History

‘Poor farm’ exhibit examines historical safety net for ‘worthy poor’

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Long before there were safety nets like nursing homes, food pantries, subsidized housing and hospitals, there were “poor farms” to care for those who were old, sick, lame, or blind. Despite being labeled “poor farms,” they were not places of despair, according to a new exhibit at the Wood County Historical Center. In Ohio, all 88 counties had poor farms, starting in the mid 1800s to 1936 when public charity transitioned into more modern day social services. Wood County’s poor farm was located on County Home Road, southeast of Bowling Green. The sprawling building remains there today as a historical center. To commemorate the 150th year of the opening of the county poor house, a new exhibit will soon open at the center – “For Comfort and Convenience: Public Charity in Ohio by Way of the Poor Farm.” By all accounts, Ohio’s poor farm system provided a gentler life for the old and sick than many states, according to Holly Hartlerode, curator at the historical center. Curator Holly Hartlerode with old photo of residents at former Wood County Poor Farm. “We are not the only state that had a poor farm system, but we were very successful, which we’re proud of,” she said. “It is my deepest goal as curator that people do not see places like this as negative,” Hartlerode said. When Wood County’s poor farm opened in 1869, there were no public safety nets in place. “There was no social welfare, so where did people go? How do we best care for people?” Hartlerode said, noting society’s struggle. The model for the poor farms caring for paupers came over with the colonists. Based on the British workhouse system, almshouses were erected in New England, and many state constitutions offered public charity relief. In Ohio, the almshouse system was modified to fit the needs of its citizens. After the Civil War, states began to look at the best ways to provide comfort to those in need, at the convenience of those charged with dispensation of public charities. Every county in Ohio had a home to care for the “worthy poor.” The poor farms provided no luxuries, but in most cases they offered plenty to eat, warm places…


WBGU-TV gets grant, seeks local funds for Neil Armstrong documentary

From WBGU-TV PUBLIC TELEVISION WBGU-TV has been selected as one of 15 PBS stations nationwide to receive a $10,000 grant from WGBH’s “American Experience” for special programming in commemoration of the upcoming 50th anniversary of the first successful manned moon landing. WBGU-TV is creating a documentary celebrating the early life of the first man on the moon and Wapakoneta, Ohio, native Neil Armstrong. The documentary will include interviews with those who knew Armstrong and how his accomplishment had such a lasting effect on Northwest Ohio. It will feature Wapakoneta and various locales that figured prominently in Armstrong’s formative years. Plans are to premiere the documentary during Wapakoneta’s “First on the Moon” celebration in July. It then will air on WBGU-TV and be available for viewing online. “American Experience” is planning a six-hour, three-part documentary about the politics and culture of the space age and the journey that led to the moon landing. It will air on PBS throughout the summer. “We are proud and excited to showcase Armstrong,” said WBGU-TV co-General Manager Anthony Short. “When you stop and think about it, it’s amazing that the first man on the moon grew up in our viewing area. It was such a monumental time in our history and he was such an interesting (and humble) person.” “We were thrilled to receive the grant and are hopeful that others will support this project,” said WBGU-TV co-General Manager Tina Simon. “It’s been 50 years now since the moon landing and it’s important that we’re able to talk with people who were in Wapakoneta when it happened and let them share their experiences, before time makes that impossible.” Along with the grant, WBGU-TV will be seeking additional sponsors and funding sources in support of the documentary. The station will be hosting a 5K fun run/walk April 6 with proceeds benefiting the project. The WBGU-TV “Great American Run: Ruby’s Race for Space” will begin at 9 a.m. at the Jerome Library on the Bowling Green State University campus and follow an easy course around the university. To register or for more details, visit davesrunning.com or wbgu.org. For airdates of the documentary, visit the station’s online program schedule at wbgu.org. WBGU-TV is a PBS affiliate and partner of Bowling Green State University…


BGSU’s Christina Lunceford reflects on a legacy of fighting for equality during MLK tribute

