Articles by David Dupont

Record Store day is a hit at Finders

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News National Record Store Day has turned into a record-setting day for sales at Finders Records in downtown Bowling Green. “The last three or four years for Record Store Day have been record-setting days for us in the history of Finders,” said the shop’s founder and owner Greg Halamay. He was standing inside the door greeting people as he let them in. With 200-300 people waiting outside the downtown Bowling Green shop for the 10 a.m., opening he was controlling how many people were in so the store didn’t become too crowded. The most popular area was the crates of vinyl records. In its 10th year, Record Store Day was founded to celebrate the resilience of the local record store. Getting ready for the day is a lot of work, Halamay said. “But it’s a celebration of what we are, who we are, and where we’ve been down the path.” The beginning of Record Store Day coincided with the rediscovery of vinyl records, the music format of choice when Finders first opened its doors in 1971. “Vinyl is back,” Halamay said. “Vinyl has been embraced at Record Store Day with all the special editions that’ve come out and created a lot of enthusiasm for the record collectors.” Some of the earliest arrivals were from Columbus and Cincinnati, Halamay said. And collectors travel from Michigan to shop. Zachary Weymer drove up from Sidney with his best friend from childhood for Record Store Day. They’d previously gone to a store in Lima, but decided the extra miles were worth a trip to Bowling Green. “These guys have…


BGSU faculty honored for excellence

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University recognized a group of its highest-achieving faculty April 13 during the annual Faculty Excellence Awards. Faculty were honored for research, teaching, creative arts, service, leadership, advising, mentoring and more during the celebratory event in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom at the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Joining President Mary Ellen Mazey on the stage were alumnus David Levey, chair of the BGSU Board of Trustees, who gave credit to his undergraduate faculty for launching him into a successful life; Dr. Rodney Rogers, provost and senior vice president; and Dr. William Balzer, vice president for faculty affairs and strategic initiatives, who led the event. “All of BGSU takes great pride in the work and accomplishments of our faculty,” Rogers said. “Time and time again, we hear stories about a particular faculty member who changed a life, challenged a student, opened a door to new possibilities. That’s what makes BGSU such a great place.” Three faculty received the Professorship of Excellence title. The Professorships of Excellence are presented to faculty holding the rank of full professor who have achieved outstanding success in teaching, research, creative arts or service and whose work merits special recognition. The title is held for three years, and brings additional support for its duration. Dr. Cynthia Baron, theatre and film, was named Professor of Research Excellence. Dr. Mikel Kuehn, musicology, composition and theory, was named Professor of Creative Arts Excellence. Dr. Kefa Otiso, geography, was named Professor of Service Excellence. The Master Teacher Award, selected and presented by the Student Alumni Connection, was given to Dr. Andrew Gregory, School of Earth, Environment…


Angelwood Gallery opens new show FLUX

Submitted by ANGELWOOD GALLERY Angelwood Gallery is pleased to present FLUX celebrating our 24 years in business. The show opens on April 29 and runs until June 18. There will be a weekend long Open House to kick off the show on Saturday, April 29 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday, April 30 from noon to 5 p.m. The weekend will also feature pottery demonstrations, specialty food tasting and refreshments. Angelwood Gallery, which has featured regional artists since its inception, will continue that tradition with a wonderful line up of talented artists. The artists will include, gallery owner and potter Julie A. Beutler. She will be featuring over a 100 new pots with a strong emphasis on functional/kitchen ware as well as garden inspired pottery. Her work will feature finishes from wood kiln as well oxidation and raku firings. Other artists featured are mixed media artists Andrea Feller and Shannon Eis who both work with found objects to create funky animal sculptures, jewelry and wall work. They use common household goods, pieces of wood, found objects and other interesting finds to make these cool sculptures and 2D works. Glass artists joining the show are: Lars Glass, Beth Ziss, and Peg Briggs featuring home and garden glass as well as jewelry. Potters Brandon Knott, Joyce Donahue, Maggie Trzcinski, Rachel Burks and Scott Jones will be have an impressive collection of functional pottery as well as some sculpture. Metal artists will include furniture, wrought iron wall pieces and sculptures by Mike Leady of Southpaw Metal Studio and silverware jewelry, kitchen ware and garden pieces by Nadine Musser. New acrylic paintings by Jenny…


