Large farms must meet strict regs, ODA official says

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The Wood County Commissioners often hear about problems with CAFOs – concentrated animal feeding operations.  So last week, they met with the person in charge of keeping track of those large farms and the manure produced by them. Kevin Elder, chief of the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Division of Livestock Environmental Permitting, gave the county commissioners an overview of CAFOs in Ohio, including the regulations and the numbers in the state. Wood County has three dairy cow CAFOs and one chicken CAFO. Dairy cattle statistics for Ohio show the greatest number of operations with dairy cows as 39,000 farms in 1950. Those farms had more than 1.1 million dairy cows. “That was back when my grandpa taught me how to milk cows,” Elder said. And that was back when it was common for most farms to have their own dairy cows, Wood County Commissioner Doris Herringshaw said. “Everybody had cows.” By 2016, the number of farms with dairy cows had dropped to 2,671, and the number of dairy cows in Ohio had decreased to 266,000. Wayne County leads the state in dairy cows, followed by Mercer and Holmes counties. Ohio ranks 11th in milk production and first in Swiss cheese production. Ohio has the most robotic milkers, Elder said, with one dairy in Wood County being robotic. Cows are also producing so much more milk than in the past, with an average per cow output in the past of 4,000 pounds a year, increasing up to 40,000 pounds a year, he said. The only livestock group that has expanded in the last few years in Ohio is poultry. In 1963, the state had 5 million layer chickens and 10.7 million broilers. By 2015, the layers numbered 33 million and the broilers hit more than 80 million. Ohio ranks second in the U.S. for both laying hens and egg production. “Poultry is the only species that has increased in numbers,” Elder said. “Wood County was the highest beef cattle county in the state at one time, now it’s almost non-existent,” he said. Elder explained to the commissioners what qualifies as a large concentrated animal feeding operation in Ohio: 700 mature dairy cows 1,000 beef cattle 2,500 swine weighing 55 pounds or more 10,000 swine weighing less than 55 pounds 82,000 chicken, laying hens 125,000 chickens, other than laying hens 55,000 turkeys 500 horses There are a total of 230 CAFOs in Ohio: 40 dairy 5 beef 78 swine 103 poultry 4 horses “Either farms are getting bigger or…


Now what? League of Women Voters discuss next steps after march

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   These were not crazed feminists shrieking about their rights. These were librarians, teachers, nurses – many retired – who are motivated to march and to make a difference in today’s rapidly changing U.S. under President Donald Trump. This was not a radical group, but rather the Bowling Green League of Women Voters, who spent the evening talking about how they can fight back. They listened to stories from other “spunky” women who joined in the Women’s Marches across the U.S. And then they faced an uncomfortable question. “Do you think it made a difference?” one woman in the audience asked. “Was anybody listening who should have been listening?” While the responses may have lacked certainty, they were full of hope. “It’s very hard right now to see if it’s going to make a difference,” said Martha Turnwald-Fether, a retired school administrator who marched in Washington, D.C. But she added that even though Trump didn’t acknowledge the massive march, it had to bother him to have that many people marching in his front yard. “You see that many people, and you think, how did we lose?” So the roomful of women, and a handful of men, brainstormed on how to make sure the march mattered. “What do we do next?” one woman asked. Some of the suggestions were: Encourage people to vote. Quit listening to “alternative facts” and urge others to do the same. Help find good candidates. Work to redistrict and end gerrymandering districts. Support good journalism that is trustworthy. Donate money to good candidates. Have polite but firm conversations with elected officials. Let politicians know what you think, through calls, visits to their offices, letters or emails. Join local groups that are working together for change, such as Indivisible District 5. One marcher, Heather Paramore, suggested that local residents will need to step outside their comfort zones to make a difference. “Change doesn’t happen when you’re comfortable,” she said. Women may have to march more, said Marilyn Bowlus, of Pemberville. “I don’t need to go to a gym anymore,” said Bowlus, who has participated in several marches. “I’ve become a marcher, a professional marcher.” “I realized this was always me, but I got lost for awhile,” she said. Women also need to stand up for real facts, said Penny Evans-Meyer, of Bowling Green. When others spread falsehoods about the government supporting abortions through Planned Parenthood, people need to speak up and say that’s untrue. “Outside of this room, I’m not sure if people know that,” she…


