Optimal Aging keynote speaker says we must take getting older into our own hands

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In my many years of covering speeches, I have never jumped up onto the speaker’s back. But in his Optimal Aging Community Fair keynote address Colin Milner, the CEO of the International Council on Active Aging, said we must continue to try new things even as we get older. So when asked for a volunteer – a male volunteer from a crowd that was predominantly female, I raised my hand. The woman sitting next to me made sure he saw it. Milner brought me on stage in Bowling Green State University’s Grand Ballroom. After a few tries – I’m 62 and not as agile as I once was – I bounded awkwardly onto his back. And with my stocky frame astride his stocky frame, he started asking the audience questions. How easy with me on his back would it be for him to climb stairs? Or play with his grandchildren?  Would he be able to catch himself if started to fall? “This is what being inactive looks like,” he said. “Taking David off is what being active looks like. Keeping our  strength as we get older, keeping our power, keeping our agility,  so that at the end of our life … we compress morbidity so that actually are spending as much of our life in optimal health as possible.” Milner said: “Between the ages 35-70, we begin to lose our function. … If we are inactive it continues to decline throughout our life. But if we remain active, we can reduce that loss of function significantly.” During that period we lose 50 percent of our strength. “That’s one of the reasons we decline.” So having me on his back was to simulate that loss of strength, or maybe it’s just his way of exercising. Aging goes beyond the physical. The international expert who has said he wants to change the face of aging, explained how people need to stay mentally active and socially active, and how all these factors interconnect. He showed images of an outdoor exercise session in Japan where people stay around to socialize after they’ve completed their tai chi. He touted a new, upscale looking retirement community that’s hosting camps and activities for children. He showed a video of a wizened, wiry gent scaling an ancient ruin. He flashed a slide of a man who ran marathons at 100, and another…


BG community nudged toward more inclusiveness

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Crowding around the tables at the library Thursday were people of white privilege, people of color, and people who love who they choose to. At one table in the back of the room were four people of different backgrounds with one common link – discomfort and discrimination in Bowling Green. Ayanna Byers, a BGSU graduate student from Pittsburgh, had been in the city for less than three weeks. Longtime Bowling Green residents were telling her about a nearby community, when Byers asked if it was a “sundown town.” The white women at the table didn’t understand, until Byers explained. “It’s a town where if you’re a person of color you shouldn’t be there after sundown.” As a black woman, Byers said she is accustomed to being followed around stores by shop employees. “I’m so used to things happening,” she said, so sometimes she doesn’t even realize it at first. She has only ventured off campus twice since arriving in the city, the first time to an ice cream shop. She was standing at the counter to order, when a white woman and her children pushed in front of her. “It still happens,” Byers said. Sometimes it’s subtle, and impossible to prove. “But you feel it in your gut,” said another person at the table, Krishna Han, who is from Cambodia. “I never knew racism till I came to this country,” said Han, whose skin is brown and who speaks English as his third language. Han said Bowling Green is much more inclusive than a lot of small American cities, but there is room for improvement. At the other end of the table was a white lesbian couple, who told of a less than welcoming experience when they moved to Bowling Green last year. The couple said a neighbor left notes with the words “Dike” and “Lesbo” for them, and tried to injure their dog by putting rat poison in their backyard. The couple, Jacqueline Adams and Kacey Long, reported the threats. They ended up moving to a different home during their first semester in the city – and found a very supportive landlord and neighborhood. “Sometimes you get that one rotten neighbor,” Adams said. “We don’t let one person define how we feel about everyone.” Those four were among about 60 people who gathered Thursday to discuss diversity and inclusion in the…


