Arts and Entertainment

Miguel Zenon mixes jazz, Puerto Rican traditions to create a new sound

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Miguel Zenon’s music is rooted in the twin heritages of jazz and the music of Puerto Rico. The composer and saxophonist’s potent blending of those traditions has earned him a MacArthur Fellowship, the so-called “genius grant.” MacArthur Fellows website says that Zenon is: “Drawing from a variety of jazz idioms and the indigenous music of his native Puerto Rico to create a new language of complex, yet accessible sounds that overflow with emotion.” Zenon will visit the Bowling Green State University campus Wednesday, Jan. 24, and Thursday, Jan.25, to perform and work with students. On Thursday at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, the Jazz Lab I, directed by David Bixler, will perform Zenon’s music with the composer as soloist. He will also sit in with the jazz faculty during their regular session downtown at Bar 149 Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. In teaching, Zenon said in a recent telephone interview, “I just try to give an idea of the things that worked for me. I feel what really works is looking back and trying to learn from that process.” He urges students “to trace it back to what happened before to try to discover themselves through that.” Zenon’s journey of discovery began in Puerto Rico. He didn’t come from a family of musicians, but was surrounded by music. There was the pop music his peers loved, and the music his mother played on the radio. And his father was an amateur percussionist. Zenon had the usual early elementary education, singing in choir and tooting recorder. “I was exposed a lot of folklore because it’s embedded in the culture,” Zenon, 41, said. He heard folk sounds at parties and holiday celebrations. “I was exposed to certain rhythmic things.” At 11 he was admitted to a performing arts school. He was asked to select an instrument. He wanted piano, but the school had enough pianists. Of the available options, he picked saxophone. “I just wanted to play music more than any specific instrument,” Zenon said. His musical…


Toledo Museum exhibit puts mummies in a new light

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART The Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) is once more displaying the two Egyptian mummies that launched the Museum’s early collection and have fascinated visitors for more than a century. The exhibition explores how TMA acquired Young Priest (ca. 800 BCE, Third Intermediate Period) and Old Man (ca. 100 CE, Roman Period), their historical significance in the Museum and the phenomenon of Egyptomania – Western civilization’s interest and obsession with ancient Egypt during the 19th- and 20th-centuries. The Mummies: From Egypt to Toledo is a rare opportunity to see the mummies, alongside other ancient Egyptian artifacts, and is on view exclusively at TMA from Feb. 3 through May 6. “We want to offer the public an opportunity to consider the various questions that arise today regarding the collecting that occurred in Egypt over 100 years ago, and what these objects mean in today’s context,” said Brian Kennedy, the museum’s Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey Director, President and CEO . The exhibition is co-curated by Adam Levine, deputy director, and Mike Deetsch, the Emma Leah Bippus director of education and engagement. The exhibition is organized into three thematic sections: the rise of Egyptomania beginning with Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt in the late 18th-century; ancient Egyptian religion and the afterlife; and burial practice, human remains and the humanization of an ancient civilization. The exhibition places the mummies in historical context by including additional Egyptian objects and artifacts from the TMA collection as well as loans from other institutions and private collections. Memorabilia from the Libbeys’ travels to Egypt will be on display along with examples of Egyptomania portraying ancient Egypt in film, art and advertising. Related programming includes a Saturday matinee film series titled “He Went for a Little Walk: Mummies in the Movies” which runs Feb. 17 through May 5. The films all begin at 2 p.m. in the Little Theater. Tickets are free for members and $5 for nonmembers (discounts available with ticket bundles). From March 8 through 10, guests can participate in the “Mummies by Moo-Light” Flashlight Tours. Tours begin at 9 p.m. on Thursday andFriday and 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. on…


