BGSU Jazz Week headliner Dayna Stephens has a musical vision all his own

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News Saxophonist and composer Dayna Stephens wants students to know that  all the technical information and trickery they are learning are just tools. Those tools need to be applied “to more accurately, more clearly, telling whatever story they have inside  of them.” The New York-based musician will visit Bowling Green State University next week as the headliner for Jazz Week. He’ll play with the jazz faculty on Thursday at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall and on Friday at with the Jazz Lab Band  I in Kobacker Hall. Thursday’s show is free. Friday’s concert is a ticketed event. Asked during a telephone interview what he tries to convey to students, he said he tells them “not to focus too much on the technique.” They need to tell  “an engaging story” in “a unique voice.” Stephenson said he forged his own voice — a burnished, well ripened sound — by listening to saxophonists as diverse as swing legend Lester Young and jazz fusion master Michael Brecker.  “I love them both,” he said. “Having those two big influences is bound to produce something a little different.” Stephens, 40, has been recognized by Downbeat magazine as one of the music’s Rising Stars. David Bixler, the director of jazz studies at BGSU, said that he invited Stephens to campus on the recommendation of a student, though has also heard with Stephens perform shows with pianists Kenny Barron and Fred Hersch.  Stephens’ ears are tuned to the other musicians he’s working with regardless of what instruments they play or whether they are masters such as pianist Barron or players younger than himself. “I’m still trying to understand what drummers do,” he said. “The attempt will also lead to unique ways of expressing myself.” Known as a saxophonist, he has also performed professionally as a bassist.  That’s been essential to his approach. “Having people relying on your beat makes your sense of rhythm stronger.” That firm sense of time is important whether he’s in the rhythm section or the frontline. Also playing bass  taught him the value of using simpler melodic ideas. “You can’t play everything you play on a saxophone.” Listening has been at the core of his musical growth….


Suicide numbers often see spike during springtime

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Springtime is the season of flowers, sunshine, warmer temperatures – and suicides. Twenty years of statistics collected by the Wood County Suicide Prevention Coalition show the highest rate of suicides is seen in April. Since 1999, there have been 26 suicides recorded in the county during the month of April, compared to the lowest number of nine during the month of December. Knowing this, the coalition members talked recently about increasing the public service announcements about suicide as spring approaches. It is believed that the seasonal changes that bring many people out of winter doldrums may work against those with severe depression. To some, springtime is believed to provide the boost of energy required for executing a suicide plan. To people with severe depression, the contrast between a blooming world and the barren inner life of the clinically depressed can be too much for them to bear. Some researchers note that the sunlight-driven changes in levels of the feel-good chemical serotonin may make people more aggressive and, if they are depressed, they could direct that aggression at themselves. The Wood County Suicide Prevention Coalition is also aware that more men than women take their lives. Last year, of the 18 suicides reported in the county, only one was a woman. So the organization talked about promoting the “Man Therapy” campaign. The online campaign, at mantherapy.org, was created in response to the realization that nationally men take their lives through suicide four times more often than women. Using humor, the website offers men a 20-question “head inspection.” It then provides tips on reducing stress and getting active. Videos show testimonials by other men talking about their experiences with depression, and how to handle difficult emotions. The coalition members also talked about the “Momo challenge,” being reported nationally by parents. Hackers have reportedly been able to insert images into kids cartoons on YouTube. The images show a creepy woman encouraging children to harm themselves, and threatens to harm their parents if the children say anything to them. Coalition members suggested that parents talk to their children about the possibility of that image popping up during cartoons on YouTube. In an effort to reach out to…


