. 21–Music at the Manor House features the BG Brass Ensembles. The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Manor House in Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., in Toledo. Free Feb. 23 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features visiting writer Callista Buchen. The BGSU M.F.A. alumna and author of chapbooks “The Bloody Planet” and “Double-Mouthed” will read from her work beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Feb. 23–The Hansen Series Guest Artists are Grammy-winning ensemble Roomful of Teeth. Through study with masters from singing traditions the world over, the eight-voice ensemble continually expands its vocabulary of…


River House Arts opening two exhibits in two weeks

Submitted by RIVER HOUSE ARTS River House Arts and Contemporary Art Toledo will present “Heterogeneous: States of American,”opening Tonight (Feb. 16) with a reception from 6-9 p.m. at the gallery in the first floor of the Secor Building, 425 Jefferson Ave., Toledo. In this provocative and timely new exhibition of paintings and mixed media, three Toledo artists, Josh Byers, David Cuatla Cuatl, and Faith Goodman express the fractures and symmetry of millennial life. The show remains on exhibit through March 4. Riverhouse Arts is also opening the Sien Collective’s “Sweeping Close… and Now”  Friday, Feb. 22, at 6:30 p.m. in the Owens Community College’s Walter E Terhune Gallery. The Sien Collective is Meagan Shein of Ann Arbor and Siobhan Arnold of San Diego. The two artists use historic photographic processes of Cyanotype and the paper negative, as well as drawing, encaustic and hand sewing to investigate the properties of trees and our place in the contemporary world. It continues through March 22. Also continuing in the Gallery 6 of River House Arts are the paintings of Croatian artist Nevenka Arbanas. Created in the early 1990s during the Bosnian War and its aftermath, the works were sourced from a local collector and are priced to sell. The gallery on the sixth floor of the building. River House Arts is a full service gallery offering exhibitions of modern and contemporary artists. Hours are Tuesday through Friday, noon to 8 p.m. and by appointment.


Kehinde Wiley’s portraits bring people from the street to museum walls

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Kehinde Wiley found his direction as a painter on a street in Harlem. He’d recently finished his graduate studies in art at Yale and had enrolled the Studio Museum of Harlem’s art residency program in 2001. At Yale he painted black males with extravagant hair styles. Thursday in a talk at the Toledo Museum of Art, he said that had completed his study “at the feet of the fathers,” and was in a crisis as to where to go next. There at his feet he found a piece of paper. A rap sheet. On it was the young man’s mug shot. Wiley said at that instant he thought: “This is a really cool portrait. I know that’s kind of screwed up. If you’re thinking like I think which is to use your life to tell a story about the world you live in, finding this piece of paper tells a story about the world we live in.” He turned the mug shot into a portrait, and that painting is now hanging in the Toledo Museum of Art’s exhibit Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic. The major retrospective of the Brooklyn-based artist’s career is now on exhibit through May 14. In the 15 years since finding that mugshot Wiley has achieved “super star status,” said Brian Kennedy, director of the Toledo Museum. That was evident by the standing-room-only crowd that gathered in the Peristyle on Thursday to hear the artist’s talk on his work. Wiley has achieved fame by both celebrating and challenging the notions of Western art. He has highlighted the lack of black bodies depicted in the paintings of museums such as the TMA. “That’s not right,” Kennedy said. Wiley has set about redressing that by setting young people of color who he meets on the streets and dance halls around the world and placing them within the context of Western classic art. So it is a black man wearing a bandana, sweat wristbands and camouflage who leads the army over the Alps, not Napoleon. Through Wiley’s work black bodies command their place on museum walls in monumental form dressed in the best urban fashion. Some of the women wear gowns designed by a top designer. All this came about because his mother sent Wiley and his twin brother to after-school art classes when they were 11. They lived in South Central Los Angeles and were coming of age in the late 1980s, the same time the Crips and the Bloods were emerging. “My mother put me through art school as a kid not because she particularly cared about the paintings on the wall but because she wanted to keep us off the street.” The classes required two-hour treks across the city and back to the museum where they met kids from different neighborhoods who spoke different languages and ate different foods. “The match got struck,” Wiley said, when he discovered “those portraits of 18th and 19th landed gentry at museum with all those powdered wigs, with lap dogs, all those pearls.” “As a kid from the hood I thought: ‘What in the world is that?’” But he also thought: “I’d like to make something that contends on that level.” “New Republic” is testament that he has achieved that goal. While those old paintings…


