Articles by David Dupont

Everyday People Cafe cooks up new twists on classic diner dishes

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Everyday People Café, the newest eatery in Bowling Green, has deep roots in the city’s culinary culture. The proprietor Pat McDermott has a long history with the Corner Grill, Cohen and Cooke’s, and other restaurants in the area, and he wants to bring the skills honed in those kitchens to his own operation at 309S. Main St. At the Grill, where he worked third shift for 15 or so years, it was cranking out diner favorites quickly and simply. At Cohen and Cooke’s he got to see the adventurous side of the culinary enterprise. What was on hand, he said, is what went into that day’ menu selections. He wants to blend those two approaches. “I want it to be classics, just trumped up a little bit,” he said. He’ll have plenty of help in that with his fellow cooks out back. Steve Bishop was McDermott’s mentor at the Corner Grill from the time McDermott was a dishwasher. Chris Parratt is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America and has worked locally at Reverend’s and the Oaks on campus as well as in Portland, Oregon. McDermott has been wanting to launch his own place for a while, and the opportunity popped up when Andy Halleck and Ammar Mufleh bought the building that formerly housed the Falcon Market and Café Havana. Finding financing proved difficult, then McDermott was approached by local bar owners Nate Cordes, Michael Wahle, and Troy Myers. They were looking for a home for a liquor license they’d recently acquired, and suggested a four-way partnership. So Everyday People Café was born,…


BGSU Women’s Center in transition as it marks its 20th anniversary

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Women’s Center at Bowling Green State University will mark the 20th anniversary of its founding in a state of flux. Mary Krueger, who has directed the center since its founding, retired at the end of the academic year, and the center is slated to be relocated from Hanna Hall to most likely Hayes Hall in early fall. Vice President for Students Affairs Thomas Gibson wrote last week in response to questions from BG Independent news: “We are finalizing the recruitment process requirements to commence the search in approximately two weeks.” He said the hope is to have a new director in place by October. In the meantime, Krueger is staying on part time, working two days a week. Last fall, the Women’s Center was moved into the Division of Student Affairs, out of the Office of Equity and Diversity. In spring, after protests over the way the university handled cases of sexual assault, faculty members put support for the center and for hiring a director with background in addressing sexual violence on campus in a list of demands. (http://bgindependentmedia.org/faculty-members-urge-bgsu-to-be-a-leader-in-addressing-sexual-violence/). Gibson wrote: “I am seeking a candidate who has at minimum of 3-4 years of related work experience; in-depth knowledge of women’s issues, especially in the college/university setting; a student advocate; a good collaborator with faculty colleagues, especially from Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies; strong leadership and public relations skills; excellent administrative and organizational skills; evidence of potential successful fund-raising, including grant-writing.  And certainly, I am seeking an educator, support resource and advocate for survivors of sexual violence, perhaps with the potential to serve as a deputy…


Young African leaders visit community garden, discuss sustainability

Submitted by THE COMMON GOOD Members of the Young African Leaders Initiative’s Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders gathered with local volunteers at the community garden this past Saturday to see an example of small-scale sustainable farming on Saturday. The YALI members took some time to work the garden and harvest some vegetables before coming together to partake in a roundtable discussion about sustainability. The group discussed comparisons of agriculture in Africa versus agriculture here, as well as cultural views and practices embracing sustainability. The presence of different perspectives provided insight on global views regarding sustainability. To catch a glance of small-scale sustainable farming yourself, stop by the community garden located at the Peace Lutheran Church (1021 W. Wooster St. Bowling Green, OH 43402). Take a look at the communication board at the garden or visit commongoodbg.org for more information.


Black Swamp Arts Festival’s juried art show celebrates continued excellence in its 25th year

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For the Black Swamp Arts Festival’s juried art show the 25th year celebration is pretty much business as usual. That means working to maintain its standing in the Sunshine Artist magazine’s listing of top art shows. Last year the festival was ranked 70th on the journal’s Top 100 Classic and Contemporary Show list. That’s about where the festival has ranked in the 15 years or so that, it has broken onto the list. Those rankings are based on artists’ average sales which are something shy of $3,000. The 25th Black Swamp Arts Festival will be presented Friday, Sept. 8 through Sunday, Sept.10, with the art shows presents Saturday and Sunday. For more details, visit: http://www.blackswampfest.org/. Brenda Baker, who chairs the festival’s visual arts committee, said she would like to think the milestone year has attracted a few more artists to apply. As it was the jurors Kathy Buszkiewicz and Brandon Briggs reviewed 222 applications to fill the 112 booth spaces on Main Street in downtown Bowling Green. Six award winners from last year have committed to returning. That includes best of show winner Isaac Smith. Baker said that 18, or 12.5 percent, of the artists are in their first Black Swamp Arts Festival. “That’s pretty high.” Another 15 percent have been regulars for at least that past five years. The rest are in or out depending on the judgement of the jurors. Buszkiewicz wrote in an email: “Having judged this show in the past, this time I have seen some good returning artists’ applications. There also seems to be some new applicants to the…


