Articles by David Dupont

Immigrant Solidarity Committee to gather Oct. 1

From LA CONEXION DE WOOD COUNTY La Conexion de Wood County’s Immigrant Solidarity Committee will hold a gathering on Sunday Oct. 1 at 4 p.m. in the meeting  room of the First Presbyterian Church on South Church Street in Bowling Green. This will not be a formal meeting, but instead an opportunity to plan and share ideas about upcoming projects including a partnership with the Wood County Library to build oral histories of immigration stories, November’s event hosting Steve Tobocman of Global Detroit, and more. Light snacks and beverages will be available. (Infused water included.) La Conexion also been approached by a DACA recipient from Fostoria who is need of support in covering the $495 renewal fee and donations will be accepted on the recipient’s behalf. Donations are not required, but will be much appreciated. If more money than is needed is collected, the balance will be held to help to assist any other DACA recipients who come forward needing assistance, or to help families who need assistance in paying for legal documents such as certified birth certificates, government issues passports or IDs, or other official documents they need in order to ensure that their family can remain together. Families in need are identified by La Conexion’s services or through referrals from ABLE’s Immigrant Rights program. Those unable to attend but would like to help support this DACA recipient, can mail your donation to La Conexion directly: La Conexion P.O. Box 186 Bowling Green, OH 43402 Include a note in the memo line or include a message indicating the donation is to support DACA related fees, as well as a…


STEM on the Park embraces every day science & fun

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The STEM disciplines – science, technology, engineering and mathematics – are infused in daily living. Don’t believe it? Take a stroll through STEM in the Park that sprawled inside and outside of the Bowling Green State University Field House Saturday. You’ll see feats of engineering, and owls, starfish and other fauna from around the world, and bottles with multicolored water  that illustrate the ocean layers. You’ll also see kids making pizza dough, and taking those first tentative sounds on musical instruments. You’ll see kids tumbling and watching bubbles float high above them. And don’t forget the slime. That was the favorite of Melissa Works’ four children, age 4 to 10. Logan, 8, was especially enthusiastic about the slime, his sister Rozlyn, 6, liked the bubbles and gymnastics, and all including Benjamin, 10, and Serena. 4, were enjoying the free hot dog and mac and cheese lunch provided by Tony Packo’s. Well, Serena was more interested in leaving her mark with a crayon to the paper table coverings. Work said that the activities held the interest of her crew. They still had the outside to explore, she said. This is the eighth year the event has been staged on the campus of Bowling Green State University, Emilio Duran, who teaches in the College of Education and Human Development, said the idea for the event first occurred to him and his wife, Lena Duran, who also teaches in the college. The college, they realized, offers many events for students and teachers. “We wanted to do something for families,” Duran said. “This is a community event. It’s…


BGSU students set sights on breaking Guinness record

The Bowling Green State University Homecoming Student Steering Committee is attempting to break the Guinness World Record for the longest line of toothpaste tubes. The current record, set in China in December 2016, is 3,018 tubes, or 3.22 miles. The committee hopes to collect at least 3,019 standard (3 oz.) tubes of toothpaste by Oct. 5. If this goal is reached, the world record attempt will be recorded on the field in Doyt Perry Stadium following the Homecoming football game Oct. 15. After the official attempt, the toothpaste will be donated to America’s ToothFairy: The National Children’s Oral Health Foundation. As a resource provider, the organization works to increase access to oral health care by supporting nonprofit clinics and community partners delivering education, prevention and treatment services for underserved children. Donations can be dropped off at the Office of Campus Activities, 401 Bowen-Thompson Student Union.


American Brass Quintet gets down to business during BGSU residency

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even at the top of their game, the members of the American Brass Quintet still understand the importance of daily practice. John Rojak, the bass trombonist for the ensemble, said he started practicing for four hours a day back when he was an undergraduate, and he’s just now easing off on that routine. Not that it’s easy given the musicians’ heavy workloads as teachers, freelance performers, and members of a pioneering brass ensemble. The American Brass Quintet has been in residence at Bowling Green State University since Wednesday as guests of the Hansen Musical Arts Series. They’ve performed a mini-recital, held instrumental classes, coached, and consulted with student composers. Their visit will culminate tonight (Friday, Sept. 22) with a free concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. On Thursday afternoon they met with students to talk about the business side of music. While the quintet represents the core of their work artistically, it is just part of how they earn their livings. They all play in a variety of settings, from chamber orchestras such as Orchestra of St. Luke’s or the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra to Broadway shows. Rojak spent years in the pit of “Les Miserables.” Those hours in the practice room at what was then Lowell State College were the bass trombonist’s launching pad. Lowell State was his “safety school” and he was playing so he could get out. He ended up transferring to the Juilliard School of Music. But Rojak said he got the most important music lesson playing in amateur bands. He recalled during the…