Pelletier to revisit old friend, Mozart’s fourth horn concerto, with BG Philharmonia

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For French horn players, there’s no escaping the four Mozart concertos. Andrew Pelletier, professor of horn at the College of Musical Arts, has played the fourth Horn Concerto as many as nine times with full orchestra, and he doesn’t know how many times with just piano. And it is a staple of the repertoire for his students. They know whenever they go out for auditions, whether for scholarships, competitions, graduate school admission or orchestral work, movements from the second and fourth will be required. Their soaring melodies, flourishes and ebullient calls serve as the foundation of the instrument’s literature. Pelletier will perform Mozart’s Horn Concerto in E-Flat Major with the Bowling Green Philharmonia Sunday, April23, at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. The orchestra also will perform Brahms’ Symphony No. 2 and Stravinsky’s “Firebird” Suite. The fourth of Mozart’s horn concertos is “the most involved” of the set, Pelletier said, with two cadenzas. In Mozart’s time, Pelletier said, horn was the most featured wind instrument. The instrument had not long before come in from the field. The hunting horn made its first orchestral appearance in opera, whenever a hunting scene was involved. Horn players of the time developed techniques to allow them to play more notes than the natural bugle-like overtone series. This enabled the horn to play virtuosic passages “and “beautiful singing melodies,” Pelletier said. “It’s the sound of the horn that captures so many different emotions that caught me.” Mozart made full use of the instruments resources and associations. “Whenever I play Mozart I feel I’m…


K.S. Letts’ art explores ancient myth in the future tense

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ancient myths tell us what the future holds for humanity. That’s the underlining theme of artist K.A. Letts’ new show, Trans Human, at the River House Arts in the Secor Building in downtown Toledo. The exhibit opens with a reception tonight (Thursday, April 20) at 6 p.m. at the gallery at 425 Jefferson Ave. Regular gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 4-10 p.m., and by appointment by calling 419-441-4025). “I’m very interested in where we’re at as a species,” Letts said in a recent interview. “We’re at a point of being very close to the point of controlling our own evolution, and looking forward you wonder how the changes we make in ourselves will affect us as human beings.” Bio-engineering, including gene therapy and neuro-prosthetics, and robotics which threaten to make much human work obsolete, pose existential questions about where humanity is headed. One of the guides, Letts believes, “is through the stories we tell.” So the artist takes stories either from Ovid’s Metamorphosis or the Bible and uses “them to discuss what human beings are and what we’re going to be.” These are not illustrations, Letts said, “as much as making an image around the story.” She translates her vision of those stories in to bold, graphic designs. Her work draws a number of influences. The Chicago imagist school played a key influence as did Matisse and aboriginal art. She uses a limited palette. Black and white dominate. She uses silver and gold in a way that’s reminiscent of religious icons. Other tones are muted, and used sparingly. In “Original Sin” there’s a…


Threat of severe weather tonight (April 20)

BRADLEY J. GILBERT, WOOD COUNTY EMA DIRECTOR There is a severe weather threat for this evening (April 20) across NW Ohio.  Overnight the Storm Prediction Center increased the severe weather risk category across Northwest Ohio to “Enhanced.”   Atmosphere dynamics along with very warm temperatures and increased dew points (humidity) this afternoon will cause thunderstorms to develop across Eastern Illinois into Northern Indiana and then into NW Ohio.  Scattered showers and thunderstorms are possible late this afternoon, but the bigger complex of thunderstorms will move into the area after 5 p.m. Current models indicate this complex of storms to be in the Wood County/Toledo/Findlay area around 7 p.m. or 8 p.m.  this evening.  The primary threats will be damaging straight line winds and large hail; however, an isolated tornado or two is also possible over Northwest Ohio and especially just north of the Ohio/Michigan line. Heavy rain will also be possible which may cause some flooding issues after yesterday’s rainfall.  More than likely, some type of severe weather WATCH will be issued for our area by late this afternoon.