BGSU arts events through Feb. 8

From BGSU MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Jan. 25 – The Faculty Artist Series presents pianist Robert Satterlee. He has appeared on the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts in Chicago, San Francisco’s Old First Concert Series and the Schubert Club in St. Paul, Minn., among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 26 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Sam Adams and Dan Gualtieri. They will present their work at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 26 – BGSU’s Jazz Lab Band I will perform with guest artist and saxophonist, Loren Stillman. Stillman has received praise in such publications as The New York Times, Downbeat magazine, Jazziz, Jazz Times, and on National Public Radio,marking him as an innovative voice of modern jazz. His original recordings have received critical acclaim from The New York Times and four star recognition in BBC Jazz Review, Jazz Man magazine and Downbeat. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu/arts. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Jan. 27 – Students in the BGSU dance program will present a concert at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre of the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Tickets are $5 at the door. Jan. 27 – The College of Musical Arts Guest Artist Series features “Schubert, Songfulness and the Body,” a lecture/recital by pianist Arved Ashby, a professor of music at Ohio State University. Ashby focuses on 20th- and 21st-century art music within broader contexts of cultural history, critical theory, post-Marxist aesthetics, and media and communications. He is the editor of “Listening to Modernism: Intention, Meaning, and the Compositional Avant-garde” (Rochester, 2004) and author of “Absolute Music, Mechanical Reproduction.” In 1996, Ashby received the prestigious Alfred Einstein Award from the American Musicological Society. The lecture recital will begin at 2:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 27 – The Toledo Museum of Art and BGSU’s College of Musical Arts presents EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art. The performance and discussion series explores the relationship between contemporary music and art through music performances in response to specific works of art. The event will feature BGSU doctoral candidates and begin at 7 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St, Toledo. Free Jan. 28 – Students in the BGSU dance program will present a concert at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre of the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Tickets are $5 at the door. Jan. 30 – Students from the BGSU piano studio will present a recital at 7 p.m. at the Wood County District Public Library, 251 N. Main St., Bowling Green. Free Jan. 31 – Tuesdays at the Gish begins with the 2010 film “Night Catches Us,” directed by Tanya Hamilton. Set in 1976, this award-winning film developed at Sundance centers on Marcus (Anthony Mackie), a Black Panther member who returns to the neighborhood he left after tumultuous events a decade before. His father has died and the family home has…


Local readers pick their choice as best picture book (updated)

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News And the winner is… “What To Do With a Box” by Jane Yolen. That was the book selected about a dozen folks, kids through grandparents, who gathered to consider what should win the Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished picture book of 2016. The winner of the actual Caldecott Medal announced Monday morning at the American Library Association’s Midwinter Meeting is “Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat” by Javaka Steptoe. Kathy East, retired children’s librarian at Wood County District Public Library, said Sunday during the Mock Caldecott Election that the real committee has already made its choice. The press release was being drafted, and first thing in the morning the winner of the medal and honor books will get a telephone call. East has been through this before. She served  on the committee in 1987 when Richard Egielski won for “Hey, Al” and chaired the committee in 1998 when Paul Zelinsky won for “Rapunzel.” The award goes to the illustrator. The committee that awards the prize can start with a field of as many as 500 books. By the time they gather in January that’s been whittled down to 100 or so. Then each of those books must get a simple majority to stay in contention. East said usually 30 make the final draw. From there the best books rise to the top. The eventual winner, she said, must have more than a simple majority. It must have a significant margin of victory. That requires a number of rounds of balloting. “You want to make sure everyone on the committee is able to go out and say ‘this is the most distinguished children’s book,’” East said. Not that there aren’t those who later who will later kvetch about the choice. “There’s conversation,” she said. The rewards for having the image of the Caldecott Medal affixed to the front of the book are significant. “The guarantee for the artist is the book will always stay in print.” Those gathered at the public library Sunday had a much abbreviated version of the selection process. Library staff had pulled 49 picture books published in 2016. They split into two groups, each looking at a random sample of half the books. Each group picked their four favorites from what they had. Then they cast ballots. “What To Do With a Box” and Terry Fan’s “The Night Gardener” were locked in a virtual tie. After another ballot, Yolen’s book was the clear winner. The book shows the wonders a simple box can provide. Alice Walters, a second grader who was the youngest casting a ballot, said the book was her favorite because all the illustrations were actually drawn on cardboard. Besides she loves playing with boxes, and Yolen captured what it felt like. “You can use what you make with the box,” she said. “The Night Gardener” about a mysterious topiarist was named an honor book as was Aaron Becker’s “Return.” East said there’s no set number of honor books that can be designated.  There have been as many as five. The Bowling Green event is the third Caldecott mock election East has presided over this Jaanuary. She did one at the Mazza Museum of International Art from Picture Books for the museum’s docents. They selected…