Heartland Sings to perform at Pemberville Opera House

From the PEMBERVILLE OPERA HOUSE Heartland Sings will present “In the Mix” Saturday,  February 3, 7:30 p.m, in the historic Pemberville Opera House as part of the Live in the House Concert series. The vocal ensemble principal vocal artists, along with Maestro Robert Nance, will present a unique program showcases vocal harmony and vocal jazz style at its finest. Heartland Sings’ high energy and originality makes for a memorable concert experience.   Tickets are $12 and  available for $12.00 @ Beeker’s General Store, at the door or by  contacting Carol Bailey at 419-287-4848, carol@pembervilleoperahouse.org    www.pembervilleoperahouse.org Heartland Sings is a nonprofit vocal music production company based in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Always striving for excellence and innovation, we serve Northeast Indiana and beyond with entertaining productions, cultural programming, and quality education in the vocal arts. Founded in 1997, by Maestro Robert Nance, Heartland Sings has since grown into a broad based vocal arts company, consisting of full-time and part-time administrative and artistic staff. For nearly two decades, Heartland Sings has been changing the lives of participants and patrons through song. Heartland Sings entertains and enriches audiences within a 225-mile radius of Fort Wayne, with the purpose of serving as a professional, educational resource for the vocal arts, cultivating a community of artistic and cultural appreciation, and providing performance opportunities to area vocalists and musicians. Performers are: Maestro Robert Nance – President & Artistic Director, piano Elaina Robbins – Soprano, Principal Vocal Artist Ashlee Bickley – Mezzo-Soprano, Principal Vocal Artist Mark Phillips – Tenor, Principal Vocal Artist Jerome Síbulo – Baritone, Principal Vocal Artist Ian Williams – Bass-Baritone, Principal Vocal Artist To benefit the opera house elevator fund, the Historical Society will host a pre-show baked chicken dinner at Higher Grounds in Downtown Pemberville from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Meal includes baked chicken, stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy, choice of salads, green beans, roll and butter andcChoice of beverage for $9.95 and tax. Homemade pie is a la carte.  Reservations not necessary but appreciated. Call 419-287-3274


Scholar reflects on the role food played in the fight for racial justice

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Like any army, those who struggled for freedom during the Civil Rights movement marched on their stomachs. Food became an early symbol of the movement when five black college students took seats at a Woolworth lunch counter and waited in vain to be served while white onlookers pelted them with invective. Food scholar Jessica Harris has looked at the menus of the lunch counters where the protests spread and noted that the bill of fare was hot dogs, hamburgers, grill cheese – typical “American” food. Harris was the keynote speaker for the Beyond the Dream presentation Wednesday evening at Kobacker Hall in the Bowling Green State University campus. Her talk “Feeding the Resistance: Deacon’s Chicken and Free Breakfasts” culminated an evening in which the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was celebrated in music, words, and art. The program opened with Joseph Schwantner’s “New Morning for a New World: Daybreak of Freedom” performed by the Bowling Green Philharmonia conducted by Emily Freeman Brown. The programmatic piece offered orchestral swells and whispers to accompany a text read by Uzee Brown, a BGSU gradate and now chair of the music department at Dr. King’s alma mater, Morehouse College. The text was drawn from various speeches and essays by Dr. King. The music was anxious and on edge as Brown recounted the oppression of African Americans. “There comes a time when people get tired,” he intoned, “… tired of being kicked about by the brutal feet of oppression.” There were brilliant brass calls to action as the text described the struggle for freedom. “Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood,” Brown read. The piece ended reflecting on the future when “we will emerge … into the bright and glowing daybreak of freedom and justice for all God’s children.” The orchestra concluded quietly as the musicians hummed a simple, resonant harmony. An abstract animated film by Heejoo Kim with music by Evan Williams, a…


Toledo Youth Orchestras to perform at Peristyle

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Toledo Symphony Youth Orchestras (TSYO) are composed of the most talented young musicians from various areas of Northwest Ohio and Southern Michigan. The opportunity to perform with a group of musicians who share a similar dedication to musicianship and quality of performance is a great supplemental experience for serious young artists. On February 4, at 2 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater, the Toledo Symphony Youth Orchestras will perform their second concert of the season. The performance on Sunday afternoon will feature the TSYO’s Symphonic Orchestra and Concert Strings ensemble, conducted by Patrick Barrett and the Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Wasim Hawary. Winners of the Toledo Symphony Youth Orchestras Solo Competition, Erin Gardiner and Cole Habekost, kick off the program with pre-concert music beginning at 1:40 p.m. Ms. Gardiner, a senior at Perrysburg High School, will perform the second movement of Barber’s Violin Concerto and Mr. Habekost, a Toledo School for the Art senior at Waterville, will perform the first movement of Wieniawski’s Concerto No. 2, both accompanied by Clint Fox. The TSYO will perform selections by eminent composers Jean Sibelius, Modest Mussorgsky, William Rand, principal horn player of the Philharmonic Orchestra, and more. On February 10, the TSYO Concert Strings will travel to Columbus, Ohio to perform at the 2018 Ohio Music Education Association Professional Development Conference. Additional upcoming TSYO performances include a Side by Side concert with the Toledo Symphony on March 4, at 4 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater, and a Pops concert on April 30, at 7 p.m. at Maumee High School’s Performing Arts Center. To become a member of the Toledo Symphony Youth Orchestras, students must audition to be placed in one of three ensembles, the Philharmonic Orchestra, Symphonic Orchestra, or the Concert Strings ensemble. The Philharmonic and Symphonic Orchestras serve as full orchestral experiences while the Concert Strings ensemble is dedicated to preparing string students for more complex repertoire. The Toledo Symphony Youth Orchestras concert on February 4 at 2 p.m. at…