WBGU-TV to stay put, more or less, as BGSU comes away from spectrum auction empty-handed

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Dave Kielmeyer first discussed the possibility of Bowling Green State University taking part in the Federal Communications Commission’s incentive auction, he said that WBGU-TV’s spectrum could fetch millions, or nothing, “nada.” Now some 20 months later, after a vigorous public discussion period, and more than a year-long auction process, “nada” it is. The university announced Friday that it had withdrawn from the auction about a month ago, and the station will continue to broadcast in the UHF spectrum. The only change for WBGU-TV will be a move a few spots down on the dial from 27 to 22. That’s part of the repacking process whereby TV stations are packed into one part of the spectrum, and wireless providers into the newly acquired space. But that won’t happen for at least another 18 months or so. Kielmeyer said the station’s engineering staff is looking at the details of making the change. “I don’t think it’ll be terribly difficult.” All the costs of moving will be picked up by the FCC. The parties could not comment while the auction was going on, and only now has the FCC allowed stations to announce the outcome. The FCC had staged the auction to free up spectrum for use by the growing wireless sector. Kielmeyer, who as chief marketing and communications officer oversees the station, said that the university decided that the money being offered was not enough to continue in the process. The university, he said, had hoped to generate some revenue that could have been used for student scholarships. The university trustees had said that the station would continue to operate, but allowed the administration to participate to see if it could surrender its UHF spectrum, which is more desirable, and move to VHF, or possibly partner with another station, and share spectrum. In a statement released by the university, President Mary Ellen Mazey said: “As we indicated before the start of the auction, WBGU-TV remains an integral part of the University’s core mission, a valued asset in the community, and an important provider of experiential learning for our academic programs. We look forward to continuing that mission.” The university conducted four public meetings in the summer of 2015. Those hearings drew hundreds, almost unanimous in supporting keeping the station on the air. They included students and BGSU alumni who had worked at the station. Graduates spoke of how the station helped launch their careers. They included families who praised the quality of programs. One was an elderly man who said…


Winterfest Chillabration tent puts a song in the heart of downtown BG

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Winterfest in Downtown Bowling Green will now offer visitors a place to chill out on Saturday. Wendy Chambers, executive director of the Bowling Green Convention and Visitors Bureau, said a people have suggested the annual celebration needed more of a downtown presence. So this year, the Huntington Bank parking lot at the southeast corner of South Main and Clough streets will be turned into an ice garden and tented music venue. Winterfest gets underway tonight (Friday, Feb 10 with events at the Community Center and the Slater Ice Arena on the Bowling Green State University campus. The university is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the arena. From noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday the Chillabration Tent will offer hot chocolate, coffee and doughnuts, and will be the site of ice carving demonstrations. Three ice sculptures, each inspired by Disney animated movies, will be carved. Karaoke will be set up to allow people to sing along to their favorite tunes from the movies “Frozen,” “Aladdin” and “Little Mermaid.” Other ice sculptures sponsored by local businesses and organizations will be on display in the parking lot. Though the temperature is expected to reach to 50 degrees, Chambers said, she’s been assured that the ice sculptures can go on as scheduled. “We kind of go with the flow,” she said. “Mother Nature’s going to do what Mother Nature’s going to do.” Also during the day Saturday there will be carriage rides starting from the courtyard at the Four Corners Center and a high school art show inside the building. Shops, she said, will be offering special “snowtastic” sales as well. From 4 to 11 p.m. Saturday beer and wine will be available for purchase in the Chillabration tent. The beverage tent is modeled after the beer garden at the Black Swamp Arts Festival, Chambers said. The country rock band Corduroy Road, featuring Josh Denning and Niki Carpenter, two veterans of the Bowling Green music scene, will be the headliner. The band will perform at 7:15 p.m. Chambers reached out to Tim Concannon, who runs the Hump Day Revue at Stones Throw, to fill out the stage schedule. Concannon also books the acts for the farmers market, and is in his second year co-chairing with Cole Christensen the Performing Arts Committee for the Black Swamp Arts Festival. Corduroy Road, with the tight vocal harmonies of Denning and Carpenter, is “a really fun band,” he said. “I use them as a cornerstone.” For other acts he drew on his broad knowledge of town’s rock…


