Film

Visitors see arts in action at annual BGSU showcase & sale

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Song and dance  and more spilled into the corridors, classrooms, corners and stages of the Fine Arts Center and the Wolfe Center for the Arts Saturday during the 14th ArtsX. The gala showcases the creativity of all the arts on campus. This year ArtsX invited special guests Verb Ballets, a Cleveland-based company. The company adopted the name Verb Ballets because it evoked action, said Richard Dickinson, associate artistic director. The company’s performances at ArtsX showed how fitting that name was. In the second of the Verb’s two performances Saturday evening, it blended humor and sensuality to the music of Mozart in K281. That sensuality was evident throughout, whether on the contemporary “Between the Machine” with a pulsating score that mixed jazz with industrial sounds, to the climatic setting of Ravel’s “Bolero,” where European and Indian classical dance moves blended with flamenco. Verb didn’t restrict its action to the stage. It also presented classes for community and university dance students earlier in the day and performed and worked with middle and high school students on Friday. Dickinson said the company particularly enjoyed the middle school, where a two-hour delay on a Friday meant the energy level was particularly high. The company’s performances Saturday had people buzzing in the halls of the Wolfe Center and Fine Arts Center as they perused the jewelry, ceramics, glass, prints, and more on sale.  Artists also demonstrated their techniques. Music suffused the event from traditional sounds from Beethoven to taiko drums to the experimental work of doctoral students. As usual there was far more going on than any one visitor could take in. While the crowd attending seemed smaller than in the past, the energy of the participants was still high.        

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BGSU Arts Events through April 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 6 — Academy Award-winning actress Eva Marie Saint will attend a special showing of “The Trip to Bountiful,” the 1953 television production she starred in with Lillian Gish, at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater at BGSU’s Hanna Hall. Gish and Saint reprised their roles on Broadway the following year, earning Saint the Drama Critics Award and the Outer-Circle Critics Award. Following the screening, Saint, a BGSU alumna, will discuss her career and her work with Gish. Free   April 6 — World Percussion Night will feature multiple drumming styles, including performances by the Taiko and Steel Drum ensembles from the College of Musical Arts. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $10 for other adults; tickets the day of the concert are, respectively, $10 and $13. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 6 p.m.weekdays at 419-372-8171. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. April 11 — The Faculty Artist Series presents Matthew McBride-Daline on the viola. Since his debut in Carnegie Hall, McBride-Daline has performed worldwide as a viola soloist. An avid chamber musician, he has performed at numerous international festivals including the Banff Center for the Arts, Verbier Academy, the Music Academy of the West, the New York String Orchestra Seminar and Sarasota Music Festival. His performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 12 — Continuing its focus on exile and migration, the International Film Series presents “Balseros (Rafters)” (2002, Spain, 120 minutes, directed by Carles Bosch and Josep Maria Domenech), with an introduction by Dr. Pedro Porbén from the Department of World Languages and Cultures, Latin American Studies. Filmed in Cuba, Guantanamo Bay and the United States, this transnational film gives insight into the “human adventure of people who are shipwrecked between two worlds.” The award-winning documentary tracks the lives of Cubans who fled Cuba by raft during the economic depression of the so-called “Periodo especial” in the early 1990s. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater, located in Hanna Hall. Free April 12 — Jazz Lab Band 2 will give a performance at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $10 for other adults; tickets the day of the concert are, respectively, $10 and $13. Tickets can also be purchased…


Documentary about finding a movie treasure trove to be shown in Gish Theatre (updated)

The new, award winning documentary, “Saving Brinton,” will be screened Saturday, April 7 at 7 p.m. in the Gish Theater at Bowling Green State University as part of the Ray Browne Conference. (Click for more details  on the conference.) The film is about the discovery of a collection of historic films and documents in a small town in Iowa. In addition to the screening, the audience will get to see some of the oldest films in existence, which have been carefully digitized. “Saving Brinton” will have showings in New York and Los Angeles, but is making its in Bowling Green first. The film  tells  how  in a farmhouse basement on the Iowa countryside, eccentric collector Mike Zahs makes a remarkable discovery: the showreels of the man who brought moving pictures to America’s Heartland. Among the treasures: rare footage of President Teddy Roosevelt, the first moving images from Burma, a lost relic from magical effects godfather Georges Méliés. These are the films that introduced movies to the world. And they didn’t end up in Iowa by accident. The old nitrate reels are just some of the artifacts that belonged to William Franklin Brinton. From thousands of trinkets, handwritten journals, receipts, posters and catalogs emerges the story of an inventive farmboy who became America’s greatest barnstorming movieman. As Mike uncovers this hidden legacy, he begins a journey to restore the Brinton name that takes us to The Library of Congress, Paris and back for a big screen extravaganza in the same small-town movie theater where Frank first turned on a projector over a century ago. By uniting community through a pride in their living history, Mike embodies a welcome antidote to the breakneck pace of our disposable society. “Saving Brinton” is a portrait of this unlikely Midwestern folk hero, at once a meditation on living simply and a celebration of dreaming big. The screening culminates Saturday’s Ray Browne Film Festival. The schedule is: Noon- Faculty Showcase Hacked – Dir. Daniel E. Williams – 2013 – 27 min. Vida Muertos – Dir. Thomas Javier Castillo – 2017 – 17 min.   2 p.m. – Alumni Showcase Ideal Dolls – Dir. Sarah Mann – 2017 – 7 min. Story of the Wild  – Dir. Alex Goetz – 2017 – 3 min. Sneaky Pete (Clip) – Amazon Series – 2018 – 2 min. Apothecary’s Cage – Dir. Jake Extine – 2017 – 18 min.   4  p.m.- Undergraduate Film…


