Books

Earl returns in Tom Lambert’s second book

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Despite the big tell at the end of his first book, “Living with Earl,” Tom Lambert is not done with his quirky character. The first book, a series of vignettes that started as Facebook posts, told the story of a character very much like Lambert and his relationship with a convivial stranger who dresses and acts like Mark Twain. Tom refuses to call him Mark or Sam, for Sam Clemens, Twain’s given name, instead calls him “Earl,” since the character described himself as “the Earl of prose.” The book is a breezy read, with veins of humor and wisdom, and it takes a heart-felt turn in the end. Lambert said after the first book he heard from people who wanted to know what happened to Earl. Lambert posted a couple letters from Earl that whetted readers’ appetites. He now has the sequel “Dying with Earl” in hand, and ready for purchase. On Saturday, Dec. 16, at 1 p.m. he’ll celebrate the new book with a reading and reception at the Wood County District Public Library. Lambert hit on the title before he really got down to work on the second book. Not only was it a play on the title of the first book, Lambert said, but “I thought the premise would be fun to ride.” As “Dying with Earl” begins, Earl has found his way down in Florida where he meets colorful characters as is his wont and gets entangled in their affairs. Tom’s misreading of one of his letters leads him to head down to Florida. The change in locale doesn’t alter the relationship nurtured in Bowling Green. Tom and his friend end up lighting out on a road trip. As with the previous book, Lambert is working with donors to get it placed in Veterans Administration Hospitals around the country. Lambert, 71, said he’s surprised he ever wrote a first book, never mind a second. He was a poor student in…


Author J.D. Vance looks to his Mamaw for solutions to Appalachia’s ills

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The great stabilizing influence in J.D. Vance’s life was his grandmother, Mamaw. The best-selling author of “Hillbilly Elegy” told an audience at Bowling Green State University Wednesday that she always seemed to know what he needed. When she could barely afford her prescriptions, she still made sure he had the calculator he needed for high school math. Mamaw knew he needed “a little discipline and firm hand to not succumb to bad influences” as so many others in his family and community already had. When he started hanging out with an adolescent who was just getting into the drugs, she told Vance if he kept hanging out with him, she would run the kid over with her car. Her model helped him as he enlisted in the Marine Corps, served in Iraq, got through Ohio State in two years and landed at Yale law school. Vance visited campus last night as the summation of the Commons Read program. His memoir “Hillbilly Elegy” had been selected. In introducing Vance, President Mary Ellen Mazey spoke about how the book reflected the hard work, sense of place, patriotism, and humor, despite the frequent heartbreak, that marks Appalachian culture. She noted that her home state of West Virginia is the only state that is entirely within the region. “As I grew up in Appalachia, my mother would always tell me we were so poor we didn’t know we were poor, so it didn’t matter.” Vance is also an example of what American education can do, she said. Then as “a fellow hillbilly,” Mazey invited Vance, “to come on up and tell them what it’s all about.” Vance rose from tough young life growing up in Middletown, Ohio. When at Yale he took the Adverse Childhood Experience quiz, which measures how difficult one’s childhood is. He scored a 7 on a scale of 10, as did other members of his close family. His girlfriend, now his wife, scored 2…


Cameron’s Comics turns the page with shop in downtown BG

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jonathan Smith said he was something of a nerd when he was a kid. He loved Calvin and Hobbes and Mad Magazine. When Smith’s wife died three years ago this coming February, he needed something that he and his son, Cameron, could do together. Before then Smith traveled a lot selling and racing quarter-scale race cars. Reading comic books was just the thing. Together they’d travel to different shops in southern Michigan and Toledo, checking out what was available. That bonding experience blossomed into a store selling comic books and named after Cameron, 16, which opened in Adrian, Michigan, last year. The success of the Cameron’s Comics & Stuff took Smith, 42, by surprise. At first, he worked days at a factory and ran the store at night. But he found he could quit his factory job and devote himself to the store. Now Smith has opened a second Cameron’s Comics at 175 N. Main St. in Bowling Green. The shop officially opened Friday with a ribbon cutting. Over the weekend, Smith said, customers flocked to the store. Many were pleased to have a store devoted to comics and related literature, toys, and games back on Main Street. Though the store is open, it’s still a work in progress. More merchandise is coming in to fill the shelves that Smith built himself. He also plans to put a game room in the back. The main wall has the comics on white shelving. “They’re presented on white because they’re art,” he said. While he carries Marvel and DC, his stock goes deeper than that, extending to publishers including Fantagraphics, Drawn and Quarterly, Image Comics, Silver Sprocket, and Alterna. The shop also has games including the Magic: The Gathering and Catan as well as action figures and other toys. “We have our own flavor,” he said. Smith said he’s taking a slower approach to stocking the BG store. In Adrian he dove right in with games,…