We Are One Team recruits BGSU athletes into its efforts

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News We Are One Team has upped its game when it comes to enlisting student athletes in the efforts to promote inclusion and diversity on campus. The initiative, which was launched by German graduate student Yannick Kluch and a couple other students in January 2016, is now offering Bowling Green State University students athletes the chance to earn a leadership certificate with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. “One of the challenges we faced is to get student athletes involved,” he said. Some programs especially women’s sports and men’s soccer have been on board since the beginning. Athletes “are so busy with sports and studies. We decided it would be a good idea to have a certificate program that they could apply and have something to put on their resume, something related to them as student athletes.” WA1T reached out to the Center of Leadership, which already has a program in place. Kluch said WA1T tailored it to fit the concerns of student athletes. One of those signing up is Mandy Washko, a swimmer and vice president of WA1T. She’s been involved in WA1T since last year, and sees the importance for herself and her fellow athletes “Often inclusion and diversity pushed on us,” she said. This is a way to encourage student athletes to become leaders. Teams typically have people from all over the country and even the world. To be a team leader, she said, she has to understand other people and their experiences. The training Yannick said will help student athletes reflect on their own identities. They are seen, he said, through…


Gish, Women’s Center, Geography Department moving to make room for Maurer Center

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University is making final preparations for the transformation of Hanna Hall into the Robert W. and Patricia A. Maurer Center, the new home for the College of Business. A transformational gift from the Maurers of Bowling Green provided major support for the new facility that will bear their names in recognition of their longtime service and generosity to BGSU. The $44.5 million renovation and expansion will include high-tech classrooms, an atrium gathering place, a student success center, a café and a wide range of meeting areas and other amenities to keep BGSU at the forefront of educating business students. Construction will begin in fall 2018. In preparation, the current occupants of the building – the Department of Geography, the Gish Film Theater and the Women’s Center – will be relocated to new homes at the end of the current academic year. According to Provost and Senior Vice President Rodney Rogers, the geography department will move to Hayes Hall to be closer to the Department of Geology, which along with the Department of the Environment and Sustainability makes up the School of Earth, Environment and Society. Eventually the entire school will be brought together. The Gish Film Theater will be moved to the Bowen-Thompson Student Union Theater. The theater will continue to recognize the contributions of Ohio actresses Dorothy and Lillian Gish with a display featuring photographs and other items from Lillian Gish’s estate. The rest of the Gish collection will be housed in University Libraries. “This project allows us to meet the needs of tomorrow’s students while honoring the legacy of the…


Black Swamp Players’ “Baskerville” is more about laughs than logic

  By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ken Ludwig’s “Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery” gives the whodunit a whole new twist. Figuring out the mystery take a back seat to figuring out what actor will appear where and as what character speaking in what accent. The cast’s coming and goings, all facilitated by a revolving stage whips up the kind of manic comedy that makes Ludwig’s plays so beloved of community theater troupes, including the Black Swamp Players. “Baskerville” opens the Players’ 50th season this weekend. Shows are Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. and Sept. 29 and 30 at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, 1526 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green. Tickets are $12 and $10 at http://www.blackswampplayers.org or at the door. That the Players should open their 50th season with this comic take on a classic Sherlock Holmes tale is entirely fitting since Ludwig comedies and a variety of mysteries have been a staple of their seasons. They come together in “Baskerville.” The play, directed by Kistin Forman, takes the classic tale and surrounds Holmes (Eric Simpson) and his friend Dr. Watson (Lane Hakel) with a cast of  40 zany characters all played by three actors—Christina Hoekstra, Jordan Jarvis, Ben Forman, who also gets credit for the clever set design. Here the sleuth’s cogitation over the clues is  upstaged by their antics. They bounce from one character to another, sometimes in the same scene. Forman, at one point, keeps having to switch hats, literally, to play two different people. That also means slipping from a Texas…