BG High’s musical “Shrek” delivers a message about acceptance on way to a fairy tale ending

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A musical based on an animated film shouldn’t feel this timely. But you can’t escape the echoes of the news when a host of refugees flood onto the stage of the Bowling Green Performing Arts Center. Yes, the refugees are a motley assortment of your favorite fairy tale characters. Still one feels the very real pang of people displaced. These refugees end up in a swamp, the home of the misanthropic ogre, Shrek, who wants no part of them. “Shrek: The Musical” like its predecessors “Shrek” the movie and the original picture book by William Steig turns fairy tales on their heads. The show, directed by JoBeth Gonzalez, still delivers a happily-ever-after ending. Along the way there’s plenty of comic patter, tuneful melodies, dances, and a few heart-tugging moments. “Shrek, the Musical,” Bowling Green High’s all-school musical, opens tonight (April 20) at 7 p.m. continuing Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. in the PAC. The animated film really sets the bar for the cast and crew. Technical director Ryan Albrecht and his team capture the atmosphere and settings, and manage to make these shifts without interrupting the action. The dragon is a particularly nice piece of stage puppetry. Justin McKenzie does a good job as the gruff Shrek. He shows that a lot of that grouchy exterior is an affectation. He lets the ogre gradually open up emotionally. That process begins with his relationship with Donkey played with a sure sense of comic timing by Josh Coleman, who is able to capture the antic spontaneity of Eddie Murphy from…


BGSU’s “Twelfth Night” has Shakespeare doing Jazz Age shimmy

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As the matches are made in “The Twelfth Night” the characters gather on stage for a Charleston inspired dance number to that 1920s hit “Masculine Women! Feminine Men!” I could well imagine that peppy song with its refrain “which is the rooster which is the hen” inspiring the BGSU Department of Theatre and Film’s production of the Shakespeare comedy. The confusion of gender lies at the heart of the comedy. Director Jonathan Chambers has set the play in the days of the flappers, 1929 in particular. He injects period touches such as mentions of accordions, Jack Dempsey and the shimmy, as well as having people playing golf, into the script. The sound design is packed with period hits that reflect on the action. In his notes he explains that just as in 1929 the world was poised on the brink of a new era, when Shakespeare wrote the play England was pondering what would come after the reign of Queen Elizabeth. In both cases there was much frivolity with an undertow of apprehension. This “Twelfth Night,” though, does not linger on the darker shades. It just wants to have fun and keep the audience laughing, and succeeds in grand fashion. The play opens Thursday (April 20) at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts on the Bowling Green State University campus. It continues with shows Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. with matinees Saturday and Sunday. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for students and children. Available at the Wolfe Center box office or by calling 419-372-8171, or…


Earth Week speaker to explain how a grizzly killing changed the face of national parks

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Nature has a way of asserting itself. Jordan Fisher Smith noted a small example of that as he walked into Hanna Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. During his talk to the 40 students in Amilcar Challu’s American Environmental History class, he showed them a shard of limestone. The building represents human ideas of architecture set in stone. Now nature, through freezing, thawing and the movement of water, is having its way with human design. Or maybe it’s the dandelion, an invasive species, rising up through the concrete sidewalk. “That’s wildness,” he said. “That’s the unexpected that happens without human intervention and design.” Or maybe, that assertion comes during the 1972 celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of Yellowstone Natural Park. In the midst of all the activities, a hiker Harry Eugene Walker is pulled off the trail, killed and eaten by a grizzly. That’s the subject of Smith’s book “”Engineering Eden: The True Story of a Violent Death, a Trial, and the Fight Over Controlling Nature,” a finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. He’ll speak about the book and the National Park system tonight (April 18) at 7 p.m. in the Student Union theater. Though Yellowstone was created in 1872, people knew nothing about how to run them. They served as “nature management kindergarten,” Smith told the class. Officials were guided by a few “crude rules.” Plant-eating animals were good, and the predators who ate them were bad. Fire was bad. So after human market hunters killed off the elk and bison, park officials decided they…


