Quince’s advocacy for a place in new music for female voices bears fruit

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For three members of Quince Contemporary Vocal Ensemble, the concert on Monday at Bowling Green State University is a homecoming. The ensemble got its start here when three members met. Amanda DeBoer Bartlett, Liz Pearse and Kayleigh Butcher studied with Jane Schoonmaker Rodgers in the College of Musical Arts as graduate students. Carrie Henneman Shaw is the fourth member of the ensemble. Fittingly their concert will be devoted to a single work “Love fail” by David Lang. They met the composer when he visited BGSU as the guest composer at the New Music Festival on campus.in 2011. The free Music on the Forefront concert will be Monday, Feb. 27, in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. The hour-long piece is more than four women singing. They break into duos and trios, said Kayleigh Butcher, and each has a solo. They also are called on to play percussion and she even blows on conch shell. “Love fail,” was originally written for the early music group Anonymous 4. Since that venerable ensemble has retired, “we’ve taken up the reins,” Butcher said. The piece with text written by Lydia Davis revisits the myth of doomed lovers Tristan and Isolde. This will be a concert version of the piece, though Quince traveled with Lang to the Kody Festival in Lublin Poland last year to perform a theatrical production. “Love fail” is a haunting, spacious piece full of resonant dissonances and echoes of ancient chant. “Love…

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BG searches for science to clear up pipeline confusion

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green Mayor Dick Edwards is tired of hearing conflicting “facts” about the pipeline proposed to cross city property and run close to the city water treatment plant. So he set out himself to find some “good science” instead of “unsubstantiated political statements.” The city has been asked by those opposed to the Nexus pipeline to try to intervene in the FERC approval process, but council has been reluctant to get into a losing court battle. So Edwards turned to two scientists for help. One is Dr. Charles Onasch, professor emeritus of geology at BGSU, a researcher who has probably studied the BG Fault more than anyone else on record, Edwards said. The other is Larry Wickstrom, president of Wickstrom Geoscience of Worthington, Ohio, who is the former chief of the Ohio Division of the Ohio Geological Survey. “In that important role, he warned of some of the potential dangers associated with fracking in southeastern Ohio, and as a result lost his job,” Edwards said of Wickstrom. While other geologists have presented some alarming information about the pipeline route, the geologists the mayor talked with do not share those concerns. “I take science very seriously,” Edwards assured those at the council meeting. “We’ve been doing a lot of investigating and trying to reach out to some of the best minds we know.” The geologists the mayor contacted said the most recent activity on the Bowling Green Fault can be no younger than…


Boys shower area fix could soak district for $425,000

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   When it rains, it pours. That seems to go for showers as well. The Bowling Green Board of Education got the news Tuesday evening that repairs to the high school boys lockeroom shower area could cost between $380,000 and $425,000. “It’s not a cheap fix,” said Kent Buehrer, of Buehrer Group Architecture. Those estimates include fixing and reconfiguring the shower area, plus renovating the toilets, training room and coaches’ offices. The board was made aware of the shower problems last month when Superintendent Francis Scruci said boys were not able to shower after gym or athletics because the shower area had been shut off due to large cracks in the walls and floor. Buehrer showed slides of the area beneath the shower room floor, where the floor deck was sagging. He said this is a common problem in schools built in the 1960s and 1970s, where water leaks cause corrosion of the bar joists. So while the estimate was higher than expected, Buehrer did offer a small bit of good news. “The roof isn’t going to collapse. That’s a good thing,” he said. The heavy masonry wall in the center of the shower room has settled and is pulling away from the roof deck. While fixing the shower room, Buehrer suggested that the toilet area be updated to make it ADA accessible. The weight room, which has been in need of repairs for years, may also be added to the renovation project….


