Books

Toledo Museum to host National Geographic Live speaker series

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART National Geographic Live, National Geographic’s touring speaker series, and the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) are proud to announce an inaugural three-part speaker series that will take place the Peristyle Theater throughout 2019.   “We are excited to see the Peristyle stage come alive through a combination of first-hand accounts from National Geographic Explorers and their amazing imagery,” said Brian Kennedy, the Museum’s Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey director. “We believe the National Geographic Live series provides an engaging format for the community to learn about the world around them.” The three events for the inaugural series are: Birds of Paradise Revealed Saturday, April 27: 7 p.m., Peristyle Tim Laman, a renowned photographer and forest canopy researcher, and ornithologist Ed Scholes, authors of the major National Geographic book, “Birds of Paradise Revealed,” will take visitors deep into New Guinea to observe these astonishing avian creatures. Evolved to attract mates with their extraordinarily colorful feathers, which they display in dances executed with ballerina-like grace, these birds are a living laboratory of evolution. Meet all 39 species and enjoy their secret lives, bizarre displays, and dazzling courtship antics in breathtaking visuals. When Women Ruled the World Thursday, May 30: 7 p.m., Peristyle Dr. Kara Cooney, professor of Egyptology, explores the reigns of powerful ancient queens to illuminate a time when women ruled the world. Often neglected in the history books, these strong female leaders were considered exceptions to the rule, but their power and influence is undeniable. Standing at Water’s Edge Saturday, July 27: 7 p.m., Peristyle Cristina Mittermeier learned the concept of responsible earth stewardship from her indigenous nanny as a child growing up in Mexico, and she explores that calling through the ways of life of four communities and their individual relationships with water—the Kayapó in the Amazon, the Inuit of Greenland, the First Nations people of British Columbia, and native Hawaiians. “We are thrilled to be bringing some of National Geographic’s most dynamic and entertaining explorers to TMA,” said Yulia Petrossian Boyle, Senior Vice President for Global Media and Experiences at National Geographic….

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BGSU Arts Events through Nov. 28

At the galleries – “The Shodo Way of Writing: Calligraphy Scrolls from the BGSU Asian Studies Collection” exhibition continues through Nov. 18 in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Presented by the BGSU Galleries, the exhibition includes 30 calligraphy scrolls by contemporary Japanese masters of these traditional arts.  Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Nov. 7 – Award-winning documentary filmmaker Dr. Matthew Donahue, a lecturer in popular culture, will present and screen “The Amsterdam T-Shirt Project,” highlighting the artists, vendors and creators of souvenir T-shirts in Amsterdam, Netherlands, the souvenir T-shirt capital of the world. The presentation and screening will begin at 1 p.m. in the Pallister Conference Room, Jerome Library. Nov. 7 – The Faculty Artist Series presents Caroline Chin on violin. She is an assistant professor and has been described by the Chicago Sun Times as “riveting and insightful, who lights up in passages of violin pyrotechnics.” She has performed throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 8 – The Prout Reading Series presents readings by MFA students Erin Carlyle and Katy Cesarotti. Carlyle, a poet, and Cesarotti, a fiction writer, are MFA students in the creative writing program. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Nov. 8 – The BGSU Early Music Ensemble and Graduate String Quartet will present a recital at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 8 – The College of Musical Arts hosts the SPLICE Festival 2018, featuring music written for instruments and electronics. The first concert is at 8 p.m. in the Cla-zel Theatre, 127 N. Main St., Bowling Green. The festival runs through Nov. 10. For a complete listing of events, visit https://splicemusic.org/festival/ii/program/. Nov. 9 – The SPLICE Festival 2018 continues with a concert at 10:30 a.m. and a talk at 1:30 p.m., both in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center; a workshop at 3:30…


