Two sides at odds over proposed BG charter amendment

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Words matter. The proposed Bowling Green charter amendment is intended to give the community rights to a healthy environment and livable climate. But while that may be the intent, critics say the words go far beyond those reasonable rights. The wording of the charter amendment may be difficult for voters to digest. The supporters interpret it as giving citizens a right to peaceably protest projects such as the Nexus pipeline that is planned near Bowling Green’s water treatment plant. But others see the wording as so open to interpretation that it goes far beyond what most city residents would want. It hardly seems possible the two sides of the Bowling Green charter amendment issue are talking about the same two pages of text when they describe the proposal. Lisa Kochheiser and Brad Holmes, of the Bowling Green Climate Protectors, see the charter amendment as a way for citizens to intervene if the city does not adequately protect its citizens from harm to their environment. “We’re not trying to overthrow the government. We want to strengthen our government by adding to citizen rights,” Holmes said. The majority of people don’t want pipelines in or near their communities, he said. “This is going to be the most tangible way of people legally protesting.” City attorney Mike Marsh doesn’t want pipeline in the city either. And if there were a ballot issue to not allow Nexus on city land, he would support it. But the charter amendment goes far beyond that, he said. “It’s a far reaching, almost anarchy type of proposal,” Marsh said. “It…

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What’s happening in your community (updated Sept. 25)

NEWLY POSTED: Ukulele sessions begin Sept. 27 Ukulele for Beginner and Intermediate players starts this Wednesday Sept. 27 and continues for five sessions through Nov. 5 at : a.m. to noon. Learn how to strum, play chords, and jam to familiar and new songs! No experience necessary; limited number of instruments will be provided. Held at the Wood County Public Library, firstfloor meeting room. Taught by Lisa Gruenhagen, of the BGSU College of Musical Arts. Sponsored by he BGSU Optimal Aging Institute. NEWLY POSTED: Scholars to discuss National Parks, starting Oct. 16 “Our National Parks: Photography and Geology,” will be presented Oct. 16, Oct.  30, and Nov. 13 from 1 to 2:15 p.m. at the Simpson Garden Community Center in Bowling Green. Photographic historian Dr. Andrew Hershberger will discuss high-quality reproductions of some of the earliest photographs created in the region during the 1800s. Geologist Dr. Kurt Panter will describe the geological processes that formed the incredible landscapes captured in the photographs.co-present about Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon national park areas. Sponsored by the BGSU Optimal Aging Institute and the Bowling Green Parks and Recreation.   NEWLY POSTED: Vive Ensemble to perform Stravinsky Debussy at museum, Oct. 8 The Vive Ensemble, conducted by Maria Mercedes Diaz Garcia, will perform chamber music versions of Debussy’s “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun” and Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring” on Sunday, Oct. 8,  3 p.m. in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Great Gallery as part of the museum’s Great Performances series Formed in 2016 VIVE! Ensemble has presented new and creative versions of revived classics, and has premiered new works by composers across the…


We Are One Team recruits BGSU athletes into its efforts

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News We Are One Team has upped its game when it comes to enlisting student athletes in the efforts to promote inclusion and diversity on campus. The initiative, which was launched by German graduate student Yannick Kluch and a couple other students in January 2016, is now offering Bowling Green State University students athletes the chance to earn a leadership certificate with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. “One of the challenges we faced is to get student athletes involved,” he said. Some programs especially women’s sports and men’s soccer have been on board since the beginning. Athletes “are so busy with sports and studies. We decided it would be a good idea to have a certificate program that they could apply and have something to put on their resume, something related to them as student athletes.” WA1T reached out to the Center of Leadership, which already has a program in place. Kluch said WA1T tailored it to fit the concerns of student athletes. One of those signing up is Mandy Washko, a swimmer and vice president of WA1T. She’s been involved in WA1T since last year, and sees the importance for herself and her fellow athletes “Often inclusion and diversity pushed on us,” she said. This is a way to encourage student athletes to become leaders. Teams typically have people from all over the country and even the world. To be a team leader, she said, she has to understand other people and their experiences. The training Yannick said will help student athletes reflect on their own identities. They are seen, he said, through…