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Christina Lunceford has been thinking about her legacy lately. In introducing Lunceford as the keynote speaker for the annual Martin Luther King Tribute Friday, university student Morgan Hollandsworth noted that this was Lunceford’s  last day as Assistant to the President for Diversity and Inclusion.  Lunceford, who had a split role at Bowing Green State University for the past couple years, will become interim chair of the Department of Higher Education and Student Affairs and part of the leadership team for the College of Education and Human Development.  Lunceford said in this period of transition she’s looked back at those who helped guide her to become who she is as an educator, scholar, and mother. Some are unknown outside her family, others more renowned. Yet each struggled for social justice “with integrity, resilience, and joy,” she said. “I am definitely part of each of these legacies. I do my best to make sure their investment in me was worthwhile, and I take that responsibility very seriously to do good with what they instilled. It’s important that the legacy continues.” Lunceford started with her grandmother Lyda Mae Saunders.  Lunceford said growing up in East St. Louis, Missouri, her father “started fighting, stealing and drinking at a young age.” Bowling Green High School Madrigals perform “Tshosholoza” with David Siegel, left, on percussion, and Kam Frankfort singing lead. Her grandmother moved with him to the outskirts of Dallas, where she taught, taking advantage of some of the opportunities just opening up for blacks. Yet she knew she needed more, so she went to graduate school in Denver, because what she needed was not available to her in the South at that time. Lunceford still wears her grandmother’s 1958 class ring. Her father, Ronald Lunceford, went on to become a sociologist and counseling psychologist. He met her mother in Kansas where he went to train teachers working in newly integrated schools. As a mixed race couple their lives were “adventurous,” Lunceford said. They relocated to southern California, where he taught and together they founded a clinic for black and Latinos setting an example of building community. The percussion played during the Madrigal Singers’ performance of the South African anthem “Tshosholoza” earlier in the program…


Parks district offers winter activities

From WOOD COUNTY PARK DISTRICT The Wood County Parks District is offering a full slate of programs to help young and old to get the most out of winter. Polar Parks Mini-Camp Wednesday – Friday, January 2 – 4; 9:00 am – noon W.W. Knight Nature Preserve 25930 White Road, Perrysburg Experience a wild Wood County winter through this 3-day mini-camp! Each day highlights a different educational theme and seeks to explore through hands-on and outdoor activities. Cost: $12/$10 FWCP per day, or $30/$25 FWCP for all three days. Ages 8-13. The registration deadline is one week before the beginning of the camp day. Leaders: Jim Witter and Craig Spicer Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Introduction to Orienteering Sunday, January 6; 1:00 – 3:00 pm Bradner Interpretive Center 11491 Fostoria Road, Bradner Find out what else the magnetic compass can do besides show you which way is north. This reliable low-tech tool can help you get from point A to point B. We will learn the basics indoors and then take it outside on a short orienteering course. Leader: Bill Hoefflin Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 EcoLit Book Group Meeting Thursday, January 10; 7:00 – 9:00 pm W.W. Knight Nature Preserve: Hankison Great Room 29530 White Road, Perrysburg For this meeting, please read The Snow Leopard by Peter Matthiessen. Discussion leader: Cheryl Lachowski, Senior Lecturer, BGSU English Dept. and Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist (OCVN) Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Homeschoolers: Project Feederwatch Friday, January 11; 10:00 – 11:00 am Bradner Interpretive Center 11491 Fostoria Road, Bradner Learn how Wood County Park’s volunteers count birds at our windows on wildlife and how you can help scientists learn about bird populations in Wood County. Leader: Jim Witter Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Native American Moccasin Making Workshop Series Saturdays, January 12, January 26, February 9, February 23; 10:00 am – 2:00 pm Carter Historic Farm 18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green Learn the skill of making authentic Native American moccasins over the course of four sessions. The Plains two-piece style will be featured. Cost for series: $30. Leader: Stewart Orr Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Arctic Open Archery Saturday, January 12; 12:30 – 3:00 pm Arrowwood Archery Range…