Debunking the myths about running for elected office

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Candidates running for office need name recognition, a 30-second porch speech and a good pair of walking shoes. Dr. Melissa Miller, political science professor at Bowling Green State University, presented a program Tuesday on “Gotta Run: Taking the mystery out of running for office.” She spoke to a crowded room of potential candidates and interested citizens, where tables had to be removed to make space for more people. “You’re here tonight because you care about democracy,” Miller said. But running for office can be a frightening prospect. Many potential candidates fear that throwing their hats into the ring may cost too much money, demand too much time, and require them to make long-winded speeches. It’s those fears that might lead to the more than 40 percent of state legislature races in the nation going uncontested each election, Miller said. “That’s not so good for democracy,” she said. So Miller tried to debunk several myths surrounding running for office. Myth: Running for office is so expensive that only the rich can afford to do so. False. While more than $1 billion was spent on the last presidential races in the U.S., running for local offices takes modest budgets in most cases. The only fee for filing with the board of elections to be a candidate is between $30 and $80, depending on the position being run for. And most candidates for local offices don’t break the bank on running. “You can get a campaign up and running with a few thousand dollars,” Miller said. Miller talks about how to campaign for office. Myth: Running for office is too complicated. “Truth be told, it’s a little complicated,” Miller confided. Candidates need to know their local government structures. For example, in Bowling Green the City Council candidate races are partisan and based on wards. In Perrysburg, the council races are non-partisan and citywide. Some have primaries, some do not. And different communities have different filing deadlines. But all a candidate needs to know can be found at the Wood County Board of Elections. “Go to your county’s board of elections,” Miller said. “There’s no substitute for talking with professionals at the board of elections.” Myth: It…


BGSU dining service growing its own produce with new hydroponics system

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News When students returned to campus in the chill of winter — so cold classes were canceled for two days — they still could get a taste fresh greens harvested on campus. Over Winter Session, a five-tower hydroponic growing system  was installed in Bowling Green State University’s Oaks Dining Center. Lettuce grown in the dead of winter was livening up the menu in the vegan-friendly Shoots station in the Oaks. Mike Paulus, director of dining services, planted the seed for the project last October. It serves a double function, he said. The sustainable system teaches students about being socially responsible, and it helps keep the cost down for dining services — the cost of the system is expected to be recouped by savings on food costs. Paige Wagner, campus dietician and teaching kitchen coordinator, said once the idea was suggested, she and Dave Beaverson, facilities director, researched systems and came back with a plan of action. The five towers were installed over Winter Session. Within a couple weeks, Wagner was harvesting lettuce, about 30 cups worth. She said she expects to get 30 harvests over the course of the semester. That’s a conservative estimate. Lettuce is the first to come in, but there are herbs in the works as well as peppers and cherry tomatoes.  Produce grows twice as fast as usual in the system. She said they are also looking at investing in a vining system to grow full size tomatoes, an in-demand ingredient.  “That’s something we’ll invest in once we see how all this goes,” she said.… Lettuce was the first, Wagner said, because “it’s the easiest one to grow and the hardest one to kill.” The system has no soil. A sponge keeps the plants’ roots moist, and that means the system consumes only a tenth of the water traditional farming does.  With a 10-gallon tank for each tower, that means no regular watering, just a top-off now and then. Wagner said she does have to regularly check the pH level of the system to make sure it stays in the slightly acidic range, 5.5-6, that the plants prefer. Wagner documents the plants’ growth and how much they’re yielding as well as…


Searching for solutions to opioid crisis – 17 died from overdoses last year in county

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Seventeen Wood County residents died last year from opioid overdoses. Two days before a recent community forum on opioid addiction, Wood County Commissioner Ted Bowlus went to the funeral visitation for 33-year-old man killed by opioids. “He came from a good family. His mother was a nurse,” Bowlus said. “It just goes to show it can happen to anybody,” regardless of their age, education, socio-economic situation. “We need the public, we need the community, we need the county in helping us fight this battle,” Bowlus said as he talked about the crisis that kills 130 people each day in the U.S. The community meeting on opioid addiction, held at First United Methodist Church in Bowling Green, featured speakers who try to prevent addiction, those who work with addicts, and those who decide the fate of addicts in court. Preventing addiction Kyle Clark and Milan Karna addressed the prevention efforts in the county – stressing that addiction is not a moral failing but rather a chronic brain disease. “Addiction is an epidemic in our county and is best addressed through prevention,” Clark said. “Youth and adolescent programs are more important than ever before.” Through the Wood County Educational Service Centers’ Prevention Coalition, efforts are made to delay experimentation with drugs by local youths. The older they are, the more responsible decisions they can make as their brains develop, Clark said. So programs are offered to try to decrease the availability of drugs, alcohol and cigarettes, while increasing the education to kids about the harm these items can cause, Clark said. For the past 16 years, surveys conducted in Wood County schools show some success with students. For example, in the most recent survey, 95.7 percent of fifth through 12th grade students said they had been drug free in the last 30 days. “That’s because prevention works,” Clark said. For every $1 spent on prevention, $67 are saved, Milan said. “The cost of addiction is really quite staggering,” he said. Parents need to play a role in prevention, Milan added. “A critical part of this is truly parents talking to their kids about drugs,” he said. Working with addicts Belinda Brooks works with local addicts…