Jeff Fearnside delivers short stories worth the wait

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jeff Fearnside has his new year’s goal set out for himself – finish his novel. And he’s hoping that novel, when finished, won’t take as long to see print as his first book of fiction, “Making Love While Levitating Three Feet in the Air.” The Bowling Green native who now lives in Corvallis, Oregon, completed that manuscript in 2005. The stories had already won awards including the Santa Fe Writers Project Literary Award. The collection was a finalist for the New River Press MVP award. Publishing, he thought, at the time “was just around the corner.” But what was right around the corner was frustration. “Then it didn’t go to the next level,” he said in a recent telephone interview. “I lost faith and stopped sending it out. Something I now really regret. That put me behind.” He advises other writers not repeat to that mistake. “Keep the faith.” When he decided to start submitting the manuscript again, it wasn’t long before he struck a deal with Stephen Austin State University Press. The book was published in 2016. “It all worked out in the end,” he said. “Making Love” brings together 13 short stories, including the six he submitted for his Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing thesis from Eastern Washington University in 2000. The stories are “stylistically all over the board,” the author said. There’s realism, allegory, magic realism, and surrealism. “I like a collection that has a little bit of eclecticism to it.” What holds them together is keen psychological insight expressed in clear, shapely prose. The collection opens with the quirky realism of “Nuclear Toughskins,” about coming of age in the shadow of the bomb and includes the allegory, “Cat People,” in which feline overlords dish out just desserts to those who have treated them well or badly. For the record, Fearnside has two cats and is assured of rewards should his fantastical vision come true. On the other end of the spectrum is “Going for Broke,” a straightforward piece…


Older artists invited to submit work for 50+ Shades of Grey exhibit

From BOWLING GREEN ARTS COUNCIL Bowling Green Arts Council is proud to announce 50+ Shades of Grey, an exhibit that will feature the work of artists who are 50 years of age or older. The show will occur February 23rd through March 28th, 2018 at the Wood County Senior Center, 305 N. Main Street, BG. All artists may submit up to two original works of art in any two-dimensional medium.  Members of Bowling Green Arts Council may submit up to three works. The entry fee for the show is $20 and the deadline for submission is February 5, 2018.  For more information regarding this exhibit and the application and payment process, please consult the BG Arts Council website at www.bgartscouncil.com, or you may obtain an entry form at the Senior Center. An opening reception at the Senior Center with refreshments and entertainment will be held from 5-7 pm on Friday, February 23. Guests will be able to vote for a People’s Choice Award to be announced at 6:45. The winner will receive a $50 gift certificate courtesy of The Art Supply Depo.  50+ Shades of Grey is sponsored by the BG Arts Council and the Wood County Committee on Aging.