Five houses being demolished for East Wooster facelift

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Brick by brick and board by board, bulldozers are changing the landscape along East Wooster Street in Bowling Green. The demolition of the old houses is seen by some as a blessing for the future – while others view it as a loss of the city’s past The city of Bowling Green received five demolition permit requests at the end of last month for houses across from Bowling Green State University. Those houses – at 926, 930, 1010, 1024 and 1030 East Wooster Street – are now at various stages of demolition. The owner of 1010 E. Wooster St. is listed as BGSU, while the owner of the other four locations is Centennial Falcon Properties, an entity established by BGSU seven years ago to finance the construction of residence halls. There are no specific immediate proposals for the lots where the homes are being demolished, according to Dave Kielmeyer, spokesperson for the university. “There are currently no plans for the properties. The sites will be seeded this spring and remain green spaces for the foreseeable future,” Kielmeyer said last week. Some local residents have lamented the loss of old homes across from the university – especially the house that sat back off the street on the southwest corner of Crim and East Wooster. That home was reportedly built in 1840 using locally quarried stone. The city’s planning department sees BGSU’s efforts as a step in the right direction to clean up the East Wooster corridor to the city. Some of the homes being torn down were non-conforming uses, since they were zoned as single-family residential but were being used for student rentals. The homes were “not all in tip-top shape,” Bowling Green Planning Director Heather Sayler said. Another house being torn down across from BGSU. The houses being demolished had suffered the wear and tear of being rentals to college students – and in some cases had reputations as being major “party” houses and eyesores along East Wooster Street. At the beginning of the school year each fall, the city’s mayor and university’s president walk the neighborhood along East Wooster Street and ask the latest batch of student renters to be respectful of those living nearby, driving through…



Looted artifacts are making their way home to Turkey

By JAN LARSON  McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The 2,000-year-old artifacts looted from Turkey and sold to BGSU are being carefully packed up for their trip home. Officials from BGSU and Turkey shared the stage Tuesday morning to talk about how history is being righted with the return of the ancient art. “It is clear today that the best place for these is in the Republic of Turkey,” BGSU President Rodney Rogers said. The Turkish officials were grateful. “I know BGSU could have prolonged this process if they wanted to,” said Umut Acar, consul general for Turkey. The story of the mosaics is part history, part mystery. Dr. Stephanie Langin-Hooper, one of the people who solved the mystery of the mosaics, pieced together their story. About 2,000 years ago, a Roman family built a home in the area of Zeugma on the banks of the Euphrates River, said Langin-Hooper. They had a luxurious dining room floor created with custom mosaics of handcut stone and glass. The mosaics were a “marvel of artistic creation,” with intricate images of Bacchus the God of wine, theater masks and exotic birds. “Fast forward to the early 1960s,” Langin-Hooper said. “Zeugma and all of its glorious villas had long since fallen into ruin and been buried by the sands of time.” The artifacts were lost – except to looters, who were interested in profits not preserving art. Using crude methods, like pickaxes and sledgehammers, the looters removed at least 12 of the mosaic images and smuggled them out of Turkey. They were shipped halfway across the world. They ended up in an antiquities gallery in New York City, where they were fraudulently labeled with the provenance of a legal excavation in Antioch. It was there that BGSU officials spotted them and legally purchased them for $35,000. When the mosaics made a re-debut in 2011 at the newly constructed Wolfe Center for the Performing Arts at BGSU, a new professor on campus – Langin-Hooper – started researching the artifacts. She was assisted by Professor Rebecca Molholt of Brown University. “Together we began to suspect the truth,” said Langin-Hooper, who is now at Southern Methodist University in Texas. The mosaics were not artifacts delicately removed and sold with legitimate documentation – but…


County to preserve courthouse murals before too late

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   For more than a century, the murals on the top floor of the Wood County Courthouse have caused heads to tip back in admiration of the artwork. The county commissioners would like courthouse visitors for years to come to have that same experience. So the commissioners are planning to spend nearly $70,000 to restore the works of art. “That building is on the National Register of Historic Places,” said Wood County Administrator Andrew Kalmar. And the murals are an integral part of the structure. “They depict scenes from Wood County a century ago.” The county commissioners are expected on Tuesday to enter into a contract for $21,980 to lease scaffolding for the restoration project. Earlier this fall, they had approved a contract for $47,390 to hire McKay Lodge Conservation Laboratory Inc., from Oberlin, to restore the murals. The work will be laborious and tedious – taking an estimated four weeks for each towering mural. The scaffolding will go up on Nov. 26, with a tentative completion date of Feb. 1, 2019. Putting up the scaffolding in itself is a difficult job. “We’ve had it done before, for painting the trim,” on the courthouse’s third floor, Kalmar said. “Unfortunately, that’s a major portion of the costs for whatever we do there.” The commissioners were told earlier this year that the aging murals were at a critical point. A painting restoration expert said it’s now or never for the massive murals. “You’re at the turning point,” Kalmar said the county was informed. “If we don’t do restoration now, they are going to start coming off the walls.” The murals depict Fort Meigs in 1813 on the east wall, and an oil field in 1904 on the west wall. The murals were painted * by I.M. Taylor, an artist and mayor of Bowling Green. A couple years ago, workers restoring plaster at the courthouse noticed some paint flaking on the murals. So the county contracted with ICA Art Conservation, a non-profit center in Cleveland for advice. Andrea Chevalier, a senior painting conservator, visited the courthouse to get a close look. She saw large areas where the paint is peeling, yet still precariously hanging onto the surface. There are also a…