Congressional candidate to hold listening session

From GALBRAITH FOR CONGRESS Michael Galbraith (D) announced today his plans to hold a listening session with interested area residents at the Wood County District Public Library in Bowling Green, Tuesday, April 25 at 6:30 p.m. Galbraith recently declared his candidacy to challenge incumbent Robert E. Latta in the 2018 election for the right to represent Ohio’s 5th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives. “I am getting in this race to represent the people of the 5th Congressional District, and the first step in the process is to hear their hopes and concerns,” said Galbraith. “The most important job of a Member of Congress is listening to constituents. This listening session is just the start.” Following the announcement of his candidacy, the chairman of the Wood County Democratic Party, Michael Zickar, said “I think he’ll be a great candidate. So many people are frustrated with the status quo. There’s a lot more energy this cycle. People are really fired up.” Details about the event can also be found on the campaign’s Facebook page, Galbraith for Congress, and at the website, www.GalbraithforCongress.com. J. Michael Galbraith grew up in Maumee. He received his bachelor’s degree in Economics from Bucknell University and an MBA from Bowling Green State University. He also worked in international finance, mostly in London, for almost 30 years. When he returned to Northwest Ohio, in 2003, he worked as a financial adviser for Northwestern Mutual. He now teaches in the Finance Department at BGSU. His father, John A. Galbraith, served in the Ohio Legislature as a Republican from 1967 to 1986. Galbraith currently runs his own small investment…


BG News alumni award scholarships honoring Terry Goodman

From BG NEWS ALUMNI SOCIETY A current Bowling Green State  University student and an incoming BGSU freshman are the first winners of the Terry Goodman Memorial Journalism Scholarship at the university. The awards are intended for students who work at the campus newspaper, The BG News, and are sponsored by the BG News Alumni Society and presented by the Department of Journalism and Public Relations. Winner of a $500 scholarship is Courtney Brown, a BGSU junior multiplatform journalism major from Huron, Ohio. A graduate of Norwalk High School and a transfer student from Firelands College, Brown is a reporter at The BG News and is expected to become an editor in the next academic year. Winner of a $250 scholarship is Brionna Scebbi of Cleveland. Scebbi will enroll at BGSU next fall and plans to work at The BG News and storytelling with online platforms at the university. She is a senior at Saint Joseph Academy and is editor of the high school newspaper, The Jaguar Beat. She has been active with that newspaper all four years of high school. The scholarship is named for Terry Goodman, a 1978 BGSU journalism graduate who was sports editor of The BG News. He went on to win 39 state and national journalism awards during a reporting career with The Chronicle Telegram in Elyria, the Sandusky Register and the Lorain Journal (later The Morning Journal) in Lorain. At the Journal, he was sports editor and then associate managing editor in charge of the daily layout and design from 1980 until his death from cancer in 1996. The BG News Alumni Society was established…


BGSU taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University is in it for the long haul when it comes to sustainability. Under the terms of the American University and College Presidents’ Climate Commitment, which BGSU president Mary Ellen Mazey signed with almost 700 of her peers, the university will work to reduce its carbon footprint by an average of 4 percent a year, leading to being carbon neutral by 2040. Monday marked the kickoff for Earth Week activities on campus. A short ceremony to mark the occasion was held outside McFall Center with those gathered moving to place green pinwheels outside the student union. The theme is “Action Today, Better Tomorrow.” Nick Hennessey, BGSU’s sustainability manager, said Monday that the university is close to reducing its carbon footprint by 4 percent annually, but hasn’t done so yet. “We’re working on it. We’re taking a big chunk of it. We’re right where we want to be.” He’s looking forward to finalizing the university’s greenhouse gas analysis. “The most change has occurred in the last year,” he said. Renovation of buildings helps, Mazey said. She’s proud of the number that have earned LEED – Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – Certification. When the Harshman Quad, the Family and Consumer Science building, and West Hall come down this summer that will have “a major impact on our energy consumption,” Mazey said. Hennessey said the effort to reduce the carbon footprint also got a boost from the city. Now 40 percent of the electricity supplied to BGSU comes from renewable sources. Mazey praised the Friday Nights Lights Out program through which student…


