BGMS cheerleaders share the spirit with girls teams

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Two-four-six-eight, Bobcat cheerleaders show they appreciate girl athletes too. For the first time at Bowling Green City Schools, the middle school cheerleaders recently chanted on the sidelines for the seventh and eighth grade girls basketball teams. After only cheering for boys games in the past – cheering for girls seemed natural. The cheerleaders had planned to root for their female classmates a couple weeks ago – but got snowed out. “When the first game was canceled, everyone was pretty bummed,” said cheerleader Audrey Nester. So that made last week’s game even sweeter. “I feel like everyone was excited. We’re like friends with them.” Fellow cheerleader Emma Ferguson agreed. “Sometimes the girls say they never have as much of an audience,” Emma said. “They were really excited.” Cheerleaders Audrey Nester and Emma Ferguson Even though the stands weren’t full – (remember this is seventh and eighth grade basketball) – the gym was loud with chanting and cheering. “It’s a different atmosphere,” Emma said. “It’s a ‘we support each other’ atmosphere.” Melanie Ferguson, Emma’s mom and a middle school teacher, said the tradition has always been for cheerleaders to root for the boys teams. “That’s just been the thing,” Ferguson said. “But slowly, some schools are changing.” Some of the girls basketball players were actually unsure about the added pressure this might bring. “Some were nervous. It will be loud,” they told Ferguson. In preparation for the game, the girls basketball team made goodie bags for the cheerleaders, and the cheerleaders made cookies for the team, she said. “We love supporting all the sports,” said Jordan Betz, the cheerleading coach. “Our girls love to cheer,” and cheering is their sport, Betz said. “This is our chance to show them we are athletes, too.” Cheerleaders share the spirit at girls basketball game. Basketball player Audrey Geyman said the presence of the cheerleaders made the team feel good. “It’s like pretty amazing to have them here, and not just for the boys. They care,” Audrey said. As he stood on the sidelines cheering on the girls basketball…

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What’s happening in your community (updated Feb. 23)

NEWLY POSTED:  British duo to bring magic & laughs to Pemberville, March 5 The British comedy and magic team Keith Fields and Lady Sarah will bring their distinctly British sense of humor to the historic Pemberville Opera House, Saturday, March 2, 7:30 p.m. Keith Fields is a world champion magician and headline comedian, Lady Sarah is an English lady with a penchant for shoes,. She does her best to keep everything in some semblance of control. Tickets are $12.00 and available at Beeker’s General Store, at the door or by contacting Carol Bailey at 419-287-4848, carol@pembervilleoperahouse.org, or www.pembervilleoperahouse.org.   NEWLY POSTED: Teen improv troupe to share skits, games, March 1 Wood County District Public Library is hosting an After Hours Improv Night for youth ages 11 and up Friday, March 1, 7-9 p.m. The BGHS Improv Troupe will share skits and short drama games, with plenty of opportunities to participate and create positive and spontaneous scene work. No previous acting experience required.  The library will also provide popcorn and pizza. Pre-registration is required. Registration forms are at the library and on the library website at www.wcdpl.org/teens-can-volunteen-wcdpl.  For more information, contact the Children’s Place staff at 419-352-8253.   NEWLY POSTED:  Virtuoso pianist blends composition, jazz, March 10 Both a virtuosic pianist and composer, Gwilym Simcock will perform Great Sunday, March 10 at 5 p.m., in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Great Gallery. Simock is one of the most important musicians on the British scene. Trained as a classical pianist during his youth, at the age of 18 he turned his attention to jazz and composition, putting his musical foundation to work in the quest to draw his audience into a new musical world that moves the mind as well as the soul. Tickets are $10 for museum members, $15 for nonmembers, and $7 for students and military personnel.   NEWLY POSTED: Public invited to retirement party for Vic Gable, March 13 Come celebrate the retirement of Vic Gable at wli, Work Leads to Independence, 991 S. Main, Bowling Green on March 13, from 1 to 6 p.m. After more than 28 years in the field of employment…