BGSU marks Jerome Library’s 50th year

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Fitting for a library that doubles as a work of art, Jerome Library will unveil a new piece at its celebration of the 50th anniversary. The program will start at 4 p.m. Friday. There’ll be short presentations on the history of the library as well as a presentation by Librarian Amy Fry on the mural. Then a piece by sculptor and book artist Vince Koloski, that draws inspiration from those murals, will be unveiled. The eight-story tall building with six floors of abstract art running up both the west and east faces first opened in 1967. Dean of University Libraries Sara Bushong said she’s been assured by the artist Donald Drumm that the designs have no hidden meaning. Bushong said that at the time, students “either loved it or thought it was the most atrocious thing they’d ever seen.” Now it’s hard to imagine campus without it. While the mural has been a constant landmark on campus over the past 50 years the services within it have evolved. When it was built it was devoted mostly to stacks of books. Now every one of its floors have been repurposed, sometimes several times over, Bushong said. The change is most evident on the first floor. “The goal is to have the first floor to be a very student services focused,” she said. The floor hosts the Learning Commons, Student Athletic Services, and, most recently, the Collab Lab. And, she added, “we’re still circulating books, which is good.” A member of the accreditation team for the architecture program commented that he was “impressed with how many people were coming in the building,” Bushong said. “There’s a lot of reasons to come here.” The library has about 450,000 visitors a year, that’s students, faculty, community member, and tour groups. The library went up in the midst of a university building boom. With its step down entrance and the dramatic murals, it was intended to add contrast to…


Winter Wheat plants seeds of literary harvest

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The seeds for Winter Wheat were planted at Bowling Green State University back in 2001, and the writers have been harvesting the benefits annually ever since. Abigail Cloud, who is coordinating this festival, said: “The basic metaphor is sewing the seed for later harvest.” Winter Wheat begins Thursday, Nov. 2, and runs through Saturday night when the participants will gather at Grumpy Dave’s for an open mic. The weekend will include workshops, panels, talks, and readings. Between 200 to 300 participants are expected. Winter Wheat is free and registration is open throughout the weekend. For more information and schedule visit http://casit.bgsu.edu/midamericanreview/winter-wheat/ Cloud said she’d just arrived at BGSU in 2001 when Karen Craigo set about organizing the first gathering.  “She had been wanting to do a community event for a while,” Cloud said. The event welcomes back graduates of the Creative Writing Program as well as students and faculty from schools around the region and as far away as California and Texas, and writers from the local community. “It’s a good town-gown outreach,” she said. “It’s kind of nice to have a banner event for creative writing.” This year Winter Wheat is convening in conjunction with the meeting of the International Symposium for Poetic Inquiry. This is the first time the symposium is being held in the United States. Faculty colleague Sandra Faulkner, the host, suggested the arrangement and Cloud readily agreed. Winter Wheat adds value for those traveling from abroad. Last year a meeting of student editors convened at the same time. Winter Wheat differs from other writing conferences by including time for writing. “There was a recognition when we started that a lot of times when we leave comforting environment of workshops at school, we stop making time for our work. So we’re offering that time to produce something new. … It gives us a chance to dig back in and do some new writing on specific topics or explore where we haven’t had a chance to explore before.”…


At BGSU, Clarence Page reflects on Middletown & “Hillbilly Elegy”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Clarence Page is a story teller. That’s what all good journalists are, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner said. On Thursday at Bowling Green State University, though, he reflected on someone else’s story, J.D. Vance’s “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis.” Vance’s book has been selected as the university’s Common Read. Page was invited to BGSU to discuss Vance’s book. Meant to bring everyone together to read the same book and spark discussion, this year’s selection has done the trick. Social media is full of commentary on the book, and even its appropriateness as the Common Read. “Hillbilly Elegy” arrived at the same time as Donald Trump was elected to office, and many reviewers touted it as the book to read if you wanted to understand Trump voters. Vance takes a hard look at his people, who feel displaced in America and are plagued by dysfunctional families and unemployment. This demographic is the most pessimistic of any in the country.  Poor whites are more pessimistic than poor blacks. “Maybe because we’re used to it.” Page, who like Vance comes from Middletown, Ohio, said the book gave him a look at what was happening on the white side of town. Page noted he started out as “colored,” and has been a Negro, black, African-American, before now being a person of color. His family, he said, was “po’” because, according to his father, they were too poor to afford the “or.” But, he added, “ we were rich in spirit.” Page, 70, said he’s told Vance that save for the difference in age and race, it could be his story. But there were differences. Unlike Vance who chronicles a difficult family life, Page said his family was boring, a quality he’s come to appreciate as he’s gotten older. Like Vance’s grandfather, Page’s family moved north from the south to work in northern industry. Page’s people were part of the Great Migration that…


Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Clarence Page to visit BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS As part of the Bowling Green State University 2017 Common Reading experience, BGSU will welcome Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Clarence Page, syndicated columnist and senior member of the Chicago Tribune editorial board, as the Common Reading Scholar-in-Residence. Page will participate in a number of events and give a public presentation at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26 in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom at the Bowen-Thompson Student Union, followed by a question-and-answer time. In his Oct. 26 presentation, Page will address issues of culture and identity in the United States and share his perspective on topics raised in this year’s common read “Hillbilly Elegy.” Like J.D. Vance, author of “Hillbilly Elegy,” Page grew up in Middletown, Ohio, where “Hillbilly Elegy” is set but a generation earlier, attended Middletown High School and went on to a successful writing career. Also during his visit, in a session designed especially for faculty and graduate students, Page will participate in a faculty panel discussion on “Migrations and Cultural Populations” from 3-4:15 Oct. 26 in 207 Union. Moderated by Dr. Ray Swisher, sociology, panelists include Drs. Melissa Miller, political science; Andrew Schocket, American culture studies; and Larry Smith, humanities and English, BGSU Firelands. Dr. Michael Ann Williams, chair of the Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology at Western Kentucky University, will speak about “Appalachian Cultural Landscapes” at 6 p.m. Nov. 2, also in 1007 Business. Vance will be on campus Nov. 29 to discuss his New York Times best-seller, “Hillbilly Elegy.” To register for Page’s talk visit registration.


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING  & COMMUNICATIONS Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison. Murchison is known as a varied performer, composer, arranger, educator, conductor and producer. He was a member of the River City Brass in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 2002-15, and was the principal solo euphonium for the last nine of those years. Since then, Murchison has performed solo and chamber music concerts across the U.S. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 13 – The BGSU Concert Band will perform as part of Homecoming festivities. The band will perform traditional repertoire and new compositions by the world’s leading composers, conducted by Dr. Bruce Moss. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and $7 for adults and available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. Oct. 15 – The Sunday Matinee Series presents “Bedroom, Parlor and Bath” (1931, U.S.A., 85 minutes, directed by Edward Sedwick, with Buster Keaton, Charlotte Greenwood and Reginald Denny), with an introduction by film historian Dr. Jan Wahl. It very well may be that Buster Keaton’s greatest achievements lay in the silent era when he was allowed to control the making of each film. Yet his was a genius that could not be entirely diminished, even by the bosses at MGM. Keaton was able to adapt to…


Writer reaches beyond trauma of rape, 9/11 to confront PTSD

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Julia Torres Barden grew up as the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center rose above the New York skyline. “I spent my whole childhood watching them get bigger and bigger,” she said in a recent interview. That childhood started in the projects in the South Bronx, amidst her fellow Puerto Ricans, and then later in Upper Manhattan. On the day of the 9/11 attacks she was back in Manhattan on business. She was watching the aftermath of the first plane striking on a large screen in Times Square with a group of strangers. At that moment they assumed it was an accident, then the second plane struck. “It was devastating … to see them collapse like that. Those towers were raise in glory throughout my childhood,” she said. Now there was a sense of the city being under attack. Torres Barden, now of Perrysburg, recalls in striking detail the next couple days, being trapped in her hotel room, watching far too much TV coverage. She remembers the constant bomb threats to the Empire State Building, Grand Central Station, the Lincoln Tunnel, which was her exit from the city, At the time, she said, she was just concerned with making it through the day, and getting back to her husband and three sons in Virginia. It would be a few years later when she would realize the toll the attack took on her, when suddenly found herself struggling to breathe. What she and doctors thought was an allergic reaction to nuts, turned out to be the emergence of Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome. Torres Barden has written a book “NewYoricanGirl … Surviving My Spanglish Life,” that deals with her life’s traumas and her recovery. On Saturday, Oct.  14, from 2 -4 p.m. she will sign and talk about the book at Gathering Volumes, 196 E. Boundary St., Perrysburg. Then at 4 p.m. there will be a community conversation about mental illness with a therapist. Torres Barden…