Valentine stories of birds, bugs, bunnies and more

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   As you agonize to find the perfect gift for your sweetheart on Valentine’s Day, consider yourself lucky that you’re not some species in the animal kingdom. Some male spiders have to perform bizarre dances to win over females. And some male birds are at the mercy of how much red feathering they have to attract a mate. Humans at least can modify their apparel and take dancing lessons. Wood County Park District Naturalist Jim Witter will present a program on Valentine stories from nature on Monday, at 7 p.m., in the W.W. Knight Nature Preserve in Perrysburg Township. Parents need not worry – the program will be G-rated and will not include any awkward animal copulating videos. But it will show some of the courtship behaviors of animals. Forget the box of chocolates. Some animals, such as male bluebirds have “feeding ceremonies,” where they prove to their love interest that they are good providers. “In order to get her to stick around, it’s like, ‘Look at all the dragonflies I can catch,’” Witter said. Eagles sometimes exhibit that same behavior. Some females in the animal kingdom are won over by an attractive male with a good singing voice. That’s the case with red-winged blackbirds. “They do a lot of calling and chasing around back and forth,” Witter said. Experts covered up portions of the red patches on the males, and found that the females no longer fancied those males. “Females tend to select males with larger red patches,” he said. Frogs profess their love through croaking. Usually it’s the male who pursues the female – but not always. Female cardinals have been known to sing to lure males. Like humans, sometimes a male can woo a female with his homey habitat. “He needs the right territory and the most food,” Witter said. Otherwise the female may turn up her beak and look elsewhere for a more worthy mate. The Bowerbird actually sets up “staging areas” while dating. The males keep neat houses in order to attract chicks. But like some humans, once the honeymoon is over the commitment to cleaning evaporates. Also like humans, many animals stray from their mates for romance. “Some birds aren’t as monogamous as scientists once thought,” Witter said. Such is the case with red-winged blackbirds – once thought to be lifelong mates. Closer observation shows some sneaky behavior going on. “While one male is busy driving off another one, a third one sneaks in” to the nest and gets busy with the…


