BGSU’s “Amazons” shows making art under the Nazis as darkly comic tragedy

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Frau in “Amazons and Their Men” is explicitly said not to be Leni Riefenstahl, the great German filmmaker who put her prodigious talents to the service of the Nazis. She is Riefenstahl’s moral doppelganger who allows us to view the filmmaker’s crisis of conscience between art and reality from another angle, one that puts her in even harsher light that reveals her self-deception. Art can never isolate itself from its context; reality has a way of infecting artifice. Jordan Harrison’s “Amazons and Their Men” opens tonight (Thursday, Oct. 19) at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at Bowling Green State University, and continues with shows Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Next weekend shows are Oct. 26 and 27 at 8 p.m. and Oct. 28 at 2 and 8 p.m. Advance tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for students and children; all tickets the day of the performance are $20. Tickets can be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts or the Wolfe Center box office. As the play opens, we find The Frau (Sarah Drummer ) filming what she perceives as her masterpiece “Penthesilea” a version of Greek myth in which and  the Greek hero and her enemy Achilles fall in love. It is clear what draws her to this story, Penthesilea, queen is a strong, dominant woman, not unlike how she sees The Frau sees herself. Yet the passions within the story are at odds with her controlling nature. Passion for her is a tool to achieve her goal of a visually stunning work…

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Middleton Twp. asks voters to support levy for new fire station

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Middleton Township has outgrown its fire stations. Fire equipment has steadily gotten larger, and the aging stations are bursting at the seams. “We literally have a couple inches,” between pieces of equipment, Middleton Township Fire Chief Steve Asmus said. “I always say we have to grease them to get in,” Middleton Township Trustee Penny Getz said. So the township is asking its voters to approve a 3-mill levy for 15 years, to build a new centrally located fire station for fire and EMS. The levy would generate about $456,480 a year and cost the owner of a $100,000 home about $150 a year. The township’s fire and EMS equipment is now divided between four buildings – the fire station in Haskins, the fire station in Dunbridge, the EMS station near the intersection of Ohio 25 and Ohio 582, and the new township administration building on Route 25. The Haskins and Dunbridge stations were both built in the 1950s. “We have equipment spread out all over,” Asmus said. “We would like to have it in one location. We have no place to put the equipment right now.” Township officials would like to have a centralized location that has room for the equipment including six truck bays, space for training, an area for decontamination, and a system to rid the building of exhaust emissions. The proposed station, which would sit just to the south of the new Middleton Township administration building at 21745 N. Dixie Highway, would cost an estimated $6 million. Since township officials believe it’s only a matter of time before 24/7…


What’s happening in your community (updated Oct. 18)

NEWLY POSTED: Fire safety at BGSU Harshman Hall, Oct. 19 BGSU students are invited to participate in an interactive fire safety experience offered by the Bowling Green Fire Division today, Oct. 19, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., in Harshman Hall. Participants will learn about the Rodgers Hall fire at BGSU, and walk through fire safety exhibits. People will also have the experience of navigating through a room filled with smoke. NEWLY POSTED: Peanuts Movie marathon at library, Oct. 27 The Children’s Place of the Wood County Public Library will be showing a pumpkin movie marathon all day on Friday, Oct. 27, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Drop in anytime on Friday to enjoy popcorn and watch Charlie Brown and all his friends in a favorite fall classic movie. For more information, contact the Children’s Place at 419-352-8253. NEWLY POSTED: Talk on native plants opens BGSU Sustainability Week, Oct. 23  Karen Root will open Sustainability Week activities at Bowling Green State University with a talk on “Managing Land Use to Foster Native Biodiversity,” Monday, Oct. 23, 7 p.m. in Room 207 of the Bowen Thompson Student Union on campus. Today’s landscape is dominated by human activities which puts critically important, native species and ecosystems at risk for decline. This lecture examines the question of whether our communities can develop strategies to make land use decisions more compatible for native species locally and regionally. For a complete schedule of Sustainability Week programs visit www.bgsu.edu/sustainability . NEWLY POSTED: Treehouse Troupe performs “New Kid” at library, Oct. 24 Families are encouraged to join with student groups to watch the BGSU Treehouse Troupe perform “New Kid”…


Under Friday night lights, homecoming crowd cheers on kickoff of BGSU fundraising campaign

