Arts and Entertainment

Indigo Girls to perform with Toledo Symphony, June 1

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Grammy award-winning Indigo Girls—iconic duo Amy Ray and Emily Saliers—will come to Toledo on June 1, 2018 at 8 p.m. for a one-night-only Spotlight Event at the Stranahan Theater to perform some of their greatest hits including “Closer to Fine,” “Power of Two,” and “Galile” —all with full orchestra in a new sonic experience. Sara Jobin will lead the Toledo Symphony Orchestra for her final performance as Resident Conductor in this program of folk and symphonic music. Three decades after releasing their first album and countless U.S. and international tours later, the Indigo Girls continue to make waves on the music scene. They remain the only duo with top 40 titles on the Billboard 200 each decade since the 1980s. In 2012, Emily Saliers and Amy Ray began collaborating with orchestrators to create larger-than-life arrangements that combine the original instrumentation with a full orchestra of musicians, fusing together folk, rock, pop, and symphonic music into one. They have performed with more than 50 symphonies across America to date and will perform with the Toledo Symphony for the very first time in June. “The Indigo Girls have achieved a new and raw experience all over again without sacrificing any of the emotional qualities that defined their music over the years,” said Felecia Kanney, Director of Marketing for the Toledo Symphony. “It’s incredible. Together, they totally unleash the full power of symphony orchestra, performing with our musicians as opposed to in front them, and you will definitely hear that in their arrangements that are more akin to the music of John Williams’ film scores as opposed to music of Bach or Haydn.” “When I hear the symphony come in, it’s a convergence of a lot of feelings,” says Emily Saliers, according to the Indigo Girls website biography (indigogirls.com). “First, you can’t believe your good fortune that it’s really happening, and then you’re hit with the power of this enormous, full orchestra coming from behind you. Even when we play by ourselves now, I can’t perform these songs without hearing the orchestra in my head.” Indigo Girls will take place Friday, June 1, 2018 at 8 p.m. at the Stranahan Theater. Tickets are available at toledosymphony.com or by calling the Toledo Symphony Box Office at 419-246-8000.


PRIZM brings art collection, including Haitian crafts, to Sam Bs

From PRIZM CREATIVE COMMUNITY PRIZM Creative Community is pleased to announce its  “Sun, Sand, Summer Exhibition” as the newest exhibit in Wood County.  On display thru July the 30th at the Sam B’s Restaurant in Bowling Green the exhibit pays homage to the pleasures of nature, outdoor life, and nostalgia enjoyed with warmer days. On display is a collection of over 150 new pieces, by 24 artists in all medias including jewelry, ceramics, glass, acrylics, oils, fiber, alcohol inks, wood, floral, and paper.  Many featured items would make great Mother’s Day, Graduation or Wedding Gifts this season while supporting local artisans. An informal Opening Reception with free drinks and appetizers and a chance to meet many of the artists will be held on Thursday evening May 10 from 7:30- 9:30 p.m. in the back bar area of the restaurant at 163 S. Main Street in Bowling Green.     New to the exhibit space is a special collection from The Circle of Life project sponsored by Missions International of America located in Perrysburg.   The Circle of Life project is a system in which local artisans and business people have mentored the Haitian people to develop their artistic skills, to make and market products that have given them a never before opportunity to make an annual income to feed their families.    Most of the products are made with recycled paper, but a generous donation to the non-profit has enabled the group to begin to develop leather products as well. These reasonably priced products include innovative jewelry, coasters, key rings, change bowls, pots, and decorative items. Also exhibiting for the first time is several new and innovative artists.   Just graduating BGSU student Regina Hilton is showcasing her beautiful hand crafted ceramics.  Each ceramic mug, and drinking glass or porcelain bowl is uniquely formed and glazed. Regina encourages customers to pick up each item, and select the one that fits their hand the best.  Also new this exhibit is the hot blown glass of retired Toledo attorney Cindy Tesznar who features three different series of her work including sandblasted vases, nautilus swirl designs, and floral vases, and décor items.  Sam B’s is also excited to feature designer floral items from The Exceptional Touch. Having designed custom Christmas trees for The Toledo Club, wedding events and private clients over the years, The Exceptional Touch offers distinctive and timeless floral designs for protected outdoor and interior environments.   Several past guest artists are returning to the gallery space with fresh and innovative work.  Randy Bennett features his nostalgic mixed media work capturing iconic nature and history such as his piece to honor The Midnight Cowboy.  Wendy Jenkins, a local fiber artist features decorative and useable fiber art to brighten your home environment. Artist Darlene Krohn features distinctive works using pen and ink with watercolor, while Photographers J.D….