Bequest boosts county library’s book budget

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Library Director Michael Penrod didn’t know Elfreda Rusher except as a patron with a broad taste in books. Future library patrons will be able to enjoy their own literary tastes thanks to a bequest from the Rusher estate. The retired Bowling Green State University business education professor left $153,000 to the library with the expressed wish that it be used for books. Rusher died at 101 in April. She taught business education at BGSU from 1950 until her retirement in 1976. Penrod told the library trustees Monday that because of the conditions of the bequest the money has to go into the library’s general fund and not to the Library Foundation. Penrod and Fiscal officer Linda Joseph will make sure that the money will be spent on books in the coming years. “When someone says thank you in this way” by remembering the library “considering all the entities in the community that need support, it’s very humbling,” Penrod said. Such planned giving makes a big difference, Penrod said. That’s why the library’s new strategic plan, which runs through 2021 calls for the library to work with the foundation “to implement a planned-giving program and increase the Foundation’s ability to support library efforts monetarily.” The library’s trustees approved the strategic plan unanimously Monday. The plan represents the bare bones of what the library intends, Penrod said. Now it will be up to the library’s management team will flesh out how to put those ideas into action. Brian Paskvan, the president of the board, noted the areas that are outside what’s considered the traditional functions of the library. With the new access to Lynda.com the library is entering in a major way the area of job training and development. Another new area is the “library of things,” where what’s loaned out extends beyond the usual items. The library also loans ukuleles, puzzles, and telescopes that we provided by the Toledo Astronomical Association. Assistant Director Michele Raine said that the society told her if the telescopes are damaged, they will fix them. Penrod said there are limits…


Author Adam Alter warns about the dangers of being hooked on electronics

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Writer Adam Alter believes technology has an addictive power over people. He should know.  In his talk Monday at Bowling Green State University, Alter related his own experience with the game Flappy Bird. He was on a six-hour flight from Newark to Los Angeles. He had plans for all he would accomplish in that time. He started by playing the game. Six hours and a continent later, he was still playing the game. “I had lost all sense of the passage of time.” Alter was on campus because his book “Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked,” was chosen as the campus’ Common Read. It raised, said Sheila Roberts, acting vice provost of academic affairs, themes that are familiar and  “frankly a little bit uncomfortable.” Speaking before a packed ballroom mostly of students, Alter described how people’s involvement with technology is increasingly taking over that part of our lives not devoted to work, sleep, and the other necessities of life. That free time “where all the magic happens.” Alter said he deleted Flappy Birds, and its developer Dong Nguyen, in a fit of conscience, even had the game pulled from app stores even though it was making $75,000 a day in advertising and sales. Alter doesn’t see Apple, Facebook, and the other tech giants as following suit. Though, he said, they seem aware of the dangers and are instituting some changes. Alter said he was prompted to write the book after reading a profile of Apple founder Steve Jobs in The New York Times. The reporter, Nick Bilton, commented to Jobs that his kids must love the iPad that had recently been released. Jobs replied they didn’t have one. “We limit how much technology our kids use at home.” In exploring further, Alter found that Jobs was not alone. His attitude about his children’s engagement with technology was typical of those in the tech industry. This is akin, Alter said to the belief among drug dealers: “Never get high on your own supply.” The author noted that many…


Get in the act of writing at the library

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY On Saturday, Oct. 20, the Wood County District Public Library and students from the Foundations for Teaching Writing class at BGSU will offer activities to inspire writers of all ages at a National Day on Writing celebration held at the library (251 N. Main, BG) from noon until 2 pm. The event will feature a number of activity stations where visitors can participate in a live action Mad Libs game, rainbow writing, magnetic poetry, and blackout poetry created by coloring out words on a printed page, as well as other activities. “Writing is important to everyone,” said Dr. Heather Jordan, the class instructor, “and this celebration will help people remember how much fun writing can be. The students were very excited about the opportunity and wanted to have innovative activities to include writers of all ages and stages.” BGSU students will lead the activities as part of their service learning initiative. “Engaging with the community in authentic environments in such an important component of their educational experience that the students get really excited about,” said Jordan. “We are really looking forward to a day devoted to nurturing writers, said Michele Raine, Assistant Director at WCDPL. “Without writers, where would we get the next great book?” This year is the 10th anniversary of the National Day on Writing and participants can stay connected to all the activities at #WhyIWrite.