Once ordinary skills now extraordinary at the fair

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   For more than 140 years at the Wood County Fair, people have been showing off their prowess at baking and sewing. The skills exhibited were once a way of life, a necessity. Now, they are uncommon –and draw “oooohs” and “aaaaahs” from those who have never stitched up a bodice or never baked up a rhubarb pie. Judy Arps and her daughter, Janeen Shipp, both of Haskins, were admiring the quilting entries Wednesday at the fair when asked if either of them bake or sew. Arps cracked a smile, and Shipp rolled her eyes. “We had to learn it out of necessity growing up,” said Arps, who learned to sew from her mom. “If I wanted more than one dress, I had to sew it.” Arps became so skilled that she sewed her prom dress and her wedding dress. She is now passing on those skills to her granddaughter. Arps also excels in the kitchen, specializing in baking bread and the secret family recipe for coffee cake. “She taught me how to can,” Shipp said. That was also a necessity when Arps was growing up. Shipp has carried on the tradition, canning jams, fruits, green beans, tomatoes, red beets and pickles. “If you can put it in a can, you can can it,” Shipp said, echoing her mom’s words to her. Cooking is a different issue, one that Arps admits she lets slide some days. “I can go get a sandwich faster than I can turn the oven on.” Denise Waterfield, of Grand Rapids, also learned her sewing skills at an early age – though not from her mom. “I have a picture of when I was 9 years old, sitting on the couch opening an embroidery kit for Christmas,” Waterfield said. She was hooked. “My grandmothers were seamstresses, knitters and milliners. I think it’s in the genes.” Waterfield walked through the display cases at the fair pointing out her handful of ribbons earned for embroidery, lace work, quilting, sewing a stuffed animal and a coin purse. The secret, she said, is patience. That’s something she knows a lot about, since during the school year Waterfield is a bus driver for Bowling Green City Schools. Betty Whitacre, of Bowling Green, said she’s too short on patience to handquilt, but she loves quilting by machine. “My mom used to quilt at the church…


Eden Boutique offers fashion paradise in downtown BG

By DAVID DUPONT BG INDEPENDENT NEWS A shopping trip for clothes that left Kati Thompson dissatisfied provided the impetus to launch her new business. Eden Fashion Boutique, 186 S. Main St., Bowling Green, will mark its grand opening with a ribbon cutting Friday at 11:30 a.m. The shop will feature contemporary women’s clothing and accessories, including the active leisure line Albion. Thompson said Eden will be the exclusive Ohio dealer for the line. Still Thompson envisions her shop as something more. She wants Eden Boutique to be “a place for all women to gather and have fun and feel love. I know that has nothing to do with clothes, but I just want to be that space, that positive atmosphere.” That means having a spacious interior that not only displays the clothing well, but is easy to move around in. Thompson and her husband, Dave Thompson, have six children, including two foster kids. Thompson said she knows what it’s like to try to move around a shop with a stroller. She also made sure the restroom can accommodate a mother with children. Also, “I wanted to bring an opportunity for women of all sizes to shop together.” When Thompson went out to Los Angeles to purchase inventory, she brought a team – her sister and a couple friends. “Each of us have different body types.” They could looked at the clothing differently. So they may say: “That looks cute on you, but not on me.” The stock includes a large selection of denim, so women can find just the jeans that fit just right. “I tried to bring in a lot of unique fabrics and patterns, not something you can pick up any store in the mall,” she said. “The premise is we’ll only have a limited number of items. When it’s gone, it’s gone, so everyone in town isn’t walking around wearing the same thing.” That’s exactly what she was looking for that she didn’t find earlier this year. A 2004 marketing graduate from Bowling Green State University, she envisioned what the perfect shop for her would be. “I wanted to come into a space that was well curated with a unique selection of items, not something everyone in town would have, and a place where the inventory would change regularly.” Thompson said she knew she wanted to be in the 100 block of South Main, and on the…


