Arts and Entertainment

SPLICE Ensemble brings heart & soul to electroacoustic music

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even music that relies on circuitry needs the human touch.  “It’s really that live concert that can make music live and breathe and survive the test of time,” said Keith Kirchoff, of the SPLICE Ensemble. “It’s the performer that’s going to take this music into the next generation.  We still need to go to concerts, and it’s this concert experience that’s driven by a compelling performer … that makes it an immediately relatable art form.” The SPLICE Ensemble will headline the SPLICE Festival  this week at Bowling Green State University. The festival convenes Thursday, Nov. 8 on the Bowling Green State University, and continues through Saturday, Nov. 10. SPLICE will perform a free concert on the last night at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall. The festival is devoted to electroacoustic music. Kirchoff defines electroacoustic music as classical music using electronics that’s “designed for the concert stage, for concentrated listening, intentional listening as opposed to being in the background or for dancing.” The festival, Kirchoff said, is a mix of performances and workshops. “We wanted to create a ground where  the education is an intrinsic part of the festival.” The festival is one branch of the umbrella SPLICE organization. It started as a one-week summer institute, branched out into the festival, and soon will have an academy program. The ensemble grew out of the institute, Kirchoff said. SPLICE was launched about five years ago by composer Christopher Biggs and Kirchoff, a pianist. “I felt there weren’t very many, if any, opportunities for performers to become comfortable integrating electronics into their performances,” Kirchoff said. The ensemble is an outgrowth of the festival. Kirchoff and Biggs  “wanted to have a performance faculty that was really good at their instruments and really good at electronics.” That, Kirchoff said, turned out to be himself, Kirchoff and fellow institute faculty, Adam Vidiksis, percussion, and  Sam Wells, trumpet.  “We really enjoyed working together,” the pianist said. They realized that they had a distinctive sound. Only one composition existed for their particular instrumentation.They set about soliciting composers to write for them. That process was facilitated by the institute and the festival. The SPLICE Festival is in its second year. Last year it was presented at Western Michigan University where Biggs teaches. Bringing it to BGSU was a natural. Elainie Lillios, of the BGSU composition faculty, teaches at the SPLICE Institute. She’s been “the…


Library offers chance to meet children’s book author Jane Yolen

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY Bestselling and award-winning children’s book author, Jane Yolen will talk about her work at the Wood County District Public Library on Thursday, November 8 at 7 p.m. Jane Yolen is the best-selling author of over 365 children’s, middle grade and young adult novels, picture books, story collections, and poetry anthologies. Her works include award-winner The Devil’s Arithmetic, the bestselling picture book series How Do Dinosaurs Say Good Night, Caldecott Honor winner Owl Moon, and hundreds more. For a complete list of her titles, as well as a Jane Yolen calendar that recommends one title a day for a full year, please visit her website, janeyolen.com. Jane Yolen’s visit is supported through a gift from the estate of Majorie Conrad, along with BGSU’s Literacy in the Park and University Libraries. During her visit to Wood County District Public Library, Ms. Yolen will speak, answer questions, and be available to autograph books. Six of Ms. Yolen’s titles will be available for purchase that evening through the Friends of the Library. Available for purchase will be Owl Moon, The Devil’s Arithmetic, How Do Dinosaurs Count to Ten, How Do Dinosaurs Play With Their Friends, What to do with a Box, and Fly with Me, published in October 2018 The audience is encouraged to bring any personal copies of Ms. Yolen’s books for signing as well. For more information, contact the Children’s Place at 419-352-8253.


