Campus Pollyeyes

New Year’s resolutions easy to make, hard to keep

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Marcy Collins gave up on New Year’s resolutions long ago. So as 2018 rolls around, her resolution is to not make a resolution. “I quit doing those years ago,” Collins said as she worked at the front desk at the Wood County Commissioners. “None of them come true.” But some people still have hope – even if it’s just a sliver of optimism – that starting a new direction stands a better chance of success when it begins with the turn from one calendar year to the next. Dallas Mohr still clutches to the hope. “I guess I’ll try to lose a little weight,” he said. That may mean a change in eating habits, since he made his 2018 prediction as he waited for his carryout order at Campus Pollyeyes. But Mohr had other goals, too, that do not require cutting back on pizza. “This year I want to strive to be a better person, and to do better in my business” which he is just starting up. A business resolution was also top on the list for Ben and Jen Waddington, of Waddington Jewelers in downtown Bowling Green. As they worked at their jewelry counter, the couple talked about resolutions. “You feel like you have to start something at the new year,” Ben Waddington said. So the couple decided to focus on time management. “With kids and a small business, that’s always hard,” he said. But now that both their children are in school, they can focus more on their business which saw growth last year. The plan is to get to work earlier, be more organized and take advantage of the extra time that both kids are in school, the couple agreed. Research shows that nearly half of all American adults make New Year’s resolutions. Fewer than 10 percent stick with their resolutions more than a few months. The most common goals are losing weight, exercising more, quitting smoking and saving money. Tricks to success include setting realistic resolutions, focusing on one goal at a time, telling someone about your resolution, changing your behavior with others who have set the same goal, starting small and not expecting perfection. But Monica O’Connor isn’t messing around with any small goals. As she checked on residents at Wood Haven Health Care, she admitted to not having great success with New Year’s resolutions in the past. “I try. Do I keep them up? Heck no,” O’Connor said with a smile. This year, she’s got a list. At the top is losing weight, followed by improving relationships, then saving money. “I got a lot of them this year,” O’Connor said. Dean Heilman, who works in maintenance at Wood Haven, was planning to mix it up a bit next year. “It starts out good – typically…


DeWine serves up campaign for governor at Campus Pollyeyes

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   As Mike DeWine worked the tables at Campus Pollyeyes, he had one question. “What’s the best thing to eat here?” He got one response from his fellow Republicans waiting to greet the gubernatorial candidate. “The breadsticks.” DeWine, Ohio’s attorney general, is shifting into high gear for the governor’s race to be decided next fall. Tuesday morning he started with breakfast in Mayfield Heights, followed by pie in Amherst, then showed up for pizza in Bowling Green. Early campaigning can probably be forgiven, since there are already three other Republicans in the governor’s race, including Secretary of State Jon Husted, Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor, and Rep. Jim Renacci. Even before DeWine’s arrival at Pollyeyes, some of those present had already picked him as their top choice. “I like the fact that he has a plan on the opioid epidemic, and he’s ready to go,” David Jenkins said as he dug into a calzone. Jenkins, who is treasurer of the BGSU College Republicans, is part of the voting population that needs to get excited about the next election, said George Nicholson, whose son runs Campus Pollyeyes. “I think it’s wonderful he’s coming here,” Nicholson said about DeWine. “It’s a good thing for us and a good thing for the College Republicans.” David Kuebeck, co-chair of DeWine’s campaign in Wood County, is already sold on the attorney general. “He’s the most experienced candidate by far,” Kuebeck said, listing off DeWine’s past roles as U.S. senator, U.S. representative, lieutenant governor, state representative and now state attorney general. “Nobody’s got a resume like that.” Unlike the other GOP candidates, DeWine has 90 percent name recognition. As for the age difference between DeWine and his younger competitors, Kuebeck shrugged that off. “I don’t buy into that argument too much.” And unlike his competition, DeWine has taken on the opioid crisis – and has put money behind the fight, including a grant recently awarded to Wood County. “He is tackling the most difficult public issue of our time,” Kuebeck said. DeWine is also credited with helping to keep the BCII crime lab in Bowling Green. When the lab outgrew its building in Bowling Green, several other locations in the state were considered. But a new expanded lab was built on the BGSU campus. DeWine also has the largest war chest, and has raised more money than the other GOP candidates for governor. “That’s a good thing, because somebody’s got to pay for all this pizza and breadsticks,” Kuebeck said, smiling. The candidate’s wife, Fran DeWine, talked about knowing her husband since first grade. She told of his first race for an elected seat decades ago, when the two of them knocked on 18,000 doors in Greene County. Fran DeWine decided after that campaign that the next time she went…