History

BGSU Arts Events through May 10

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 17 – The College of Musical Arts presents tuba professor David Saltzman for the weekly Faculty Artist Series. Saltzman has been the tuba and euphonium instructor at BGSU and the principal tuba player with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra since 2007. He also is the principal tuba player for the summer Glimmerglass Opera Festival. He has performed with orchestras throughout the U.S. and Canada. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 18 – “A Forgotten Legacy: Rediscovering Europe’s Black Musical Past” will be the topic of Dr. Arne Spohr, a BGSU College of Musical Arts associate professor of musicology and a faculty fellow for the BGSU Institute for the Study of Culture and Society. The presentation will include a lecture about early modern black European composers and a live performance by the BGSU Early Music Ensemble of some of the compositions that have not been heard in 400 years. The presentation will begin at 7 p.m. in the Wood County District Public Library, 251 N. Main St., Bowling Green. Free April 18 – The International Film Festival, with the theme of “Undoing the Single Story,” features a screening of “Timbuktu,” the 2015 film directed by Mali’s Abderrahmane Sissako. The term “single story” refers to Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngoze Achidie’s TED talk, “The Danger of the Single Story.” Achidie explores the power of storytelling to construct and perpetuate stereotypes about others—especially if one tells one single story about them over and over again. This year’s International Film Festival therefore explores ways to discover unexpected, unfamiliar stories about cultures as different as those found in the film’s locations of Mauritania and Mali. The film is a work of breathtaking visual beauty that tells the story of self-described jihadists who, with high-caliber weaponry, are presuming to rule a small village and its surrounding grazing land and waters near Timbuktu. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in 206 Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Free April 18 – The Spring 2019 Reading Series features Julie Webb and Ali Miller, creative writing MFA students and English department teaching associates. Webb will read poetry and Miller will read fiction. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free April 18 – The BGSU Guitar Ensemble will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 19 – The BGSU University Choral Society will present an off-campus performance titled “Choral Evensong.” The concert will begin at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, 1526 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green. Free April 22 – The BGSU jazz department will present a performance that features a variety of jazz favorites ranging from Thad Jones’ “Cherry Juice” and John Coltrane/Frank Foster’s “Giant Steps” to Thelonious Monk/Kenny Clarke/John Fedchock’s “Epistrophy” and Bret Zvacek’s “It Might Be You.” The performance will begin at 8 p.m. at the Clazel Theater, 127 N. Main St., Bowling Green. Free April 23 – Music at the Manor House welcomes piano students of BGSU Associate Professor Solungga Liu. The students will perform at 7 p.m. at the Toledo Metroparks Wildwood Manor House, 5100 Central Ave., Toledo. Free April 23 – The Graduate String Quartet will perform a recital at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 24 – The College of Musical Arts presents the Middle School Honors String Festival, featuring beginning to advanced middle school string players. The students, who participated in chamber music sessions, master classes, string technique group sessions and chamber orchestra, will perform under…

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‘Poor farm’ exhibit examines historical safety net for ‘worthy poor’