Art in Park offers artists a breath of fresh air, June 8

From BOWLING GREEN ARTS COUNCIL The Bowling Green Arts Council and Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Department will host Art in the Park on the grounds of Simpson Garden Park, 1291 Conneaut Avenue, on Friday, June 8, 5-7  p.m. Artists of all ages are invited to bring their easels and art supplies to the park to paint in the gardens for this event. Artists can register to participate by sending an email to blair@surrealogic.com. No sales can be made on Park premises; however, artists may bring a sample finished work and are encouraged to bring business cards to distribute. To encourage artist participation, The Art Supply Depō in Bowling Green has donated a $100 gift certificate for the artist voted “People’s Choice” by those in attendance. In addition to the artists at work, Art in the Park will feature hands-on arts activities for children. There will also be local musicians, music by students of the BGSU College of Musical Arts and performances by the Black Swamp Players and Horizon Youth Theatre. Some light refreshments will be provided.


Toledo Museum celebrates 200 years of Libbey Glass

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART To commemorate 200 years of excellence in glassmaking, the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) has organized Celebrating Libbey Glass, 1818-2018. The exhibition will present more than 175 outstanding examples of glass from TMA’s renowned collection as well as objects and materials from the Libbey Inc. archives, including pressed glass tableware, Amberina art glass, Libbey’s world-renowned “brilliant” cut glass (including TMA’s glorious Libbey Punch Bowl), mid-century modern barware and examples of more recent “premium give-away” glasses for companies. Celebrating Libbey Glass will be on view exclusively at TMA beginning May 4 and continuing through Nov. 25 in the Glass Pavilion. “As founders of the Toledo Museum of Art, the Libbey family was instrumental to the advancement of arts education and art appreciation in this region,” said Brian Kennedy, TMA’s Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey director. “It is our honor to recognize the Libbey legacy of innovative glass design, practices and production and to celebrate the Museum’s longstanding commitment to the medium through collections development, exhibition, research and programming.” The story of the Libbey Glass Company began 200 years ago in East Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established as the New England Glass Works in 1818, the company rose to prominence in the 19th century, cementing its reputation as one of the most successful American producers of fine glass tableware. As the general manager of the company from 1872, William L. Libbey (1823-1883) saw the business through difficult economic times, eventually taking over the firm’s lease to become owner. His son, Edward Drummond Libbey (1854-1925), joined his father as partner in 1880. Promoted to superintendent in 1883 at the age of 29 when his father died, the young Edward faced serious challenges with rising fuel costs and growing labor unrest. In 1888 he made the decision to move the entire operation to Toledo, Ohio, because of the abundance of natural gas and high-silica content sand, as well as its proximity to shipping and rail lines. Continuing its production of both high-end and everyday tableware, the factory thrived in Toledo and in 1892 officially changed its name to the Libbey Glass Company. Its success helped to brand Toledo as “The Glass City.” Throughout its history, Libbey has created a great variety of decorative and useful blown and pressed objects in both colorless and richly colored glass, at times decorated with cutting and engraving. The firm won national and international fame through their extravagant displays at world’s fairs, especially the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893 and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, in 1904. The company also made history by developing automated glass manufacturing processes. Its innovative and creative approach to glass has enabled Libbey to endure economic challenges and dramatic changes in taste and style. Edward Libbey married Florence Scott, a Toledo native, and their personal fortune helped to establish the Toledo…


Art Walk helps downtown BG blossom (updated)