Plastic bag ban urged – before state yanks right to do so

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Green-minded students challenged Bowling Green Monday evening to live up to its environmentally conscious reputation. During the second public meeting to collect comments on a possible ban or fee on single-use plastic bags, seven citizens spoke – six in favor of a ban and one with a host of questions. Listening were members of the City Council Community Improvement Committee made up of Mark Hollenbaugh, Bill Herald and John Zanfardino. The Bowling Green State University students and graduates listed off other communities that have already adopted measures to stop the proliferation of single-use plastic bags. On the coasts, in San Francisco, Boston and Seattle, plastic bag bans are already in place. The rules differ depending on the city, explained Amelia Reed. Some still allow plastic bags for produce and meat products – but they have to be made of a high percentage of recycled plastic. Some cities have gone further and have enacted 5 cent paper bag taxes to encourage shoppers to bring cloth bags. The European Union recently voted to ban single-use plastic bags by 2021, according to environmental science student Ross Martin. “If an entire continent can do it, the city of Bowling Green and the university can do it,” Martin said. If not, Bowling Green will continue to be a part of the problem, he added. “We need to follow the example of our friends across the pond,” Martin said. Martin suggested that the ban cover all businesses, not just the big box stores. He questioned the concern by businesses that customers will go elsewhere to shop if Bowling Green businesses no longer have plastic bags. BGSU is already working to implement a single-use plastic bag ban, according to Tatiana Grazos. Last spring, more than 1,000 signatures from students and staff were collected to request a plastic bag ban. The effort was supported by the university, and the bags will be phased out by spring of 2020. The university is coming up with alternatives for students – such as bags made with 85 percent recyclable material, Grazos said. “I implore the city of Bowling Green to implement a plastic ban,” not only for big box stores, but for all businesses,…


BGHS grad finds perfect fit at regimented West Point

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News When many of his fellow high school graduates couldn’t wait to shed the routine of school and experiment with new-found freedoms, Bradley Krupp went the other route – immersing himself in the regimented demands of West Point military academy. When his fellow graduates slept through their morning college classes, Krupp was up every morning at 6:50 a.m., in formation – already shaved and in his uniform – whether cold, hot, rain or shine. “Then you wake up and you do it again,” Krupp said. Krupp, a 2015 graduate of Bowling Green High School, and the son of Dave and Denise Krupp, is the commander of his company at West Point. He is scheduled to graduate from West Point in May with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. Krupp chose West Point, not because of a long family military history, but rather in an effort to find a life-long purpose. “I thought maybe it would be a good way to find a little bit more purpose and do something worthwhile,” he said recently on his drive back to West Point after a visit back home to Bowling Green. “It was as much a realization that it was always what I was looking for.” West Point chose Krupp because of his ACT score, his leadership skills that already showed in high school, and his physical fitness. “They are fairly specific in what they want,” Krupp said. “You can be smart, but you may not be a leader. They want to make sure you show up fit, smart and ready to perform.” It was a perfect match. “I like it. I like schedules. I like knowing what I am doing most days,” with workouts at the same time, classes at the same time, meals at the same time and in the same place with assigned seats. Though it’s a mindless process to put on his uniform each day, Krupp does occasionally miss the freedom of choice. “I do miss normal people clothes,” he said. “But any complaint I have is minor.” Self-disciplined Krupp doesn’t mind routine – even though it means a strict schedule of studying, workouts, weekend trainings, and limited breaks from West Point. “You…