Kehinde Wiley’s urban take on Old Masters coming to Toledo Museum

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART The Toledo Museum of Art presents Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic, an exhibition of 60 paintings and sculptures questioning ideas of race, gender and the politics of representation. On view Feb. 10-May 14, 2017, A New Republic spans Wiley’s 14-year career including his earliest explorations of the male figure, his unique take on Old Master portraiture and his later forays into sculpture and iconography. The exhibition is organized by the Brooklyn Museum. “The magnitude of this exhibition will impress even those familiar with Wiley’s work,” said Brian P. Kennedy, TMA director, president and CEO. “He has taken the grandeur of portrait painting and translated it with his portrayals of contemporary African American men and women. Wiley bridges the gap between traditional portraiture and our daily lives, and in doing so, he raises questions about identity and how we perceive ourselves and others.” Wiley’s signature portraits of everyday men and women riff on specific paintings by Old Masters, replacing the European aristocrats depicted in those paintings with contemporary black subjects, drawing attention to the absence of African Americans from historical and cultural narratives. “The Toledo Museum of Art is home to a wide array of singular masterpieces gathered together from across time and geographic regions,” said Halona Norton-Westbrook, TMA director of collections. “The museum’s strong collection of Old Master paintings offers a particularly compelling framework for the presentation of Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic. Playing with traditional conventions of European portraiture, Wiley examines symbols of power, wealth, status and identity in today’s world. Juxtaposing A New Republic with the Old Master portraits hung in TMA’s adjacent galleries provides context for Wiley’s work. Visitors will be encouraged to examine the paintings that inform his portraits through a new lens.” The subjects in Wiley’s paintings often wear sneakers, hoodies and baseball caps, and are set against contrasting ornate decorative backgrounds that evoke earlier eras and a range of cultures. Through the process of “street casting,” Wiley invites individuals, often strangers he encounters on the street, to sit for portraits. In this collaborative process, the model chooses a reproduction of a painting from a book and reenacts the pose of the painting’s figure. By inviting the subjects to select a work of art, Wiley gives them a measure of control over the way they’re portrayed. The exhibition includes a selection of Wiley’s World Stage paintings, begun in 2006, in which he takes his street casting process to other countries, widening the scope of his collaboration. Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic is organized by Eugenie Tsai, the John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum. A fully illustrated catalogue published by the Brooklyn Museum and DelMonico Books • Prestel accompanies the exhibition. This touring exhibition is made possible by the Henry Luce Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts and Grey Goose Vodka. Additional support is provided by Sotheby’s, Ana and Lenny Gravier, Sean Kelly Gallery, Stephen Friedman Gallery, John and Amy Phelan, Roberts & Tilton, and Pamela K. and William A. Royall, Jr. The Toledo showing of A New Republic is presented in part by Welltower, a Toledo-based real estate investment trust (REIT) that provides capital to leading seniors housing operators, post-acute care providers and health systems. This presentation of the exhibition is also made possible by…