Oscar-winning alumna Eva Marie Saint to be special guest at Bravo! BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Academy Award-winning actress and Bowling Green State University alumna Eva Marie Saint ’46, ’82 [Hon.] will make a special appearance at the 4th annual Bravo! BGSU, which raises funds for arts scholarships. Programs in the arts have been central to Bowling Green State University for more than 100 years. On April 7, the quality and vibrancy of all of the University’s arts will be showcased at this special event. Bravo! BGSU celebrates the very best of the University’s arts – from the College of Musical Arts, School of Art, Department of Theatre and Film, the Creative Writing Program and the Dance Program. Guests will experience a magical evening of vocal, instrumental and theatrical performances, plus exhibitions and demonstrations by student and faculty artists in glass, ceramics, metals, sculpture, graphic design and digital arts. This year the event includes a silent auction featuring items that range from prime seats to see Hamilton at the CIBC Theatre in Chicago and a week’s stay at a bed and breakfast in southern France to artwork by BGSU alumni and experiential packages with the Toledo Zoo or the BGSU Falcon Marching Band. The auction is now open at bgsu.edu/bravo. “BGSU has a strong tradition of academic excellence in the arts and this event showcases the very best of our talent. It is a great opportunity for the community to experience a unique, exciting event,” said Bowling Green State University President Rodney Rogers. “We are especially appreciative of our sponsors, including our presenting sponsor PNC, for their partnership and support of our students.” Funds raised from the event benefit scholarships for arts students. Last year’s event raised more than $75,000 for scholarships. Held in the award-winning Wolfe Center for the Arts, the celebration offers professional-level entertainment and fabulous fare. From Broadway vignettes to musical ensembles and solos, from live painting and backstage activity to creative writing recitations, it will be a night to remember. The celebration will begin at 6 p.m. in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. For more information or to purchase tickets online, visit bgsu.edu/bravo. Tickets also are available by phone, 419-372-9213, or email kmdevin@bgsu.edu. Guests with disabilities are requested to indicate if they need special services, assistance or appropriate modifications to fully participate in this event by contacting Accessibility Services at access@bgsu.edu or 419-372-8495 prior to the event.


Film series at Gish Theater explores exile & migration across continents

From BGSU INTERNATIONAL FILM SERIES “Exile and Migration” will be the theme of International Film Series in the Gish Theater in Hanna Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. The films will be screened in the theater on Thursdays and Fridays at 7:30 p.m. except on April 13 when the film begins at 8. The series explores exile and migration in feature films and documentaries from around the world, including from the US. The second film, “Earth” by Indian-Canadian filmmaker Deepa Mehta, will deal with “partition” that divided India and Pakistan in 1947. Another focuses on North African migration to West Germany in the 1970s. “The Second Migration” (African-American migration from the South to the Northern cities) will be featured in a documentary in addition to the Zainichi, Korean migrants living in Japan and affiliated with North Korea. A Cuban film, “Balseros,” about the rafters who attempted to migrate to the US, is also scheduled. We end with a contemporary Senegalese film about migration via the Atlantic to Spain. The films will be introduced by the filmmakers on March 22 and 29 or by BGSU faculty members.   On 22 March, the film viewing will be preceded by a reception at 6:30 in front of the Gish Theater in the hallway.  For the second film screening with the filmmaker present (March 29), a second reception will be held after the screening. This is the last semester before the Gish will be relocated to the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Scheduled films are: MARCH 22 “Persona Non Grata” (2015) Directed by Cellin Gluck, Japan Moving biopic about Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara, sometimes called a “Japanese Schindler,” who issued several thousand visas to Jewish refugees in Lithuania before 1941. The film made its U.S. debut at the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival in 2016. MARCH 23 “Earth” (1999) Directed by Deepa Meethe, Canada/India This award-winning period drama is set in Lahore (Pakistan) during the 1947 partition separating India and Pakistan. One of the few films to explore the haunting ramifications of Partition, it focuses on the point of view of a young girl torn between allegiances. MARCH 29 “Montréal la Blanche (Montreal, White City)” (2016) Directed by Bachir Bensaddek, French Canada The story about a former Algerian pop-star who has fled to Canada to escape the Algerian Civil War (late 1990s) and who finds herself in a taxi cab one Christmas Eve in Montreal with an Algerian cab driver and is…


