Arts and Entertainment

The arts can save the world, opera composer Jake Heggie believes

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When composer Jake Heggie comes to campus next week, he has a charge for music students – bring back the arts to schools. “This is a critical moment,” he said. “Arts can save the world.” They build empathy and understanding, and without that human beings’ more destructive tendencies take hold. Heggie, composer of the operas “Dead Man Walking,” “Moby-Dick,” “It’s a Wonderful Life,” and others, will visit Bowling Green State University Sunday, Oct. 22 through Tuesday, Oct. 24 as guest resident for the Edwin H. Simmons Creative Minds Series. He will give a free public lecture on Sunday at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. He will also give talks about his work, present workshops, and offer master classes Monday and Tuesday. Visit for www.bgsu.edu/CreativeMinds the schedule. All events are free. Heggie knows well the power of music to give solace and bring people together. Growing up in Bexley outside of Columbus, he started to study classical piano, and around the house he heard the big band music his father, an avocational saxophonist, loved. His father had dreamed of becoming a musician, but the son of Hungarian immigrants, he went into medicine and became a doctor. He suffered from depression and committed suicide when Heggie was 10. Music helped Heggie deal with the emotional “shrapnel” of his father’s death.  “I found solace in piano and musical theater. That’s where I found strength.” He started about this time…


BG community bands scares up film favorites in Spooktacular concert

From the BOWLING GREEN AREA COMMUNITY BANDS With a nod to iconic movie characters, the Bowling Green Area Community Bands present A Halloween Spooktacular Family Concert on Sunday, October 22 at the Bowling Green Schools’ Performing Arts Center. Doors open at 3:30, by the downbeat of the concert at 4 p.m. The Concert Band, under the direction of Thomas R. Headley, opens with a new  setting of our National Anthem,  “The Star Spangled Banner,”  followed by   Gershwin’s “Strike Up the Band,” “Entry March of the Boyares”  and  “America”,  from “West Side Story,”  music by Leonard Bernstein. Consistent with the concert’s movie theme, both the Gershwin and the Bernstein are from musical and movie scores. The year also represents the 100 birthday of the legendary Leonard Bernstein. BiG Band BG, the jazz component of the BG Community Bands, led by William Lake, will also honor the 100th birthdays of music luminaries Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk. Included in their set will be Gillespie’s “ A Night in Tunisia” and Monk’s signature tune “Round Midnight”. Concluding the night-themed program will be Cole Porter’s “Night and Day”. BiG Band BG soloists include Adam Young, William Tabron, Dan Schellhas, Lily Young, Keith Bernhard and Danny Rodriguez. The closing set of the Concert Band begins with “Tuba Tiger Rag”, a Canadian Brass favorite, featuring the terrific tuba talents of Andrew Kalmar, Katie Ferren, William Lake and Rob Cintron.  Closing the Spooktacular Concert is a John Higgns arrangement of “Hollywood Milestones”, a medley of block-buster movie themes. The…


“Rocky Horror Show” on stage in Maumee

From 3B PRODUCTIONS 3B Productions will present the musical stage version of “The Rocky Horror Show,” Oct.19-22 at the Maumee Indoor Theatre. Performance schedule is: Thursday, October 19, 8 p.m., Friday, October 20, 8 p.m., Saturday, October 21 7 p.m., followed by a midnight performance. Conversations with the cast and crew immediately follow each performance. Dr. Frank-N-Furter and his merry band of misfits take you on a strange journey of love, lust, and the quest for ultimate satisfaction in this updated version of the 1975 Broadway musical that inspired the cult film “The Rocky Horror Picture Show”. One dark and stormy night, Brad and Janet, a newly-engaged couple, set out to begin their journey toward matrimonial bliss when a sudden blowout forces them down a path of domination, illumination, and sensual debauchery that ultimately leaves them searching for more than just help with a flat tire. A parody tribute to the science fiction and horror B movies of the 1930s through early 1970s, this hilariously dark and foreboding musical invites you to leave your inhibitions at the door, and revel in the strange and absurd. Fans of the film will recognize many of the songs, such as “Science Fiction Double Feature”, “Damn it Janet”, “Time Warp”, “Sweet Transvestite”, “Hot Patootie”, and more. The production features many local actors, including: Emily Popp, Janet: Courtney Gilliland, Bradley King, Bradley King, Durrell Johnson, Matt Badyna, Shannon Ruhe, Mara Connor, Tanner Duvall, Zachary, Patrick Davis, and Dylan Coale. Audience members are encouraged to dress in costume, bring props…