Scholar Jessica Harris to discuss role of food in Civil Rights movement

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Dr. Jessica B. Harris, a preeminent scholar of the food of the African Diaspora, will serve as keynote speaker for Bowling Green State University’s “Beyond ‘The Dream’” 2018 series of events. Harris’ presentation, “Deacon’s Chicken and Free Breakfasts: Food and the Civil Rights Movement,” will begin at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 17 in Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Doors open at 6 p.m. for this free event, which is open to the public. A book signing will immediately follow the program, which will include an orchestra performance and a School of Art visual presentation. Harris is one of a handful of African Americans who have achieved prominence in the culinary world. She holds a Ph.D. from New York University, teaches English at Queens College and lectures internationally. Her articles have appeared in Vogue, Food & Wine, Essence and The New York Times. She has been inducted into the James Beard Foundation Who’s Who in Food and Beverage in America and recently helped the Smithsonian Institute National Museum of African American History and Culture to conceptualize its cafeteria. Heejoo Kim, an assistant professor of digital arts whose projects focus on social issues, will give a presentation. The Bowling Green Philharmonia will perform Joseph Schwantner’s “New Morning for the World: ‘Daybreak of Freedom,’” written to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. BGSU alumnus Dr. Uzee Brown, chair of the Department of Music at Morehouse College, will narrate the piece. “Beyond ‘The Dream’” will feature a series of events through April, including the 29th annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tribute Jan. 12. The event will feature keynote speakers Dr. Harold Brown, who was a member of the Tuskegee Airmen Red Tails, a group of African American men, and Dr. Marsha Bordner, president emeritus at Terra State Community College. Brown and Bordner co-wrote a memoir of Brown’s life, “Keep Your Airspeed Up: The Story of a Tuskegee Airman,” released in August 2017. A book signing will follow this 1 p.m. event at the Bowling Green Performing Arts Center, 530 W. Poe…


St. Tim’s Discovers features music of Irving Berlin

Submitted by KAREN SMITH FOR ST. TIMOTHY’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH The Song is Ended (but the Melody Lingers on): An Afternoon with the Vocal Music of Irving Berlin is the third offering of the 2017-18 season of St. Tim’s Discovers, the classical music series sponsored by St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, Perrysburg. Using a concert format similar to the well-received 2016 concert St. Tim’s Friends Sing Broadway, several local musicians are presenting standards specifically from the Irving Berlin songbook.  The concert is Sunday, Sept. 21, at 3 p.m. Vocal soloists will include soprano Cheryl Babb, who has been featured with many area ensembles including the Canterbury Singers, USA; soprano Ann Corrigan recently retired from BGSU and the current St. Tim’s choir director; current BGSU faculty member Ryan Ebright (baritone) and Sara Ebright, soprano; tenor Father Jeff Bunke, the rector of St. Timothy’s and accompanist Michael Gartz, a staff member at both BGSU and St. Timothy’s. Special guest artist for this event is Gabe Hunyor, currently a sophomore at St. John’s High School and an active member of the Perrysburg Musical Theater. Ensemble pieces will include a medley from the musical Let’s Dance,  I Love a Piano and seasonably appropriate selections from White Christmas.  Individual numbers in the program include Blue Skies, Let’s Have Another Cup of Coffee and I’ve Got My Love to Keep Me Warm.  The audience will have an opportunity to participate in a sing-a-long to God Bless America. Beginning at 3 p.m., the concert will be held in the sanctuary of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, 871 East Boundary Street, Perrysburg, Ohio.  St. Tim’s Discovers is dedicated to bringing classical music to communities throughout Northwest Ohio. The performance is free and open to the public; doors open to the public at 2:30 p.m.  St. Timothy’s is fully accessible with plenty of convenient parking. Information on all upcoming events in the series is available at www.saint-timothy.net.  


Photo exhibit at Way Library brings those served by WCBDD into focus

Submittted by PRIZM “Lens on Learning; A Social Documentary of Developmental Disabilities,” a collaborative photography project completed this past year by BGSU students with individuals served by the Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities, is  on display through February 15 exhibit at The Way Public Library Gallery. The exhibit is presented by the library in collaboration with PRIZM Creative Community. The project not only brought awareness to the BGSU student who were paired with an individual served by the WCBDD and captured their story through photography,  but it helps the community at large to be aware of the community integration program administered by the WCBDD for our disabled citizens.   This five year old program has captured the life of many developmental disabled individuals who live, work and contribute in our community. (See related story http://bgindependentmedia.org/portraits-in-friendships-between-bgsu-student-photographers-wood-lane-individuals-exhibited-at-toledo-museum/) In 1990 the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act addressed the needs of people with disabilities and prohibited discrimination in employment, public services, and public accommodations. Thirty-five years before the ADA, The Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities, a county agency, began to support and assist Wood County residents with developmental delays in increasing their skills, capabilities and independence. “The camera provides a tangible means to connect with one another and the world,” writes Lynn Whitney, the BGSU professor of photography who directs the senior level Community Projects Class at BGSU. “This class challenges students to forge personal relationships and explore aspects of being human from a vantage different than their own. This year we offered the camera to our partners from Wood Lane allowing us to speak with not just for them. This year, governmental mandates to privatize many key services provided through WCBDD, influenced our seeing to reveal a fuller picture of the lives of individuals so often living and working at the margins.”   The exhibition pieces hung on the gallery walls at The Way Library documents the day to day life of disabled individuals served by WCBDD at home, work, and play as captured through their BGSU Student partner. This year…