Rapid Fired Pizza opens shop in BG with giveaway

Submitted by RAPID FIRED PIZZA Rapid Fired Pizza will host a grand opening in Bowling Green, Ohio on Monday, September 25 followed by a 500 free pizza giveaway on Tuesday, September 26th.  The company has achieved 21 restaurant openings in just 2 years time. The Bowling Green restaurant, at 852 S Main St in Bowling Green is over 4,000 square feet and will seat 100 people.                                                      “The work week is fast paced and people need somewhere to go for a quality meal that is quick and affordable at both lunchtime and dinner.” says Ross Wiley, the franchisee and operator for the Bowling Green location.  “We are excited to finally get this location open,” stated Wiley.  The Bowling Green team expects a large turnout at the grand opening and giveaway.                                                                                 Rapid Fired Pizza offers a build your own or craft pizza that is cooked in 180 seconds.  RFP features eight sauces, eight cheeses, over thirty toppings, and fourteen dipping sauces for patrons to build their perfect pizza, there are ten craft pizzas on the menu as well.  Salads, breadsticks, and desserts are also available. Craft beer will also be available in Bowling Green as soon as the liquor licensed is processed through the State of Ohio. The concept was founded in Kettering, Ohio and has grown as fast as their pizzas cook with Bowling Green being the 21st store to open and many more under construction right behind it.  Every Rapid Fired Pizza location has flat screen tvs,  LED lighting and uses recyclable materials.   Rapid Fired Pizza opened their first store in September of 2015. For more information visit…


Gypsy Lane closed for sewer work

Effective Thursday, September 21, from 8 a.m. until  4 p.m. daily, Gypsy Lane Road, between Rudolph Road and Sand Ridge Road, in Bowling Green will be closed for sewer maintenance. Detour: Rudolph Road to Sand Ridge. All work is weather permitting.


BGSU not ready to tee off yet on corporate development on Forrest Creason site

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A plan to bring a company to campus to locate on the site of the Forrest Creason Golf Course is in the very earliest conceptual stage. President Mary Ellen Mazey said that the idea to attract a company, possibly a high tech firm, was at this point little more than a talking point. She did broach the concept recently at a luncheon meeting when university retirees when asked about the future of the golf course. She said she’s also discussed it with a number of alumni. Her interest was piqued during a chat with one alumni Mick Story, who works for Jackson National Life. Story, a former Falcon football player, said that Jackson Life located near the Michigan State University campus to have proximity to its future workforce. Such an arrangement could also fit in with the state’s Third Frontier initiative which seeks to develop high tech industry in Ohio. The company could provide internships to students. Mazey noted that the university has a strong program in supply chain management. It also has a record of successful collaboration with outside entities, including the Falcon Health Center, the Falcon Flight Center, and the Bureau of Criminal Investigation lab. But any corporate project is still very much in the conceptual phase. For any property to be leased or sold, the BGSU Board of Trustees would have to take action. While the future use of the 138–acre golf course is what initiated this line of thinking, the university also has other property it could develop, on both the west and east side of I-75 and to the…


Bent Frequency to perform Elainie Lillios composition at BGSU concert

From the BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Innovative saxophone and percussion duo Bent Frequency will perform at Bowling Green State University Sept. 25 as part of the Music at the Forefront concert series sponsored by BGSU’s MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music. The 8 p.m.concert in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center is free and open to the public. The duo of percussionist Stuart Gerber and saxophonist Jan Berry Baker will perform “ Hazy Moonlight” by composer Dr. Elainie Lillios, a professor of music composition in the College of Musical Arts. in Lillios received a highly competitive 2016 Barlow Endowment Commission for Music Composition to write a work specifically for Bent Frequency, and has collaborated closely with Gerber and Baker on the piece. (See a story on the commission here.) The duo are known for cutting-edge new music and have commissioned more than 20 works and given numerous performances of this new repertoire across the United States, Mexico and Europe since 2014. The Lillios composition will not be the first Barlow commission to be performed by Bent Frequency, who have also premiered one by composer Mark Engebretson. Their work is international in scope, including commissions from seven American composers and two European composers. In 2015-16 they premiered a composition by Laurent Durupt funded by a grant from the French American Cultural Exchange, along with works by several others. In addition to the work by Lillios, their 2017-18 agenda features commissions by John Liberatore and Zack Browning. Music at the Forefront is an annual concert series featuring performances by accomplished and innovative performers of contemporary music.  


Expert’s examples of poorly designed environments hit home at BGSU’s Optimal Aging Fair

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Speaking from 400 miles away in upstate New York, Esther Greenhouse, struck a nerve with those watching her in Bowling Green. The environmental gerontologist was the keynote speaker at the Optimal Aging Community Fair at Bowling Green State University. Greenhouse projected an image of a parking meter kiosk as an example of poor design. You could almost hear the local audience groan. The City of Bowling Green installed such meters to considerable complaint. Throughout her presentation, Greenhouse talked and showed images that could have come from just a few miles away: Four-lane roads that are hard to cross; old houses that require steps to enter; showers that require climbing into; sidewalks in poor repair; and rural roads with no sidewalks. And when she took questions, those in the audience zeroed in on precisely those issues – rural transportation, roundabouts, and parking kiosks. The problem with so many of these issues of public space, Greenhouse said, is that our built environment is designed for people driving vehicles. A small town has roads made so trucks can easily negotiate it, not so people can walk safely. “We’ve put all out transportation eggs in one basket, vehicular traffic, primarily vehicles with one person in them,” Greenhouse said. Those environments discourage people with limitations, whether age, disability, or logistical, from going out. And that makes their problems even worse. “The status quo is not benign,” she said. “We do not design for everyone.” It discourages elders from getting out, making it harder for them to get the exercise, healthy food, and the social interaction they need. These kind…