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A Walbridge painter who stepped out for her first Art Walk in downtown Bowling Green won top honors in the annual spring event Saturday. Shirley Frater won the first place Juror’s Award. She said she decided to do the event after exhibiting in the 50+ Shades of Grey Exhibit at the Wood County Senior Center. The second place award went to photographer Flannery Murnen, a junior at Bowling Green State University, and another first time participant in the show. Richard Gullet won third place for his detailed pen and ink drawings. Gullet, who showed his work in Qdoba, also won the People’s Choice award. Emily Metzger’s charcoal self-portrait, shown in Murder Ink Tattoo Company, won second place in People’s Choice, and Gail Christofferson won third place for her art guitars, which were on display at Finder’s Records. Following the event, the judges Sara Busler and Lauren Canavan issued a statement, about their choices. Of Frater’s work they wrote: “Shirley draws inspiration from a variety of materials. These materials include found objects such as medallions, old book pages, napkins and photos. Through the use of these found objects she creates an intricate composition that tells a narrative. The arts pays attention to all the fine details of her work from production to presentation. Each frame is found and repurposed to complement the work enclosed within.” Frater said that exhibiting at the senior center inspired her to show her work more, as well as become more involved in the Bowling Green Arts Council, who co-sponsors Art Walk with Downtown BG. Frater said she was a little concerned that she was in Biggby’s Coffee, which is a block off Main Street. But foot traffic at the shop was good, and a couple of the pieces she sold were to people who had just stopped in a buy a coffee. O f Murnen’s work, the judges wrote: “Through the use of traditional film cameras, Flannery’s work is at the mercy of the moment. Pairing her love of history and talent in photography, she captures images for posterity. One photo captures a quick glimpse of the crowd on the Woman’s March on Washington, while another documents a woman in Cuba carrying clean water, a basic amenity often taken for granted in other countries.” Murnen is not a complete newcomer to the show. She works at Coyote Beads where her photos were displayed, and has worked during Art Walk. Also, while in high school, she participated in Art Walk projects, though she said she never had the time to actually attend. Now a junior at Bowling Green State University, Murnen is a double major in history and photography. The two merge in her work. She shoots film, not digital, and despite what some people think, this is not a waste…


Graduating seniors reflect on their time at BGSU through dance

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Footlights Dance concert on campus tonight (April 26) and Friday, April 27, will be bittersweet for some of the dancers. Among the 30 or so dancers on stage will be three graduating dance majors — Adla-Marie Burke, Cincinnati, Alexa Piccirillo, Findlay, and Salon Gegel, Wapakoneta. “It is bittersweet,” Burke said. “We’re closing a chapter, but we’re all moving on time to start our professional careers.” Footlights will be staged at 8 p.m. both nights in the Whitney Studio room 222.in Eppler North on the Bowling Green State University campus. The three dancers said they benefited from a strong support system within the dance program. “Our instructors are helpful making sure we’re doing everything we can to be able to succeed,” Burke said. “One of benefits of small program is you can find your own path. You can find how dance works for you, and they will find ways to help you,” Piccirillo said. Piccirillo said they know they can tap into that support system even after they’ve left campus. The three graduate as the dance program is in transition. The program, now part of the School of Human Movement, Sports, and Leisure Studies, is being shifted into the Department of Theatre and Film, an administrative move from the College of Education and Human Development to the College of Arts and Sciences. As part of the move, the dance major will be eliminated, though the dance minor will be retained. Piccirillo said at first they were sad to hear about the end of the major, but after talking with dance instructor Colleen Murphy, they were reassured. “It’ll be a really good transition for the program,” she said. Burke said that she anticipates that will lead to more of the kind of collaborations that now mostly happen at ArtsX and Bravo! BGSU. At Bravo! this year, she danced with the Combustible Ensemble. She and two other performers moved to sounds the musicians were improvising in the moment. “That was absolutely so much fun.” The University Dance Alliance, a student run group, has been essential to their development on campus. The student-run organization, which has doubled in size to 110 in four years, is open to all interested in dancers, whether they are formally studying or not, whether they’ve been dancing since they were toddlers or just started. The UDA gives students the opportunity to choreograph their own pieces, and dance in works created by their peers. “It’s good to work with different people who have different backgrounds,” Burke said. The performances “are little more laid back” than the official dance concert, Piccirillo said. “It’s kind of nice way to do something different.” Gegel, a double major in dance and business as well as being in the Honors College, hasn’t been able to participate because of…