Horizon Youth youngsters tune into absurd comedy with “Magic Harmonica”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The stage manager in Horizon Youth Theatre’s production of “The Magic Harmonica and Other Fanciful Tales” has problems keeping her cast in line. They always want to veer away from the script. Officious, and controlling, the stage manager played Kaitlyn Valantine is not above yanking one narrator for another when they displease her. What she can’t control is the way the playwright Janet Layberry also has a mind of her own. These four one-act plays within a play all employ the tropes of fairy tales, but do so in absurd and comic ways. “The Magic Harmonica” is on stage at the Otsego High auditorium Thursday and Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $5. Visit www.horizonyouththeatre.org/product/harmonica. The play uses the troupe’s younger cohort of actors, ages 6 through 12, but there seem few concessions to age. The humor is at times intentionally juvenile, often involving grade school word play. Nobody delivers those jokes better than an actual grade schooler. Sometimes the humor seems pitched to the parents, as when Michelle (Calista Wilkins) in “The Woobly Fiasco” tells the enchanted prince carrying an outsized sword: “People haven’t used swords for ages, now they have … lawyers.” And then there’s the jester played by Liam Rogel who trades in absurdist non-sequiturs. Each story has lessons here but they spare us the morals and never let messages get in the way of a good time. The first of the four plays, “You Call…


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING  & COMMUNICATIONS Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison. Murchison is known as a varied performer, composer, arranger, educator, conductor and producer. He was a member of the River City Brass in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 2002-15, and was the principal solo euphonium for the last nine of those years. Since then, Murchison has performed solo and chamber music concerts across the U.S. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 13 – The BGSU Concert Band will perform as part of Homecoming festivities. The band will perform traditional repertoire and new compositions by the world’s leading composers, conducted by Dr. Bruce Moss. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and $7 for adults and available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. Oct. 15 – The Sunday Matinee…


Writer reaches beyond trauma of rape, 9/11 to confront PTSD

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Julia Torres Barden grew up as the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center rose above the New York skyline. “I spent my whole childhood watching them get bigger and bigger,” she said in a recent interview. That childhood started in the projects in the South Bronx, amidst her fellow Puerto Ricans, and then later in Upper Manhattan. On the day of the 9/11 attacks she was back in Manhattan on business. She was watching the aftermath of the first plane striking on a large screen in Times Square with a group of strangers. At that moment they assumed it was an accident, then the second plane struck. “It was devastating … to see them collapse like that. Those towers were raise in glory throughout my childhood,” she said. Now there was a sense of the city being under attack. Torres Barden, now of Perrysburg, recalls in striking detail the next couple days, being trapped in her hotel room, watching far too much TV coverage. She remembers the constant bomb threats to the Empire State Building, Grand Central Station, the Lincoln Tunnel, which was her exit from the city, At the time, she said, she was just concerned with making it through the day, and getting back to her husband and three sons in Virginia. It would be a few years later when she would realize the toll the attack took on her, when suddenly found herself struggling to breathe. What she and doctors…