Divas dive into downtown scene to bring opera & art song to new listeners

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News An ensemble of young vocalists wants listeners to belly up to the bar and drink in the beauty of song. The Black Swamp Opera Ensemble will perform Cocktails & Cadenzas, a variety of operatic arias, art songs, and musical theater pieces, on Friday, January 12, at 9 p.m. at Two Foxes Gastropub. All six singers recently earned Masters of Music in vocal performance from Bowling Green State University’s College of Musical Arts. Now on the cusp of careers, they are taking their art to the places they like to hang out, according to sopranos Kate Pomrenke and Kyle Schreiber. Pomrenke said she got the idea for the ensemble after performing at Toledo on Tap, an event celebrating beer brewing. “Why can’t we do something like that here? There are so many singers here that have graduated,” she said. “We’re all young singers looking for whatever opportunities we can to perform, and this is a good way bring our art to the community.” “We’re just a group of friends,” Schreiber said. “We graduated, and we’re all in the area.” Other members are Jarrod Davis, tenor, John Mink, baritone, Savanah Stricklin, soprano, and Brett Pond, baritone. They are accompanied by a pianist. Schreiber said that while they were still in school, they talked about doing a Halloween show. So the ensemble made its debut in October with a Halloween performance, complete with costumes, at Grounds for Thought. They followed that up with a Christmas concert, also at Grounds, mixing carols in with their usual repertoire. “It’s very casual,” Schreiber said. “We don’t want it to be super fancy. We want to go to bars and coffee shops. We want it to be accessible.” That means singing for the folks who come specifically to listen to them as well as entertaining those who just happen to be in the venue. People can listen to a song or two, or the whole concert, Pomrenke said. The performances are presented round-robin style. Each singer will perform one piece, and…


BG high students breaking in ‘Newsies’ musical for school productions

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The young thespians and their adult mentors at Bowling Green High School are ready to set the pace for their peers across the country by piloting the Broadway musical, “Newsies.” Their mission, shared by about a half dozen other schools, is to stage the popular show. Director Jo Beth Gonzalez and the rest of the staff will then share their insights into what it takes to produce the musical with a high school cast. That could result in the production company, Musical Theater International, tweaking certain aspects that prove too difficult for young actors and crews. Their input will also be shared in production notes that will be included when other high schools rent the script. The Bowling Green High School theater is no stranger to this process. They did their first pilot production with “Mary Poppins” in 2014, followed by “Peter and the Starcatcher.” Those projects gave choreographer Bob Marzola an idea. He loved the musical “Newsies.” He became a fan of the original 1992 film starring Christian Bale when he saw it on television. Hat film was a flop at the time of its release, but became a cult classic when it was added to the Nickelodeon rotation and was released on video. Later as a fourth grade teacher at Conneaut Elementary, Marzola used the film and its story about a strike by young newspaper peddlers to talk about labor and the Industrial Revolution. “I got my students hooked on the movie,” he said. Disney turned the movie into a Broadway musical where it was a Tony Award-winning hit. Marzola wondered when Disney would release the performance rights for high schools and if Bowling Green could pilot it. He asked Gonzalez, and she asked MTI, the umbrella organization for Disney musicals. Not yet, she was told. He asked again. She asked again. Not yet. Then last spring, just as the musical theater team at the high school was starting to discuss what musical to stage in spring 2018, Gonzalez was offered the…