Booth appointed dean of BGSU Graduate College

Dr. Margaret “Peggy” Booth has been appointed dean of the Graduate College, following an internal search. Booth has served as interim dean of the college since last January. In announcing her appointment, Provost Rodney Rogers said that Booth “has done an admirable job of moving graduate education at Bowling Green State University forward and toward the goals of the Strategic Plan.” In her role as associate dean of the college from 2012 until her appointment as interim dean in 2017, Booth has been deeply involved in strategic planning for the Graduate College and in the development of innovative new graduate programs and curricula. “She is a leader who values interdisciplinary academic connections and their potential for research, scholarship and practical applications,” Roger said. “She has also worked with faculty to create new certificate programs for working professionals that enhance their skills and encourage continued educational engagement.”


Youthful performers bring historic figures to life at Rossford Chautauqua

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The stories of historic figures who shaped Rossford and the world will be told in youthful voices at this year’s Chautauqua. Rossford Chautauqua will be presented Wednesday, July 19, through Sunday, July 23, under a tent on the Rossford Marina. This is the third time Rossford has presented Chautauqua. The city hosted the Ohio Humanities Council’s official troupe of performing scholars in 2014 and 2016. But that series runs on a two-year cycle, and Chautauqua was such a hit that the Convention and Visitors Bureau wanted to stage a living history event of its own this year. So they approached Jeremy Meier, a theater professor at Owens Community College, for help. Meier has portrayed Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry. He appeared on the Rossford bill as the hero of the Battle of Lake Erie in 2014. Meier recruited some Owens alumni as well as a trio of Rossford High School students to form a local troupe of young performing scholars. While Marie Curie and Mary Shelley won’t be visiting Rossford this year, Susan Marie Frontczak, the scholar performer who acted those roles last summer, did come to town. She was on hand to help teach these young performers how bring history to life on stage. Wednesday she was working with the high school seniors Alex Chiarelott, Hannah Beene, and Nolan McHugh who are portraying Edward Ford, Florence Scott Libbey, and Samuel “Golden Rule” Jones, respectively. Frontczak said she was impressed with what the students had accomplished. But she wasn’t there to praise but to coach. As they delivered their monologues, she stopped them every few lines to suggest…


Horizon Youth Theatre marks 20 years of acting up at gala

By TESSA PHILLIPS BG Independent Contributor The excitement was palpable as community members of all ages began to fill the Simpson Garden Banquet Room last night for the Horizon Youth Theatre’s 20th anniversary gala. Kids sat at tables decorated with photos from past HYT performances and reminisced on favorite stage memories. Genevieve Simon, one of the guest speakers at the gala, spotted a scrapbook and sat down to look through it with her brother, Martin. “Martin was part of Horizon for about two years, maybe longer,” Genevieve said. “Our whole family was involved, and that’s kind of how I was roped into it,” Martin added, grinning at his sister. Martin, a senior in high school, has plans to study theater in college, like his sister before him. “Horizon definitely encouraged me to pursue theatre as a career. It inspired me,” he said. After an hour of hors d’oeuvres, HYT members began doing what they do best—entertaining the audience. Scott Regan took the stage with co-founder Jo Beth Gonzalez and spoke about the importance of history and storytelling. “These two things separate us from the animals,” Regan said. Regan became emotional as he shared a story about a child who had become ill and had been sent to the hospital around the time of an HYT production of “Winnie the Pooh.” Before a painful procedure, she had told her mom that she wished she was “back in the Hundred Acre Wood.” “What does this tell us? To me, it proves that theatre gives kids something to hold on to during hard times,” Regan said. “Horizon Youth Theatre came from a place of…


NowOH exhibit surveys local art scene

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For an art exhibit dedicated to artists of Northwest Ohio, it was fitting that the best of show winner was a local scene. Aaron Pickens received the top honor at the 10th Northwest Ohio Community Art Exhibition for a pairing of two small paintings of fields in the Grand Rapids area. They were certainly not the flashiest pieces among the work by 47 artists in the Bryan Gallery in the Bowling Green State University Fine Arts Building. They were not even the flashiest of the pieces Pickens was showing. For juror Robert Thurmer that was the point. “I choose that as best of show mostly to honor the feeling that’s created here with a few skillfully placed brush strokes and color combinations that are apparently simple, but are really quite complex,” he explained. “This is a very, very thoughtfully produced and skillfully handled, and it creates a mood and feeling that’s highly personal statement.” Pickens created the paintings plein air, in the open air. It’s a discipline he’s adopted to complement his studio work, an example of which hung right next to the landscapes. That studio painting is a still life of toys, set on a sheet of cardboard, with an ominous forest in the background. That painting took 70-80 hours to create, Pickens said. The plein air landscapes, each took about an hour to create. He goes out for just a limited amount of time to try to capture the light, in this case dawn and dusk. “This is what taught me how to paint, how to use my material quickly and efficiently,”…