Scheduling change doesn’t throw off timing of chamber competition finalists

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The new shorter semester threw off the timing of the Wayland Chamber Competition at Bowling Green State University.   The timing of the performers though was unaffected. The competition founded in 2007 was moved into the earlier part of March, two to three weeks earlier than usual, to accommodate the new 15-week semester. And the semester also had a later start because of Winter Session. That, said Brittany Lasch, one of the faculty members coordinating the event, put a strain on  students. It would be extremely difficult to form and prepare an ensemble in those few weeks. Also the event conflicted with some off-campus activities that some students were involved in.  Still the finals of the competition held Sunday (March 3) featured the usual mix of intriguing music crisply performed. Borderlines Trio: Taylor Francis, Steve Naylor, and Gretchen Hill The winner in the undergraduate division was the Borderlines Trio — Taylor Francis, flute, Gretchen Hill, clarinet, and Steve Naylor, piano. They performed  the aptly titled  “Relentless” movement from Pierre Jalbert’s  “Triple Set.” The piece featured darting, interlocking lines with the shards of musical ideas ricochetting from one instrument to another. Then the trio performed “Portraits of Langston” by Valerie Coleman (who has performed on campus as part of Imani Winds). Dedicated to writer Langston Hughes, the two movements were imbued with the spontaneity of jazz. The first place award for the graduate division went to Landlocked Percussion, a repeat winner. With shifting personnel the ensemble won first place in 2018 and second place in 2017.  Nick Fox is the only constant member over the three years. Other members this year were: Henrique Batista (returning from 2017) and Jerry Emmons ( returning from 2018) with pianist Ariel Magno de Costa. Their two pieces Michael Oesterle’s  “Carrousel” and Michael Laurello’s “Spine” called for delicacy, including passages played with knitting needles, as well as intricate high volume cadences precisely executed. Third Nature: Frances Zengel, Trey Washington, and David Hirschfeld Another percussion ensemble, Third Nature — Frances Zengel, Trey Washington, and David Hirschfeld — won second place in the undergraduate division.   Tuphonium Winning second place in the graduate division was  Tuphonium — Graeme Materne and Elena Markley,…


BG parks & rec achieves 2018 goals; reaches for more in 2019

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Some statistics are meaningful – some are just interesting. For example, who knew that 1,564 hot dogs were sold at City Park last year? And is there some connection between the 1,403 orders of nachos with cheese sold at City Pool and the 59 swim diapers sold? But seriously, here are some stats from Bowling Green Parks and Recreation for 2018: 19,670 total participants in programs.82,394 daily swipes into the community center.2,918 reserved facility uses, with an estimated headcount of 81,254.6,931 fitness program participants.47,935 visits to City Pool. Kristin Otley, director of the Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Department, recently reported the 2018 accomplishments and 2019 goals for the department. The parks and rec department did some long-range planning, plus completed maintenance and repairs. Work continued to make the parks more accessible to people with physical disabilities, the Nature Center at Wintergarden Park was remodeled, roof and HVAC repairs were made at Simpson Building, and Ridge Park saw drainage repairs and the installation of a backstop. At Conneaut-Haskins Park, new trees were added after the large ailing tree at the base of the sledding hill was removed. And new benches were added along the Wintergarden Park trail. The parks and rec department also made several land management improvements, such as: Restoration of native plant species at Wintergarden St. John Nature Preserve, Carter Park and the community center.Continued paving of trails at Simpson Garden Park.Redevelopment of the Healing Garden at Simpson Garden Park.Completion of the two-acre prairie expansion at the community center.Expansion of the hosta garden to more than 1,000 different species. The parks and rec department also last year expanded youth fitness offerings, as well as lowered the age of participation in fitness classes. Programs were offered on a variety of topics or skills, such as bubble soccer, outdoor survival skills, wilderness first aid, archery, birding, nature study, theater camps, a walking program, and aqua bikes spinning classes at the pool. Otley also presented information on goals planned for the parks and rec department in 2019. Big on the list is the demolition of three buildings near the entrance of City Park – then the construction of a new replacement building. The department…