Filmmaker Gaston Kabore sees movies playing role in coming African Renaissance

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Gaston J-M Kabore, a filmmaker from Burkina Faso, would like to see the waves of refugees fleeing Africa stay at home. “If you teach the youth … not to leave their continent and go and die in the desert and the sea because they believe there’s Eldorado elsewhere, if they take the money they gather to make the risky trip, if they make it work where they are, they will do miracles,” he said. They need to understand that over the ages, Africans have resolved their issues and can again. In the past Africans built civilizations and empires with sophisticated religions and rites, sculpture, dance, and music. The Mossi emperor still exists, without any civic power, but still commanding respect enough that he is called upon to mediate disputes. But now there are psychological “sediments” undermining Africans’ belief in themselves. Kabore, 67, has dedicated his career to telling the stories of his people. On Friday at noontime he will be the keynote at the Africana Studies Student Research Conference in the Bowen Thompson Student Union. His talk is free. The filmmaker has been in residence on the Bowling Green State University campus this week, where all four of his feature films and his short philosophical film “2,000 Generations of Africans” have been screened. Kabore started as a historian, beginning with studies in his homeland before traveling to Paris. In France he studied how Africans were depicted in illustrated magazines in the period following the 1885 Berlin Conference. At that conclave of European powers, leaders decided how they would conquer and divide Africa. When their forces met, Kabore said, they would stop. That led to boundaries drawn without regard for natural features or tribal divisions. “This explains some of the drama we live with today.” He wanted to study history, he said, because he was learning the history of Africans that “was being written exclusively by Europeans.” He did not “feel the thoughts and conscious decision of the Africans no matter who they are.” Studying those early 20th century magazines “you see all the sources of the stereotypes and prejudices.” Those prejudices became almost part of the DNA of the French and other colonizing powers. “These things were meant preserve the interests of the government and the politicians.” Kabore decided to go to film school to see how this dynamic played out in movies. A…


Toledo Museum exhibit puts mummies in a new light

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART The Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) is once more displaying the two Egyptian mummies that launched the Museum’s early collection and have fascinated visitors for more than a century. The exhibition explores how TMA acquired Young Priest (ca. 800 BCE, Third Intermediate Period) and Old Man (ca. 100 CE, Roman Period), their historical significance in the Museum and the phenomenon of Egyptomania – Western civilization’s interest and obsession with ancient Egypt during the 19th- and 20th-centuries. The Mummies: From Egypt to Toledo is a rare opportunity to see the mummies, alongside other ancient Egyptian artifacts, and is on view exclusively at TMA from Feb. 3 through May 6. “We want to offer the public an opportunity to consider the various questions that arise today regarding the collecting that occurred in Egypt over 100 years ago, and what these objects mean in today’s context,” said Brian Kennedy, the museum’s Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey Director, President and CEO . The exhibition is co-curated by Adam Levine, deputy director, and Mike Deetsch, the Emma Leah Bippus director of education and engagement. The exhibition is organized into three thematic sections: the rise of Egyptomania beginning with Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt in the late 18th-century; ancient Egyptian religion and the afterlife; and burial practice, human remains and the humanization of an ancient civilization. The exhibition places the mummies in historical context by including additional Egyptian objects and artifacts from the TMA collection as well as loans from other institutions and private collections. Memorabilia from the Libbeys’ travels to Egypt will be on display along with examples of Egyptomania portraying ancient Egypt in film, art and advertising. Related programming includes a Saturday matinee film series titled “He Went for a Little Walk: Mummies in the Movies” which runs Feb. 17 through May 5. The films all begin at 2 p.m. in the Little Theater. Tickets are free for members and $5 for nonmembers (discounts available with ticket bundles). From March 8 through 10, guests can participate in the “Mummies by Moo-Light” Flashlight Tours. Tours begin at 9 p.m. on Thursday andFriday and 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, with a pre-reception taking place in the Green Room one hour prior to the tours. Tickets are $15 for members and $20 for nonmembers. Two exhibition-related Master’s Series will be held in the spring. On Thursday, March 29, Bob Brier (a.k.a. Mr. Mummy) will lead a discussion titled “Egyptomania: Our Three Thousand Year Obsession with the Land of the Pharaohs”…