Kim Young’s digital prints offer break from typical vacation images

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Search the images of family vacation on the internet and you will be blinded by the sun and smiles. Quite the contrast to the gray of an Ohio winter. Digital artist Kim Young of Bowling Green has taken some of those images and altered their digital DNA to create fresh abstract images. Those images will be part of the exhibit Virtual Vacation at the Neon Heater Art Gallery in Findlay. The show includes Young ‘s digital prints and installations by video artists Laura Post and Richard Munaba. The show opens with a reception Thursday, Jan.5, from 5 to 8 p.m. and continues in the gallery on the second floor of the Jones Building,   400½ S. Main St. Findlay, through Jan. 13. Young’s digital prints depict inviting scenes of vacation sport including Disneyland, as viewers have never seen them before. She has subverted the scenes of beaches, mountains and Mickey Mouse by digging deep into their digital codes. Her prints provide a vacation as much from the clichéd images of vacation as from the Ohio winter. Young, who teaches in the Bowling Green State University School of Art, said: “I’m really interested with how computers and images, and humans and images, are interacting. There’s more images to interact with than at any point in human history, so people get kind of numb to the whole idea of images. I’m a visual artist. What does that mean to someone who makes digital images and wants people took at them? I don’t want my things to look like something people have seen a 100 million times before.” All those images that pop up on our various screens, are not really images, Young said. “They’re code.” So she started to dig into the code itself. The string of seemingly indecipherable numbers. She messed with it. Introduced glitches. She took colored pencils and wrote out the string of characters for JPG images. “I had never seen most of these characters. It was very meditative. It got me thinking about how computers recognize images compared to how humans do. I kind of nerded out on that.” For the work that will displayed in Virtual Vacation, she did searches for vacation photos. She took stock images, and then altered the code, but not so much that the computer didn’t still recognize the image. The result was abstract patterns, swirls of color, lines that look like they rise above the surface of the paper. Is that a shadow-like image of Mickey Mouse’s ears dominating the corner of one print? The images display the same internal coherence of the best abstract art. Young wanted them printed out either on paper or acetate, to give them physical form. The images displayed just on a screen “leave me cold.” She first exhibited work using this technique about a year ago in a show in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Community Gallery. Those pieces will be included in the Neon Heater exhibit as well. The Neon Heater was opened in 2012 by Ian Breidenbach in “the least likely space” for a gallery, Young said. “He is really devoted to having a space where he can show challenging contemporary art, primarily installation art.” He issues open calls for artists, and assembles the exhibitions from that. Young is…


Holiday week perfect time to feast on Toledo Museum’s treasures

By DAVID  DUPONT BG Independent News As the gaiety of Christmas Day fades, and we enter that phase of holiday denouement, the Toledo Museum of Art throws it doors open to welcome  visitors with a whole slate of activities leading up to New Year’s Day. Now that the gifts are unwrapped and the meals eaten, a visit to the museum is in order. It’s a great place to take out of town visitors, and share with them one of the treasures of Northwest Ohio. For those locals who have never visited, it’s a great time to acquaint them with this grand institution. The museum has a wonderful holiday feel, and it tends to attract enough people to give it a warm social buzz, without being hectic. There’s more to do than look. There’s a full schedule of activities from life drawing to game playing for all ages. (See http://bgindependentmedia.org/toledo-museum-offers-great-art-escape-over-holidays/) For the past few years, my wife and I have gone to the museum on New Year’s Day. Museums are just one of those spaces – along with baseball parks and libraries – where all I have to do is step inside and my spirits are lifted. That’s true whether it’s the first time I visit, or the Toledo Museum, a place that by now almost feels like home. I started going to museums when I was in college. I was a student at UMass in Amherst, but took lessons from a jazz trombonist at Berklee College of Music in Boston, a two-or-more-hour bus ride away. It seemed a shame just to go to the lesson and head home, so I’d go to the Museum of Fine Arts. I even had a student membership. It was convenient, only a few blocks from Berklee, and I could check my horn and satchel of music, which usually by that time also had a few newly purchased jazz albums. I’d spend a couple hours, just wandering the galleries, fixating on one or two at each visit. I’ve loved museums ever since. What’s the attraction? Museums plunge you into the texture of your times. Yes there are celebrations of kings and warriors, historic and mythological. There are also celebrations of common folks, who operate windmills, fight in wars, haul goods and grow food. And the paintings can evoke the particular weather of a day hundreds of years ago, and the rhythm of life—the dock workers at early morning, the harvesters at midday, the diners in the evening.   On repeat visits, these folks become like old friends, greeting you around each corner. There’s the tourists and their bored tour guide in Tissot’s “London Visitors,” the woman washing clothes near Francois Boucher’s “The Mill at Charenton” or the figures in Marisol’s “The Party.” This year we can greet the museum’s newest permanent resident Jaume Plensa’s “Paula” who in just a few short months has become a fixture outside the museum’s main entrance. I always meet someone I know at the museum, but more than that I enjoy the congenial company of strangers. The museum draws all sorts, young and old, visitors from far and visitors from the neighborhood. The Toledo Museum under Director Brian Kennedy has increased its efforts to open itself up to the community. Last summer’s block party was a stellar example. And its…