Panel discussed the tangled, unsavory roots of the migration crisis

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The roots of the current immigration crisis run deep, and they extend to the seat of government in the United States. The complexity of that web were traced during Pushed Out: Root Causes of Migration from Mexico and Central America Wednesday at a discussion hosted by La Conexion at the Wood County Library. Four speakers addressed the historical background of immigration from Mexico and Central America as well as current reality. They spoke both from scholarship and personal experience. Valeria Grinberg Pla, a professor of Spanish American literature and culture, traced the violence that has sent so many Central Americans adrift. The U.S. had a pattern of interfering in the governments of Central American nations to promote the interest of American corporations, particularly those of the United Fruit Company. Any government that promoted land reform was likely to be overthrown. That happened in Guatemala in the 1950s, leading to 30 years of civil war, and in the 1970s in Nicaragua where the Reagan Administration backed a counter revolutionary force trying to overthrow the government, Pla said. These countries as well as El Salvador all suffered from extended period of civil strife with Honduras suffering collateral damage from the neighboring conflicts. And the aftermath of those wars has been devastating.  Many refugees from the war ended up in the United States. The adults had to deal with dislocation and the trauma of war, Pla said.Their children faced cultural dislocation. Some joined gangs here in the United States as a way to cope. When they returned to their home countries, they brought gang culture with them.  Those gangs took root in the post-war landscape, Pla said. These Central American countries now suffer from the highest rates of non-military violence of any place in the world. Those migrants, including those in the caravan on its way to the United are fleeing this violence, she said.  “They are not economic migrants. They are not seeking a better life. For them, it’s a matter of life or death.” The Rev. Herb Weber, of St. John XXIII Catholic Parish, first traveled to Central American about 30 years ago. He ventured to Guatemala when the civil war was still raging. “After war, countries are not settled…


Mosaics to be removed later this month & returned by BGSU to Turkey

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Last May, Bowling Green State University announced that it had reached an agreement to return 12 pieces of ancient mosaics in the University’s art collection, on display in The Wolfe Center for the Arts, to the Republic of Turkey. They will be formally returned to a Turkish delegation next week, removed, and packed for shipping. The University invites the community to view the collection before its return. The mosaics are on display outside the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at the BGSU Wolfe Center for the Arts. They may be viewed from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on: Thursday, Nov. 15 Friday, Nov. 16 Monday, Nov. 19 Editor’s note: At the time of the announcement of the return, the Turkish  government said it would provide replicas to replace the originals. (See related story.)  


Composer Sam Adler experienced Kristallnact as child, commemorates it in cantata to be performed Sunday