Art expert unravels mystery of ancient Greek pots

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART The Toledo Museum of Art is offering an in-depth learning experience with Sanchita Balachandran, associate director of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. On Saturday, Sept. 23, Balachandran will present a lecture titled “CSI (Ceramics Scene Investigation), Ancient Athens: Investigating Greek Potters and Painters” in the Little Theater at 2 p.m. Admission is free. Balachandran’s talk will focus on her ground-breaking work to solve the 2,500-year-old mystery of how ancient Greek craftspeople fabricated their highly artistic and technologically significant red-figure ceramics. Based on her 2015 Johns Hopkins University undergraduate course, “Recreating Ancient Greek Ceramics,” Balachandran, an art conservator, will discuss the importance of collaborating with a professional potter and incorporating the expertise of art historians, archaeologists and materials scientists in teaching a hands-on class for college students to make their own “ancient” cups. In addition to the lecture, Balachandran will collaborate with the TMA Conservation Department on photographing a small selection of ancient works in a new way. “During her visit to Toledo, Sanchita Balachandran will discuss her latest research to identify the presence or absence of line drawings on red figure ceramics utilizing Reflection Transformation Imaging, a photographic-computer process that reveals low relief details of the artists’ design and handiwork,” said Suzanne Hargrove, head of conservation at the Museum. “She will highlight examples she has studied at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum, the J. Paul Getty Museum and other cultural institutions, and will include select artworks from the TMA collection of red-figure vessels to be imaged during her visit for this talk.” Both the “Recreating Ancient Greek Ceramics” course and some of…


BGSU library hosts presentation on banned music

Submitted by MATTHEW DONAHUE In recognition of Banned Books Week, Bowling Green State University’s Jerome Library will present “Popular Music Controversies and Banned Popular Music: The Ascent from Low Culture to High Culture” by Dr. Matthew Donahue, of the Department of Popular Culture, Thursday, Sept. 28 at 1 p.m. in the Pallister Conference Room. The free presentation will highlight some of the controversies surrounding rock and roll music and various subgenres from the 1950s to the present. In addition to examining some of the controversies surrounding rock and roll and its many subgenres, this presentation will also examine how certain popular music styles have gone from being labeled as “low culture” and being banned or controversial, to being celebrated and embraced by so called “high culture” institutions such as museums and universities. There will also be a brief musical performance by Dr. Matthew Donahue (guitar) and BGSU alumni Craig Dickman  (drums) and Tyler Burg (bass). Dr. Matthew Donahue is a lecturer in the Department of Popular Culture at Bowling Green State University, teaching a variety of courses related to popular music and popular culture. In addition he is a recognized musician, artist, filmmaker and writer, his academic and creative pursuits can be viewed at www.md1210.com .  


Toledo Symphony expands TSO in HD offerings

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Toledo Symphony announced on Wednesday that it will expand its popular TSO in HD program to its entire Classics series at the Toledo Museum of Art’s Peristyle Theatre for the upcoming 2017-2018 season. The expansion is made possible by a major grant from Buckeye Broadband. The TSO in HD program installs large, high-definition screens on either side of the Peristyle stage. This allows audiences to view live footage of the concert as the orchestra performs. Close- up shots follow major themes in the music and reveal rare, on-stage perspectives to concertgoers. The technology debuted in 2015 at a special Gala featuring world-renowned violinist, Joshua Bell. Audiences will next have the opportunity to see TSO in HD in action at the orchestra’s opening weekend, September 29 and 30, 2017, at the Peristyle. At each concert, the Toledo Symphony’s Chief Artistic Officer and President Emeritus, Robert Bell, will work with a team of producers and on-stage cameramen from WGTE Public Media. Together, the team works from a conductor’s score and cues the cameras to create the real-time video feed. Due to the high costs of labor and technology, current funding allows the Toledo Symphony to provide TSO in HD at just one Classics weekend and three educational programs each season. Thanks to a grant from Buckeye Broadband, the Toledo Symphony will be able to present TSO in HD at all of its Classics performances at the Peristyle, from September 2017 to May 2018. “Buckeye is proud to be the TSO in HD technology sponsor and enhance the concert experience for the entire Peristyle audience,” says Bonnie Ash,…