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After split with UT, BGSU aims to expand its nursing program

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Like a cell that splits in order to reproduce, the nursing collaboration between Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo is coming apart. The goal is to graduate more nurses, said Interim Dean Sue Houston. The institutions announced this week the end of the collaboration which dates back to about 1972, Houston said. Originally BGSU’s partner was the Medical College of Ohio, before its merger with UT. It was UT, she said, that initiated the dissolution of the collaboration. “The University of Toledo approached us about their desire to be independent and pursue the nursing programs on their own,” Houston said. Once BGSU officials studied the options they realized it offered opportunities for BGSU as well. The separation has been “very agreeable” and “collaborative,” she said. There will be no change for either students already in the program or the class that enters in fall. Students who enter in fall, 2019 will be in the new program. Houston said the university now enrolls 100-120 students in a class. About 50 move into the clinical rotation. The culling of students after the second year is rigorous. All the pre-nursing students are ranked based on their performance in the first two years of pre-requisite courses and only the top students are accepted into the clinical rotation. Some are able to continue in a small collaboration with Mercy College. For some students “nursing may not be the major for them,” Houston said. “They don’t quite understand the science they need.” But “there are a many great students who might not quite have that GPA and might be great nurses, and it’s frustrating right now that we’re not able to meet the needs of those students. … It’s a very, very competitive process to get into the clinical rotation.” In some semesters the standard is higher than to get into medical school. By moving more pre-nursing students along to the clinical stage without lowering standards, “there’s…

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BGSU faculty granted tenure and promotion

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University celebrated the scholarly and creative achievements of 43 faculty members on May 4 when the board of trustees awarded promotion and tenure. The trustees also approved the hiring as associate professor with tenure of Dr. Neil Baird, for the English department. Baird joins BGSU from Western Illinois University, where he is an associate professor and director of the University Writing Center. Faculty promoted to full professor: • Dr. Neil Englehart, political science • Dr. Gabriel Matney, School of Teaching and Learning • Dr. Wei Ning, mathematics and statistics • Dr. Jeanne Novak, School of Intervention Services • Dr. Kurt Panter, School of Earth, Environment and Society • Linda Rich, library teaching and learning • Dr. Nancy Spencer, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies • Dr. Mikhail Zamkov, physics and astronomy Receiving tenure: • Dr. Mohamad Mayyas, engineering technologies Tenure and promotion to associate professor: • Dr. Kelly Balistreri, sociology • Thomas Castillo, theatre and film • Dr. Douglas Ewing, marketing • Dr. Nicole Jackson, history • Dr. Andrew Kear, School of Earth, Environment and Society • Dr. Rebecca Kinney, School of Cultural and Critical Studies • Dr. Sidra Lawrence, musicology, composition and theory • Dr. Christina Lunceford, higher education and student affairs • Dr. Alexis Ostrowski, chemistry • Leigh-Ann Pahapill, School of Art • Dr. Shannon Pelini, biological sciences • Dr. Kimberly Rogers, mathematics and statistics • Dr. Jerry Schnepp, visual communication and technology education • Chris Willis, School of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Policy • Dr. Alexey Zayak, physics and astronomy Promotion to senior lecturer: • Cynthia Bailey, applied sciences • Elizabeth Burns, mathematics and statistics • Abigail Cloud, English • Ann Darke, mathematics and statistics • Dr. Daria Filippova, mathematics and statistics • Dr. Eric Mandell, physics and astronomy • Dr. Christina Miller, mathematics and statistics • Dr. James Pfundstein, world languages and cultures • Amanda Rzicznek, English • Dr. Allen Rogel, physics and astronomy • Kimberly…


Solungga Liu performs musical treasures at Mother’s Day recital at Toledo Museum

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Solungga Liu remembers the day well. A hot, rainy afternoon in her native Taiwan, and she was bored. So she randomly pulled a score from the shelf in her studio. It was the music of Charles Tomlinson Griffes. She did not know his work much beyond his piece “The White Peacock.” She sat at her piano and began to sight-read through the music. She played through the entire book. “Right at that moment I couldn’t stop,” she remembers. “I fell in love with his works.” That passion for the music of Griffes, whose work sits at the intersection of Romanticism and Impressionism, will be on display Sunday at 3 p.m. when Liu performs a Great Performances recital in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Great Gallery. The program will include Griffes’ transcription of “Les Parfums de la nuit,” the second movement of Ravel’s orchestral piece “Iberia,” a piece she premiered after its discovery. Music by Cesar Franck and Amy Beach, another little appreciated American composer, will also be on the program. Two years after Liu’s discovery of Griffes’ music, she recorded “The Pleasure-Dome of Kubla Khan: The Piano Works of Charles Tomlinson Griffes” on Centaur Records. By that time Liu had joined the faculty of the College of Musical Arts at Bowling Green State University. The Toledo concert will be similar to the one she presented last November at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. It was there that the Debussy transcription had been discovered. Liu said that Griffes, who was born in Elmira, NY, had studied for four years in Berlin. He heard an early performance of Debussy’s “Iberia.” He was so taken with the piece, that he faithfully transcribed its intricacies for solo piano. Back in the United States he taught music at the high school in Tarrytown, NY, a job he hated. But it did give him access to New York City. He traveled to the offices of the publisher G….