Pianist Chu-Fang Huang has musical stories to tell

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When concert pianist Chu-Fang Huang listens to the finalists in the David Dubois Piano Festival and Competition Sunday morning, she wants the young musicians to tell her a story. “More important than making your fingers move faster or more brilliantly, you need understand what the composer has to say. Otherwise playing the piano would be like being a blacksmith, just hammering.” This epiphany ignited her passion for music. “I realized every piece of music is like a piece of literature. Every piece of music is like something by Shakespeare and Tolstoy. It’s just written in different language.” She arrived at this understanding when she was 17, and a student at the Curtis Institute. She’d been playing for 10 years at that point easily winning many competitions. But her technical mastery driven by a strong competitive streak was not enough. “If you want to crack the code, send the right kind of message, the right kind of emotions to your listener you must understand through the notes, the chords, the melody, what the composer is trying to say.” “I realized what a great world I’d gotten into, the great emotions and how affecting and touching those things can be,” Huang said in a recent telephone interview. All this will come to the fore when she performs in recital Saturday at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall. Tickets are $7 in advance at: https://itkt.choicecrm.net/templates/BGSU/index.php or by calling 419-372-8171. Her program will conclude with Maurice Ravel’s La Valse, a piece she performed in 2005 as winner of International Piano Competition and finalist in the Cliburn International Piano Competition. In the flamboyant waltz, originally written for orchestra, Ravel depicts the European aristocracy on the brink of World War I who “didn’t want to face the fact that something was coming. They wanted to dwell in their luxurious lives while shooting was already happening outside their window. It’s a huge sarcasm Ravel pulls off.” The Chopin sonata and ballade that she will play both speak to the composer’s love of his native Poland. The ballade is based on a Polish poem and his Second Sonata was written as Warsaw was falling to the Russian czar. The latter piece includes the famous funeral march. Huang will also perform two pieces by Haydn, a composer she feels is underappreciated. “Haydn speaks to me more than Beethoven and Mozart,” she said. His music is “humorous, fast changing, subtle.” The story of Huang’s own career began before she even touched a keyboard. The only child of working parents,…


Women urged to throw their hats in ring for elections

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Women are still playing catch up attaining elected positions in the U.S. Statistics show that when women run for elected offices, they are elected at the same rate as men, according to Mary Krueger, director of BGSU Women’s Center. The disparity exists because fewer women throw their hats into the rings as candidates. “They don’t run nearly as often,” Krueger said. “Let’s get past this.” To help young college age women interested in attaining public office, the BGSU Women’s Center is offering a program called “Elect Her,” on Saturday. The workshop is designed for women eyeing spots in student government, politics or any leadership positions. According to the Center for American Women and Politics, the following offices are filled by far fewer women than men. The statistics show: U.S. Senate: 21 percent women; 16 Democrats and 5 Republicans. U.S. House: 19 percent women; 62 Democrats and 21 Republicans. State senates: 22 percent women; 253 Democrats, 175 Republicans, 13 non-partisan, 1 Independent. State houses: 26 percent women; 854 Democrats, 528 Republicans, 4 Progressive, 3 Independent, 1 Working Families Party. State governors and other state elected officials: 24 percent, 32 Democrats, 41 Republicans, 1 non-partisan. Mayors of 100 largest cities: 19 percent women. Mayors of cities with over 30,000 population: 19 percent women. The disparity certainly is not due to competence, Krueger said. However, it could be partially due to men getting a couple centuries’ advantage. It has not even been a full century since women gained the right to vote in 1920 with the 19th Amendment. “Over generations in this country, women have been discouraged from running for office,” Krueger said. “There’s a legacy of being forbidden. The men have had a couple hundred years’ head start.” This is the second time the “Elect Her” workshop has been hosted by the Women’s Center. Krueger said she had no idea of the heightened relevancy it would have – with so many women now being involved in or inspired by the national women’s marches. “When we planned this and picked this date, we didn’t know what would be going on in the nation and the world,” she said. “It certainly is especially timely,” Krueger said. “I’m hoping some of the energy of the women’s marches can be captured.” Speaking at the workshop are some candidates with experience running and getting elected. They are State Senator Edna Brown, State Senator Teresa Fedor, Findlay Mayor Lydia Mihalik and Bowling Green Councilman Daniel Gordon, who has experience running for office while still in…