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Long before there were safety nets like nursing homes, food pantries, subsidized housing and hospitals, there were “poor farms” to care for those who were old, sick, lame, or blind. Despite being labeled “poor farms,” they were not places of despair, according to a new exhibit at the Wood County Historical Center. In Ohio, all 88 counties had poor farms, starting in the mid 1800s to 1936 when public charity transitioned into more modern day social services. Wood County’s poor farm was located on County Home Road, southeast of Bowling Green. The sprawling building remains there today as a historical center. To commemorate the 150th year of the opening of the county poor house, a new exhibit will soon open at the center – “For Comfort and Convenience: Public Charity in Ohio by Way of the Poor Farm.” By all accounts, Ohio’s poor farm system provided a gentler life for the old and sick than many states, according to Holly Hartlerode, curator at the historical center. Curator Holly Hartlerode with old photo of residents at former Wood County Poor Farm. “We are not the only state that had a poor farm system, but we were very successful, which we’re proud of,” she said. “It is my deepest goal as curator that people do not see places like this as negative,” Hartlerode said. When Wood County’s poor farm opened in 1869, there were no public safety nets in place. “There was no social welfare, so where did people go? How do we best care for people?” Hartlerode said, noting society’s struggle. The model for the poor farms caring for paupers came over with the colonists. Based on the British workhouse system, almshouses were erected in New England, and many state constitutions offered public charity relief. In Ohio, the almshouse system was modified to fit the needs of its citizens. After the Civil War, states began to look at the best ways to provide comfort to those in need, at the convenience of those charged with dispensation of public charities. Every county in Ohio had a home to care for the “worthy poor.” The poor farms provided no luxuries, but in most cases they offered plenty to eat, warm places to sleep, clean conditions, and a feeling of community. The state required a certain amount of cubic feet per person, separate living and dining areas for men and women, suggested wholesome menus, clean laundries, chapels, and building recommendations for sturdy structures. “You can really see how much they cared,” Hartlerode said. Photo of women working with bushels of berries. Wood County’s poor farm sat on 200 acres, some of which was planted and harvested by the more able-bodied residents. The farm housed anywhere from 40 to 70 people at a time. “They were very self-sufficient,” she said. “Remember, these people were farmers, too.” The state believed that children should be housed elsewhere because they were liable to contamination by association with “vile men and viler women.” There were also concerns that children brought up in such settings would become satisfied with lives of poverty. However, some children did live with their mothers at the home. The farms also took in more than just the sick and poor – those “worthy poor” who were there due to misfortune and mismanagement. In the terminology of the day, they also housed “idiots” and “epileptics.” Old black and white photos show the residents sitting around dining room tables with linens and china dishes. They show images of women knitting or cleaning berries in the kitchen – with smiles on…


WBGU-TV gets grant, seeks local funds for Neil Armstrong documentary

From WBGU-TV PUBLIC TELEVISION WBGU-TV has been selected as one of 15 PBS stations nationwide to receive a $10,000 grant from WGBH’s “American Experience” for special programming in commemoration of the upcoming 50th anniversary of the first successful manned moon landing. WBGU-TV is creating a documentary celebrating the early life of the first man on the moon and Wapakoneta, Ohio, native Neil Armstrong. The documentary will include interviews with those who knew Armstrong and how his accomplishment had such a lasting effect on Northwest Ohio. It will feature Wapakoneta and various locales that figured prominently in Armstrong’s formative years. Plans are to premiere the documentary during Wapakoneta’s “First on the Moon” celebration in July. It then will air on WBGU-TV and be available for viewing online. “American Experience” is planning a six-hour, three-part documentary about the politics and culture of the space age and the journey that led to the moon landing. It will air on PBS throughout the summer. “We are proud and excited to showcase Armstrong,” said WBGU-TV co-General Manager Anthony Short. “When you stop and think about it, it’s amazing that the first man on the moon grew up in our viewing area. It was such a monumental time in our history and he was such an interesting (and humble) person.” “We were thrilled to receive the grant and are hopeful that others will support this project,” said WBGU-TV co-General Manager Tina Simon. “It’s been 50 years now since the moon landing and it’s important that we’re able to talk with people who were in Wapakoneta when it happened and let them share their experiences, before time makes that impossible.” Along with the grant, WBGU-TV will be seeking additional sponsors and funding sources in support of the documentary. The station will be hosting a 5K fun run/walk April 6 with proceeds benefiting the project. The WBGU-TV “Great American Run: Ruby’s Race for Space” will begin at 9 a.m. at the Jerome Library on the Bowling Green State University campus and follow an easy course around the university. To register or for more details, visit davesrunning.com or wbgu.org. For airdates of the documentary, visit the station’s online program schedule at wbgu.org. WBGU-TV is a PBS affiliate and partner of Bowling Green State University serving a 19-county region with award-winning programming and educational resources. For more information, visit www.wbgu.org.“American Experience” is in its 30th season. Its programs feature the incredible characters and epic stories that have shaped America’s past and present. It is television’s most-watched history series and has been honored with every major broadcast award. It typically airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m.


