Business

Newbery Award winning author Katherine Applegate to visit Gathering Volumes, June 2

From GATHERING VOLUMES Katherine Applegate is the author of The One and Only Ivan, winner of the Newbery Medal. Crenshaw spent over twenty weeks on the New York Times’ children’s bestseller list. Home of the Brave continues to be included on state reading lists, summer and class reading lists. With the release of her latest middle-grade novel about embracing diversity, Wishtree, local bookstore Gathering Volumes participated in Nationwide Wishing Day with a day full of activities culminating in a children’s cooking contest. Gathering Volumes’ event was deemed the most creative and Katherine Applegate is headed to Perrysburg to help celebrate. Ms. Applegate will be at Gathering Volumes on Saturday, June 2. Seating for the event will begin at 4:30 p.m. After a presentation and discussion, Ms. Applegate will be available to sign books. Ms. Applegate won the 2013 Newbery Medal for The One and Only Ivan. This annual award, granted by the American Library Association, recognizes the previous year’s “most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.” The story is written from the viewpoint of a gorilla living in a glass cage in a shopping mall. According to the award committee, “Katherine Applegate gives readers a unique and unforgettable gorilla’s-eye-view of the world that challenges the way we look at animals and at ourselves.” Her latest novel, Wishtree, is narrated by Red, an unforgettable oak tree who is many rings old. Red is the neighborhood “wish tree” – people write their wishes on pieces of cloth and tie them to Red’s branches. The animals who seek refuge in Red’s hollows help Red grant a wish for a child that moves into the neighborhood. Funny, deep, warm, and nuanced, Wishtree is Katherine Applegate at her finest, writing from the heart and from a completely unexpected point of view. Denise Phillips, owner of Gathering Volumes says, “Ms. Applegate’s novel, Crenshaw, tells the story of Jackson, whose family has fallen on hard times, and his imaginary friend, Crenshaw. Crenshaw is a large, outspoken cat who comes into Jackson’s life when Jackson needs help. It…

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BG voters to decide on Sunday sales at Sunset Bistro

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Voters in a section of Bowling Green’s west side will get to decide one ballot issue next week that won’t cost them a penny – except later when they order a drink while dining out. On Tuesday’s primary election ballot, voters in Precinct 110 will vote on allowing Sunset Bistro to serve wine and liquor on Sundays, from 10 a.m. to midnight. The citizens included in this vote are surrounded by Foxgate, Meeker Street, Wooster Street and Conneaut Avenue. Sunset Bistro, owned by Prudy Brott, at 1220 W. Wooster St., has been open now for three years. The restaurant serves beer, wine and liquor on every other day of the week, but on Sundays can only serve beer and Verdi, a type of sparkling champagne. “We’d just like it to be like the rest of the days of the week,” Brott said. Restaurant employees went door-to-door to collect petition signatures to get the issue on the ballot. “We had such a great response,” Brott said. Customers at the bistro often ask for wine or liquor on Sundays, during the restaurant’s weekly brunch or later during evening dinners. “They want to have a glass of wine or a cocktail,” she said. There have been times when diners have left the restaurant when they find out that wine and liquor are not available on Sundays. And one regular group of diners often goes to one of their party’s homes for a drink then return to Sunset Bistro for dinner, Brott said. The lack of liquor sales was particularly detrimental this past New Year’s Eve that fell on a Sunday. People were reluctant to make reservations, she said. “It limits what we can do here,” Brott said. Even if the voters pass the Sunday sales issue, Brott will still have to apply to the State Liquor Control for the proper license. “It wouldn’t be immediate,” she said. But people have been very supportive. “We serve…