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Under the lights Friday night, President Mary Ellen Mazey summoned up her former cheerleader self to whip up support for Bowling Green State University’s comprehensive campaign, “Changing Lives for the World.” Always a booster of the university she leads, Mazey turned her enthusiasm up a notch addressing a Homecoming Weekend crowd gathered to mark the kickoff of the public portion of the $200 million campaign. Mazey said given the good start she envisions the campaign topping the official goal, maybe raising as much as $250 million. Since the campaign was announced in spring, 2014, the university has raised $110 million in “leadership giving.” Now the university is ready to get the public engaged in the effort. The money will be used for facilities, scholarships as well as named professorships and academic programs. Mazey noted that BGSU is one of the very few colleges in Ohio that doesn’t have a named college. She’d like to see two by the time the campaign wraps up in 2020. Mazey said she and many others in attendance benefited from scholarships when they were students, and now it is time to return the favor. Two students who have benefited from those scholarships testified to their importance. Meg Burrell, former student representative on the Board of Trustees, talked about how she fell in love with BGSU. She arrived for her tour during “the worst weather,” but the tour went great.  It was her first one, and she felt this augured well for the rest. Yet 14 tours later, “I had not found another BGSU.” Receiving Presidential Leadership Scholar made her…


Have to deal with guts to get glory of jack-o-lanterns

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   As Breanna Serrato reached into the pumpkin and pulled out the guts, she got a huge grin on her face. “I love it, actually, getting messy. The squishiness of it,” the 17-year-old from Bowling Green said. Not everyone shared those feelings. At a nearby picnic table, Jessica Nekoranec, of Risingsun, grimaced as she scooped out the juicy innards. She was enjoying the carving, but the “sticking your hand in – not so much,” she said. Nearly 40 people picked out pumpkins Thursday evening for the annual jack-o-lantern making sponsored by the Wood County Park District. The pumpkins were carved at a shelter house on the Wood County Historical Center grounds, where they will be put on display for the annual Folklore and Funfest this weekend. Some came armed with their own carving equipment, accessories and definite ideas for their pumpkin art. Others just let the spirits take them. With spooky music playing in the background, the carvers got to work. “I thought at home what I’m going to do before I got down here,” said Pam Douglas, of Portage. Her plan was to turn the pumpkin into Mickey Mouse, with two Folger coffee can lids acting as the big mouse ears. “He may not end up looking like Mickey Mouse, but that’s my plan,” she said. Mary Grzybowski, of Bowling Green, won last year for carving a cat. She was hoping to repeat that winning design. “I had an idea, but it’s not turning out right,” she said. Grzybowski wore her gardening gloves for the task – more out of habit than…


BGSU trustees raise president’s pay, approve new school, & appropriate funds for Maurer Center, real estate purchases

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees gave President Mary Ellen Mazey a vote of confidence in the form of a 3-percent pay increase, plus a bonus that goes toward her deferred compensation. The raise will bring Mazey’s compensation to $424,360. Also, a contribution of $61,800, 15 percent of her pay, will be made to her deferred compensation package, as required by her contract. The board added another $50,000 contribution to her deferred compensation package, which she will receive upon leaving the university. Her contract runs through 2019. Mazey said “we’ll see” when asked about if she’d continue beyond that date. She did say it is important to see the $200 million comprehensive fundraising campaign through to successful completion. Megan Newlove, who chairs the board, the increased compensation is “based on her performance and where we are as an institution.” She cited an improvement in retention rates, enrollment, facilities upgrades, the progress in completing the master plan, and the comprehensive campaign which has raised just over $100 million. “You always want the board to be supportive,” Mazey said, not just of her, but the university. Asked to respond to those who would question the raise, she said, it came down to benchmarking what she makes compared to presidents at other similar institutions. That’s the same approach taken to determine faculty, staff, and administration salaries. In other action, the trustees approved the creation of the School of the Built Environment. The new school, within the College of Technology, Architecture, and Applied Engineering, brings together the Department of Architecture and Environmental Design and the Department…


BGSU professor Nancy Spencer was on the line at Battle of the Sexes

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Nancy Spencer was offered the chance to be a line judge at the tennis match dubbed the Battle of the Sexes, she at first demurred. Now a professor at Bowling Green State University, she was a 24-year-old at Corpus Christi, Texas, when former men’s tennis champion Bobby Riggs challenged women’s champion Billie Jean King to a match. But a few months earlier Riggs, as much as showman as an athlete, had defeated Margaret Court. Spencer said she was so “devastated” by that outcome “I had told myself I wouldn’t watch the next match.” Technically she wouldn’t be watching the match, the official said, she’d be watching the lines. He sweetened the deal by offering her a couple complementary tickets for friends and a pass that would allow her to tour the Astro Dome, then “the eighth wonder of the world,” where the match was being held. So on Sept. 20, 1973, she was at the center line making calls for a match that made history. She was one of three women officiating the match. In the wake of the release of the major motion picture “Battle of the Sexes,” starring Emma Stone and Steve Carell, Spencer will give a talk on her experience at the match Monday, Oct. 16, at 7 p.m. in room 111 in Olscamp Hall on the BGSU campus. The match, Spencer said, was big news. Making the four-hour drive from Corpus Christi she stopped to get gas, and the attendant asked her out of the blue who she thought would win the match. Few people followed tennis at the…