Will Santino’s “Examples of Anything” is a love song of words & images

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Will Kiley Santino’s new book “Examples of Anything” is easy to describe and impossible to define. The book is a progressive series of squares, each a small abstract painting with a word or phrase attached. And in that dynamic between words and images, the mystery begins. What is the relation between the lime and sky blue watercolor square and the phrase “how lawnmowers say hi”? And as the reader-viewer progresses, rhymes and echoes among squares reveal themselves, hinting at a narrative. Santino, a Bowling Green native now studying art at the University of Wisconsin Madison, will only say that there’s “a through line about intimacy and closeness to another person.” That plays out in an interior monologue of abstract illustration and elusive poetry. Santino said he wanted to create an experience that someone could take from beginning to end, or simply study a single page. The images are abstract smudges of mood. The words may be mundane – “swing set” and “bike trail.” Does the image represent the words? What kind of person would pair those words and colors? Other phrases are more evocative – “blaming autumn” and “cymbal shiver.” Others hint at narrative – “thrown out toys” and “the silence after everyone stops laughing.” Santino shows his love of language by using arcane terms that will have even highly literate readers reaching for the dictionary – heliotaxis (movement of an organism in response to sunlight); keraunomancy (divination by thunderbolts); and borborygmus (a rumbling or gurgling made by the movement of liquid in the intestines). And he’s not afraid to coin a term or two when his muse requires – “pregret” and “heartifact.” Part poetry, part painting, “Examples of Anything” is a lyrical reflection on life as it is being lived. The final words are: “All I want to say is something to you.” Then book ends with several pages of color fireworks. This is the 27-year-old’s second book. His first, from 2015 was a children’s book, “My Week,” about a boy’s adventures through his fantastic hometown, a place every much like Bowling Green. He builds a child’s fantastic world, full of fanciful creatures and places. Santino is a naturalist who explores fantastic worlds of his own creation. “My Week,” Santino said, showed him he could produce a book and self-publish it. He’s dreamed and worked at being a writer since he was a child. At 10, he said, he was always “starting stories and novels that were, in my head, 1,000 pages.” He wrote long passages of them. He drew their cities and characters in great detail. He remembered starting to draw – though he only thought of them as doodles—while watching his older brother, Ian, playing video games. He’d sit and create new worlds inspired by what he saw on the screen. He doodled incessantly, filling the margins of his stories with pictures. Those fantasies spilled out into the margins of his schoolwork, “much to the annoyance of my teachers.” In high school at Maumee Country Day, a teacher suggested he go to art school. Santino told him he was a writer. He went off to the College of Wooster to realize that dream. There he continue to conceive of, and partially finish, mammoth projects including a massive four-part novel. Then he…