News to them… Corpe & Weiss of “Morning Show” win I Love BG award

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even such perceptive radio personalities as Clint Corpe and Larry Weiss had trouble ferreting out who was the winner of this year’s I Love BG Award. As Dave Horger, their predecessor at “The Morning Show” on WBGU-FM, provided details of the winner’s “life,” they sensed something amiss. For one thing there was enough resume for two people. Corpe wondered: Who else beside him attending the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce’s Mid-Year Meeting and Awards Program went to school in Bowling Green… Kentucky? But the detail about working for Bowling Green State University didn’t fit. Born in Germany fit him, but Corpe never worked as a youngster at A&W Root Beer. That story, however, clinched the winner’s identity for Weiss. He remembered well the day that Horger was describing. Weiss was 13 or 14 and his friend’s uncle’s A&W stand was busy and desperate for help.  So they called him in. A shiny, new convertible pulled up and ordered three root beers. The young Larry delivered them, spilling them into and onto the car. He returned with another round of pop, and, as Horger related, after he dumped those in the car, he called his mother to pick him up. His career at A&W was over after one car. Far greater success lay ahead. He went on to graduate from BGSU in 1967 and to work in industry before returning to the university with a job in alumni relations in 1973. When he was approached about returning to BGSU, he responded: “Those were the best years of my life. I’d love to come back to…


Closing time at Ginny’s Inspired Fashions is bittersweet

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For stylish women, Ginny’s Inspired Fashions in downtown Bowling Green let them dress to a T, from socks for their toes to hats to top off their assemblage with outerwear and underwear for parts in between. The shop, though, was more than a place to find what to wear to go out and have a good time, but a destination in itself, a gathering spot, founder and owner Ginny Stewart said. A place to share stories, drinks, laughs, and, now that Stewart has announced she’s closing, tears. “I’m going to cry,” one customer declared as she walked into Ginny’s Tuesday. Just a few racks of dresses, tops, and skirts remained. The supply of headwear was thinning out. Stewart wrapped purchases in Christmas paper, and she had no more bags. Though Stewart originally said she’d stay open until late in July, it now looks like Friday, July 14, will be her last day. Stewart said after seven years she’s retiring. “My husband (Scott) is going to be working fewer hours in the next year, and we want to spend more time doing the things we’ve talked about doing. I want to spend more time involved in the social causes that matter to me, and I want to give more time to the schools.” Stewart is in her first term as a member of the Board of Education. The district has a bond issue to fund a major building project on the ballot in November. She announced the news of the shop closing in an email to customers late Friday night. But, she said, word started…


Bobby G brings taste of Delta blues to Howard’s

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Robert Gray first got hooked on the blues listening to sound standing outside the juke joint in his native Winterville, Mississippi. He and his friends didn’t have the money to get in so they absorbed the sounds that wafted from the homespun club. “We just loved what was going on,” he said, “so we would try to sing, just walking down the road singing. That’s when I first got it.” That was years before Robert Gray began Bobby G, the blues singer. Bobby G, now 73, will perform Saturday, July 15, at 7 p.m. at Howard’s Club H in downtown Bowling Green with Curtis Grant Jr. and the Midnight Rockers. Cover charge is $5. Bobby G will also perform Saturday, Sept. 9, at the Black Swamp Arts Festival. The performance celebrates the release of “Still Sanding” on Third Street Cigar Records. This is the bluesman’s first full-length album, and it’s giving the world – it’s charting in Italy, Australia, and elsewhere – its first taste of Bobby G. John Henry, a local blues impesario said, the bluesman is “a treasure.” Because Gray stayed around home, raised two children with his wife, and didn’t go out on the road and experience the hardships and bad habits that so often entails, “he’s well preserved.” His voice is clear, with a sweet high range, though he can growl when the tune demands it. That’s all on display on “Still Standing,” a set of originals written by Johnny Rawls. Before all this could transpire and he could take that love of the blues to the stage, he needed…