Toledo Museum celebrates 200 years of Libbey Glass

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART To commemorate 200 years of excellence in glassmaking, the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) has organized Celebrating Libbey Glass, 1818-2018. The exhibition will present more than 175 outstanding examples of glass from TMA’s renowned collection as well as objects and materials from the Libbey Inc. archives, including pressed glass tableware, Amberina art glass, Libbey’s world-renowned “brilliant” cut glass (including TMA’s glorious Libbey Punch Bowl), mid-century modern barware and examples of more recent “premium give-away” glasses for companies. Celebrating Libbey Glass will be on view exclusively at TMA beginning May 4 and continuing through Nov. 25 in the Glass Pavilion. “As founders of the Toledo Museum of Art, the Libbey family was instrumental to the advancement of arts education and art appreciation in this region,” said Brian Kennedy, TMA’s Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey director. “It is our honor to recognize the Libbey legacy of innovative glass design, practices and production and to celebrate the Museum’s longstanding commitment to the medium through collections development, exhibition, research and programming.” The story of the Libbey Glass Company began 200 years ago in East Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established as the New England Glass Works in 1818, the company rose to prominence in the 19th century, cementing its reputation as one of the most successful American producers of fine glass tableware. As the general manager of the company from 1872, William L. Libbey (1823-1883) saw the business through difficult economic times, eventually taking over the firm’s lease to become owner. His son, Edward Drummond Libbey (1854-1925), joined his father as partner in 1880. Promoted to superintendent in 1883 at the age of 29 when his father died, the young Edward faced serious challenges with rising fuel costs and growing labor unrest. In 1888 he made the decision to move the entire operation to Toledo, Ohio, because of the abundance of natural gas and high-silica content sand, as well as its proximity to shipping and rail lines. Continuing its production of both high-end and everyday…


Chamber of Commerce: “All of us will benefit from an enhanced, state-of-the-art  school district”

The Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors has voted to endorse the School Bond issue.  From the business and economic development perspective, there is a strong link between quality schools and local commerce.  We know from first-hand experience that new business, whether it has one employee to 500+, often the quality of the schools factor into the decision to locate or not in our district. We know recruiting and retaining a skilled and diverse workforce is a major factor that determines our economic growth.  A quality district with state-of-the-art facilities is often a priority for new hires who are looking to move into our area. If these new hires stay, they add to growth of our housing, retail, churches, parks and more. All of us who live in the BG School District benefits from that commerce as well.   We also recognize that time is of the essence.  Based on the 4/26/2018 Bowling Green City Schools Tax Analysis, compiled and presented by Rockmill Consulting Firm, the costs of the proposed project will only continue to rise. Mr. Conley noted that since the November 2017 election, the cost of our project has already risen by 4M.  The cost is predicted to continue to increase due to interest rates, inflation, and the rising construction costs. To curb costs, waiting is not an option. And to the current and future Bobcats, our community owes you state-of-the-art facilities and opportunities to become the best you can be in a very competitive world.  And for the future, we want you to continue the cycle of investment and commerce in BG, where you too will be assessing the quality of the school district for your own children. The bottom line is this, all of us will benefit from an enhanced, state-of-the-art  school district that is competitive to area school districts. Such a school district is a powerful attraction to new business and the domino effect of strengthening local commerce, the workforce, and the  over-all…


Money on a mission: Values-based investment pays off

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Companies that pursue policies that help the environment can also help investors’ bottom-line. That’s the foundation of the strategy of Terra Alpha Investment, said Amy Dine, director of advocacy for the company. Dine served as keynote speaker at a Socially Responsible Investing Workshop held Tuesday at Bowling Green State University. Formed three years ago, Terra Alpha Investments uses measures of  environmental productivity to determine which companies it will invest in. This approach is not “a niche,” Dine said, nor a fad. Sustainable investing, she said, represented about 20 percent of all professionally managed funds in 2016, about $8.72 trillion. That’s up, she said, by 33 percent, from 2014, and expected to grow when 2018 figures are reported. Investor putting their money where their values are, is not a new approach, Dine said. It began with investors who wanted to invest their money in companies that aligned with their religious faith, or at least, disinvest from tobacco, liquor, and other “sin”-related firms. That approach, Dine said, foundered some because the returns did not match the market. Still faith-based investing remains strong. The BGSU workshop was co-sponsored by Munn Wealth Management, a Maumee firm heavily engaged in faith-based investing. The second wave of values-based investment was prompted, Dine said, by activists in the 1970s and 1980s, looking for ways to protest apartheid in South Africa, industrial disasters including the nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl and the chemical release at Bhopal, India, as well as domestic concerns such as brownfield sites. These activists saw having proxy votes as a way to sway corporate behavior. Now the third way uses corporate practices to decide which companies to invest in. This is more than protest, but a realization that those companies paying attention to how they use natural resources, that are diligent about the treatment of those in their supply chain, and that govern in a transparent and for long-term success are just better companies, she said. Chemistry Professor Neocles…