“All Hands on Deck! Show” claims Branson honors

Submitted by JODY MADARAS “Let the drums roll out, Let the trumpets call, while the people shout, “Strike Up The Band!” The “All Hands On Deck! Show” has been awarded the 2017 Branson Terry Music Award for “Morning Show Of The Year.” “The All Hands On Deck! Show” is an homage to Bob Hope, and an American 1942 Roadshow & Radio Broadcast reproduction featuring the songs, dances, laughs, and favorite radio commercials that America has loved for 70 years! The production was nominated for: Morning Show of the Year, Band of the Year, and Drummer of the Year. “We love sharing our musical message of patriotism with folks all across the U.S.A, and they really seem to enjoy the fact that we transport them back to a time our country had that can-do spirit of working together,” said creator/producer Jody Madaras in a recent intervieweing a part of the Branson community. The people here are just the best, and we are deeply honored by receiving the award for outstanding “Morning Show of the Year.” “The ALL HANDS ON DECK! Show” features Broadway veteran and Pemberville, Ohio native Jody Madaras (creator, producer, Ted Crosley), Valerie Hill (Betty Blake), Emily Gardenhire (Daisy Maxwell), and Taylor Hopkins (John Handley), and the rich sounds of the LIVE 9-piece Hollywood Victory Caravan Orchestra (featuring Branson’s Drummer of the Year nominee Rob Wilson), classic commercials, tight harmonies, impromptu skits, and 42 of the greatest American songs ever written, as well as a full-circle patriotic salute celebrating…


St. Tim’s to present music history talks by Samual Adler, opening brass concert

From ST. TIMOTHY’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH St. Timothy’ Episcopal Church, Perrysburg, proudly announces the opening concert of the 2017-18 St. Tim’s Discovers Series.  Perrysburg’s own, the Academy Brass Quintet will perform on Sunday, October 15, at 3 p.m. The series is also adding  a music history lectures series by the eminent scholar and composer Dr. Samuel Adler, formerly on the faculties of the Eastman School of Music and Juilliard. The topic for the noon, October 15 is “The Classical Period into the Romantic Era.”  A soup and salad lunch is available preceding the lecture, at 11:30 a.m. Call the church office, 419-874-5704, by noon, Thursday, October 12, for luncheon reservations.  The cost of lunch is $10. Formed in 1994, the Academy Brass Quintet (ABQ) is a professional brass quintet comprised of outstanding brass musicians from across northwest Ohio. Founding members include Michael Smith, trumpet, who is the director of orchestras for Perrysburg Schools, and Pete Vavrinek, horn, who also creates many original arrangements for the ABQ.   Other members currently include Bruce Heuring, trombone; Perrysburg Junior High band director Jason Jordan, tuba; and Dr. David Kosmyna, trumpet.  Dr. Kosmyna, a Toledo native, has had an extensive performing career across North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Presently, he serves on the faculty at Ohio Northern University, teaching trumpet, music composition and theory and directs the Jazz Ensemble. The Academy Brass Quintet performs music from many styles, appealing to a wide variety of musical tastes.  For the St. Tim’s performance, the ABQ is planning Adagio by Mozart,  Pavane  by Faure’,  a…


Arts beat: VIVE! has right stuff in performance of orchestral masterpieces

Ed.  Note: This is the first is a series of commentary and observations on area arts events. This will supplement, not replace, the coverage BG Independent news already provides. By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Usually when Debussy’s “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun” or Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring” are performed, the size of the orchestra approaches 100. On Sunday (Oct. 8) VIVE! Ensemble conducted by Maria Mercedes Diaz Garcia took on those early 20th Century masterworks with a dozen musicians on each. The performance in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Great Gallery, was stellar. What the pieces might have missed in orchestral heft they gained in translucent textures with subtleties of voicing ringing out through the ensemble. Diaz, a student in Bowling Green State University’s Doctorate in Contemporary Music program as are a number of the other musicians in the ensemble, shaped these pieces with clarity and a sure sense of form. As the “Rite” roared to a finish, two sets of timpani and a bass drum provided enough boom to drive the piece home. But the three percussionists on the “Rite” never overwhelmed the rest of the ensemble. Instead it was the audience that was overwhelmed and moved by the performance. A few more observations: * Both pieces open with signature solos, and Kenneth Cox on flute on “Prelude” and Joshua Hart on bassoon on “Rite” did justice to their solos. The smaller ensemble meant that all the solo parts stood in greater relief. The ensemble benefits…