Scruci searches for path to success for BG school buildings

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci reacted to two ends of the school facilities spectrum at Tuesday’s board of education meeting. First, to Richard Chamberlain’s request that the district not ask voters for any more money until it gets rid of unmandated programs, Scruci said cutting school programs would result in a race to the bottom for Bowling Green City Schools. And second, to the task force members who have voted for elementary consolidation as the top school building option, Scruci said as an educator he agrees. However, as a superintendent who needs to get a building issue passed, he asked the task force to reconsider. “While I believe that’s the best proposal, our community said ‘no’ to that,” Scruci said. And they repeated that “no” a second time when the bond issue was tried again.. “Consolidation is not what this community wants,” Scruci said. The superintendent also responded to some task force members’ disappointment that the high school portion of the overall building plans has been put on hold in effort to get community support for new or renovated elementaries. Scruci agreed that the high school is in great need of work, but the elementaries are running out of space. So the elementaries must either have overcrowded classrooms or add more modular units. “Space is a tie breaker for me,” he said. And Scruci reinforced what the district’s task force facilitators have been saying – “the longer we kick the can down the road,” the more expensive it will be. Superintendent Francis Scruci speaks at board meeting. As for Chamberlain’s suggestion that the district reduce costs by cutting out unmandated programs, Scruci said that would leave English, math, science and social studies. That would mean the end to agriculture education, athletics, band, theater and many, many other programs, the superintendent said. “This board has been fiscally responsible,” Scruci said, noting that the district has not asked for new funding for nine years. The district has to provide unfunded mandates from the state, such as busing to private schools, ACT testing prep, and College…


Mayor prepares BG for ‘pivotal’ year at State of the City address

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News After 58 years in public service, Mayor Dick Edwards gave his last State of the City address Tuesday, focusing on Bowling Green’s storied past, its challenging present and its hopeful future. And as for Edwards himself, who started in public service during the Kennedy administration, his success has often depended on the “gospel” of President Harry Truman, who said, “it is amazing what you can accomplish if you don’t care who gets the credit.” Nadine Edwards reminded her husband of that quote when he became mayor in 2012. “Believe me, it works,” the mayor said. So as Edwards listed off the accomplishments of the city in the past year, he made sure to spread around the credit. He talked about the 27 ribbon cuttings for new and expanding businesses last year, the slow recovery of the city budget, and most of all, the city’s partnership with Bowling Green State University. Since 1910, BGSU has been an “integral part of our economic and social fabric,” Edwards said. The two entities are “mutually interdependent. One cannot succeed without the other.” It was the urging of past BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey that resulted in a joint vision study to update the city’s land use plan of 1987. That study led to new plans focusing especially on the city’s east side. “It was a pressing community need – how to give new life and measures of hope and vitality to our sagging neighborhoods,” Edwards said. Eventually, a Community Action Plan with its many “challenging recommendations” was adopted and plans were made for the East Wooster corridor. But the city is up to the challenges, the mayor added. “Now is the time for action,” Edwards said. “It will test our mettle as a community.” And though the mayor is in his last year in office, he assured that isn’t resting yet. For 2019 is a “pivotal year.” State of the City address Tuesday morning in the Wood County District Public Library atrium Bowling Green is primed for progress, Edwards said. The city has achieved a healthy bond…


Curtain closing on last movie rental store in BG – Family Video

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News The credits are rolling for the last movie rental store in Bowling Green. That means the end of a tradition for those in the community who still prefer scanning the store shelves for a golden classic or a new action flick. Like the generation raised on dime matinees at theaters, there was also a generation raised on weekly trips to the movie rental stores. “When I was a kid, Friday and Saturday nights, places like this were packed,” Ivan Kovacevic said as he reminisced with his son about the end to the movie rental stores. On Monday, Kovacevic and his son were getting some deals buying a couple movies at Family Video. “It’s the changing times,” he said. “Businesses like this have more options” and much more competition. The closure, with the last day open to the public on Friday, has some frequent customers feeling blue, Family Video Manager Kait Nelson said. “A lot of our regulars are sad. They don’t have the streaming services,” Nelson said as she staffed the front counter on Monday. “They are our friends. They are our family. It’s become a routine for them.” Sure, there are Red Box movie rentals – but those aren’t the same as video rental stores, she said. Red Box rentals offer no human interaction. “You get a friendly face,” at the movie store, Nelson said. “Employees can offer suggestions.” But it’s more than that, she added. Try renting a movie classic at a Red Box. “Red Box is all about new stuff,” Nelson said. “We have a lot of classics.” And if you want more than one night to watch a movie – better get ready to pay a fine with Red Box. Family Video rentals last five days. Family Video movies for sale through Friday Bowling Green has been home to many movie rental stores – Video Spectrum, Video Connection and Movie Gallery to name a few. The Family Video store, at 816 S. Main St., was a latecomer to the city. Nationally these stores focused on smaller cities and more…