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In the early morning hours of Nov. 11, 1938 Samuel Adler’s family heard an explosion nearby their home in Mannheim, Germany. The 10-year-old later learned that it was the chapel at the Jewish Cemetery being bombed. This was the night that would come to be known as Kristallnacht — the night of broken glass, when the Nazis launched their full scale their persecution of Jews, moving beyond harassment to state violence. Adler’s father, Hugo Adler, a noted cantor, was caught up in the arrests, but released.  He tried to leave the country but couldn’t. A few days after Kristallnacht he and his son went to the central synagogue, which had been destroyed, where they climbed to the loft to collect and rescue as many of the music books, which contained the musical legacy of the congregation. Nazis moved around below where the two worked. Later the family was able to flee Germany “on the last train,” Adler remembers. “We were scared to death until we left for America.” A half century after those traumatic events, Adler, now an internationally renowned composer, commemorated Kristallnacht in “Stars in the Dust” with a libretto by the late Samuel Rosenbaum, one of the chief cantors in conservative Judaism. To commemorate the 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht, “Stars in the Dust” will be performed Sunday, Nov. 18 at 4 p.m., at Temple Shomer Emunim, 6453 Sylvania Ave, Sylvania. The performance will feature Cantor Andrea Rae Markowicz, soloists Christopher Scholl, tenor, and Lance Ashmore, baritone, from Bowling Green State University as well as the university’s Collegiate Chorale, conducted by Richard Schnipke, and orchestra, conducted by Emily Freeman Brown, Adler’s wife. The award-winning actress and singer Michelle Azar, the composer’s niece, will narrate.  Adler, who is retired from the faculties of the Eastman School of Music and the Juilliard School, now lives in Perrysburg. The libretto, Adler said, chronicles what happened drawing on contemporary accounts, including that  of a cantor who sang Kaddish, the traditional prayer of mourning, after seeing the damage wrought on his community. “It ends in conviction that it must never happen again,” Adler said.  But given anti-Semitism dates back 2000 years, vigilance will always be necessary. “We have to work at it so…


Two local men lost lives in worst U.S. Navy loss in WWI

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   As the world celebrated the 100 anniversary of the conclusion to the “war to end all wars,” local residents remembered two of the 70 Wood County men killed in World War I. The soldiers – one from Tontogany and one from Bloomdale – lost their lives to a German U-boat commander trying to improve his lackluster war record in the waning days of the war. The story of the local “boys” lost at sea was told Saturday by Wood County Historical Center Education Coordinator Michael McMaster during the annual brunch meeting of the historical society membership. The two local men were aboard the USS Ticonderoga, a steamship used to transport cargo by the U.S. Navy. The ship was built in Germany, but was seized by the U.S. in 1917, turned over to the Navy and converted to transport soldiers and horses to the war raging in Europe. Nearly half of the men on board were from Northwest Ohio, McMaster said. “They were chosen to take care of the horses,” he said. One of the men was Charles “Clint” Lybarger, of Washington Township. His name is memorialized in the name of the Lybarger-Grimm American Legion Post in Tontogany. The other is Milan Lee Long, of Bloomdale. Both men were on their way to replenish U.S. Army artillery troops in France in the early autumn of 1918. They were among more than 250 soldiers on the USS Ticonderoga as it joined part of an armed convoy of about 40 ships headed to Europe. Sometime during the night of Sept. 29, the Ticonderoga had engine trouble and fell behind the convoy. The ship commander, James Jonas Madison, blamed the problems on “bad coal.” The next morning, those on the Ticonderoga saw the German submarine U-152 running on the surface. For two hours, the Germans fired upon the U.S. transport ship. Nearly every person on the Ticonderoga was wounded, McMaster said. The USS Galveston, the protector of the convoy, reportedly had so many crew members sick with the Spanish flu, that the ship was unable to get back fast enough to defend the Ticonderoga, McMaster said. At 7:45 a.m., the Ticonderoga sunk along with much of its cargo of men and…


Historical museum revisits panic-inducing ‘War of the Worlds’ broadcast

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Eighty years ago the world was on the brink of global war, and the American people were spooked by a fictional invasion. Tuesday, Oct. 30, marks the 80th anniversary of the first broadcast of “The War of the Worlds,” Orson Welles’ radio adaptation of the H. G. Wells’ novel. The Wood County Historical Center will celebrate the anniversary by presenting a recreation of the broadcast at 8 p.m. that night. Tickets are $10. The cast and crew of the show doesn’t expect to induce panic the way the original reportedly did. How many people back in 1938 actually took the broadcast to be actual news is subject of debate. Jane Milbrodt, who provides the music, isn’t surprised if some people did. “It sounds like it’s really happening.” Kent and Janet McClary at the request of Historical Center Director Kelli Kling assembled a cast of local thespians. This is the fourth time the couple has been involved in a recreation of the broadcast. “It’s nostalgic,” Janet McClary said. “It’s a piece of history. People like to see it performed.” She will join Jim Barnes, who also participated in those earlier productions, in providing the sound effects. And they have enlisted a real radio personality Clint Corpe, of the WBGU-FM’s “Morning Show,” for a central role. Others involved include Tom Milbrodt doing sound and actors Lane Hakel, Jeremy Kohler, and Jim Toth. The show will be taped for possible future broadcast. Together they will bring to life the story of Martians landing in Grover’s Mill, New Jersey, and then running roughshod toward New York. Welles staged the story as a series of news bulletins interrupting an evening of musical entertainment. The urgency of those bulletins gave the script a vivid sense of reality. “It’s really a super adaptation,” Tom Milbrodt said. The next day newspapers reported of cases of people in panic because they thought the invasion was real. Some, Janet McClary said, may have tuned in late, missing Welles’ introduction. Some even thought it was Germans, not Martians attacking. While the Martians never conquered the earth, the broadcast and its effects certainly captured the imaginations of many. Kling said the show is a perfect fit for the season and with…