BG solar field can power up to 3,000 homes

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Mayor Dick Edwards was beaming as he announced that the recent sunny days have led to some good numbers at the Bowling Green solar field – the largest solar installation in Ohio. On the best day so far, the solar field generated 19.6 megawatts of energy. “The sun is cooperating,” Edwards said during Monday’s City Council meeting. The 165-acre solar field, located at the corner of Newton and Carter roads, northeast of the city,  consists of more than 85,000 solar panels and is capable of producing 20-megawatts of alternating current electricity. In an average year, the solar field is expected to produce an equivalent amount of energy needed to power approximately 3,000 homes. It will also avoid approximately 25,500 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions per year since the energy is generated from a non-fossil fuel resource. “That’s an amazing factoid there,” Edwards said. Along with sustainable benefits, the project will also have economic benefits for the city, according to city officials. By having the generation supplied “behind the meter,” the city will see lower capacity and transmission charges, as well as on-peak energy delivered at times when customer demand for electricity is highest. “We are excited to see this project come online and start delivering power to our customers,” Bowling Green Utilities Director Brian O’Connell said. “Like the wind turbine project, we are looking forward to many years of a local and renewable resource.” The site was built and is owned and operated by a subsidiary of NextEra Energy Resources LLC. The power generated will be sold to American Municipal Power Inc. under a multi-year contract. AMP will then sell this clean energy to the city and other participating AMP member utilities. AMP partnered with NextEra to construct and operate up to 80 MW of new solar generation in other member communities. Additional solar sites are already under construction and more are planned in Ohio, Michigan and Delaware. “Great work to you and your staff,” Council President Mike Aspacher said to O’Connell. “Obviously it’s a project we’re all proud of.” Also at Monday’s meeting, council members revisited last week’s discussion on city zoning rules, which was part of the Community Action Plan process. Council member Bruce Jeffers suggested that it would be a good idea for council to identify the CAP goals first, before working to revise the zoning code. Council member Bob McOmber mentioned the high cost of doing major revisions to the zoning ordinance. The consultant hired to do the city’s community action plan…


Faculty senate hears about parking, approves graduate program & honorary degree

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Faculty Senate at Bowling Green State University was not stuck in park when it met Tuesday. Its agenda was jammed, but it kept moving, at least with as much speed as it could manage with presentations on faculty files related to merit and promotion, charter revisions, and a change in who is qualified to teach and supervise graduate students. Then there was the discussion of parking. Aaron Kane, manager of Parking Services, explained the new system his office will be initiating. Now parking enforcement officers will cruise lots and scan license plate numbers to determine if cars are parked where they should be. The system, he said, has many advantages. It should save time and energy. “Improved productivity is going to be a major benefit,” he said. People will no longer have to stand in line to get their hanging passes. The registration process will be done all online. Each faculty member will be able to register two cars. Students will be able to register one car. People with loaners or rental cars will be able to go online and change the registration so that car will be covered instead of one of the two originally registered. When prospective students and their families come to campus they will be able to register their vehicles ahead of time. At the ice arena, Kane said, people coming for open skate, now have to park, run inside, get a tag, and return to the vehicle to put it in. Now they’ll just give their license plate number at the desk. The system will allow parking services to gather data on which lot are filling up, with the possibility of an app that will tell commuting students which lots have spaces and which are full. The system Kane said may be extended to pay lots, allowing visitors to pay for parking without going to the kiosk. The system, he said, has worked well at Ohio State and Cleveland State. New graduate degree The senate also approved a new Master of Arts in European Studies. The interdisciplinary major would prepare students for careers in business, journalism, government, research and education. The program builds on the university’s strengths including established study abroad programs. The major, said Edgar Landgraf, a professor of German, also addresses a lack of expertise in European language and culture. Europe is the second largest trading partner of the United States and Ohio. Honorary degrees The senate gave its approval to the granting of two honorary degrees. One will be awarded…