Evacuation order lifted at BGSU

An evacuation order on the Bowling Green State University was lifted at 3:35 p.m., less than 30 minutes after employees were told to leave  Shatzel Hall and Administration Building and to avoid the area on the west end of campus because of a gas leak. University spokesperson Dave Kielmeyer said the leak as in front of Shatzel. “Only a small number of people working in Shatzel since summer has begun.”


Poli sci prof’s life stories are the last word on getting things done

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Every year the Mortar Board honor society at Bowling Green State University selects a professor to deliver a “last lecture,” a speech to culminate the university experience. The speaker should be an “accomplished professor” distinguished for scholarship, leadership and service. That’s what the email that Melissa Miller, professor in political science, received early one January morning said. She accepted the honor with little thought, or the assistance of her morning coffee. She was, she said, “putty in the hands” of Mortar Board. It was only after some questions from her husband and political science department colleague Neal Englehart that the magnitude of the task at hand dawned on her – probably about the same time the sun dawned on her Perrysburg home. He wondered: How long should lecture be? What is the lecture supposed to be about? “I’ve got nothing,” Miller realized. She related this dilemma to those attending her “last lecture” recently. “Nine Lives Later: What I Learned about How to Get Things Done” encapsulated what she would say if this was the last lecture she’d ever give. In the end, Miller addressed this challenge the way she had so many others in her life and career dating back to her undergraduate years at Cornell University. Those challenges could be finishing her doctoral dissertation or making a Halloween costume for her 3-year-old. They occurred while competing on a college forensics team and climbing a mountain in Alaska. “I always find a way,” she said. “I always come through. I have a pretty good grasp of how to get things done.” When faced with daunting tasks, Miller explained in her lecture that she relies on three basic techniques – use what’s at hand; start the caffeine drip; and call a friend. When she was on the speech team at Cornell she found herself competing in impromptu speaking for the first time. She failed miserably in her first attempt. Then her coach explained that all…


BGSU graduates told to make their voices heard

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Beth Macy got her start as a writer in a stand of lilacs near her home. The youngest, late arriving, child in a family of four, she spent a lot of time alone. She would hide among the lilacs and listen to those who came by. She heard the “strange and beautiful, about justice and injustice.” That’s what Macy would write about years later as a journalist, winning national honors for her books, magazine articles, and newspaper reporting. Macy told the graduates at the Saturday morning commencement ceremonies at Bowling Green State University that after spending four years or so “honing your distinctive voice, now it’s your turn to be heard.” She continued: “Don’t forget to see your corner of the world with your slant, that tilted way of looking at life that only you and you alone can provide. Find your own stand of lilacs and be still among them. Look up and reach out.” If Macy at 53 could whisper in the ear of her 22-year-old self, she tell her to “remember the lilacs.” Interim Provost John Fischer said Macy has made a career writing about “the outsiders and underdogs.” She’s authored three books, including a forthcoming exploration of the opioid epidemic. Macy recalled her graduation day when she was likely concerned about how she was going to move all her belongings to Columbus in a 20-year-old VW Beetle. Would the car even make it? The only thing holding the battery in place was a cutting board wedged in the back seat. Awaiting her was her first job, a $200 a week position with a city magazine that largely involved updating the publication’s restaurant guide. The idea for becoming writer stemmed from a fourth grade teacher giving her the book “Harriet the Spy.” Here Macy said she found a kindred spirit. At BGSU, she found people to help her shape her own talent advising her she should be able to come back…


As BGSU aviation program reaches new heights, trustees approve expanding flight center’s footprint

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The aviation program at Bowling Green State University is flying high. Friday Board of Trustees voted to double the size of the property the university leases to North Star Aviation, the firm that provides flight training for BGSU aviation students. That property will be used to build a hanger to house the additional four planes that will be purchased to serve the growing student body. The Bowling Green Flight Center will also expanded, including room for a new jet flight simulator. “We always hoped we would need this action, but we didn’t expect it to come so soon,” Sherideen Stoll, the university’s chief financial officer, told the trustees. In fall, 2014, 70 students were enrolled in Flight Technology and Operations. That program now has 194 students. The original lease for the center, which opened spring, 2015, was for four acres. The new lease expands that to 8.2 acres. Groundbreaking on the hanger will be able to start immediately. The flight center expansion is still in the planning stages. The trustees also approved new fees that will be charged as the center moves toward training on multi-engine planes. Stoll indicated that further expansion will occur off-site. The air space can only be used for a limited number of flights, and the Wood County Airport is approaching that limit. In another public-private partnership, the trustees approved a joint use agreement between BGSU and Cedar Fair, the company that owns Cedar Point, related to the construction of an academic building in Sandusky to support the university’s new degree in resort and attraction management. The state is providing $800,000 for the academic building for what’s expected to be 200 majors once the program is launched. The building will provided living space, classrooms, conference spaces, and offices. The degree-completion program will be open to employees of other companies, beside Cedar Fair. Students can take the first two years of the program on the Firelands campus. The trustees also approved…