Anti-Wicks survey calls have a nasty ring to them

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The campaign for the State House District 3 seat has already taken a nasty turn. Residents have received calls by a Texas-based research firm that started as a straight-forward election survey until it started discussing the race between Democrat Kelly Wicks and Republican Theresa Charters Gavarone. Then, said Rick Busselle, a local resident who received a call, the questions turned negative. Busselle, who sometimes teaches surveying, said he only continuing listening out of professional interest. The caller asked a series of questions and inquired if this made the respondent more or less likely to support one of the two candidates. Starting with Wicks, the caller cited the candidate’s support for a higher federal minimum wage, adding the contention that it would cost jobs and kill the economy, a highly debatable conclusion. Noting Wicks’ support for Planned Parenthood, the caller referenced a discredited story that the women’s health service sold body parts from aborted fetuses. When it asked about Gavarone’s positions, the spin was all positive. Wicks said he heard about the calls from people reporting they’d been called “and disgusted by the Trump-style tactics coming from our new state representative.” Wicks, who owns Grounds for Thought coffee shop with his wife, Laura, said he wasn’t surprised by the turn, though that it came so early was a little surprising. “In two previous campaigns have been subject to lies innuendo about myself, my family, the shop,” he said. Wicks has previously run for the State House and last year for Bowling Green mayor. The calls are “trotting out” more of the same, he said. Wicks said that this time he decided “to stand up” and go public with his complaints. He’s been working too hard for the community to let it pass. “This is one of the reasons people are disgusted with politics, and why it’s so hard to get good people to run for office.” While not wanting to justify the misinformation in the calls, Wicks asserted that he does support mass transportation because it was good for people, communities and business. As to Planned Parenthood, he said: “Planned Parenthood provides vital work in this community. It’s unconscionable when Ohio has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the country for Republicans to work to shut down health clinics that people need to solve this problem.” For her part, Theresa Charters Gavarone said…


What to say to kids about so much violence? BG school district offers help

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Some Bowling Green parents are struggling with how to explain the recent violence in the world to their children. Though surrounded by cornfields and isolated from much of the turmoil in the world, the children see images and hear stories of the violence. So to help families discuss these difficult topics, a community meeting will be held Aug. 11. The meeting was organized after some parents expressed their concerns about how to talk with their children about incidents like the shootings in the Orlando night club or the terror attacks in France. “A couple moms were getting their hair done, and talking about ‘I don’t know what to tell my kids,’” Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci said. Scruci saw an opening for the schools to help. “If we can provide some resources,” he said. “We want to give our families a chance to ask questions. ‘What should we say? What shouldn’t we say?’” The school district is partnering with the Not In Our Town organization to host a community discussion on Aug. 11 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., in the Performing Arts Center Lobby at Bowling Green High School. The discussion will be targeted for the adults in children’s lives, and may not be appropriate for children themselves. Heather Sayler, an organizer of the Not In Our Town organization, said it is hoped that some people with counseling expertise will be able to speak at the meeting. “People who work with children on a daily basis, or when they are in crisis,” she said. Social media makes it almost impossible for youth to avoid news of violence here in the U.S. and around the world. The news lately has been full of stories about terror attacks in Europe and Asia, mass shootings here in the U.S., the killings of black men by police, and the killings of police trying to protect their communities. “The purpose of the meeting is to share ideas of how to talk to your children about the violence, answer any  questions you may have, and to give resources for parents to use to help their children better understand and feel safe,” the school district said in a press release about the event.  


Optimal Aging panel gets personal about facing challenges

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Optimal Aging Community Fair was all about getting older while remaining healthy in body and mind. Monday’s fair was the first major public event for Bowling Green State University’s newly launched Optimal Aging Institute. For luncheon speakers the event, the Wood County Committee on Aging put together of panel of local residents who have faced the kind of challenges people encounter as they age. Denise Niese, executive director of the committee, said it was not hard to single out those selected. Nancy Wright, Tim Tegge and Dr. Richard Barker are all well known in the community and have bounced back from challenges that would set others back on their heels. A video of Nora Liu, a retired university women’s basketball coach, was also shown.  Though in assisted living herself, she continues to lead exercise classes. Wright, of Grand Rapids, helped her husband run a funeral home and is a very active community volunteer. Her moment of truth came on Feb. 11, 1993, when she wasn’t feeling well and had her husband bring her to the emergency room at Wood County Hospital. There the emergency room doctor missed the signs of a heart attack because no one expects a 50-year-old woman to have a heart attack. The error was caught. She received the proper treatment. Wright not only lived to tell about it, but to preach about her experience, especially to women who may mistakenly think they are not at risk of a heart attack. Wright said that she learned that after menopause women’s risk of heart attack is the same as men’s. She also has a family history of heart disease. It killed her father, and all four of her brothers have heart problems. Tegge, who was born in 1964, was, in his words, “the rookie” on the panel.  He’s been dealing since he was a child with a condition many experience late in life. He had a form of early onset macular degeneration, “which means I have a lot of blind spots.” Maybe one of the biggest, he said, was that he was at the age that he’d be asked to be on the panel. Tegge related how he felt after being laid off that he’d found the perfect job as the executive director of the Wood County United Way. His skills were a match, but then he learned that the outgoing…