Show will go on for Black Swamp Players

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Black Swamp Players Board of Trustees voted Wednesday night (April 25) to stage a 51st season, reversing an earlier decision to suspend operations.. Earlier this year, the Players announced it was suspending productions because of lack of personnel to help stage shows. Lane Hakel, president of the Players board stated the earlier decision “was reversed last night due to an influx of enthusiastic, energetic people who have stepped forward to join together to revitalize the Players.” Hakel said details of what shows will be produced next season are not settled. “We do know that they will likely be in November, February, and April.  We also have several experienced and talented directors that have offered to take on a show.” The directors will select the shows they wish to stage. In announcing the suspension in February, Hakel said that it was a lack of technical help that was really hindering its operations. But after press coverage, including a letter published by long time Player Bob Hastings, people began to step forward. “We are really excited by the infusion of talent and energy that we have received and hope to continue performing quality live theater for the residents of Bowling Green and Northwest Ohio for another 50 years,” Hakel said an e-mail Thursday morning. Later in an interview, he said two dozen people have stepped forward to help. The board he noted has been short a vice president and five board members. In the upcoming elections, there will be contested seats for the 14-member board. Hakel said he is running for another term as president. Many of those who have come forward are new to the troupe. A few former board members have also returned. That includes Tom Milbrodt, a stalwart who saw the troupe through rough patches in the past, and has continued to do lights and sound for productions. When it suspended productions, the board was also suspending its fundraising for a new home. Since 2000, the Players’ home has been in the fellowship hall at First United Methodist Church. While grateful for the church’s generosity, the space has limitations, both physical and operationally. The troupe for example cannot sell 50-50 raffle tickets or alcohol. Those are ways of raising funds that other theater use. Hakel still believes for the troupe to reverse its decline in audience finding a new space is essential. “There are a couple intriguing possibilities that the new board is investigating for a permanent location.” One would involved sharing a space with a business. The 50 for 50 campaign, which was raise $50,000 in the Players’ 50th anniversary, has $23,000 in pledges and donations. Elections for officers and trustee will occur at the Players’ annual banquet and membership meeting. Also, the next season’s offerings will be announced. “Rather than a…


Toledo Museum exhibits works from 100 years of Toledo Area Artists exhibits

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART In 1917 the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) and three local artist collectives established the Toledo Federation of Art Societies (TFAS). The following year, the first Toledo Area Artists (TAA) exhibition sponsored by TFAS was held at TMA. Today TFAS is affiliated with more than 40 area art organizations—including artist clubs, galleries, college and university art departments —and hundreds of individual members within a 150-mile radius of the city of Toledo. This retrospective exhibition celebrates the 100th anniversary of TFAS and the century-long tradition of celebrating and recognizing the best artists in the region by TMA. It will showcase more than 20 works of art in a wide variety of media from the approximately 270 works purchased by TFAS for its collection over the last 60 years of TAA exhibitions at TMA. Decades in the Making will be on view at the Museum from April 28 through June 24. “The greater Toledo area has a history of incubating some of the most forward-thinking creative practitioners in the country,” said Brian Kennedy, TMA’s Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey director. “This legacy is in large part the result of the support provided by the Toledo Federation of Art Societies. Decades in the Making commemorates the 100th anniversary of TFAS and recognizes our joint commitment to the region’s outstanding arts and artists.” The works were selected by Halona Norton-Westbrook, Director of Curatorial Affairs at TMA. Among the featured artists will be Diana Attie (drawing), Edith Franklin (ceramics), Dominick Labino (glassblowing), and Kenneth Thompson (sculpture). “Since 1948 the Toledo Federation of Art Societies has been investing in Toledo-area artists while at the same time growing a permanent collection of some of the most dynamic works of art created in our region,” said Doug Adams-Arman, TFAS president. “We look forward to sharing highlights of these noteworthy acquisitions with the entire community as part of our 100th anniversary festivities.” Decades in the Making: Highlights from the Toledo Federation of Art Societies is on view in Gallery 6 from April 28 through June 24, 2018. Admission to the exhibition is free. For more information about the Toledo Federation of Art Societies, please visit tfas100.org # # # The Toledo Museum of Art is a nonprofit arts institution funded through individual donations, foundation grants, corporate sponsorships and investments. The Ohio Arts Council helps fund programs at the Toledo Museum of Art through a sustainability grant program that encourages economic growth, educational excellence and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. Glass Pavilion® and Toledo Museum of Art Glass Pavilion® are registered service marks. Admission to the Museum is free. The Museum is open Tuesday and Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Noon to 5 p.m.; and is closed Monday…