BGSU’s Christina Lunceford reflects on a legacy of fighting for equality during MLK tribute

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Christina Lunceford has been thinking about her legacy lately. In introducing Lunceford as the keynote speaker for the annual Martin Luther King Tribute Friday, university student Morgan Hollandsworth noted that this was Lunceford’s  last day as Assistant to the President for Diversity and Inclusion.  Lunceford, who had a split role at Bowing Green State University for the past couple years, will become interim chair of the Department of Higher Education and Student Affairs and part of the leadership team for the College of Education and Human Development.  Lunceford said in this period of transition she’s looked back at those who helped guide her to become who she is as an educator, scholar, and mother. Some are unknown outside her family, others more renowned. Yet each struggled for social justice “with integrity, resilience, and joy,” she said. “I am definitely part of each of these legacies. I do my best to make sure their investment in me was worthwhile, and I take that responsibility very seriously to do good with what they instilled. It’s important that the legacy continues.” Lunceford started with her grandmother Lyda Mae Saunders.  Lunceford said growing up in East St. Louis, Missouri, her father “started fighting, stealing and drinking at a young age.” Bowling Green High School Madrigals perform “Tshosholoza” with David Siegel, left, on percussion, and Kam Frankfort singing lead. Her grandmother moved with him to the outskirts of Dallas, where she taught, taking advantage of some of the opportunities just opening up for blacks. Yet she knew she needed more, so she went to graduate school in Denver, because what she needed was not available to her in the South at that time. Lunceford still wears her grandmother’s 1958 class ring. Her father, Ronald Lunceford, went on to become a sociologist and counseling psychologist. He met her mother in Kansas where he went to train teachers working in newly integrated schools. As a mixed race couple their lives were “adventurous,” Lunceford said. They relocated to southern California, where he taught and together they founded a clinic for black and Latinos setting an example of building community. The percussion played during the Madrigal Singers’ performance of the South African anthem “Tshosholoza” earlier in the program reminded her of her father. He often played African drums, sometimes to relieve stress and sometimes “to bring joy” to their family. Part of her family’s circle in California were two of black pioneers in psychology, Robert Guthrie and Joseph White. They would argue between themselves, each wanting to bestow on the other the distinction of being the father of black psychology.  Each wrote seminal works on black psychology. Guthrie, who received his bachelor’s degree from Florida A&M, a historically black university, was told when he went on to graduate school that he could not cite his former professors. Their work was not published in the “right” journals. Guthrie went on to published the book “Even the Rat Was White: A Historical View of Psychology.” At the time, Lunceford noted, he was criticized for being “divisive” by the American Psychological Association. His book has since been inducted into the APA’s archives.  He and White were instrumental in founding the Associate of Black Psychologists. White wrote a seminal article “Toward a Black Psychology” in 1970 and published it not in a scholarly journal but in the popular magazine “Ebony.” He wanted the article read by the general public. He wanted it in beauty parlor and barbershops, Lunceford said. She learned from them how to disagree respectful and good natured way. They had divergent views, for example,…


Parks district offers winter activities

From WOOD COUNTY PARK DISTRICT The Wood County Parks District is offering a full slate of programs to help young and old to get the most out of winter. Polar Parks Mini-Camp Wednesday – Friday, January 2 – 4; 9:00 am – noon W.W. Knight Nature Preserve 25930 White Road, Perrysburg Experience a wild Wood County winter through this 3-day mini-camp! Each day highlights a different educational theme and seeks to explore through hands-on and outdoor activities. Cost: $12/$10 FWCP per day, or $30/$25 FWCP for all three days. Ages 8-13. The registration deadline is one week before the beginning of the camp day. Leaders: Jim Witter and Craig Spicer Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Introduction to Orienteering Sunday, January 6; 1:00 – 3:00 pm Bradner Interpretive Center 11491 Fostoria Road, Bradner Find out what else the magnetic compass can do besides show you which way is north. This reliable low-tech tool can help you get from point A to point B. We will learn the basics indoors and then take it outside on a short orienteering course. Leader: Bill Hoefflin Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 EcoLit Book Group Meeting Thursday, January 10; 7:00 – 9:00 pm W.W. Knight Nature Preserve: Hankison Great Room 29530 White Road, Perrysburg For this meeting, please read The Snow Leopard by Peter Matthiessen. Discussion leader: Cheryl Lachowski, Senior Lecturer, BGSU English Dept. and Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist (OCVN) Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Homeschoolers: Project Feederwatch Friday, January 11; 10:00 – 11:00 am Bradner Interpretive Center 11491 Fostoria Road, Bradner Learn how Wood County Park’s volunteers count birds at our windows on wildlife and how you can help scientists learn about bird populations in Wood County. Leader: Jim Witter Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Native American Moccasin Making Workshop Series Saturdays, January 12, January 26, February 9, February 23; 10:00 am – 2:00 pm Carter Historic Farm 18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green Learn the skill of making authentic Native American moccasins over the course of four sessions. The Plains two-piece style will be featured. Cost for series: $30. Leader: Stewart Orr Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Arctic Open Archery Saturday, January 12; 12:30 – 3:00 pm Arrowwood Archery Range 11126 Linwood Road, Bowling Green Arrows fly in the crisp winter air! Arrive anytime between 12:30 and 3:00 to give this cool archery a shot. Leader: Craig Spicer This is an open program. There is no need to register. Ice Age Mammals of Ohio Tuesday, January 15; 6:30 – 8:00 pm W.W. Knight Nature Preserve: Hankison Great Room 29530 White Road, Perrysburg An impressive array of extinct animals used to call Ohio home following the retreat of the last glacier. Discover these megafauna and learn about some of the theories behind their extinction.  Leader: Bill HoefflinRegister at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 A Stitch in Time Saves Nine Thursday, January 17; 7:00 – 8:30 pm Carter Historic Farm 18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green Explore the lost art of mending, a time-honored skill of the Depression Era homemaker. Bring an item to mend, thread, needle, and a willingness to learn! Leader: Virginia Dean Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Wild Skills: Fire-Building Friday, January 18; 6:30 – 8:00 pm Wood County Historical Center: Adam Phillips Shelter 13660 County Home Road, Bowling Green Fire is one of the best tools to have on your adventures, providing clean water, heat for cooking and a positive attitude. Learn hands-on how to start and maintain one safely and successfully in a variety of different situations. Leader: Craig Spicer Register…