BG completes first ‘Complete Streets’ efforts

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green City Council members admitted the city may have qualified for a slow-moving vehicle placard in its progress on Complete Streets. But when council took action Monday evening, some acknowledged the wait paid off. In an effort to make city streets more accommodating to bicyclists, council had debated several options – many of them expensive. On Monday, the city’s Transportation and Safety Committee and then City Council agreed on how to proceed with its first two streets as part of the Complete Streets program. Conneaut and Fairview will be milled and resurfaced at an estimated cost of $529,393. That was the easy part since it was work that already needed done. Then came the choices of how to make them more accessible to two-wheeled travelers. The option of widening Conneaut and making dash lanes for bicyclists the entire length of the street came with a price tag of $65,000. The option of creating a bike lane on Fairview fell out of favor early on because of logistical problems with neighbors and the golf course. So on Monday, the decision was made to forgo the widening of Conneaut and use sharrows (street markings shaped like bikes and arrows) from Grove to Lafayette streets to remind motorists of the need to share the road. And on Fairview, the decision was made to widen the sidewalk on the east side of the street, then have a crossover to the west side from Liberty to Grove streets. The $32,000 improvements would be ADA compliant. “This will serve as a template for how we treat other streets,” said council president Michael Aspacher, acknowledging that the approval has been a long time coming. “I think it’s exciting that we are doing something.” Council member Bob McOmber said he was glad the Fairview sidewalks, which are in poor condition, are being replaced. Scott Seeliger said he was relieved that the sidewalks could be widened to ADA standards without encroaching further into residential front lawns. And Bruce Jeffers said he was glad the city didn’t act hastily on bike accommodations that can be quite costly when other options may work just as well. Many of the council members referred to the Yay Bikes program, which city officials participated in last November. The program promotes education as well as physical accommodations to make communities safer for bicycling. The program teaches bicyclists to “own the lane,” by riding not along the edge but rather where the passenger tire runs. Motorists learn to swing wide and give…


Citizens get peek at BG Community Action Plan

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Adam Kirian and Adrian Lowien came to the Community Action Plan open house for two reasons – 10-week-old twins Charlie and Freddie, who attended bundled in blankets. “We wanted to get some input for these little guys as they get older,” Kirian said as he looked at the tiny twins. The couple lives on the East Side of Bowling Green, which is the focus of much of the community action plan. “I’m glad they are trying to clean up the area,” Lowien said. The couple has a home on Clough Street, with several neighboring rental properties leased to BGSU students. “Sometimes they are really good kids and sometimes you want to call the cops every night,” Kirian said. Overall, the young couple liked what they saw at the community plan open house held Tuesday evening in the atrium of the Wood County Courthouse. “We like a lot of it,” Lowien said, especially the emphasis on open spaces. “I’d like to see more green spaces and parks. That would encourage more families.” From the other side of town was Beverly Miner, who also approved of the plans presented on big charts. “The theory is good,” she said, then added, “But it takes money to do things.” Miner particularly liked the proposals to upgrade housing, work on bettering the relationship between the city and the campus, putting a bike path on Court Street, and planning a Court Street festival. In fact, she’d like to see each area of the city have festivals. “I think the East Side kind of gets a bad rep,” she said. “I think we’ve got a great town.” Miner also thought the community planning process benefited from bringing in an outside firm as a consultant. “I’ve been impressed with the people here,” she said of the Camiros group from Chicago. “They can come in with an objective view.” Jill Carr, who served on the city’s future land use committee, appreciated seeing the effort taken to the next level. “It’s really encouraging.” “I love the emphasis on the East Side,” she said. “We can’t forget about the rest of the community, but that’s where we need to start.” Carr also appreciates the Court Street effort. “It’s a great way to tie the university and community together.” She also noted the value of the new Good Neighbor Guide. “We all need that,” she said. The guide gives residents tips on how to handle issues such as vehicles parked in a neighbor’s front lawn, tall grass or neighborhood…