Poet Rita Dove brings ‘another way of singing’ to BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Rita Dove, a Pulitzer Prize winner and former Poet Laureate, almost stopped writing poetry. Her home had been struck by lightning and was destroyed, she told her audience at Bowling Green State University Thursday night.  Rebuilding so consumed her that when someone asked what was next for her as a poet, she questioned whether she’d ever write again. “I’m done. I just need to get my life in order.” That was in 1998. She’d already served as the youngest and first black Poet Laureate of the United States and won the Pulitzer Prize for “Thomas and Beulah,” a collection of poems inspired by her grandparents.  Then a neighbor asked Dove and her husband, Fred Viebahn, to go out to a local dinner dance as a way of cheering them up. They were fascinated by the dancing, and wanted to join. They ended up taking ballroom dancing lessons, and now do it competitively. The dancing inspired poems. In “Foxtrot Fridays,” she writes, of how dancing keeps problems at bay with: “Just the sweep of Paradise  / and the space of a song  / to count all the wonders in it.” Dove was on campus as the keynote speaker for the Edwin H. Simmons Creative Minds Series. During the day she spent time meeting and conversing with students. At 11 a.m. she was seated on the stage of the Donnell Theatre surrounded by creative writing students. This was an “inhuman” hour for her, Dove said. She usually writes from midnight to 6 a.m. Does she write every day? That was the first question posed. Dove said while she doesn’t necessarily sit down at her desk and write daily, she’s always “writing,” adding “I always have that attitude.” Even while traveling she has with her “a notebook or three or nine” and her phone is handy to take notes. The poet did advise the two dozen or so students that they should write every day.  This practice is akin to athletes training or musicians doing their scales. “When inspiration strikes, you’re ready.” The disadvantage, she said, is…


Wendell Mayo to read from new story collection

From GATHERING VOLUMES Gathering Volumes, 196 E. Boundary, Perrysburg,  will  welcome Bowling Green State University professor, Ohio State alumni, and author Wendell Mayo to the store in support of his latest short story collection, Survival House, Saturday Oct. 6 2-4 p.m.. About the Book: Survival House is Wendell Mayo’s fifth short-story collection. It is in part autobiographically informed by his father’s work on nuclear power for deep space travel at NASA’s Lewis Research Center (now named the John Glenn Space Center) in Cleveland, Ohio in the 1960s and 1970s, the height of the space and nuclear arms races. Often humorous, always resonant, the ten stories in Survival House not only look back to the collective mind of doom in the atomic age of the 1950s and 1960s, but also address its legacy in our time—the emergence of new nuclear powers, polarizing politics, and the ever-tightening grip of corporations. In contemporary stories, such as “Doom Town,” a small-town festival annually celebrates the survival of the human race by conducting riotous air raids. In “The Trans-Siberian Railway Comes to Whitehouse,” a bar owner desperately clings to a new all-things-Russian theme to save himself from financial ruin. Other stories, set in the 1960s, recast the Cuban Missile Crisis, Kennedy assassination, and Space Race in personal histories of the human heart that remind us what it takes to endure—both then, and now. About the Author: Wendell Mayo completed a BS in Chemical Engineering from The Ohio State University and worked as an environmental and energy engineer for thirteen years before turning to writing fiction in 1988. Since then, he has authored five full-length story collections, two reviewed in The New York Times Book Review, and another in The LA Times. His debut collection, Centaur of the North, was winner of the Premio Aztlán and the sole finalist in the AWP Award Series in Short Fiction, selected by Lorrie Moore. In addition to Survival House, his other story collections are The Cucumber King of Kedainiai; B. Horror and Other Stories; and a novel-in-stories, In Lithuanian Wood, which appeared in Lithuanian translation as Vilko Valanda [Engl:…