Ann Beck celebrates her paintings in first solo show

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ann Beck often sees her art hanging from people’s ears. Her handcrafted earrings are a familiar fashion statement in Bowling Green, where she sells them at the Black Swamp Arts Festival and at the Christmas Boutique hosted by Grounds for Thought, and elsewhere. Less common is a chance for her to see her paintings hanging from walls. Beck and art lovers have that opportunity this month during an exhibit at Grounds for Thought, 174 S. Main St., Bowling Green. The paintings are clearly by the same hand as the earrings with their bright colors and bold shapes, styled figures set in vivid landscapes. Though the paintings were created in the past three years, they represent a life in art that’s taken Beck, 49, from her native Colorado, to New Mexico, New Zealand and Bowling Green. The nature and myths of those places are all infused in the paintings. “I was one of those kids who always draws constantly,” Beck said of her start. In high school she had an inspiring art teacher. “I have a lot of success, and got a lot of awards.” But when she went to Western State College in Gunnison, Colorado, she hesitated about making art a career. She wanted to keep her art close to her and wasn’t willing to “work for anyone.” She’s still not sure what she was thinking. “I was just young and dumb,” she conceded. “I took a ton of art classes, and just dropped…


New WBGU-TV show captures sound, atmosphere of Howard’s Club H

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Dive is a moniker that Howard’s Club H wears proudly. While owners Steve Feehan and Tony Zmarzly have made a number of cosmetic improvements to the Bowling Green establishment, the essential gritty rock ‘n’ roll essence of the place remains. Joe Goodman, of WBGU-TV, recognized that spirit as soon as he came in. The graffiti, the concrete floors and the smell of well-aged beer, he said, “reminded me of all the places I loved in New York City that I was missing. … It’s where real rock is born. This is where people cut their teeth.” So the television producer started thinking about how he could share this place viewers. Working with bands and the owners, he brought in a crew to film. The result is “Live at Howard’s.” As the posters declare “the dive comes alive on WBGU-TV” on Thursday, Oct. 12 at 11 p.m., and in that time slot every week for the next nine. The shows will then be rebroadcast early Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at 3 a.m. The show’s premiere will be celebrated with a party at the club where the first episode will be shown. Goodman said the aim is for “Live at Howard’s” to be “a little manic, energetic” in keeping with the vibe of the gritty club. The aim is to feature up-and-coming bands both local and regional with a mix true to the club’s usual lineups. The first show features Howard’s regulars Tree No Leaves. The band…


Contemporary concert music rocks at BGSU’s New Music Festival

From MIDAMERICAN CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY MUSIC The 38th Annual Bowling Green New Music Festival will  showcase the work of more than 30 guest composers and performers October 18-21. The four-day international festival includes concerts, lectures and an art exhibition. This year’s featured guests include composers Steven Mackey and Sarah Kirkland Snider, guest ensemble Latitude 49, and a special performance by vocalist Shara Nova. Organized by the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music (MACCM), the College of Musical Arts and the Fine Arts Center Galleries at BGSU, the festival supports the creation of new work and engages both the University and city communities in the process of music appreciation and awareness. Founded in 1980, the New Music Festival has hosted such notable composers as John Adams, Milton Babbitt, John Cage, Chen Yi, John Corigliano, George Crumb, Philip Glass, John Harbison, Lou Harrison, David Lang, Pauline Oliveros, Terry Riley, Christopher Rouse, Frederic Rzewski, Joseph Schwantner, Bright Sheng, Steven Stucky, Joan Tower, and more than 400 other guest composers and musicians. Most festival events are free and open to the public. For a complete schedule of events, visit festival.bgsu.edu or contact the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music at 419-372-2685. Guest Bios: Deemed “one of the decade’s more gifted, up-and- coming modern classical composers” (Pitchfork), composer Sarah Kirkland Snider writes music of direct expression and vivid narrative that has been hailed as “rapturous”(The New York Times), “haunting” (The Los Angeles Times), and “strikingly beautiful” (Time Out New York). With an ear for both the structural and…