Still no action in Faculty Senate on sanctuary petition

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Faculty Senate meeting Tuesday unfolded much as the January session had. Senators were greeted by a gauntlet of protestors outside McFall, and then when the senate convened the sign-carrying demonstrators lined the assembly hall quietly and listened through President Mary Ellen Mazey’s remarks. And when she addressed the issue they were concerned about, a request for a sanctuary campus, they heard the same stance. The university must adhere to the law. But the university will do everything within the parameters of the law to assist foreign students and faculty as well as students with status under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. The university has 11 DACA students and 21 with visas or green cards from the seven countries covered by the travel ban. Mazey has publicly supported proposed federal legislation, the BRIDGE Act that would extent DACA status to people who were brought to the country illegally as children. On Tuesday, Mazey announced she joined 600 other higher education leaders in signing a letter opposing the travel ban issued by the administration. While acknowledging the need to “safeguard” the country, the letter states the signatories also recognize “the need for the United States to remain the destination of choice for the world’s best and brightest students, faculty, and scholars.” This openness promotes American values abroad as well as promoting scientific and technological advances, the letter states. When asked, Mazey would not speculate on what action the university would take if these legislative and lobbying efforts failed. Professor Francisco Cabanillas then asked if those efforts fail “would we have to say yes in our town” to immigration officials checking the status of students and faculty, referencing the Not In Our Town anti-bias program that Mazey help found. Mazey reiterated that all students and faculty are here legally, so she doesn’t see why immigration officials would come to BGSU. “We have confidence in the law.” But for those pushing for sanctuary status that is not enough. Outside before the meeting, Ethnic Studies professor Michaela Walsh, who initiated the sanctuary campus petition, said she hoped that bringing the issue up before Faculty Senate “would be the first step toward creating an open dialogue” after the issue failed to generate discussion at the previous senate meeting. Luis Moreno, also of Ethnic Studies, said the issue was driven by a concern for students, all students. He noted that most of the several dozen picketers were students. “Students are coming out on this issue,” he said. ”They need to…


Candidates file in BG – First time Green Party will get primary ballot

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   For the first time ever, Bowling Green voters will have the choice of a Green Party ballot in the primary election on May 2. A total of 16 candidates have filed with the Wood County Board of Elections for Bowling Green City Council seats. None of the ward seats will be contested in the primary election. However, filing for the two open at-large seats were four Democrats, four Green Party members, and one Republican. The primary election will narrow down the at-large race to a maximum of two candidates from each party. Since only one Republican filed, voters will be given the choice of ballots for the Democratic Party, the Green Party or for issues only. Terry Burton, director of the Wood County Board of Elections, said this is the first time the Green Party has had enough candidates to warrant a primary ballot. Burton said the lack of a Republican ballot in the primary election may cause some confusion. But since the at-large Republican place on the general election ballot is not contested, there is no need. Those voters can request ballots that have issues only. “That may cause some angst for people,” Burton said. And it may cause some voters to switch parties in the primary just so they can cast votes for some of the other candidates, he said. Filing for the two available at-large city council seats are the following candidates: Democrats: Holly Cipriani, Mark Hollenbaugh, Robert Piasecki and Sandy Rowland. Green Party: Helen Kay Dukes, BeverlyAnn Elwazani, Carolyn S. Kawecka and Rosamond L. McCallister. Republican: Gregory W. Robinette. One council member will also be elected from each of the city’s four wards. Following are the Democratic and Republican candidates who have filed for those seats. No Green candidates filed for the ward seats. First Ward: Democrat Daniel J. Gordon, Republican Ryan A. Rothenbuhler. Second Ward: Democrat John Zanfardino, Republican Kent Ramsey. Third Ward: Democrat Michael Aspacher, running unopposed. Fourth Ward: Democrat Scott W. Seeliger, Republican William J. Herald. It is possible that Independent candidates can still file to be on the ballot, Burton said. Nathan Eberly has indicated interest in running for an at-large council seat. Bowling Green voters will also cast ballots on three other issues in the primary. Bowling Green City School District will have a 0.5 percent income tax renewal for current expenses on the ballot. Two liquor issues will appear for Sunday sales between 10 a.m. and midnight at Bar 149 and at the Clazel. The deadline for…