Wood County Fair – fried up and put on a stick

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Forget fancy celebrity chefs. They’ve got nothing on fair food vendors who have figured out how to deep fry just about any food and put it on a stick for the convenience of mobile fairgoers. Pure genius. Sure, there’s more to the Wood County Fair than food. But few can walk through the gates without loading up on their annual favorites for the week. On the first day of the fair Monday, Nancy Grimm, Bowling Green, couldn’t walk past Mike’s Cheese Shack, where she placed her first order of the week for cheese curds. For those not familiar with fair food, that’s cheese cubes drenched in batter then deep-fried. “They’re soooo good,” Grimm said. “They are chewy and cheesey.” If eaten when still warm, the cheese stretches several inches. “I don’t know where else to get them,” Grimm said, so she gets at least a couple orders each fair week. Any guilt with that deep fried cheese? “Oh, no,” she said, walking away with her steaming hot curds. A few trailers away, Pat Snyder said she considered the cheese curds but decided on a corn dog (on a stick, of course) instead. “I can’t have that much grease in this heat,” she said of the fried cheese. “It’s a treat I don’t get very often,” Snyder said of the corn dog. “It brings back memories” of past fairs. Like many, Snyder spends much of her week at the fair. So she has to eat fair food in moderation. Her annual fare usually includes a Belgium waffle, Italian sausage and French fries or onion rings. “I try to choose one item a day.” The competition for hungry fairgoers is fierce. There’s good old farm food, like the butter drenched roasted corn on the cob, pork-a-lean sandwiches and burgers by the Beef Producers.  There’s food from south of the border, like tamales and “walking tacos” in a bag – since tacos don’t work well on a stick. “Taco Dave’s” is the mainstay for several of the county fair fire marshals, who are at the fair all week long. “We have to have Taco Dave’s all week,” said Tom Bentley. The draw is both Dave and his tacos, Bentley said. Fire marshal Randy Tolles also likes to pull up his chair at the Liberty Township food booth, where meals can be topped off with pie….


BG Council agrees on trash bin compromise

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   After months of talking trash, Bowling Green City Council took action Monday evening on a new garbage collection ordinance. The new rules require garbage bins to be stored within enclosed areas, in side or back yards, with lids closed. The ordinance was too tough for some, too lenient for others – but was passed as a compromise by unanimous vote. That common ground was recognized by council member Bob McOmber as a distinct difference between the nation’s government and communities like Bowling Green. “Not a darn thing gets done because no one will compromise,” McOmber said of federal government. “This legislation approximately splits the difference,” he said, noting that council members Daniel Gordon, Sandy Rowland and John Zanfardino wanted the ordinance to be stricter, while members Theresa Charters Gavarone, Mike Aspacher and Bruce Jeffers would have preferred looser rules. “This really is a compromise solution,” McOmber said. Rowland said she would have preferred tougher rules. “I think Bowling Green deserves better,” she said, voicing her dislike of trash bins sitting on the side of homes. “We don’t need to set the goals so low.” But Gordon said any change is progress. “It is the compromise that we worked out,” he said. “It’s a concrete improvement for residents of Bowling Green.” Council members also unanimously agreed Monday evening that the penalty for not following the ordinance will not result in the trash bins being confiscated by the city. Instead, civil infractions will be issued and fines will be levied. It was decided confiscating trash bins would be too labor intensive and could result in further trash violations by the residents. “We could be creating another problem,” Rowland said. The first infraction would result in a warning, the second a $25 fine, the third a $50 fine, and the fourth a $100 fine. “I like the fact that it’s incremental,” Zanfardino said. If the fines are not paid at leased homes by the renters, the fine will then shift over to the landlord. Aspacher said that city administration is planning an educational effort for citizens, which is hoped to create compliance. “We don’t really want to cite anyone,” he said. Waivers may be granted to people who apply, who have true hardships in complying. Council also agreed unanimously to speed up the timetable on the ordinance and give it second and third readings Monday…