Airport use takes flight – so funding for updates needed

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News The revived aviation program at the Wood County Regional Airport has led to busier runways, hangar rentals and fuel sales. But the increased use of the airport is creating the need for some updates at the facility, according to Jeff Hamons, president of the airport authority board. And those updates require funding that the airport doesn’t have, Hamons informed the Wood County Commissioners last week. So the airport board is working on its pitch in order to secure federal funding for the updates, he said. The airport is in need of three primary improvements. The engineering for those projects will cost $162,000 – which the airport authority already has funded. The projects are: Micro-sealing of the runways, including lettering and numbering of the taxiways. The markings are quite deteriorated, especially with the increased use by the BGSU aviation program.Runoff areas for planes to pull off into when the runways are busy. It’s quite frequent now when there is runway congestion caused by multiple students and instructors taking off at the same time. “There’s no place to put the line-up,” Hamons said. A runoff area would give student flyers a place to pull off to work on flight prep with their instructors. Currently, the wait can be a half hour or more if there are four or more planes in line.Extension of the angled taxiway at the airport. The regular airport budget pays for standard maintenance – but construction costs are out of reach, Hamons said. The airport is working with BGSU on the projects, since the updates are needed for the aviation program. “They need this stuff to get done,” Hamons said. There are currently about 300 students in the aviation program. That number is expected to double in the next few years, Hamons said. “All indications are from everybody that the program will grow,” he said. The national pilot shortage – caused by fewer pilots retiring from military service and going into commercial flying – has created an increased demand for the BGSU program. BGSU is planning on doubling the size of its learning center at the airport – possibly breaking ground in April or May. “Great things are happening,” Hamons said….


Imagination rules in the world of author & illustrator Tony DiTerlizzi

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News Tony DiTerlizzi writes creates stories that are read and viewed by millions of people. Most famous is the “The Spiderwick Chronicles,” both as a book and a movie. There’s “Adventures of Luke Skywalker, Jedi Knight,” a George Lucas approved expansion on the “Star Wars” franchise. Then there’s “Kenny and the Dragon,” The Wood County District Public Library’s Youth Community Reads book for this spring.  Of all those fans one reader remains the most critical to the best selling author. What will 10-year-old Tony think of what now 50-year-old Tony DiTerlizzi makes? Tony DiTerlizzi with Juno Kleinhans, who also likes to draw and write her own stories. DiTerlizzi recently visited Bowling Green as part of the Community Reads program. He visited schools, and in the evening gave a talk about how the 10-year-old from Florida grew up to become a beloved author and illustrator. Luck, he said, was important. Yes, people tell him that he’s lucky because he gets to spend his time  drawing and writing fanciful stories. When DiTerlizzi talked about luck, though, he went back to his childhood growing up in southern Florida. “Old people move down there and turn into lizards,” he said. He was not a good student. He preferred sitting in class drawing. In those doodles he unspooled the stories that were being screened in his mind. Then came time for him to give an oral book report on the classic children’s book “The Mouse and the Motorcycle” by Beverly Cleary.  “An oral book report is like oral surgery,” DiTerlizzi  told the audience of parents and kids. Then he crouched,, trying to make himself as small as he could, to demonstrate how he presented his book report. He had failed to master even the basic details of the book. The problem was, DiTerlizzi said, was that the books he loved were picture books, such as Arnold Lobel’s “Frog and Toad.” While Cleary’s novel had a few illustrations, it was mostly words. But DiTerlizzi was in luck. His teacher had an inkling of what the problem was. So he gave 10-year-old Tony another chance. Pick two scenes from the book and draw pictures of them. Suddenly the youngster was engaged, reading…


Kenwood parents informed of state designation for school

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Bowling Green City School officials breathed a collective sigh of relief when every school building in the district was removed from the Ohio Improvement Process. That change was based on progress the district made in student growth. However, Superintendent Francis Scruci sent out a letter to Kenwood parents on Friday explaining a new development. Despite being considered worthy of being taken off the OIP list, Kenwood has been designated as an “EdChoice” school. “It’s contradictory,” Scruci said Friday. “Here’s a building that was determined to be an independent building through the OIP. It just doesn’t make a whole lot of sense.” The EdChoice designation means that parents of Kenwood students can access scholarships for their students to attend parochial or private schools – with Bowling Green City Schools footing the bill. Scruci has referred in the past to the State Report Card as a “flawed system.” This latest designation only reinforces his belief. “By no means am I saying that as a school or district that we do not embrace accountability,” he said. But the data used to designate Kenwood as an EdChoice school were the K-3 literacy results from 2013-14 and 2017-18. Since 2014, the district has made major curriculum changes – which resulted in the lifting of the OIP ranking. “This was done due to our teachers and district changing the way we approached instruction and meeting the needs of all our students,” Scruci wrote to parents. In his letter, he assured parents that Kenwood is delivering the same quality educations that have been provided in the past. “This designation should not cause alarm or a loss of faith in the instruction provided by the hard-working professionals that are present at Kenwood Elementary,” he said. When contacted after sending out the letter, Scruci said the flawed state system does not reflect the quality of the education provided at Kenwood. “If I had a child of elementary age, my kids would go to Kenwood, and I’d be very comfortable with that,” he said. The “EdChoice” designation is fairly new in Ohio, and sticks with a school for two years. “We’re pretty optimistic it will be two years and we’ll be out of…