BG seeks scientific facts surrounding pipeline

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green officials would like to dig into the facts around the Nexus pipeline but have no interest getting tangled in a lawsuit. City council was presented with some unsettling scientific information Monday evening, and was asked to file a motion to intervene with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission – which is on the edge of approving the pipeline plans. “We still have the right to insist that the dangerous situation at the pipeline river crossing be fully analyzed,” Lisa Kochheiser, of Bowling Green, said to council. “Time is of the essence here.” A grassroots group opposed to the Nexus pipeline as it crosses Wood County has worked with a Bowling Green State University professor who is a geologist and environmental policy expert. Based on the information found by Dr. Andrew Kear, the group filed a formal motion to intervene with FERC. Kear spoke directly to city council. “I’m not an advocate against natural gas,” he said, noting his appreciation for hot showers. However, the route of the Nexus pipeline, “poses unnerving public health and safety risks.” The initial report submitted to FERC said the Bowling Green Fault Line is deep below the surface, so it is not a concern. However, the fault is so close to the surface that it is visible in places, and is even pointed out by a marker in Farnsworth Park on the other side of the Maumee River. “The pipeline crosses the fault right near the Bowling Green drinking water supply,” Kear said. While the fault line is not active, drilling and lubrication can cause earthquakes, like those in the Youngstown area, he said. The pipeline would be 700 feet from the water plant and a quarter mile from an active blasting quarry on the Waterville side of the river. Also, little research has been done on the suspected karst geology in the area which should be avoided by pipelines. “They screwed up horribly,” said Terry Lodge, the attorney who filed the objections on behalf of local residents. “Now is the time for the science to be seriously indulged and engaged.” And the city would have a legitimate reason to question the pipeline plans, he added. “You certainly have a very serious dog in this fight.” Having a city get into the battle on behalf of its water plant would give the concerns more credence, Lodge said. “FERC might hear a little bit better.” “They should take a hard look at this location and see if they can find a better…


Greek accordion master squeezing his instrument into contemporary music

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Panagiotis Andreoglou is a missionary proselytizing about the virtues of accordion. The Greek musician has traveled to Bowling Green intent on introducing composers and music lovers here to his instrument, and to understanding through experience that it’s more than a vehicle for polka, zydeco or tango. Not, that there’s anything wrong with those venerable styles. They are part of his instrument’s DNA. Still wielding a button accordion, a further development from the more familiar piano accordion, he’s intent on showing that the instrument he begged to play when he was a child has a place in contemporary music. Andreoglou will make his case Tuesday at 8 p.m. in a guest artist recital in Bryan Recital Hall in Bowling Green State University. His program showcases his instrument both as a haunting solo voice and in conjunction with pre-recorded electronics. He will also perform March 2 at 8 p.m. with the New Music Ensemble. Andreoglou is in the early stages of a semester long residency at BGSU made possible by Fulbright Artist Scholarship. He decided to take up residency after meeting BGSU composition professor Elainie Lillios at a music festival in Thessaloniki in his native Greece.  They were intrigued by each other’s music. BGSU’s strong reputation as a center of contemporary music was an attraction. Andreoglou is particularly interested in electro-acoustic music, Lillios’ specialty, where acoustic and electronic sounds merge. The accordionist believes the particular timbre of his instrument lends itself particularly well to the genre, and he wants to encourage composers to explore those possibilities. “Composers are interested generally in new sounds since this is a new instrument with a lot of possibilities they can use.” Andreoglou has been exploring the sound of the accordion since he was 7. His father had a small piano accordion, and could play three songs, Andreoglou remembers.  “I was fascinated,” he said. “I wanted to learn. I insisted.” So his parents sent him to the local music school. A few years later he began piano lessons as well and through his teenage years he played and studied both instruments. When he went to university he focused on piano. He majored in musicology with studies in ethnomusicology and continued his piano at the local music school. It was only after he graduated that the accordion drew him back. By then he had acquired a button accordion. The instrument was developed in the 1950s and allows the player far greater flexibility. The notes are sounded using small buttons. In the right hand each button sounds a…