BGSU Arts Events through Jan. 23

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Jan. 10 — BGSU’s Guest Artist Series welcomes back former faculty member and pianist Yu-Lien The. A prizewinner of the 12th International Piano Competition Viotti-Valsesia and the Deutsche Musikwettbewerb, The has performed at the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival and at Carnegie Hall, with the new music ensemble Opus21. Frequent collaborations with saxophonists Joe Lulloff and Henning Schröder have led to several world premieres of new commissions for both piano and saxophone. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 13 — Sigma Alpha Iota members will present a Winter Musicale at 6 p.m. in the Choral Rehearsal Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 14 — Praecepta, the student chapter of the Society of Composers, Inc., will present a performance of their work titled “24/24.” The group promotes new music activities in the Bowling Green community. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 16 — Violinist Harvey Thurmer is the next performer in the Guest Artist Series. Thurmer is active in the promotion and recording of new music. His recording of Kurtag’s “Kafka Fragmente” with soprano Audrey Luna, available on the Ars Moderno label, represents the first recording of this monumental work by American artists. The performance will begin at 8 pm in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical ArtsCenter. Free Jan. 18 — Visiting Writer Clifford Chase will read from his fiction. Author of “Winkie” and “The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir),” Chase teaches at Wesleyan University. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 18 — The Guest Artist Series presents Li-Shan Hung on the piano. She made her Carnegie Hall debut at Weill Hall in 2003 and was invited to present a second Weill Hall recital in 2005. The recipient of numerous music performance prizes, she has performed and taught around the world. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19 — BGSU presents EAR | EYE: Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art in conjunction…


Chillabration offers businesses, organizations the chance to sponsor ice sculptures

Submitted by DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN Winterfest BG Chillabration is back for 2018 even bigger and better than last year, Feb. 9, 10, and 11. The Saturday evening (Feb. 10) of live bands in a heated tent, incredible ice bar and amazing ice garden met with rave reviews.  This year the Frozen Swamp Tent will not only provide shelter for live music from 4-11 pm, it will also present the first ever Winter Market from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m..  All this happens in the Huntington parking lot on the corner of Clough and South Main Streets. This is also the location for our beautiful ice garden and live ice carving demonstrations.  This year we will host mascots from the area from 10 a.m. to 5 p..m and they will be the models for our talented ice carvers.  This is sure to be a hit with every age group. This event offers something for everyone.  Families come out for the day and another crowd comes out to enjoy the hours of entertainment and craft beer and wine served from behind the incredible ice bar.   The Downtown Foundation will be overseeing the ice sculpture sales as a fundraiser. We are asking you to consider partnering with us to help make this year’s event spectacular with your commissioning of a custom ice sculpture displayed for the thousands of people expected to attend.  They will also be seen via our website, social media and other media coverage. The funds raised will help us continue to complete beautification projects in our historic downtown.   You can contact our office at 419-354-4332 or download an order form from our website at DowntownBGOhio.org.


Noted young pianist Stewart Goodyear to perform ‘Emperor’ concerto with Toledo Symphony

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Proclaimed “a phenomenon” by the Los Angeles Times and “one of the best pianists of his generation” by the Philadelphia Inquirer, Stewart Goodyear is an accomplished young pianist, concerto soloist, chamber musician, recitalist, and composer. Goodyear will perform Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5 “Emperor”- known for its virtuosic style and wide dynamic ranges – with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra on January 12 & 13 at 8:00 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater. Goodyear began his musical training at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto and later went on to receive his bachelor’s degree from the Curtis Institute of Music, where he studied with legendary pianist Leon Fleisher. He then received his master’s degree from the Juilliard School of Music. Mr. Goodyear has performed with major orchestras all over the world including the Philadelphia Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, Pittsburgh Symphony, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Cleveland Orchestra, Montreal Symphony, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Atlanta Symphony, Baltimore Symphony, Seattle Symphony, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, and NHK Symphony Orchestra. Following Beethoven’s heroic Piano Concerto No. 5, Maestro Giordano Bellincampi will conduct Brahms’s radiant Symphony No. 2 on Friday and Saturday evening. “This is a great concert to attend if you’re looking for an experience to start your year off on the right note. The dazzling Beethoven’s Emperor coupled with Brahms’s Second and its ability to draw you into the music from the very first notes will leave you feeling uplifted and refreshed.” said Felecia Kanney, Director of Marketing for the Toledo Symphony. Two performances of Beethoven’s Emperor will take place January 12 & 13 at 8 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater. Tickets to these performances are available at toledosymphony.com or by calling the Toledo Symphony Box Office.