BGSU Undergrad Art Show is a launching pad for young talent

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News The opening of the annual Undergraduate Exhibition is one of the busiest days for the galleries at Bowling Green State University. The annual exhibit features work by 100 artists, and the awards ceremony draws a large contingent of family, friends, fellow artists, faculty, and staff. Sunday’s opening was no exception. For Charles Kanwischer, the director of the School of Art, the turnout is fitting. Harking back to the first time his work was shown, he said, this is a milestone in these young creators’ careers. “To win a prize, to be acknowledged some way, is to start believing in yourself, and that’s the most important function of this show,” Kanwischer said. Work exhibited in the Bryan Gallery There were many awards — some determined by faculty, and five determined by the panel of three outside jurors. Yuna Ahn, a junior from Perrysburg, won the Medici Circle Best of Show Award  for her painting “I Swallowed the Red Pill,” which was also selected for first place in painting. Also honored by the jurors were: Jacob Church, Main Street Photo and Portrait Studio Award, for his photo “Slide.”Trent Clayton, Marietta Kirschner Wigg Print Award, for his print “South Michigan Ave.”Chloe Arch, Ringholz Art Supply Award 2D, for her drawing “Autism 6-8th.”Hannah Zitzelberger, Ringholz Art Supply Award 3D, for her jewelry “Cicadas.” (Click to see a full listing of awards.) Best of Show honoree, Ahn said she relies on art to tell her story. A native of South Korea, her family moved to Perrysburg seven years ago. Her English isn’t fluid enough to convey her ideas. “I’m always struggling to communicate. I can express myself truly through my art.” Her painting speaks volumes. “I Swallowed the Red Pill” has layers of imagery. The painting employs a popular ancient Korean painting as the background to the scene, just as the painting appears in many restaurants in Korea. That traditional painting, she explained, shows two men spying on a woman bathing outdoors. Ahn connects that to the problem prevalent in Korean of social media voyeurism using spy cams.  The…


$250 million logistics park, 2,000 jobs proposed near CSX hub

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News When the CSX Intermodal facility opened eight years ago west of North Baltimore, it brought with it the promise of luring other development. On Tuesday, a couple consultants for NorthPoint Development, in Kansas City, presented a pitch to the Wood County Commissioners about doing just that. Dave Robinson told the commissioners that NorthPoint is interested in forming a public-private partnership to help develop acreage bordering the CSX Intermodal facility. The area has room for “tons of growth” on 122 acres. That growth could mean up to 2,000 new jobs plus tax benefits for the region. But in exchange for the construction of a logistics park, the developer wants a property tax abatement of 100 percent for 15 years, Robinson told the county commissioners. NorthPoint has a great deal of experience working with intermodal partnerships, Robinson said. He noted some of the company’s existing developments in Kansas City and Rickenbacker near Columbus. The open acreage on the south side of Ohio 18, by the local CSX site, is ripe for placement of distribution and manufacturing facilities, Robinson told the commissioners. And NorthPoint has experience building “major big box state-of-the-art facilities,” he said. The acreage has room for more than 4 million square feet of building space, Robinson said. “It would be a large driver of economic development,” he said. “We think it will be a great opportunity.” A growing trend nationally is the need for distribution centers, Robinson told the commissioners. Ten percent of purchases in the U.S. are now made online. That number is just going to grow. “We see the growth of logistics and fulfillment as a very big trend,” he said. That is creating concerns for traditional malls and retail centers, but, “it also creates a massive opportunity,” Robinson said. And the location right next to the CSX Intermodal facility will be ideal. The site is also near Detroit and Chicago, right next to the Interstate 75 corridor, and close to the Ohio Turnpike. “We are believers in the economic benefits of the logistics industry,” Robinson said. The proposed logistics park…