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College Credit Plus doesn’t always add up

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As high school graduates step across the stage to receive their diplomas, more and more of them will be taking college credits with them. This is the end of the second year of the state’s College Credit Plus a program that allows students as young as seventh grade to earn college credit. The program replaced the Post-Secondary Options Program. Pushed by Gov. John Kasich, College Credit Plus greatly expanded the options, and required school districts to make the program available. Students can take courses in their home school taught by credentialed high school teachers as well as going to campus. They can also take online classes. And more and more students are availing themselves of the opportunity, said John Fischer, vice provost for strategic enrollment planning at Bowling Green State University. He expects that as many as a third of students who enroll in BGSU next fall will bring some college credits with them. Fischer has been the lead administrator overseeing BGSU’s participation in College Credit Plus. In the past school year almost 1,900 students were enrolled in at least one College Credit Plus course at BGSU, either on the Bowling Green or Firelands campus. More than half are seniors with juniors accounting for another 700 or so. The numbers by grade drop off from there – 175 sophomores, 41 freshmen, 13 eighth graders and four seventh graders. About 300 take their courses on the BG campus or online with 685 taking classes at high school sites under the aegis of the main campus “From an enrollment perspective it is robust and incredibly strong,”…

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New music tribe gathers for sounds & support at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Kelly Rehearsal Hall was alive with 100 conversations Friday noontime. In two concentric circles composers sat on the outside and performers, producers and presenters on the inside. Each pair locked in conversation, often those inside with headphones had clamped on their ears. Those outside brandishied laptops, or scores. And then at four minute intervals a gong would sound, and those on the inside would shift down to their left. This is New Music Speed Dating, and this the New Music Gathering. The three-day gathering began in Bowling Green State University’s Moore Musical Arts Center the morning of Thursday and will continue until the early morning hours of Sunday (For schedule of events including concerts Friday featuring featured artist percussionist Steven Schick and Saturday at 8 p.m. visit: http://www.newmusicgathering.org/schedule-of-events.html.) Attendees will discuss innovative techniques, musical philosophy, funding, and ways to reach new audiences. About 400 people contemporary music devotees are expected to attend. New Music Speed Dating embodies the spirit of the event, whimsical and a bit theatrical in its construct, yet practical. The event is a signature feature of the Gatherings. This is the third. The first was in San Francisco Conservatory and the second at Peabody Conservatory Baltimore. Coming to Bowling Green, said Danny Felsenfeld, one of the founders, was natural. “This is the first time we went to a school that’s known for being a center of new music,” he said. “That’s why you come to Bowling Green to learn to compose and perform new music.” The vision for the gathering was for something “simple, stripped down, and inexpensive,” Felsenfeld said. The…


New public safety director sees BGSU police headed in the right direction

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As a veteran of the Bowling Green State University police force, new Chief Mike Campbell is confident the department is headed in the right direction. Campbell has been with the force since April, 2011, when he was hired by then Chief Monica Moll as a patrol captain. When Moll left last fall to become director of public safety at Ohio State University, he was named interim chief and earlier this week hired as the permanent replacement. In an interview, Thursday, Campbell said: “We are moving in a positive direction.” That includes being in the process of seeking accreditation. Recently Campbell has been one of the campus officials called on to address how BGSU handles cases of sexual assault. The issue was pushed to the fore by a victim who complained on Facebook about how she was treated, prompting a protest late in the semester. The complaints did not target the police, still Campbell said that it is always worthwhile to look at ways to improve police procedures. The Task Force on Sexual Assault that was created by President Mary Ellen Mazey in the wake of the protest offers such an opportunity. “The major focus of the task force is to look at the process we have and evaluate what we’ve done,” Campbell said. This would include looking at “new and inventive ways” of handling sexual assault “as well as for prevention and education opportunities that can be focused on.” This issue is just one of many where the university police must interact with the separate procedures regulating student conduct. This could mean dual investigations…


BGSU turns to Campbell to lead public safety

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News   Bowling Green State University has turned to an insider to fill the position of police chief and director of public safety. In a letter to BGSU faculty, staff and students, Vice President for Finance and Administration Sheri Stoll announced that Michael Campbell, who has been serving as the interim chief since last October, has been named as permanent chief. The university conducted a nationwide search, eventually selecting three finalists. In addition to Campbell, the search committee interviewed candidates from Northeast Ohio and Ann Arbor. Campbell took over as interim chief when Monica Moll left BGSU to become director of public safety at Ohio State University. It was Moll who hired Campbell as a patrol captain in April, 2011. According to Stoll’s message: “In his time at BGSU, his leadership has been critical in creating important training and professional development programs and opportunities for his officers.” He serves on a number of campus and town-gown committees, including Not in Our Town. Campbell takes over as the campus is being roiled by complaints about how sexual assaults are being handled by the university. Campbell participated in press briefings and interviews about the issue, explaining the department’s procedures. He said on the day of a protest that drew 200 people that he is always looking at ways to improve how the department does things. During another interview, he said, that his officers will do what they can to assist victims, including accompanying them to the Bowling Green City Police of the assault occurred off campus. Sexual assault cases, whether or not they are prosecuted, are also…