Black Swamp Players’ “Baskerville” is more about laughs than logic

  By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ken Ludwig’s “Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery” gives the whodunit a whole new twist. Figuring out the mystery take a back seat to figuring out what actor will appear where and as what character speaking in what accent. The cast’s coming and goings, all facilitated by a revolving stage whips up the kind of manic comedy that makes Ludwig’s plays so beloved of community theater troupes, including the Black Swamp Players. “Baskerville” opens the Players’ 50th season this weekend. Shows are Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. and Sept. 29 and 30 at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, 1526 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green. Tickets are $12 and $10 at http://www.blackswampplayers.org or at the door. That the Players should open their 50th season with this comic take on a classic Sherlock Holmes tale is entirely fitting since Ludwig comedies and a variety of mysteries have been a staple of their seasons. They come together in “Baskerville.” The play, directed by Kistin Forman, takes the classic tale and surrounds Holmes (Eric Simpson) and his friend Dr. Watson (Lane Hakel) with a cast of  40 zany characters all played by three actors—Christina Hoekstra, Jordan Jarvis, Ben Forman, who also gets credit for the clever set design. Here the sleuth’s cogitation over the clues is  upstaged by their antics. They bounce from one character to another, sometimes in the same scene. Forman, at one point, keeps having to switch hats, literally, to play two different people. That also means slipping from a Texas…


BG to get needed warehouse space for manufacturers

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green manufacturers will soon have a place to warehouse items, rather than shipping them outside the city or using their own valuable production space. Ground was officially broken Wednesday morning for a 200,000-square-foot warehouse in an expanded area of the Wood Bridge Business Park on the east side of the city, off Dunbridge Road. “This is one of the most collaborative projects I’ve ever worked on,” Bowling Green Community Development Foundation Executive Director Sue Clark told City Council on Monday evening. The project called for teamwork with the Wood County Port Authority, Ohio Department of Transportation, JobsOhio, Poggemeyer Design Group and others, Clark said. And it called for the expansion of the business park into the next 100 acres to the east. “This is a really big event,” Mayor Dick Edwards said of the groundbreaking. “It’s fascinating how the warehouse is already underway,” Edwards said, praising Clark for her skill in navigating through the “minefields.” The warehouse is being built by Mosser Construction, which will own the site and lease it to Ohio Logistics. Clark said the additional warehouse space in the city will free up room at manufacturing sites to be used for production. “For many years, on our economic development visits, companies have relayed concerns about warehousing,” a legislative package given to council stated. “We’ve learned that, in many cases, companies are warehousing out of town.” City officials have also been told by local manufacturers that finding adequate warehousing is important because companies want to find space for new equipment or processes within their existing plants, and moving inventory…


BGSU not ready to tee off yet on corporate development on Forrest Creason site

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A plan to bring a company to campus to locate on the site of the Forrest Creason Golf Course is in the very earliest conceptual stage. President Mary Ellen Mazey said that the idea to attract a company, possibly a high tech firm, was at this point little more than a talking point. She did broach the concept recently at a luncheon meeting when university retirees when asked about the future of the golf course. She said she’s also discussed it with a number of alumni. Her interest was piqued during a chat with one alumni Mick Story, who works for Jackson National Life. Story, a former Falcon football player, said that Jackson Life located near the Michigan State University campus to have proximity to its future workforce. Such an arrangement could also fit in with the state’s Third Frontier initiative which seeks to develop high tech industry in Ohio. The company could provide internships to students. Mazey noted that the university has a strong program in supply chain management. It also has a record of successful collaboration with outside entities, including the Falcon Health Center, the Falcon Flight Center, and the Bureau of Criminal Investigation lab. But any corporate project is still very much in the conceptual phase. For any property to be leased or sold, the BGSU Board of Trustees would have to take action. While the future use of the 138–acre golf course is what initiated this line of thinking, the university also has other property it could develop, on both the west and east side of I-75 and to the…


Expert’s examples of poorly designed environments hit home at BGSU’s Optimal Aging Fair

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Speaking from 400 miles away in upstate New York, Esther Greenhouse, struck a nerve with those watching her in Bowling Green. The environmental gerontologist was the keynote speaker at the Optimal Aging Community Fair at Bowling Green State University. Greenhouse projected an image of a parking meter kiosk as an example of poor design. You could almost hear the local audience groan. The City of Bowling Green installed such meters to considerable complaint. Throughout her presentation, Greenhouse talked and showed images that could have come from just a few miles away: Four-lane roads that are hard to cross; old houses that require steps to enter; showers that require climbing into; sidewalks in poor repair; and rural roads with no sidewalks. And when she took questions, those in the audience zeroed in on precisely those issues – rural transportation, roundabouts, and parking kiosks. The problem with so many of these issues of public space, Greenhouse said, is that our built environment is designed for people driving vehicles. A small town has roads made so trucks can easily negotiate it, not so people can walk safely. “We’ve put all out transportation eggs in one basket, vehicular traffic, primarily vehicles with one person in them,” Greenhouse said. Those environments discourage people with limitations, whether age, disability, or logistical, from going out. And that makes their problems even worse. “The status quo is not benign,” she said. “We do not design for everyone.” It discourages elders from getting out, making it harder for them to get the exercise, healthy food, and the social interaction they need. These kind…