Arts and Entertainment

Pianist Sarah Cahill spotlights women composers at BGSU recital

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News Pianist Sarah Cahill admits to having mixed feelings about her project “The Future is Female.” The series of recitals is devoted to the work of female composers from the 17th century into the present. “It doesn’t seem right to lump everyone  together by gender because the majority of women composers just want to be thought of as composers,” she said in a recent telephone interview. “I’ve always been ambivalent  about all women concerts. Now I’m doing it myself mainly because there’s so much music that deserves to be heard.” Cahill will present a concert in her “The Future is Female” series Monday, March 25 at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus.  The recital is part of the Music at the Forefront series. Her repertoire for “The Future is Female” includes works by 56 composers dating by to Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre’s Keyboard Suite in D minor from 1707 to Theresa Wong’s “She Dances Naked Under Palm Trees,” inspired by the song “Images” by Nina Simone, which she is performing for the first time. Of those pieces in that repertoire, Cahill commissioned 10 of them. The Wong piece is the latest in a line of compositions written with her in mind dating back to 1977 when John Adams composed “China Gates” for Cahill who was 17. “I remember when that was a new piece no one would play it because it was such a strange piece, so minimalist,” she said. Cahill would perform the composition in competitions and “it was really frowned upon.” Now it has been well accepted by pianists and is frequently played. Commissioning new works is central to her vision as an artist. Cahill said back when she was 17 she had an identity crisis. Not unusual, she said, for a teenager. While her fellow conservatory students were locked away in the practice rooms totally consumed with being the best pianists they could be, she wanted to write and read poetry. That led to writing music criticism for alternative newspapers. “I started playing contemporary music because I liked having more of the focus on the music itself rather than me as the pianist,” Cahill…

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Journalist turned mystery writer to headline library’s Crime Solvers’ Weekend

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News Little Harriet Ann Sablosky used to retreat to the hayloft in the barn behind her rural Indiana home to read Nancy Drew and Sherlock Holmes mysteries. When she grew up, she wanted to be either a detective or write her own mystery novels. That was back in the 1960s. Now Harriett has grown up, and as Hank Phillippi Ryan she’s published 10 mysteries and thrillers. Ryan may not have been a detective, but she worked as an investigative journalist during a 43-year award-winning career. What would little Harriet think of her grown self’s work? Ryan laughs at the question. Yes, her younger self would approve, the writer said in a recent telephone interview. “What I loved about books when I was a kid was that a smart author would tell a story that would keep you turning the pages and then surprise you, in a fair way.” The reader, Ryan said, would realize: “‘I could have figured that out.’ But the author was more clever than I was.” That’s the same effect she strives for in her own novels. Ryan will be the featured guest at the Wood County District Public Library’s Crime Solvers’ Weekend, March 22 and 23. She will speak at an after-hours event Friday, March 22, 7 p.m. in the library’s atrium. Free tickets are available at the library.  “It’s such a joy” to be able to get out and meet her readers, Ryan said. Writing is a solitary pursuit. Reading is a solitary activity. “When I get to be with readers and writers, that’s when we get to share how wonderful this experience is. My books are not fully realized until someone reads them.” Ryan came to writing books mid-life. She is an investigative at WHDH-TV, 7News, in Boston. During her career she’d never ventured into mystery writing, she said, because she could never come up with a good plot. “That’s a problem if you’re trying to write a mystery,” she said. “So that dream got put in the background.” Then in 2004, she was at work at channel 7, and a story occurred to her. She came home and announced to her husband: “I’ve got this good idea for…


Eva Marie Saint to get in the act with students during March 29 visit

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University will welcome alumna and Academy Award-winning actress Eva Marie Saint for a special event on March 29.  During “An Evening with Eva Marie Saint,” Saint will talk about her career and present a staged reading with several BGSU theatre and film students. The program will begin at 7 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. The event is free; however, limited seating is available and tickets are required in advance. Tickets are available through the Wolfe Center Box Office Monday through Friday noon to 5 p.m., online at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. Guests with disabilities are requested to indicate if they need special services, assistance or appropriate modifications to fully participate in this event by contacting Accessibility Services at access@bgsu.edu or Theatre and Film at 419-372-8495 prior to the event.  


BGSU Jazz Week headliner Dayna Stephens has a musical vision all his own

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News Saxophonist and composer Dayna Stephens wants students to know that  all the technical information and trickery they are learning are just tools. Those tools need to be applied “to more accurately, more clearly, telling whatever story they have inside  of them.” The New York-based musician will visit Bowling Green State University next week as the headliner for Jazz Week. He’ll play with the jazz faculty on Thursday at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall and on Friday at with the Jazz Lab Band  I in Kobacker Hall. Thursday’s show is free. Friday’s concert is a ticketed event. Asked during a telephone interview what he tries to convey to students, he said he tells them “not to focus too much on the technique.” They need to tell  “an engaging story” in “a unique voice.” Stephenson said he forged his own voice — a burnished, well ripened sound — by listening to saxophonists as diverse as swing legend Lester Young and jazz fusion master Michael Brecker.  “I love them both,” he said. “Having those two big influences is bound to produce something a little different.” Stephens, 40, has been recognized by Downbeat magazine as one of the music’s Rising Stars. David Bixler, the director of jazz studies at BGSU, said that he invited Stephens to campus on the recommendation of a student, though has also heard with Stephens perform shows with pianists Kenny Barron and Fred Hersch.  Stephens’ ears are tuned to the other musicians he’s working with regardless of what instruments they play or whether they are masters such as pianist Barron or players younger than himself. “I’m still trying to understand what drummers do,” he said. “The attempt will also lead to unique ways of expressing myself.” Known as a saxophonist, he has also performed professionally as a bassist.  That’s been essential to his approach. “Having people relying on your beat makes your sense of rhythm stronger.” That firm sense of time is important whether he’s in the rhythm section or the frontline. Also playing bass  taught him the value of using simpler melodic ideas. “You can’t play everything you play on a saxophone.” Listening has been at the core of his musical growth….