William Easterly touts the power of poor people, not experts, to address poverty

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News William Easterly believes that poor people are the key to ending poverty. He doesn’t have to look far to find a prime example in his father, Nathan William  Easterly, retired Bowling Green State University professor of biology. His father, Easterly said, came from southern West Virginia. He was 3 years old when his father died. It was the middle of the Great Depression. “It was really a heroic effort by him, his mother and his family for him to be able to climb out of that and become a professor at BGSU,” Easterly said “It was much easier for me as a professor’s kid to become a professor. That was the easy part. The hardest part was done by my father. And I’m enormously grateful to BGSU for making that possible for my father.” Easterly followed his father’s academic path, though, in economics, not biology. He chose the field because it brought together his passion for mathematics and social justice. “He got a PhD; I got a PhD,” the younger Easterly said. “He became a professor; I became a professor. He’s my role model. I really admire enormously what my father accomplished in his career. He had much further to go then I did.” His father was present Sunday, when BGSU bestowed an honorary doctorate on his son in recognition of accomplishments as one of the world’s most read, most cited and most recognized economists. Part of him still remains in Bowling Green. He stayed in town as long as he could until opportunities elsewhere forced him to leave. That included doctoral studies at…


Faculty celebrate milestones as BGSU trustees act on promotion & tenure

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University celebrated milestones in faculty academic careers with the granting of promotion and, for some, tenure, approved by the Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees at its May 5 meeting. Promotion to Full Professor Timothy Brackenbury, communication sciences and disorders; Ellen Broido, higher education and student affairs; Larissa Szporluk Celli, English; Lynne Hewitt, communication sciences and disorders; Bob Lee, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; Mingsheng Li, finance; John Liederbach, human services; Shannon Orr, political science; Andrew Pelletier, music performance studies; Valeria Grinberg Pla, romance and classical studies; Maria Rizzo, mathematics and statistics; Charles Saenz, music performance studies; Ray Schneider, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; and Junfeng Shang, mathematics and statistics Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor Leonel Carrillo, humanities, BGSU Firelands; Hyungsuk Choo, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; Gregory Decker, musicology, composition and theory; Christopher Dietz, musicology, composition and theory; Stefan Fritsch, political science; Benjamin Greene, history; Adam Fullenkamp, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; David Hampton, School Intervention Services; Lisa Hanasono, School of Media and Communication; Daniel Kelley, natural and social sciences, Firelands; Starr Keyes, School Intervention Services; Hee Soon Lee, human services; Mary-Jon Ludy, public and allied health; Vera Lux, library teaching and learning; Kate Magsamen-Conrad, School of Media and Communication; Mariana Mereoiu, School Intervention Services; Marco Nardone, physics and astronomy; Susan Nelson, music performance studies; Sarah Rainey, School of Cultural and Critical Studies; William Sawaya, management; Robert Snyder, library teaching and learning; Mihai Staic, mathematics and statistics; Jennifer Stucker, School of Art; Liangfeng Sun, physics and astronomy;…


Union contract bears fruit for BGSU lecturers

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees had a full house for its afternoon business session Friday. Being the last meeting of the academic year, the board had approvals for tenure and promotion on its agenda. The room was packed with those faculty, their colleagues, and family. One even came via Skype from across the Atlantic. Others, however, couldn’t attend because they had final exams to give. Friday’s list was larger than usual with 81 names. That full house represents the fruit of new provisions in the university’s contract with the BGSU-Faculty Association, which sets guidelines for non-tenured track faculty to be promoted. Of the 81 on the promotion and tenure list, 23 lecturers were promoted to senior lecturer and 17 instructors were promoted to lecturer. Also, 14 associate professors were promoted to full and 27 assistant professors received tenure and promotion to associate professor. (Complete list: http://bgindependentmedia.org/faculty-celebrate-milestones-as-bgsu-trustees-act-on-promotion-tenure/) Arts and Sciences Dean Ray Craig said later that the contract has meant procedures are more uniform across the colleges. As dean he had the most names to read – 48, with 33 of those were for promotions within the NTTF ranks. General Studies Writing had the most. Over the next few years the numbers of NTTF promotions will decline, he said,  as those eligible now will have already been promoted. NTTF faculty – instructors, lecturers, senior lecturers – make up 33 percent of BGSU’s full-time faculty on the main campus. In other action from the trustees’ Academic Affairs Committee, the full board approved the merger of the departments of German, Russian, East Asian Languages and…