BGSU faculty committee finds no single solution to textbook costs

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News No one solution exists for addressing the costs of textbooks. The Textbook Affordability Committee report to the Faculty Senate recommended a multipronged approach that built on what is already being done at Bowling Green State University and approaches taken at other institutions. The report was presented to the Faculty Senate Tuesday by Ellen Gorsevski, who chaired the committee. The senate voted to accept the report and discharge the committee. In a separate vote senators submitted the report to the administration saying it should be used to guide the university’s policy on textbooks. BGSU and other state universities have been feeling pressure from Columbus politicians over the costs of textbooks. One proposal that worked its way through the legislative process before being killed would have limited the cost of textbooks to $300 a year and would have required universities to pay for textbooks. In the end, the legislature left it up to universities to develop policies to reduce the costs of textbooks. “That could change,” Gorsevski said. “This is an evolving issue.” The problem with these state approaches, Gorsevski said, is that they lacked data to back them up. How much the “object formerly known as a textbook” costs students and families is hard to determine. Now texts come bundled with digital and online resources, which can drive up the costs. The committee did some number crunching, but it is still uncomplete. One of its recommendations for the administration is to determine these costs, and then post those numbers so they are easily accessible to students and their families. What the committee did determine was a cap on spending would result in students in majors with low textbook costs, such as the Humanities, would end up subsidizing those in majors that typically have higher costs, such as the STEM disciplines. She said that as the committee studied the issue “we discovered many of you are doing a fantastic job.” The committee came up with “a…


BGSU arts events through Oct. 17

Oct. 5 – The International Film Series presents “The Mermaid” (2016, China, 94 minutes, directed by Xingchi Zhou [Stephen Chow]), with an introduction by Elizabeth Niehaus, doctoral student in American culture studies. Breaking box office records to become China’s highest-grossing film to date, “The Mermaid” sees hit director Chow (“Shaolin Soccer,” “Kung Fu Hustle”) bring his zany, comic style to a modern fairytale with an environmentalist message. After their peaceful existence is destroyed by pollution and underwater sonar, a group of merfolk send an alluring mermaid to kill the young businessman responsible. Their revenge scheme hits a snag when mermaid and tycoon fall in love. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Oct. 5 – The Visiting Writer Series features poet Christopher Kempf, author of “Late in the Empire of Men,” which won the 2015 Levis Prize from Four Way Books. He is also the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University. His poetry, essays and reviews have appeared in Gettysburg Review, Kenyon Review Online, The New Republic, PEN America and Ploughshares. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Oct. 5 – The BGSU Trumpet Guild will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison….


Astronaut & author Mark Kelly to speak at BGSU, Oct. 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS As part of events commemorating the celebration of Jerome Library’s 50th anniversary, University Libraries will host astronaut and author Mark Kelly as part of its Ordinary People, Extraordinary Stories lecture series Oct. 24 with a free presentation at  7 p.m. Lenhart Grand Ballroom | Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Kelly’s talk will be preceded by a VIP reception at 5: p.m. Tockets, which include premium reserved seating for the lecture, are $100. To tickets click here https://commerce.cashnet.com/cashnetg/selfserve/EditItem.aspx?PC=LIB-VIPTIC&ItemCount=1 To register for free lecture click here  https://www.bgsu.edu/library/about/ordinary-people-extraordinary-stories-markkelly/register-for-free-lecture.html With an extraordinary career of service to our military, our nation and humanity, Kelly has secured his place in history as a role model, modern-day pioneer and leader of distinction. Together with his identical twin brother, Scott, he has laid the groundwork for the future of space exploration as the subjects of an unprecedented NASA study on how space affects the human body. Kelly, author of “Gabby: A Story f Courage and Hope,” is known for captivating audiences with lessons learned from his extensive travels and experiences in the Navy, outer space and on the ground. From leading teams in some of the most dynamic environments imaginable, to the thrill of spaceflight, and the recovery and resilience of his wife Gabrielle Giffords, he will reveal what he believes are the foundations for success to accomplish your mission in life and work.