Third roundabout on BG City Council’s agenda for Monday

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News With construction of two roundabouts underway on the east side of Bowling Green, the city is taking steps to start preliminary work on a third. On Monday evening, Bowling Green City Council will hear the first reading of legislation allowing city officials to seek bids and enter into a contract for work on a roundabout at the intersection of East Wooster Street and Campbell Hill Road. The contracts would be for design, engineering, right-of-way acquisition, construction and other services needed to replace the existing four-way stoplight intersection with a roundabout. In 2014, the city’s East Wooster Street corridor was identified as an inefficient entryway into the city and Bowling Green State University. In 2015, an East Wooster Street Corridor Study was completed. That study recommended a roundabout at Wooster and Campbell Hill. At the same time, the Ohio Department of Transportation authorized the design and construction of two additional roundabout at the Interstate 75 entrance and exit ramps on East Wooster Street. Those roundabouts are currently under construction. The proposed roundabout at Campbell Hill is connected to the overpass improvements. Once the roundabout is constructed, a proposed median can be placed on East Wooster Street between I-75 and Campbell Hill. According to city officials, the median is recommended as a safety improvement for the corridor since left turns from driveways in the area are challenging and pose a safety risk. This newer roundabout proposal was awarded Transportation Improvement Plan funding that will be released on July 1, 2022. Construction will likely be in 2023. The TIP funding will pay for $915,000 of the estimated $1.5 million cost of the project. Though not on City Council’s agenda for Monday, the city is also planning another roundabout on the east side of the I-75 overpass at the intersection of Dunbridge Road and East Wooster Street. Also being considered on the east side of the city is a possible roundabout at the intersection Napoleon Road and Campbell Hill Road. According to Wood County Engineer John Musteric, the Campbell Hill-Napoleon intersection was identified on a list compiled by the Ohio County Engineers Association as one of the worst intersections in the region for accidents. The city administration…


Wood County working on countywide Code Red alert system

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Starting today, Wood County has a countywide “Code Red” alert system. But it will take months before the system is completely up and running. The county commissioners voted Thursday to fund a portion of the phone alert system. At the request of Wood County Emergency Management Agency Director Brad Gilbert, the commissioners agreed to pay $23,000 for the system. The total cost for the system is $46,000 – so the other half will be picked up by entities already paying for the system individually that are now joining the countywide alert system. The alerts will notify local residents of such events as bad weather headed this way or a hazardous material incident in their area, Gilbert said. Wood County is one of just a few Ohio counties that don’t already have a countywide notification system, Gilbert said last November when the idea was first introduced to the county commissioners.. All landlines in the county will automatically be hooked up for the Code Red alerts. Cell phone users will have to register for the notifications. People will also be able to choose different options of which alerts they wish to receive. That means it will take several months before the new areas not already served by Code Red will get notifications. A public information push will be made to spread the word about the program. “It’s going to be a slow roll out,” Gilbert said. The seven governmental entities that are already using Code Red are Northwestern Water and Sewer District, Perrysburg City, Perrysburg Township, Rossford, Lake Township, Walbridge and Pemberville. Those entities already had separate contracts with Onsolve Communication, the company providing Code Red alerts. So by teaming up with the county, it will not only augment the service but also reduce their costs, Gilbert said. The program will also be opened up to any other municipality or township that wants to join to post their own alerts. Those communities that become “sub-users” of the Code Red system can activate alerts on their own for residents in their area. The system can be used for non-emergency, yet helpful information such as notification of leaf collections or road closures. The system also has the…