BGSU Arts Events through Nov. 28

At the galleries – “The Shodo Way of Writing: Calligraphy Scrolls from the BGSU Asian Studies Collection” exhibition continues through Nov. 18 in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Presented by the BGSU Galleries, the exhibition includes 30 calligraphy scrolls by contemporary Japanese masters of these traditional arts.  Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Nov. 7 – Award-winning documentary filmmaker Dr. Matthew Donahue, a lecturer in popular culture, will present and screen “The Amsterdam T-Shirt Project,” highlighting the artists, vendors and creators of souvenir T-shirts in Amsterdam, Netherlands, the souvenir T-shirt capital of the world. The presentation and screening will begin at 1 p.m. in the Pallister Conference Room, Jerome Library. Nov. 7 – The Faculty Artist Series presents Caroline Chin on violin. She is an assistant professor and has been described by the Chicago Sun Times as “riveting and insightful, who lights up in passages of violin pyrotechnics.” She has performed throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 8 – The Prout Reading Series presents readings by MFA students Erin Carlyle and Katy Cesarotti. Carlyle, a poet, and Cesarotti, a fiction writer, are MFA students in the creative writing program. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Nov. 8 – The BGSU Early Music Ensemble and Graduate String Quartet will present a recital at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 8 – The College of Musical Arts hosts the SPLICE Festival 2018, featuring music written for instruments and electronics. The first concert is at 8 p.m. in the Cla-zel Theatre, 127 N. Main St., Bowling Green. The festival runs through Nov. 10. For a complete listing of events, visit https://splicemusic.org/festival/ii/program/. Nov. 9 – The SPLICE Festival 2018 continues with a concert at 10:30 a.m. and a talk at 1:30 p.m., both in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center; a workshop at 3:30 p.m. in 0108 Moore Center, and a concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall. Free Nov. 10 – The SPLICE Festival will present its final day of events in Moore Musical Arts Center starting with a concert at 10:30 a.m. and a talk at 1:30 p.m., both in Bryan Recital…


Visiting master demonstrates how art & words come together in Japanese calligraphy

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Kyoko Fujii started studying calligraphy when she was 6 growing up in Hiroshima, Japan. It was a popular after school activity, she said. Most students after a few years move onto other hobbies. Fujii however continued to study. For her doing calligraphy was like eating or breathing. She took weekly lessons for many years with a master calligrapher. Despite her abiding interest, she didn’t reflect on her art much. It was only when she was 24 and her employer, a securities and banking firm, sent her abroad to the southern United States that she realized that what she did was something special, something beautiful, a way to reach out and connect with people. Now a master instructor herself, Fujii visited Bowling Green State University on Saturday to teach the art as part of the opening of an exhibit of calligraphy scrolls given to the Asian Studies Program by the Japanese counsel general in Detroit. “Shodo Way of Writing: Calligraphy Scrolls from the BGSU Asian Studies Collection” will be on display in the Willard Wankelman Gallery in the Fine Arts Center through Nov. 18.  Fujii, who now lives in Novi, Michigan, said it was an honor to demonstrate her art amidst so many fine examples of both traditional and contemporary calligraphy. She has mastered both kohitsu (pen writing) and mohitsu (brush writing) techniques,and demonstrated both. She started by writing out the lyrics of a popular children’s song about maple trees in fall. She had painted yellow and red maple leaves in the margins of her paper beforehand. Then as the song played on her iPod, the Japanese characters appeared. More than a simple letter, each character is a combination of images that together create the meaning of the word. And the character is executed with a flourish that’s a visual representation of the meaning. Fujii said her American husband always wants to know what the words and meanings are of her paintings, she said. This came through in the second part of Fujii’s presentation. Taking individual words, she painted them, and explained how they are constructed. The word “work” included symbols for human, heart, and power. When writing the word for wind or breeze, the way the character is drawn shows the kind of wind it is. She concluded her demonstration by switching to a gold pen to write out a Buddhist prayer. The entire…


Black Swamp Players presenting musical ‘Clue’