County courthouse murals need a facelift

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Murals depicting the history of Wood County, and now part of that history, need some work. The murals on the third floor of the Wood County Courthouse depict, on the east wall, Fort Meigs in 1813 and facing it on the west wall, one depicting an oil field in 1904. The murals were painted in 1910 and 1911 by I.M. Taylor, an artist and at the time mayor of Bowling Green. Nick Foos, facilities director for the county, said that in the past 18 months as work was being done restoring plaster in the second and third floors of the courthouse, workers noticed some paint flaking on the murals. That information was shared with county officials, including County Administrator Andrew Kalmar. “We collectively decided we should do something about it before it gets worse,” Foos said. So the county contracted with ICA Art Conservation, a non-profit center in Cleveland for advice. On Tuesday, Andrea Chevalier, a senior painting conservator, visited the courthouse, and using step ladders was able to get a closer look at the situation. What she saw was not pretty, but reparable. There are large areas of areas where the paint is peeling, yet still precariously hanging onto the surface. There are also a few areas where the paint is gone altogether. Foos said the mural depicting Fort Meigs is in worse shape than the one depicting Wood County oil fields. The surfaces of the paintings are actually quite clean, without a film of dirt, nor heavy varnish. Foos said there were traces of nicotine from the time when smoking was allowed in the building. Chevalier said that to fix the murals an adhesive will have to be applied under the surface using a hypodermic needle or brush. Then a special packing press will be used to flatten the flaking paint back onto the surface. The areas where the paint is gone will be filled in and repainted to match the original. Chevalier could not give an estimate on what that will cost. She’s working on a report based on her observations on the site. She expects to have a report to Kalmar by the end of next week. Still “it’s not inexpensive.” Just getting the scaffolding up from the second landing will be costly. Chevalier was only able to touch about the bottom three feet of the murals, which she estimates are 24-by-24-feet. While not by a famous artist, they are competently painted. she said, and definitely worth preserving. “They’re part of the cultural heritage of the city and the county.” Public buildings from the late 19th and early 20th century were “very decorated,” Chevalier said. People then valued the decorative arts – stone work, sculpting, metalsmithing, glasswork, and murals. People wanted their public buildings to showcase that skill. “They were…


Art Walk in downtown BG is a sure sign of spring

From DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN Art Walk is here! It’s a sure sign of spring when the artist come out after the long winter to wake us from the gray and whites of that season to the vast array of colors that will be the focus of the weekend. April 28th, Downtown Bowling Green in cooperation with the BG Arts Council will present the 26th Annual Art Walk. This year, there will be 31 “walking galleries” featured at the businesses that offered space to the local artists. So much wonderful art to take in, but this is not all there is to the Art Walk experience. There is also a Quilt Show and Exhibit, performing artists and a culinary art component. Each of the gallery artists’ work will be judged for a 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prize as well as 3 People’s Choice Awards. Brochures with a listing of each artist and gallery location will be available at participating merchants and the Four Corners Center on the day of the Art Walk. All the galleries and the performing arts are free and open to the public. Art Walk is really a community event as it features 25 local artists, 20 plus quilters, a multitude of performing artists, 14 casual artists and charities in Project Chair-Art-Y, BG local schools as well as BGSU art departments. One of the galleries, located at 157 N. Main St., features BG Elementary school students’ art and a hands-on activities for visitors to partake in. BG High School students will display metal work at Waddington Jewelers and other artwork at Grounds for Thought. The Quilt Exhibit and Demonstrations, located at the Four Corners Center, is another major highlight of the Art Walk. Over 20 quilters will display their work and several will be demonstrating techniques. This exhibit is sponsored by the Busy Thimble and the Black Swamp Quilters and organized by Connie Miller. This year marks the 5th year for this exhibit. A beautiful quilt that will be raffled has been donated by the Black Swamp Quilters. The proceeds of this raffle will benefit the Downtown Foundation Flower Fund. The featured quilt is 70” x120” done in a log cabin pattern and machine stitched with a feather pattern. The donated quilt is currently on display at the Busy Thimble so people to get a peek of this fantastic piece before the Art Walk. On the day of the Art Walk, the quilt will be on display at the Four Corners Center. You can buy raffle tickets now at the Busy Thimble or the day of the Art Walk. Winner will be announced at the After Party. The Art Walk is one of the ways the Downtown Foundation raises funds toward the Flower Fund. Each summer about 1,000 plants are purchased to fill the 43 commercial pots…