Toledo Museum offers Great Art Escape over holidays

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART The Great Art Escape, a week of free performances, art activities and after-hours flashlight tours, returns to the Toledo Museum of Art Dec. 27-Jan. 1. Sponsored in part by Taylor Cadillac, the week of special events has become a holiday tradition for bringing together family, friends and holiday guests. Explore the galleries with the debut of the Toledo Museum of Art’s new app. During the Great Art Escape visitors are invited to play a treasure hunt throughout the galleries. Three temporary exhibitions organized by the Museum’s curators are sure to delight visitors of all ages. Gabriel Dawe: Plexus no. 35, on view in the Great Gallery, is an ethereal indoor rainbow created especially for the space it occupies. Mexican-born artist Gabriel Dawe’s textile installations have been seen in galleries around the world, most recently as part of an exhibition at the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C. The installation in the Great Gallery is sponsored in part by the TMA Ambassadors, a group of volunteer fundraisers. The Libbey Dolls: Fashioning the Story in Gallery 18 features 78 fashion figures depicting French styles from 1493 to 1915. The Libbey Dolls, formerly known as the Doucet Dolls, were the product of the World War I aid effort. Purchased in 1917 by Toledo Museum of Art founder Edward Drummond Libbey, the dolls’ clothing was created by Jacques Doucet. Art by great French artists like Nicolas Lancret and Louis-Léopold Boilly, as well as drawings and engravings from late 19th-century fashion publications, inspired his creations. Shakespeare’s Characters: Playing the Part in Gallery 6 marks the 400-year anniversary of the great playwright’s death. The exhibition explores The Bard’s band of characters, from the comedic to the tragic. Approximately 30 paintings, prints, sculptures and photographs bring the beloved writer’s works to life. Here’s a list of other free activities planned during the Great Art Escape: Make a Puppet, Tell a Story! Dec. 27 and 29: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Family Center Dec. 30: 3:30-8 p.m., Family Center Make a puppet in the Family Center and perform your own improvisational theater with it in the Cloister Gallery. Ask Me Hours Dec. 27-30: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Main Museum Dec. 31-Jan. 1: Noon to 4 p.m., Main Museum Look for docents wearing a red “Ask Me” button as they travel the galleries answering questions and engaging visitors in discussion about the art on view. Glassblowing Demonstrations Dec. 27-Jan. 1: 1, 2 and 3 p.m., Hot Shop Dec. 30: 7 and 8 p.m., Hot Shop Watch works of art in glass take shape before your eyes. Join Museum staff and local artists for live glassmaking demonstrations in the Glass Pavilion Hot Shop. Dutch Cabinet Organ Performance Dec. 27-Jan. 1: 1 p.m., Gallery 24 Enjoy sounds of the season on the Museum’s newly restored Dutch cabinet organ, played by local members of the American Guild of Organists. Drawing in the Galleries with a Live Model Dec. 27-Jan. 1: 1-3 p.m., Great Gallery All supplies are provided, and no experience is necessary. All ages welcome. Great Art Escape Live Performances Dec. 27-Jan. 1: 2 p.m., Peristyle Dec. 27: JP Dynasty (African drums) Dec. 28: Shakespeare’s Greatest Hits (dramatic reading) Dec. 29: Ardan Academy of Irish Dance Dec. 30: El Corazon de Mexico Ballet Folkloric Dec….