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 5

Sept. 27 – The Faculty Artist Series presents Cole Burger on the piano. As a solo and collaborative pianist, Burger has performed throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia – including at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall, Rome’s Teatro di Marcello, the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, the Goethe Institute in Bangkok, the American Cathedral in Paris, and the United States Ambassador’s home in Malaysia. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 28 – The International Film Series presents “Mad Detective” (2007, Hong Kong, 89 minutes, directed by Johnnie To and Wai Ka-Fai), with an introduction by Thomas Castillo, assistant professor in the Department of Theatre and Film. “Mad Detective”exemplifies the stylish visuals, spectacular violence and outrageous humor that have brought a worldwide cult following to Johnnie To and Wai Ka-Fai’s crime thriller collaborations. Forced into retirement for his erratic behavior, brilliant but possibly unhinged detective Chan Kwai-Bun is tapped by Inspector Ho Ka-On to lend his psychic abilities to solving a series of crimes. Kwai-Bun soon discovers that rather than dealing with one criminal, they must vanquish seven villainous spirits. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 28 – The BGSU Wind Symphony will present its first concert of the season, featuring music by Jim Dooley, Paul Hindemith and Steven Mackey, who is one of the featured composers at the upcoming New Music and Art Festival, Oct. 18-21. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and $7 for adults and available at bgsu.edu/artsor by calling 419-372-8171. All tickets are $10 the day of the concert. Sept. 29 – The third annual Orchard Guitar Festival, featuring renowned jazz guitarist John Scofield, kicks off its two-day celebration with master classes and a concert. The master classes, all in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center, will be led by Stephen Aron of Oberlin Conservatory at 3:30…


Businesses join in Perrysburg Rocks! promotion

Submitted by GATHERING VOLUMES  You may have already discovered a brightly painted rock hiding in a park, on a bench, or beside a flower pot. Painted Rock hunting has become a fun unplugged pastime across the country. A group of 20 local businesses is inviting you to join in the fun with Perrysburg Rocks! this fall. The stores will be hiding hand painted rocks inside their businesses and are inviting you search for the rocks and win prizes. You are even invited to join them and paint a rock to be hidden! Anyone who wishes to paint a rock has two opportunities to do so at local businesses. On Monday, September 25 at 6 p.m. there will be a painting event at Bettyanne’s Things Worth Repeating in downtown Perrysburg. All rocks and necessary painting supplies will be provided. On Thursday, September 28 there will be rocks and painting supplies available all day during the Nationwide Wishing Day celebration at Gathering Volumes. If you wish to paint a rock, please contact Bettyanne’s at (419) 874-9696 or Gathering Volumes at (567) 336-6188 to ensure they will have enough rocks for everyone. Additionally, if you are already a rock painter, you are welcome to drop already painted rocks off at Gathering Volumes to be included in the event. If you are not interested in painting, you are invited to search for the rocks starting on October 1. You can pick up a “Perrysburg Rocks!” passport with the names of all the participating sites, and get your passport stamped or signed when you spot a rock. Collecting store stamps or signatures at fifteen or more businesses will entitle diligent seekers to a small prize as well as entry into a grand prize drawing on October 31 at Gathering Volumes. For those that painted a rock, if they find their own rock in a participating business they will receive a prize immediately. Parks, playgrounds and family-friendly hiking trails are popular spots to hide the painted rocks. “When we first started considering a rock painting activity we…


Gathering Volumes to host Wishing Day event, Sept.28

From GATHERING VOLUMES BOOKSTORE What is your wish for your community?  In Katherine Applegate’s new book, “Wishtree,” no wish is too small as long as it comes from the heart. Ms. Applegate is the author of Newberry Medal winning “The One and Only Ivan” as well as “Crenshaw” which spent over twenty weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. In preparation of the release of “Wishtree” Macmillan Publishing Group is partnering with independent bookstores around the country to host a Nationwide Wishing Day to engage communities and help others. Gathering Volumes Bookstore in Perrysburg will be partnering with Macmillan and hosting a Nationwide Wishing Day event in Perrysburg in partnership with The Promise House Project. The Promise House Projects works to promote and advance the dignity and safety of all housing insecure and homeless youth through barrier free direct service, advocacy, service infrastructure, and housing support. Since 2014, they have led efforts to raise awareness about Youth Homelessness in Northwest Ohio. The event will be from 6 to 7 pm on Thursday, September 28 at Gathering Volumes in Perrysburg.  “Wishtree is about the power of wishes and hope to transform a community, and the importance of helping others,” says Denise Phillips, owner of Gathering Volumes. “The story revolves around and is told by an old oak tree that is in danger of being cut down after being in the community as a Wish Tree for over 200 years.” Many cultures have some sort of Wish Tree as part of their folklore. In the United Kingdom townspeople and tourists would drive coins into Wish Trees as far back as the eighteenth century, believing that they would be granted a wish or cured of an illness once the coin was through the bark. One of the most famous Wish Trees is in Lam Tsuen in Hong Kong, where people travel from all over the world during Chinese New Year to cover its branches in wishes written on paper. New Zealand has a famous Wish Tree…