Music Industry Club presenting multi-act show at Common Good April 21

From SAMANTHA JO SHARP BGSU Music Industry Club Members of the Music Industry Club at Bowling Green State University have been planning the Burlywood Music Festival since the beginning of January. The event will take place at The Common Good community center house, 113 Crim St., Bowling Green, with musicians performing from 2 to 10 p.m. on Friday, April 21. The event is free and open to the public, all ages are welcome. The Common Good House is a family friendly environment and alcohol is absolutely prohibited on the premises. More than five different musical acts will perform inside and outside the house at the festival. WBGU-FM’s Battle of The Bands competition winners, Indian Opinion will headline, other artist include: The Sugar Creek, Marbin, RadioBlack and Fire Sloths From Mars. Artists who have performed at MIC BGSU’s Open Mic nights throughout the year will be also be featured at the event. Music Industry minor and festival performer Zach Rzicznek is an active member of MIC and has performed at MIC’s other live events. “I am happy to be performing, I’ve been performing at BG open mics all year,” Rzicznek said. “I am really looking forward to performing at the festival.” Communications major/Music Industry Minor Alyssa Rosselot is a founding member of the MIC and plans to use the experience she has gained in an internship in NY this summer at The Syndicate in NYC. “Discussing the event and how we should market it has helped me learn more about social media and the marketing strategies that work best,” Rosselot said. BGSU’s Music Industry Director and Instructor Terry Tompkins advises the…


Student-run benefit intends to keep the jazz coming to BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Jeff Bouck was looking around for places to get a master’s degree in jazz studies, Bowling Green State University stuck out in part because of the number of guest artists it featured. More than a chance to hear these master musicians, the program offered plenty of time with them to learn the craft first hand. At the end of his first year here, Bouck and fellow jazz graduate student Mitchell Borchardt have organized a benefit for the Student Jazz Association to help ensure that continues. The SJA is a BGSU campus organization which promotes jazz in the community, primarily by bringing in guest artists. Those have included recently vocalist Kim Nazarian, drummer Carl Allen, trombonist and composer Alan Ferber, pianist Jon Cowherd, and many others over the years. These artists provide lessons, master classes as well as rehearsing and performing with students. This means students get to experience playing music with the guidance of the composer. The benefit for the Student Jazz Association will be held Thursday, April 27, starting at 7:30 p.m. at the Clazel in downtown Bowling Green. The event will feature a show by the BGSU Lab Band I giving the premier performance of pieces by Borchardt and Bouck as well as performing work by Duke Ellington, Sammy Nestico, and others. They along with Ian Palmer will conduct the band, BGSU’s premier jazz ensemble. In addition to the music there will be card games and raffle baskets. A $2 cover charge will be collected at the door. The student composers penned their charts specifically for this show. Bouck’s is a…


BGSU art faculty honored for excellence by Ohio Arts Council

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Two Bowling Green State University faculty members, Charles Kanwischer and Lou Krueger, were among the artists to receive Individual Excellence Awards from the Ohio Arts Council. For Kanwischer, who was honored for his graphite drawings on panel, said that it is remarkable that Ohio continues to honor individual artists. “It’s such a statement that individual artists are valued. It’s such a nice validation.” Having a state give support to individual artists is becoming rare. Many arts councils only give grants to organizations. Some states have abolished their state arts councils, he said. Kanwischer and Krueger were among 77 artists to receive funding from among the 465 who applied. The council distributed $375,000 in grants, almost all for $5,000. “You have to give credit to the politicians, Republicans and Democrats,” he said. “It’s hard to complain about support for the arts.” Kanwischer’s portfolio features his landscapes. The settings can be rural, suburban or urban. He said he was interested in the cyclical change in the landscape. Some of the drawings now on display at Shaheen Modern and Contemporary Art in Cleveland, depict road construction. One drawing from 2010 “Route 24 Road Project – Support Columns” shows at once construction while also evoking images of ancient ruins. Kanwischer said his work has not undergone any dramatic shifts. Instead he feels he is able to get deeper and deeper into “landscape that reveals stories.” He’s appreciative that the arts council supports “long-term careers” not just the new and novel. This is his seventh grant in the 19 years since he joined the BGSU faculty. In return for…