Scruci gets new three-year contract with schools

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci was given a three-year renewal of his contract Tuesday evening by the board of education. His annual salary is $144,000. The board praised Scruci’s work in the district and gave him unanimous support. “Thank you for all that you do for us,” Board President Ellen Scholl said to Scruci. During his 18 months as superintendent, Scruci has been a very visible presence in the community. He holds regular “coffees” with the public, and produces weekly videos about what is happening in the district. He has been a steady presence at extra-curricular events, creating positive relationships with students. In an effort to get input from the community on handling school building needs, Scruci has held open meetings in each school building. His new contract will run from Aug. 1, 2018 to July 31, 2021. Also at Tuesday’s meeting, Scruci informed the board that he feels compelled to express his personal feelings about national and state issues that he believes are damaging to public education. The superintendent is no fan of newly confirmed Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. So he plans to send a letter to DeVos, asking her to come spend some time at Bowling Green City Schools. Scruci has been open about his strong reservations about DeVos, who is a proponent of charter schools. “Public education is being threatened,” Scruci said. DeVos’ confirmation must not distract schools from their focus on educating students, he added. “We can’t as…


BG Arts Council seeking more helping hands for present & future projects

By DAVID DUPONT BG independent News The Bowling Green Arts Council wants to share the joy of art, and it needs more help to do that. The council, which originally formed as an outlet for local artists to exhibit their work, has expanded its mission over the years. The arts council now has a hand in four events over the year. The council’s 50+Shades of Grey art exhibit for older artists is now on display at the Wood County Council on Aging in downtown Bowling Green through March 23. The council will then help Downtown BG stage Art Walk on April 29 throughout the downtown. On June 10 the council collaborates with the city Parks and Recreation Department on Art in the Park in the Simpson Garden Park. In fall the council works with the Humane Society on Artists 4 Animals, an exhibit at the Four Corners Center, showcasing work of kindergarteners through seniors. All these endeavors, especially the exhibits, take time and effort to present. Alice Calderonello, the council’s secretary, said volunteers spent more than 50 hours to put on the 50+ Shades of Grey Show. That includes everything from preparing a prospectus for artists, collecting fees for exhibiting as well as taking in and hanging the art. It does not include all the work done by the staff at the Council on Aging. Right now, about eight to 10 members can be expected to help with such events, she said. Many of the chores are enjoyable, and a…


Leader who stood up for green space steps down

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   After standing up to save the green space while others wanted to build on the acreage, the leader of the project planning has stepped down. “I can’t begin to tell you how disappointed and chagrined I am to report the resignation of Dr. Eric Myers as chair of the steering committee for the Wooster Green,” Mayor Dick Edwards said Tuesday evening at the beginning of the City Council meeting. The work of the steering committee has been repeatedly criticized for planning too much on the green space, to not planning enough for the site, to not including enough input from young people despite an open process in the planning. After nearly two years of trying to satisfy the desires of many on just 1.7 acres, Myers submitted a letter of resignation to the mayor on Sunday. “I do not do this easily but, for the good of the project and for me, it is time to do so,” Myers wrote. “I will continue to support the project both vocally and financially. I appreciate the opportunity you gave me in helping with this important project.” Edwards said he has agonized over Myers resignation. “I don’t want to see all of Eric’s good leadership get pushed aside or get led down the wrong path,” the mayor said of the “little 1.7 acres that we all have grown to love.” “We see that little piece of ground as being integral” to the city’s Community Action…


Faculty Senate wants BGSU to become a welcome campus

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News No pickets showed up for Tuesday’s Faculty Senate meeting advocating for Bowling Green State University be designated a sanctuary campus. A crowd was expected for the on-call session, which is on the calendar but seldom convened. Much to the dismay of a dozen or so students and faculty gathered for the proceedings, signs at the entryway to the assembly room advised that the seats were saved for senators. Once roll was called Rachelle Kristof Hippler, who chairs the senate, invited them in to fill whatever empty seats were left. Aside from reports from President Mary Ellen Mazey and Provost Rodney Rogers, the only item on the agenda was a resolution calling for BGSU to become a welcome campus. The change in the wording from “sanctuary” to “welcome,” was intentional. Asked to explain the difference Christina Guenther, who introduced the resolution and had called for the session last time senate met, said that being a welcome campus better aligned with the Not In Our Town efforts. The term also was “less loaded in terms of associations,” said the professor of German. A bill, supported by U.S. Rep. Bob Latta (R-Bowling Green), has been introduced in the U.S. House calling for sanctions against sanctuary cities. Regardless of the term used, the senate after no action on the issue the previous two times it met, passed the resolution 46-6 with one abstention. The resolution was a softer version than the original petition. This time, Mazey choose not…