Facts are what ignites author & illustrator Don Tate’s imagination

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Perry Field House at Bowling Green State University Saturday hosted scores of future Don Tates. Tate, a prolific illustrator of children’s books who has turned his talents to writing as well, was the guest author for Literacy in the Park. The Austin, Texas-based author and illustrator started out just like all the kids who raised their hands when he asked: Who likes to draw? He’s been drawing since before he could remember, and showed a picture he made when he was 3 of his mother, and baby sister, and some poop falling out of the infant’s diaper. Even then, he liked to include realistic details. When he was a kid growing up in Des Moines, Iowa, Tate said he particularly liked non-fiction, including the “Family Medical Guide,” which had pictures of bloody ulcers and pus-filled toe sores. And when he turned to writing his own books, as well as illustrating them, he turned to non-fiction, writing about strongman Eugen Sandow and early African-American poet George Moses Horton. Those themes were among those reflected in the dozens of activities available to children throughout the field house. Nothing, though, about pus or bloody sores. Still the activities showed how literacy is intertwined with construction, natural science, art, drama, and nutrition. Tate encouraged his young listeners to follow what they loved whether it was dancing, theater, or soccer. Tate said as a child he wasn’t as good at basketball as his father would have liked. He instead wanted to make puppets. He realized he could make a simple puppet with patterns and cloth. He wasn’t satisfied. Using an old wig his mother gave him, he made a more elaborate puppet modeled on the Muppets made by his idol Jim Henson. His mother loved it, but Tate’s father wasn’t impressed. “Your son is making dolls,” he told Tate’s mother. Young Tate persisted drawing, painting, doing macramé. His work progressed along the way and led to a career in illustration. He’s illustrated more than 50 books, including work by such notable writers as Jack Prelutsky and Louis Sachar. When he decided to write a book, he did about 30 drafts of “It Jes’ Happened: When Bill Traylor Started to Draw.” It’s a true story of a man, born into slavery, who became a renowned folk artist. Then he showed it to a published author, who loved it, and told him it needed to be rewritten. That happened twice more. But every time he rewrote it, the book got better, Tate said. A published book doesn’t just happen. When it was published, it was a success and won awards. His book on the strongman Sandow, considered the father of modern body building, was also based on fact as well as the author’s personal experience. As an adult, Tate decided to…


Rock show at Alehouse to benefit The Cocoon

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Debbie De Steno never met Cat Lambert face to face. They were Facebook friends who shared an interest in the local music scene. Then Cat was off social media, and Steno learned just a few days after they’d last been in contact that Lambert had been beaten to death by her husband. De Steno and others on the music scene wanted to do something. So De Steno pulled a benefit together at the Alehouse in the Woodland Mall. Music Against Domestic Violence was born with the proceeds going to help Lambert’s family. De Steno decided to make the benefit an annual affair.  So this Saturday (April 21) the fourth benefit will be held at the Alehouse from noon to midnight. The proceeds now benefit The Cocoon Shelter. The benefit is also to raise awareness about domestic violence, an issue people hesitate to talk about. For De Steno seeing the movie “The Burning Bed” was her first exposure to the physical and emotional realities of domestic abuse. The benefit will include a raffle and 50/50 drawing   with kids karaoke from noon to 2 p.m. The kids will turn the mic over to a lineup of local bands. Starting with Bliss at 2, each band will play about a 90-minute set. Other bands in order of appearance will be: Blue Ticks; 16-year-old guitar phenom Brad Tober and the Outsiders; BG high rockers Mindless Matters; Midnight Moses; and closers, AmpWagon. The first year De Steno played with the band Second Wynd, but she finds it too much to run the show and also be part of it. Still her love of music is at the heart of the event. As a kid growing up in New Jersey she picked up the guitar her older sister abandoned. She dreamed of being the next Pat Benatar. She’s been playing music ever since. Just picking up her guitar and picking a few notes helps her recharge. Music takes you away from everyday troubles, she said. “It gives you hope.” And that’s why it so fitting as a way to raise money so “The Cocoon can get resources to help people.”  