BGSU arts events through Oct. 17

Oct. 5 – The International Film Series presents “The Mermaid” (2016, China, 94 minutes, directed by Xingchi Zhou [Stephen Chow]), with an introduction by Elizabeth Niehaus, doctoral student in American culture studies. Breaking box office records to become China’s highest-grossing film to date, “The Mermaid” sees hit director Chow (“Shaolin Soccer,” “Kung Fu Hustle”) bring his zany, comic style to a modern fairytale with an environmentalist message. After their peaceful existence is destroyed by pollution and underwater sonar, a group of merfolk send an alluring mermaid to kill the young businessman responsible. Their revenge scheme hits a snag when mermaid and tycoon fall in love. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Oct. 5 – The Visiting Writer Series features poet Christopher Kempf, author of “Late in the Empire of Men,” which won the 2015 Levis Prize from Four Way Books. He is also the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University. His poetry, essays and reviews have appeared in Gettysburg Review, Kenyon Review Online, The New Republic, PEN America and Ploughshares. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Oct. 5 – The BGSU Trumpet Guild will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo…


Tickets Available for HYT’s “Magic Harmonica”

Submitted by HORIZON YOUTH THEATRE Horizon Youth Theatre is pleased to present their third annual fall production for younger actors aged 6 – 12, The Magic Harmonica and Other Fanciful Tales. Directed by Keith Guion and featuring thirty children from many area schools, Magic Harmonica will be performed at Otsego High School (18505 Tontogany Creek Road) on Thursday, October 12 and Saturday, October 14 at 7:00 pm; and Sunday, October 15 at 2:00 pm. Tickets can be purchased online now at www.horizonyouththeatre.org/product/harmonica for just $5.00. The Magic Harmonica and Other Fanciful Tales by Janet Layberry is a collection of four enchanting plays sparkling with charm, wit, imagination, and a quirky sense of humor. In You Call That a Bedmonster?, Princess Julia discovers that Humphrey, the monster under her bed, is missing, and sends her guard out to find him. The Magic Harmonica brings a bit of excitement and adventure into an otherwise dull kingdom. But Hoo Is It For? takes us through an enchanted forest where nothing is what it appears to be, and the party which is rumored to be happening is hard to find. The Woobly Fiasco is a play within a play about a Stage Manager having trouble with her actors, who are supposed to be narrating a play about Wooblies, mysterious creatures who have become the caretakers of the animals with whom they share a crowded forest.   The cast members all play at least two roles within the four mini-plays and are as follows: Simon Baney, Lauren Carmen,…


Jazz guitar master John Scofield takes wing at BGSU festival

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jazz guitarist John Scofield is devoted to the art of improvisation, even when he’s presenting a master class. “Improvising to me is as natural as music,” he said at Bowling Green State University Saturday, The headliner for the Orchard Guitar Festival said he was there to answer questions. “I don’t have any teaching system,” Scofield said. “I do talk a lot” Everyone, whether or not they go to music school, is self-taught, he said.  “You have to teach yourself especially jazz. “ Ultimately, the self-described “music nerd” went into music because he liked it. “The more you learn about music, the more you learn it comes out of you, not the instrument.” The doors of Bryan Recital Hall were locked, he said in jest, and no one gets out without asking a question. Scofield said questions could be about anything, and even include “a plug for your band.” He told the first person who posed a question that he could leave now. He didn’t, and none of the other 100 or so attendees did either. For an hour Scofield, 65, talked about the lessons he’s learned in his almost 50 years as a professional musician. “I haven’t had a real job since Arnold Palmer’s Dry Cleaners.” Here was someone those in the audience, at least half of whom were guitarists, had heard on record, both his own, and with legends such as Miles Davis, Gerry Mulligan, and Charles Mingus. Asked about advice for prospective…