Brian Kennedy leaving job as director of Toledo Museum

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART Brian P. Kennedy, Ph.D., the Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey Director of the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) has been named the Rose-Marie and Ejik van Otterloo Executive Director and CEO of the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) located in Salem, Massachusetts. He will take up his new post at PEM in July of this year. Founded in 1799, PEM is one of the nation’s oldest—as well as fastest growing—museums in the country. Focused on innovation and impact, PEM is dedicated to creating experiences of art, culture and creative expression that transform people’s lives by broadening their perspectives, attitudes, and knowledge of themselves and the wider world. TMA was founded in 1901 and Kennedy served as the ninth director. His last day at TMA will be June 30, 2019. “It has been an honor to serve as director of the Toledo Museum of Art,” Kennedy said. “I am deeply grateful to the Museum staff, our members, the TMA board and the local community for entrusting me to lead this institution, the gem of Toledo, for nearly nine years and to contribute to its rich history.” Kennedy began his role as director, president and CEO of the Toledo Museum of Art in September 2010 with extensive experience in senior leadership positions at art museums in Ireland, Australia and the United States. A strategic thinker and collaborative leader, he is a respected art historian, curator and author. Kennedy studied art history and history at University College in Dublin, earning bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees. “Brian is a visionary museum director who has had a significant impact on TMA’s visitors, its collection, the campus and the surrounding community,” said Cynthia B. Thompson, chair of the Museum’s board. “His legacy will be felt in Toledo for generations to come.” As a thought leader in visual literacy and sensory learning, Kennedy expanded the Museum’s purpose of art education by launching a visual literacy initiative, in which the TMA collection is used to teach people of all ages and backgrounds to read, comprehend and write visual language. The curriculum developed as part of this initiative, The Art of Seeing Art™, formed the foundation for TMA’s teacher professional development workshops, staff training…


BGSU arts events through March 27

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 7 – The Prout Reading Series presents creative writing MFA students Lucas Fulton, poetry, and Christina Stump, fiction, teaching associates in the English department. Their reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. FreeMarch 7 – The BGSU Concert Band, under the direction of Dr. Bruce Moss, will perform a concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults; all tickets are $10 on the day of performance. Tickets are available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. March 7 – The BGSU Department of Theatre and Film continues performances of “The Wolves,” the debut play by Sarah DeLappe about a girl’s indoor soccer team that navigates big questions and wages tiny battles with all the vim and vigor of a pack of adolescent warriors. The play, which earned DeLappe the 2015 Relentless Award for Playwriting and was a finalist for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, runs at 8 p.m. on March 7-9, and at 2 p.m. on March 9 in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Advance tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for students and children; all tickets on the day of the performance are $20. Tickets are available at bgsu.edu/artsor by calling the Wolfe Center box office at 419-372-8171. March 9 – The College of Musical Arts hosts the annual Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition for BGSU voice and piano students. The semifinal round will start at noon and the final round at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 10 – Members of the BG Philharmonia in the College of Musical Arts will present a chamber orchestra concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults; all tickets are $10 on the day of the performance. Tickets are available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. March 11 – The BGSU University Band will present a spring concert. Directed by Dr. Bruce Moss, the band will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, Moore Musical…


BGSU marches into spring with full slate of arts events

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition:The 20th annual competition highlights talented vocalists and collaborative pianistsMarch 9 | Bryan Recital Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center Kevin Bylsma, coordinator of the Conrad Art Song Competition, gets ready to announce the winners in 2017. The annual Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song competition features talented undergraduate and graduate singers and pianists working together to present a selection of art songs in various languages, ranging from the classical period, all the way to songs by living composers. The first round of competition takes place March 9 from 1-5 p.m., with the finalists announced around 6 p.m. The final round of competition, presented as a formal concert, begins at 8 p.m., with winners announced at the conclusion of the performance. Both the preliminary and final rounds are free and open to the public in Bryan Recital Hall. For more information, visit our website. Saxophonist Dayna Stephens headlines jazz week:Enjoy jazz performances each eveningMarch 12-15 | Bryan Recital Hall and Kobacker Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center The jazz department welcomes tenor saxophonist Dayna Stephens for our annual jazz week, March 12-15. Recent recipient of the number-two spot for the 2017 DownBeat Critics Poll in the category “Rising Star—Tenor Saxophone” Stephens has garnered critical acclaim over the years for his playing, compositions and arrangements. He will be featured in a concert with BGSU jazz faculty at 8 p.m. March 14 in Bryan Recital Hall, and as a soloist with Jazz Lab Band I on March 15 at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall. Other events throughout the week include the vocal jazz ensemble March 12 at 8 p.m., and student chamber ensembles March 13 at 8 p.m., both in Bryan Recital Hall. All events in Bryan Recital Hall are free. Tickets for the March 15 Jazz Lab Band I performance are available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling the box office at 419-372-8171. Admission is free for all BGSU students with ID card at the door. Wendy and Lucy: Film celebrates Women’s History MonthMarch 26, 7:30 p.m. | 206 Bowen-Thompson Student UnionThis award-winning film is an intimate character study of a young woman, Wendy, and her dog Lucy. On her way to find work in Alaska, Wendy’s car breaks…