BG Council needs new member – applications due in 6 days

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green City Council has an open seat and is looking for a Fourth Ward resident to fill it. Anyone interested has six days to submit a resume, and 13 days to prepare a speech. On Friday, Theresa Charters Gavarone submitted her letter of resignation as Fourth Ward council member in order to take her new appointment as state representative. So anyone interested in filling her council position has until Aug. 8 at 4:30 p.m. to submit a letter of interest and a resume to the clerk of city council, Kay Scherreik. The information can be emailed to kay.scherreik@bgohio.org or sent by mail to 304 N. Church St., Bowling Green. Applicants will then be asked to give a brief presentation before City Council’s Committee of the Whole on Aug. 15, at 6 p.m., in the council chambers. The presentations will be limited to about five minutes. City Council may then vote during its 7 p.m. meeting, also on Aug. 15, to select a person to fill the Fourth Ward seat. Council President Mike Aspacher thanked Charters Gavarone for her service to the city. “Obviously, we’re very thankful of Theresa’s contribution,” he said during Monday’s council meeting. Charters Gavarone was not at Monday’s meeting, but stated in her resignation letter that she would assist in the transition process for a new Fourth Ward council member. “In order to ease the transition, I would be happy to meet with you and any potential candidates for the council seat,” she wrote. “Working with each of you and serving the people of Bowling Green in this capacity has provided valuable experience that will strengthen my position as a state representative when I am sworn into office on Aug. 2, 2016,” Charters Gavarone wrote. “I am very grateful to have been part of a team that created nearly 1,000 jobs and addressed numerous concerns for our residents over the past 2 ½ years,” she wrote. “It’s been a pleasure working with you on City Council and I look forward to continuing that relationship as I address the concerns of Wood County in Columbus.”    


Diana Bibler wins People’s Choice Award as NowOH exhibit closes at BGSU (updated)

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Diana Bibler’s “Heart Breaking” got some love from visitors to the annual NowOH art exhibit at Bowling Green State University. Bibler’s acrylic painting won the show’s People’s Choice Award. The honor was announced Sunday after the last day of the show’s two-week run. Artists arrived at the galleries in the Fine Arts Center to collect their work. More than 100 ballots were cast for People’s Choice. “Heart Breaking” was an outgrowth of a family calamity. Bibler’s family had a house fire. In the aftermath, a 90-gallon fish tank was neglected and just kept freezing and thawing. They finally just “shoved it outside” where the bright plastic plants froze inside ice crystals. That was the image that inspired Bibler’s vivid abstraction. The title “Heart Breaking” refers, in part to the fire, but was as much inspired by viewer’s reactions to the art. “It reflects the mood you get from the painting,” Bibler said. Bibler, a graduate of Bowhser High School in Toledo, will be in her third year as a 3-D art major at BGSU. Having been encouraged to be creative by her mother, Bibler has known since age 5 that she wanted to be an artist. She’s already won awards for her felted sculpture “Hero.” She entered the painting into NowOH as a way of getting more visibility for her work, and winning People’s Choice, she said, gives her confidence as she moves forward in her career. BGSU Gallery Director Jacqueline Nathan said that was more than in the previous eight shows, and in line with what she saw as an uptick in attendance. “Every day we were open we had a pretty good number of visitors, and they were enthusiastic,” Nathan said. The Ninth Northwest Ohio Community Art Exhibition exhibit features the work of 56 area artists, from both the university and the community. Entry into NowOH is open to all artists who live in 12 Northwest Ohio counties. All work submitted is included. “This all came as a result of a class in arts administration,” Nathan said. “They wanted to do something to support local artists, and this is the result.” The exhibit draws both artists from the community and the university, especially students. For students, she said, the show “is a great line on their resume.” Having the community and campus come together adds to the event. “It makes the show more exciting to…