Five houses being demolished for East Wooster facelift

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Brick by brick and board by board, bulldozers are changing the landscape along East Wooster Street in Bowling Green. The demolition of the old houses is seen by some as a blessing for the future – while others view it as a loss of the city’s past The city of Bowling Green received five demolition permit requests at the end of last month for houses across from Bowling Green State University. Those houses – at 926, 930, 1010, 1024 and 1030 East Wooster Street – are now at various stages of demolition. The owner of 1010 E. Wooster St. is listed as BGSU, while the owner of the other four locations is Centennial Falcon Properties, an entity established by BGSU seven years ago to finance the construction of residence halls. There are no specific immediate proposals for the lots where the homes are being demolished, according to Dave Kielmeyer, spokesperson for the university. “There are currently no plans for the properties. The sites will be seeded this spring and remain green spaces for the foreseeable future,” Kielmeyer said last week. Some local residents have lamented the loss of old homes across from the university – especially the house that sat back off the street on the southwest corner of Crim and East Wooster. That home was reportedly built in 1840 using locally quarried stone. The city’s planning department sees BGSU’s efforts as a step in the right direction to clean up the East Wooster corridor to the city. Some of the homes being torn down were non-conforming uses, since they were zoned as single-family residential but were being used for student rentals. The homes were “not all in tip-top shape,” Bowling Green Planning Director Heather Sayler said. Another house being torn down across from BGSU. The houses being demolished had suffered the wear and tear of being rentals to college students – and in some cases had reputations as being major “party” houses and eyesores along East Wooster Street. At the beginning of the school year each fall, the city’s mayor and university’s president walk the neighborhood along East Wooster Street and ask the latest batch of student renters to be respectful of those living nearby, driving through and going to school. The city and university have been working together for years to try to create a better first impression for people as they enter the city from Interstate 75 on East Wooster Street. This is not the first section of rental housing that BGSU has taken steps to reform. In the fall of 2016, BGSU bought two rental properties at 141 and 145 Troup Avenue, just off East Wooster Street for $280,000. The two houses are being used as forensic investigation scenario houses. The university also purchased two empty business properties at 904 and 908 East Wooster Street for $351,000. The buildings on the corner of South College Avenue, have been used as a bookstore and a variety of other purposes over the years. Kielmeyer said those properties were purchased as part of the city’s and university’s ongoing plans to improve the East Wooster corridor leading from the intersection of I-75 into downtown Bowling Green. The university is “buying in anticipation of what we might do there,” Kielmeyer said in 2016. He described it as “a strategic property acquisition. Those are important properties in our plans.” The city and university recently received a report from a firm called Development Strategies that was hired to examine the 1.8 miles of East Wooster from I-75 to the downtown. The firm spent six months interviewing…