BGSU Arts Events through April 29

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS At  the galleries  — The School of Art will host its second MFA Thesis Exhibition April 21-29 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries in the Fine Arts Center. The opening reception is at 7 p.m. Friday, April 20. Exhibitors include Fernanda Ruocco, Jacob Nolt and Ericsson De La Paz Lugo. Gallery hours are 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursday and 1-4 p.m. Sunday. All exhibitions are free and open to the public. The galleries are wheelchair accessible with the exception of the upper level of the Wankelman Gallery. For more information, visit bgsu.edu/art. April 19 — The International Film Series presents “Dear Pyongyang” (2005, Japan/South Korea, 107 minutes, directed by Yang Hong-Hi), with an introduction by Dr. Ryoko Okamura from the Department of World Languages and Cultures. Filmed in both Osaka, Japan, and Pyongyang, North Korea, in 2004, this deeply moving and intimate documentary features Zainichi (North) Korean immigrants living in Japan and their complex allegiances to family, host country, and their “fatherland.” A daughter interviews her parents as they return to Pyongyang to celebrate her father’s 70th birthday with her brothers. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater, located in Hanna Hall. Free April 19-22 — The BGSU Theatre Department presents “The Threepenny Opera,” Bertolt Brecht’s “play with music.” Brecht turned John Gay’s 18th century “The Beggar’s Opera” into a biting commentary on the bourgeoisie and modern morality. Set in Victorian London, this tale of the outlaw Mack the Knife offers a socialist critique of a capitalist world. Advance tickets are $5 for BGSU students and $15 for other adults; all tickets the day of the concert are $20. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 5 p.m. weekdays at 419-372-8171. The show opens at 8 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances are scheduled for 8 p.m. on April 20 and 21, and 2 p.m. on April 21 and 22. See review. April 20 — The International Film Series presents “La Pirogue (The Dugout)” (2012, Senegal, 87 minutes, directed by Moussa Touré), with an introduction by Dr. Beatrice Guenther, International Studies program director. In this film, a group of African men leave Senegal in a pirogue captained by a local fisherman to undertake the treacherous crossing of the Atlantic to Spain where they believe better lives and prospects are waiting for them. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theatre, located in Hanna Hall. Free April 20 — The Concert Band and University Band will give a performance. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $10 for other adults; tickets the day of the concert are, respectively, $10 and $13. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 5 p.m. weekdays at…