Wood County asked to join the ‘Big Fix’ for dogs

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Wood County has been asked to join the “Big Fix” program to spay and neuter dogs. The pilot program in Lucas County last year resulted in more than 400 dogs being fixed, according to Steve Serchuk, a volunteer with the program. “It will make the county safer,” Serchuk told the Wood County Commissioners last week. “It will save the county money. It will lead to more people licensing their pets.” Serchuk said Lucas County started the spay-neuter program after determining that almost one-third of the 57,617 licensed dogs in the county were not fixed. “We were blown away,” he said. So Lucas County, Toledo and the Toledo Community Foundation chipped in $9,000 each to reach out to the areas with the highest population of dogs that hadn’t been spayed or neutered. The goal was to fix 350 dogs – but the program exceeded expectations and 409 dogs were spayed or neutered. The success led Lucas County to apply for a matching grant of $25,000, and ask Wood County to join the project by chipping in $7,500 to have the amount matched by the grant. Wood County has approximately 21,000 licensed dogs. The funding would provide for 200 to 225 dogs being fixed. Serchuk said the county would benefit from more dogs being fixed. He presented the following information: 60 to 90 percent of dog attacks involve intact male dogs. Spayed and neutered dogs are less likely to roam and their behavior is better. “This will deal with the cause of pet overpopulation, not the result,” he said. The average cost to fix a dog ranges from $100 to $250, with the costs being highest for large female dogs. “People will spay and neuter their dogs if the cost is cheap enough,” Serchuk said. “It’s not a macho thing. They don’t have the money.” The average cost to fix a dog with Humane Ohio is $75. Most people who take their dogs to veterinarians and can afford the cost, already have their dogs spayed or neutered, he told the county commissioners. This program is for those who don’t have the money to spare. “It’s one less dog that can reproduce. It’s one less dog that is probably going to roam,” Serchuk said. Ohio allows counties to charge more for licenses for unfixed dogs, but neither Wood nor Lucas counties have opted to do…


Audits to save BG homes money and energy

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG  Independent News   Thousands of Bowling Green homes are letting cool air escape in the summer and heat seep out in the winter. So Columbia Gas is giving every homeowner, landlord and renter a chance to keep the air in their houses and money in their pockets. Bowling Green residents are being offered home energy audits for $20 by Columbia Gas, to identify how homes can be made more energy efficient. And if the residents agree to weatherization upgrades, the most they will pay per home is $300. “It’s because of Bowling Green’s interest in energy efficiency,” Jill McGinn, of Columbia Gas, explained last week to the Bowling Green Kiwanis Club. “Everyone in Bowling Green is eligible.” The subsidies through the program will pay for up to $4,000 in home improvements, but the residents will pay a fraction of that. “The most any Bowling Green resident will pay is $300,” McGinn said. “Those are some pretty huge and substantial savings.” The energy audits take about three hours to complete. An added bonus, McGinn said, is that experts also look for safety problems. McGinn knows all about that, since when she had an energy audit done on her home, it found a gas leak in her basement. “Safety is Columbia Gas’ first priority,” she said. The audits often discover leaks at gas line joints or at the appliance hook ups. The next priority is energy efficiency. The homes likely to benefit the most from the audits are those built before 1975, many which use more than 1,000 cubic feet of gas annually. Those homes are often found with very inefficient furnaces, and insulation that has settled over the years and no longer fills up space between the walls. “We run into a lot of houses that have no insulation whatsoever,” McGinn said of some of the older homes. Bowling Green resident Neocles Leontis is a believer in the audits as a way to say energy and money. “It’s a way to keep more of our money in our pockets and in our community,” he said. Leontis thought he was being smart years ago by replacing windows in his century old home. But the energy audit showed the air inside his home escaping through cracks in the basement and around windows. Many homes need thousands of dollars in upgrades to make them energy efficient, McGinn said. But…