Hess lecturer: Korean War was a pivot point in America’s war policy

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When it comes to establishing the precedent of sending Americans to fight and die in war without the approval of Congress, the buck stops with Harry S. Truman. That was the conclusion of Mary Dudziak, who delivered the Gary R. Hess Lecture in Policy History Monday at Bowling Green State University. Dudziak, a historian and professor of law at Emory University, addressed “The War Powers Pivot: How Congress Lost its Power in Korea,” a chapter from her forthcoming book “Going to War: An American History.” “I had been a fan of Harry Truman,” Dudziak said. Her first book was on civil rights, and on that score Truman was a hero.  His stance was “courageous.” He was “a stronger president on civil rights than FDR and those before him.” On June 25, 1950, the North Korean Army stormed across the 38th parallel and overwhelmed South Korean forces. “A monster is coming,” was the response of one Korean girl , Dudziak said. Truman was MIA. The 38th parallel had been the dividing line between the Communist north and the United States’ ally in the south. That division, the speaker said, was considered the “original sin” for what continues to be a festering international dilemma. Even as news of the invasion shot across the international dateline, Truman was in Missouri. Instead of rushing back to Washington, he took time to visit his farm and his brother. The president showed an “unusual amount of deference to the State Department.” The State Department’s response was to go to the then new United Nations to authorize a military response, and bypass Congress.  The Constitution gives the authority to declare war to Congress, though the president has some authority as president to use military force. “Korea was the first large scale military operation without a war declaration,” Dudziak said. It wasn’t even called a war at a time, prompting one mother to ask what she was supposed to put on her son’s tombstone. It set a precedent that presidents of both parties have used ever since most recently when President Trump ordered air strikes in Syria. Citing the Constitution’s first words “We the People,” Dudziak said that the neglect of Congress to formally declare war means the…


Secrets to stay sealed – unopened time capsule likely to be buried again

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   It looks like secrets buried in City Park will stay buried in City Park – at least for another 15 years. The riddle of the mystery time capsule rediscovered last week was solved. The capsule was buried as part of the city’s 150th birthday party in 1983. The sesquicentennial  bash also featured a 150-foot banana split and square dance demonstrations. But as far as the secrets contained inside the time capsule – well, city residents may have to wait several more years to have those treasures revealed. Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Director Kristin Otley said Monday that the original intention was likely that the time capsule remain buried for 50 years. It has only been 35 years since it was put in the ground during a community ceremony. “My guess is we will probably rebury it,” Otley said. The forgotten time capsule was rediscovered last week then city park staff and architects walked the area of City Park where a new building is being planned. The time capsule is under the footprint of the building. When the park department’s natural resources coordinator Chris Gajewicz posed the question about the time capsule last week on Facebook, it sent local residents scurrying for their local history sources. The time capsule is covered with concrete, a rock, and some etching that was too weathered to read. But some long-time Bowling Green residents recognized the location as the site of the sesquicentennial time capsule. The capsule was buried with great pomp and circumstance on Oct. 2, 1983, during a community gathering in City Park that commemorated the city’s 150th birthday. More than 1,000 townspeople showed up for the festivities which included a box lunch for $3 each, a hymn sing, children’s games, horseshoe tournament, pie baking contest judging, a style show of old fashions, softball games, wagon rides,and prizes awarded for a beard growing competition. Top-billing, right after the box lunch, was the burying of the time capsule. The event was recorded by Joan Gordon, who headed up the sesquicentennial committee. A photo taken by Jim Gordon shows local historian Lyle Fletcher burying the time capsule. But 35 years later, the time capsule, with its now undecipherable etching, had gone…