Fatal crashes reviewed

Wood County Safe Communities held their quarterly Fatal Data Review on Tuesday, June 10, 2017. Two crashes were reviewed from the second quarter of 2017 and one was deferred to the third quarter for review. The crashes reviewed were:  Route 25 at Pearl St. in the City of Bowling Green  Route 480 and Route 795  Route 20 at Oakmead in Perrysburg Township (Deferred to Third Quarter) The countermeasures established as a result of these crashes are as follows:  Always wear your seatbelt  Do not drive at an excessive speed  Always be attentive when driving  Always obey all traffic control devices  Do not drive impaired  Know your driving limitations


Horizon Youth Theatre marks 20th year with gala

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The seed for Horizon Youth theatre was planted in the dead of winter. One February night in 1997, Scott Regan, a Bowling Green State University professor of theatre and director of its Treehouse Troupe, gathered more than a dozen people involved in the arts to discuss a dream: the creation of a theater troupe for young people. The attendees didn’t need to be convinced of the value of theater for kids. The only question is whether such a troupe could take root in Bowling Green. Now more than 20 years later, Horizon Youth Theatre is blossoming. Approximately 1000 people attended the four performances of its recent musical “Cinderella.” Throughout the year it offers workshops for kids of all ages. Horizon Youth theatre will celebrate its 20th anniversary Saturday, July 15, 6-9 p.m. in the Simpson Building Banquet room. Tickets are $15. Visit http://horizonyouththeatre.org/2017/05/20-anniversary-gala/. The gala opens with a red carpet extravaganza with heavy hors d’oeuvres and music by the GRUBS. A program will follow at 7 featuring five short performances interspersed by testimonials by three alumni: Genevieve Simon, an actress now in New York; Grace Easterly; and Brittany Albrecht. (Simon will also present a workshop on Shakespeare and autism earlier in the day from 2 to 3:30p.m. at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church for actors 8-18. Cost $10.) The troupe will also honor its founders Scott Regan and Jo Beth Gonzales, the high school drama teacher. Regan said that the idea for the troupe came after a BGSU production of “A Christmas Carol,” which he had directed. The production used a lot of children, and…


Black Swamp Players announces its 50th season

From BLACK SWAMP PLAYERS The Black Swamp Players has announced its 50th season. BASKERVILLE by Ken Ludwig, Directed by Ben Forman Performance dates: September 22, 23, 24, 29, 30, October 1 Black Swamp Players is proud to announce that we will be kicking off our Golden Anniversary 50th Season with the northwest Ohio premier of Ken Ludwig’s Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery. A comedic retelling of the traditional Conan Doyle tale, a cast of five actors deftly portray more than 40 characters through a combination of accents, physicality, and quick costume changes. THE BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER by Barbara Robinson, Directed by Keith Guion along with A CHRISTMAS RADIO PLAY Performance dates: December 1st, 2nd and 3rd In this hilarious Christmas classic, a couple struggling to put on a church Christmas pageant is faced with casting the Herdman kids – probably the most inventively awful kids in history. You won’t believe the mayhem – and the fun – when the Herdmans collide with the Christmas story head on! Radio Play—expect the full radio show audience experience! THE SECRET GARDEN by Norman, Simon, Burnett directed by Cassie Greenlee Performance dates: February 16,17,18 and 23,24,25 This enchanting classic of children’s literature is reimagined in brilliant musical style by composer Lucy Simon and Marsha Norman, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright of “Night Mother.” Orphaned in India, 11 year-old Mary Lennox returns to Yorkshire to live with her embittered, reclusive uncle Archibald and his invalid son Colin. The estate’s many wonders include a magic garden which beckons the children with haunting melodies and the “Dreamers”, spirits from Mary’s past who guide her through her new…


Africa’s future is here and now

By PATRICK MAKOKORO Mandela Washington Fellow 2017 Bowling Green State University The United Nations estimates that Africa is home to some 200 million people aged 15-24 years old and they predict that this figure will double by the year 2045. Participation by the youth in matters that affect them politically, socially and economically is vital because it has a direct bearing on how they live their lives. Africa’s young and emerging leadership is made of people who have a vision of the continent’s future that is expressed through focused passion and skills. Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is playing a role in this by hosting 25 Young African Leaders for a six week intensive leadership development institute. The Young African Leaders Institute (YALI) is jointly sponsored by the Mandela Washington Fellowship (https://yali.state.gov/washington-fellowship/) and BGSU. The YALI are from 19 African countries: Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Mauritania, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. As one of the young leaders from Zimbabwe attending the 2017 Institute at BGSU, I am very excited to be amongst my colleagues from countries as far North as Mauritania and as far South as South Africa. The various YALI fellows at BGSU have such depth of knowledge on the immediate challenges of African development that when I see their passion and zeal when discussing their countries’ burning issues, I get really excited. My colleagues have inspired me to look at the world through different lenses particularly when addressing issues like poverty, corruption, hunger and disease. A colleague from Guinea-Conakry, Boubacar Diallo,…