Everyone gets into the act at Arts X

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News At Arts X a surprise awaits the visitor around every corner. An actress in a shimmering gown and dramatic blond wig, steps forward to sing “Let It Go.” One of the Living Statues in the lobby of the Wolfe Center, she’s been waiting her turn as other characters have stepped forward to offer a song or monologue. Look up and there’s a pair of eyes projected overhead. Big Sister is watching. As the audience settles for a performance in the Donnell Theatre, someone says she has just posed for a Vogue cover. Two comedians come careening down the hall on the second floor of the Wolfe Center, making a harried entrance into the Heskett dance studio. Do you know there’s an art exhibit, they exclaim. It’s part of the act; we’re all part of the act. There’s always something to see and hear and do at Arts X, and that means there’s always something to miss. There’s always someone new to meet, or an old friend to greet. With the end of the semester looming, and finals and holiday festivities just ahead, artists, performers, writers and their fans took time out to celebrate. Arts X drew hundreds to the Bowling Green State University School of Art and the Wolfe Center Saturday night. The annual event is part art fair, part music and theater festival, part holiday party. Arts X organizers have been tweaking its presentation since the start. This year the Bowling Green Philharmonia offered a prelude of holiday music in the Donnell before the hubbub officially ensued. The theme “Volanti: Seeking Unknown Heights” tied in with the featured guest artists Violet and Fortuna, storytelling acrobats. They performed two shows in the Donnell, sections from their work-in-progress, “Laces.” The piece combined a disembodied voice emerging from the dark to set the scene, a house in Toledo’s Old West End. The scenes introduced the audience to the home’s inhabitants. There was a very tall man, the original owner. There were stuffed toys left behind in a trunk. There was a lesbian couple who made the property bloom with plants and company. These stories were played out with circus arts – aerial work, acrobatics, clowning, tightrope walking. In the most dramatic instances the duo of Erin Garber-Pearson and Kathleen Livingston hung high above the Donnell stage, muscles taut, twisting in light and shadow. Auxwerks, a dance company from Ann Arbor, swept through – literally in one scene – offering impressionistic transitions between the scenes. Pop Culture Professor Montana Miller added a few high flying stories of her own about her girlhood when she felt miscast as a human. She wanted to fly, and she pursued that, always falling just shy of realizing her dream. She took to the air in the Donnell using aerial acrobatics to illustrate her story. Most other activities were earthbound. The Combustible Ensemble performed Frederic Rzewski’s “Coming Together,” complete with megaphone wielding vocalists. The piece, with text from a prison letter written by 1960s radical Sam Melville, touches on the political turmoil of that time, sentiments that resonate in our own time. Contemporary music provides much of the soundtrack for Arts X, from a solo saxophone in the Wolfe lobby to the evening of performances and video in the Wankelman Gallery, offered…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar through Dec. 9

Dec. 1—The International Film Series concludes with the 1977 film “Neokanchennaia P’esa Dlia Mekhanicheskogo Pianino (An Unfinished Piece for Mechanical Piano),” directed by Nikita Mikhalkov. From Russia’s most well-known contemporary filmmaker, an intriguing story of former lovers who meet at a pre-revolutionary country estate. Casual conversations on social issues and the music of Liszt, Rachmaninoff and Donizetti supply background to a Chekhovian treatment of returning past love. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Dec. 1—Creative writing students in the bachelor of fine arts program will present their work. The reading begins at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Dec. 1—World Percussion Night features multiple styles including performances by the Taiko, Afro-Caribbean and Gamelan ensembles. The concert begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Dec. 3— BG Philharmonia will perform a Holiday Concert to kick off the 12th annual ArtsX events. The performance will begin at 4 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Dec. 3—The 12th annual ArtsX will take place from 5-9 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center and the Wolfe Center for the Arts, including the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries, where student and faculty artists and performers show off their talents to the community. The evening includes works from the College of Musical Arts, the School of Art, the Department of Theatre and Film, the Creative Writing Program, the Dance Program, and numerous other organizations, along with holiday shopping. Free Dec. 3—The Annual Faculty and Staff Exhibition opening reception will be held from 5-9 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries located in the Fine Arts Center as part of ArtsX events. Free Dec. 4-14—The Annual Faculty and Staff Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Dec. 4— The University Choral Society performs Handel’s “Messiah” with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra in the Peristyle at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St. in Toledo. The performance begins at 2 p.m. Call the Toledo Symphony Orchestra box office at 419-246-8000  for ticket information. Dec. 5—BGSU’s Wind Symphony will give a chamber concert at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Dec. 4-14—The Annual Faculty and Staff Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Dec. 5—BGSU’s Wind Symphony will give a chamber concert at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Dec. 8–Creative writing students in the BFA program will present their work. Their reading begins at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Dec. 8 and 9—Students in the BGSU Dance Program present the Footfalls Dance Concert, featuring…