BG sees big investments by local manufacturers

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Steel on the skyline is a beautiful site to Bowling Green officials. “If you drive around, you can see steel going up in a number of places,” said Sue Clark, executive director of Bowling Green Economic Development. “That’s exciting for those of us in economic development.” Clark gave her annual report during last week’s meeting of city and business leaders. Bowling Green added new acreage to Wood Bridge Business Park, plus will be adding a much needed second entrance and exit to the park, this one on Bowling Green Road East. The 100-plus acres added to the business park was the result of teamwork by the city, Wood County, Wood County Port Authority, JobsOhio, Ohio Department of Transportation, and the Bowling Green City Schools. “These entities pulled together to get things going in record time,” Clark said. In 2017, the city saw its manufacturers invest $48 million in new equipment, and $8 million in construction. “This is a signal to us that our economy here is strong,” Clark said. The city’s manufacturers employ 4,125 full-time workers, and another 75 part-time employees. And half of the 40 companies that responded to a city survey said they have plans to add employees in 2018. However, with many companies hiring, the pool of employees to choose from is a problem, Clark said. “Workforce continues to be a pressing issue,” she said. “We must continue to be innovative in attracting new businesses and persistent in keeping them.” Some of Bowling Green’s economic development highlights last year included: Apio Inc., formerly Greenline, purchased eight acres in Innovative Tech Park to build a 20,000-square-foot refrigerated warehouse. This will free-up production space at their current facility on South Dixie Highway, plus add another 30 jobs. The city and BG Economic Development entered into an agreement with Dick Carpenter for 60 acres adjacent to Wood Bridge Business Park, with the goal of expanding the park. A 200,000-square-foot warehouse is being…


Genius Garage revs up college students’ careers

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Speed is part of Casey Putsch’s life. He drives race cars. He designs race cars. Putsch wants to speed up students’ progress on their career paths by working on vintage race cars. So now he’s devoting his time to Genius Garage, an educational non-profit that supercharges the resumes of college students from Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo by giving them hands-on experience working on automotive and aerospace engineering projects. Speaking Saturday afternoon at an open house to honor volunteers who support the program as teachers and mentors, Putsch said the project is a way to help students in a variety of disciplines to put the theoretical knowledge they learn in class to use on a real world project. Those projects, vintage race cars, prove their worth on the race track, including at the Indianapolis Speedway, with Putsch at the wheel. The project’s newest venture will even take flight. Putsch started Genius Garage five years ago. This year he moved the project to a Quonset hut at 400 Bishop Road in Bowling Green. Saturday the project’s three vintage Indy-style race cars were on display for a crowd of supporters, local business owners, university representatives, politicians, family members, and local residents. Also on view was a World War I Sopwith Camel airplane in the early stages of construction, and a high-efficiency prototype car with a recyclable chassis that Putsch is designing. Putsch said the idea for Genius Garage came after he’d launched his career following his engineering and design studies at Ohio State University. His first educational endeavor involved working with the OSU electric motorcycle project. He also would organize large-scale charity functions. Putsch looked around and realized students didn’t have the opportunities to gain the kind of experience that would set them apart in the job market. Five years ago, he said, he put much of his life on hold to develop the Genius Garage. He had the opportunity to move…