Bawdy “Threepenny Opera” takes the low & highly entertaining road

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Shakespeare for Dummies teaches that certain comic and bawdy bits in the Bard’s plays were written to appeal to the groundlings crowded at edge of the stage. “The Threepenny Opera,” though bearing an elite pedigree as the brainchild of theatrical provocateur Bertolt Brecht and composer Kurt Weill, is written through and through for the groundlings. This is bawdy, often crude by design, in-your-face entertainment meant to please those in the cheap seats. All of Bowling Green State University’s Donnell Theatre becomes the cheap sections when the Department of Theatre and Film presents “Threepenny Opera” opening tonight (April 19) and continuing through Sunday, April 22.  Shows are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 8p.m., with matinees Saturday & Sunday at 2 p.m. Visit for details  bgsu.edu/arts. Jonathan Chambers, directing Michael Feingold’s translation of Elisabeth Hauptmann’s script, doesn’t stint on the raw humor of the piece. Yes, “Threepenny” has complex political and aesthetic underpinnings, but the flashing of women’s underwear and even one actor’s bare butt take precedence. “Threepenny Opera” was conceived a satirical criticism of capitalism and the middle class. The milieu of the show is the underworld, but it’s all the underworld in the opera’s view.  After the ensemble led by Jenny Driver (Erica Harmon) introduces us to the opera’s antihero, Macheath (Kris Krotzer)  with the tune, “Mack the Knife,”, we meet  J.J. Peachum (Noah Froelich) who runs the beggars’  racket around London. If you want to beg you have to pay him a fee and share your earnings. One down-on-his-luck sucker finds this out when he is beaten by Peachum’s operatives. Peachum tells him he should be glad he could still walk. In “Peachum’s Morning Hymn,” Peachum laments that begging requires constant innovation. Human pity has a short shelve life. Even the four or five useful verses from the New Testament lose their appeal. He and his wife the grasping, conniving Mrs. Peachum (Kelly Dunn) have other concerns – their daughter Polly (Anna Parchem) has been cavorting with the thug Macheath, a Victorian Tony Soprano. To them their daughter is yet another commodity. But as Polly explains in “Barbara’s Song” she’s likely to go only so far with a respectable suitor, but will drop her panties for a poor, disreputable man. Her father, though, is intent on having Macheath arrested. The problem is the chief of police Tiger Brown (Jabri Johnson) is an old Army buddy of Macheath’s. They celebrate in “Soldier’s Song,” a caustic look at the military. Here as elsewhere the production plays up a homoerotic undertone. Johnson’s Brown watches out for Macheath, not just out of Army buddy loyalty. As much as Macheath pledges to be faithful to Polly, he’s a wandering dog and that leads to his downfall. He leaves a trail of jealousy in his wake especially between Jenny…


Black Swamp Players bask in the glow of ‘On Golden Pond’

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Please note: It is summer on Golden Pond. The loons are calling, and the black flies hatching. Norman and Ethel Thayer have returned for their 48th year to summer on this idyllic lake in rural Maine. Ethel is elated to be there. To spend another summer wiling way the time picking berries, lolling by the lake, and playing board games in the evening. Unfortunately Norman’s mood is far from sunny. It better matches the kind of weather we’ve been experiencing hereabouts lately. His idea for conversation is pondering self-cremation in the fireplace, albeit immolation with style as he does a back flip into the flames. The Black Swamp Players, who at 50 have been a going concern two years longer than the Thayers’ marriage, are staging Ernest Thompson’s “On Golden Pond,” to conclude their own golden anniversary season. The show opens Friday, April 20, and runs weekends through Sunday, April 29 at the First United Methodist Church, 1526 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green. Click for further details. http://www.blackswampplayers.org/ While Norman (Bob Welly) contemplates his demise, Ethel (Fran Martone) is in denial. She insists they are still middle-age, maybe “the far-edge of middle age.” This is the summer Norman turns 80. Ethel is 10 years younger. Welly and Martone make for a fine couple. They exude a bond even when they are bickering. Their relationship still has flickers of the young, romantic spark that refuses to be extinguished. Norman’s concerns are not imaginary. He suffers from memory loss and heart palpitations, the typical theatrical maladies of old age. These are played for laughs, and as someone just on the near edge of aging, there’s plenty of laughter from self-recognition. When he goes out, really sent out by a frustrated Ethel, to pick strawberries, he becomes confused. He returns, his bluster gone. He just wants to be back with Ethel, and the safety of her presence. Ethel would like the presence of their daughter Chelsea (Stephanie King Truman), who hasn’t been back to the pond for eight years. If not for her mother, she’d be estranged from her father. She was never the son he wanted, nor the daughter really. She never had children. Norman asks Ethel if she ever had that talk with her. Or maybe he should have had that talk with her ex-husband. Though when pressed, he can’t imagine much they’d do with a grandchild. This is the summer that Chelsea returns with her latest boyfriend, Bill Ray (Thomas Edge), a dentist. They arrive on their way to Europe with Bill’s son Billy Jr. (Gavin Miller) in tow. Edge has one big scene where he faces off with Norman, who is disinclined to engage in any kind of conversation. Having failed to establish rapport, Bill must awkwardly broach the subject of sleeping arrangements for him…