The Sheepdogs: Rain or shine rockers

DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Sheepdogs proved their rock ‘n’ roll mettle at last year’s Black Swamp Arts Festival. They took the stage as the closing act Friday night in a downpour that would have scared off many other artists. The Canadian quintet rocked out in the rain for a hard core crowd of several hundred that danced in the front of the stage, seeking refuge from the storm in the unrelenting backbeat and driving guitars. That’s just part of the deal when you’re a traveling rock ‘n’ roll band, said Ewan Currie, the lead singer and songwriter. “There’s a lot of sweat equity, a lot of travel, a lot of sucking it up… playing 10 shows in 10 days in unpredictable weather. That’s the price you pay for following the dream and playing in a rock ’n’ roll band.” The Sheepdogs will return to the festival this year as the Saturday night closing headliner. Currie hopes for better weather, but is ready to deliver “a good dose of rock ’n’ roll.” “We’ll come out with guns blazing,” he said. The festival runs Friday, Sept. 9. through Sunday, Sept. 11, in downtown Bowling Green. The band hasn’t had any off time since it last passed through Bowling Green. The Sheepdogs have been logging the miles in a tour to promote its latest album “Future Nostalgia.” The BG stop was at the beginning of a tour that will extend into November. That’s running close to 300 shows. “That’s missing a lot of weddings and other mundane life things,” Currie said. That’s being a rock ’n’ roll band. “The touring rock ’n’ roll band in 2016, we’re like the blue collar, working class musicians in a way,” he said. The music gets hardly any air play or coverage. “We’re almost like a boutique commodity.” But this is what Currie, his brother Shamus Currie, who plays keyboards and trombone, and bassist Ryan Gullen nd drummer Sam Corbett dreamed of growing up in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. They ditched their school band instruments, and learned rock listening to Creedence Clearwater Revival, The Beatles, The Kinks and other 1970s groups popular in their parents’ youth. Starting as teenagers they wrote their own songs, but also played a lot of covers to learn all the tricks and turns of the trade. Those attempts at imitation morphed into their own sound. Blending two bands, The Sheep and The…


Lt. Gov. makes it her business to help Ohio businesses

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor was right at home talking to the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce members, sharing their disdain for governmental red tape that bogs down businesses. “I was with you, fighting the bureaucracy,” Taylor said, speaking of her time as a CPA prior to entering government. That frustration led her to cross to the other side. “I discovered what I really wanted to do was serve,” Taylor said during the mid-year chamber luncheon this past week. “I wanted to be a part of writing the laws.” She started out small, running for a position in city government, then worked her way up to state representative, then state auditor, and finally to her current position as lieutenant governor under John Kasich. In government, Taylor said, she has been able to fight for taxpayers, bringing about regulatory reform. “The status quo is never acceptable for me. We hold every state governmental agency responsible for their regulatory impact on business,” she said. “If the answer is – ‘That’s what we did before’ – that is not acceptable.” Taylor described her approach as a “common sense” strategy, to look at how regulations such as those protecting the environment were affecting businesses. State rules were reviewed with a special emphasis on looking at the impact on business, she said. That analysis led to 60 percent of the rules affecting businesses being rescinded or amended, Taylor said. “We have to understand, what we do in government does affect business and job creation,” she said. Consequently, Ohio’s unemployment is down and wages are rising faster than the national average, Taylor said. “Everywhere we go, we are using common sense.” As lieutenant governor, Taylor sees her other role as making a sales pitch for Ohio. “My responsibility is to sell Ohio.” And that can be a tough job sometimes. “We don’t have a beach.” If people examine Ohio’s work record, they often take a second look at the state. “Once you get here, what a wonderful place it is to live,” she said. “They are taking a serious look at us and making decisions to come to our state.” But Ohio faces some challenges, like the opiate/heroin crisis, and infrastructure costs above and below ground, Taylor said. “We have made progress, but there is more work to do,” she said of the opiate issue. Roads, water and sewer…