From BLACK SWAMP PLAYERS The Black Swamp Players will open its fifty-first season with Clue: The Musical, which takes the stage beginning this Friday, November 9, at 7:30 p.m.  Based on the 1949 board game of the same name, Clue: The Musical concerns the murder of Mr. Boddy (Heath A. Diehl), who also serves as the host of the evening’s performance. The first act of the musical introduces the colorful characters made famous by Parker Brothers and their motives for possibly murdering Mr. Boddy. There also is an interactive component in which audience members randomly select cards that will determine which suspect committed the murder, which weapon was used, and where the murder took place. The show has 216 possible endings. The second act introduces a new character, the Detective (Mac Ramsey), who along with the cast and audience, work to solve the murder of Mr. Boddy. In addition to Diehl and Ramsey, the cast also includes: Andrew Varney (Colonel Mustard); Garrett Hummell (Mr. Green); Karla Richardson (Mrs. Peacock); Matt Crawford (Professor Plum); Annelise Mason (Miss Scarlet); and Monica Hiris (Mrs. White). The production is directed by Melissa Shaffer and Anna Chowattanakul is the music director and accompanist. Clue: The Musical briefly ran Off-Broadway in 1997 and has since been a popular choice for community theater groups throughout the country. A contributor to Broadway World dubbed it “an entertaining, humorous, and interactive musical that is not to be missed.” Clue: The Musical will open on Friday, November 9 at 7:30 p.m. Additional performance dates include: Saturday, November 10 at 7:30 p.m. ; Friday, November 16 at 7:30 p.m. ; Saturday, November 17 at 7:30 p.m. ; Sunday, November 11 and 18 at 2 p.m. Both Saturday evening performances will be preceded by a dinner, beginning at 6 p.m. , that will benefit the First United Methodist Church. All performances will be held at the First United Methodist Church on East Wooster Street in Bowling Green. Tickets for the Friday and Sunday performances are $15/adults, $12/seniors and students. Tickets for the Saturday “Dinner and a Show” performances are $25/person and must be purchased one week or more prior to the show. All tickets can be purchased on the organization’s website. The Dinner and a Show performances, which are co-hosted by the First United Methodist Church, will feature either meatloaf or a vegetarian quiche and will also include potatoes, vegetables, applesauce, bread, and various…


Black Swamp Players get investor grant from Chamber

From BOWLING GREEN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE The Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce has selected the Black Swamp Players, Inc.  as the recipient of its Third Quarter Investor Grant of $1000.   The application for the grant was submitted by Deb Shaffer, Vice President.  The funds they receive will be used to purchase equipment to help them continue to present excellent productions.  The organization was in need of new wireless microphones, which are used in the musicals so the singers can be heard over the band.  Some of their current equipment is 15-20 years old.  The need is immediate for them for their very next production. The Black Swamp Players are starting their 51st season this fall with “Clue: The Musical.” They look forward to being able to use the new equipment for many years to come. The Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce offers this $1000 Investor Grant every quarter and the application process is very simple.  Investors can download an application from our website at bgchamber.net.   For additional information about the grant or membership, you can contact us at 419-353-7945. The mission of the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce shall be to support an environment for the development and success of business within the Bowling Green area.


No mistake about it, BGHS Drama Club’s ‘Comedy of Errors’ is hilarious

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In presenting Shakespeare’s  “The Comedy of Errors”  the Bowling Green High School Drama Club has condensed it to its silliest. The plot involves the unlikely meeting of two sets of identical twins leading to humor from slapstick to clever wordplay. Think Groucho Marx joins the Three Stooges. Directed by Jo Beth Gonzalez, the play has been edited into version that runs about an hour with the tastiest bits left in.  “The Comedy of Errors” opens tonight (Nov. 1) at 7 p.m. in the BG Performing Arts Center, continuing at the same time and place Friday and Saturday. Tickets are $7 and $5 for adults. The play, set in the 1960s, opens with the trial of Egeus (Hailey Kozey), a merchant for Syracuse, captured in Ephesus, which is off-limits to traders from his city. In pleading his case to the duke (Lauren Clifford), he tells his sad tale of family separation. In a shipwreck many years before he and his twin son Antipholus and the infant purchased as the son’s servant, Dromio,, also a twin, were parted from his wife and the other twins, who have the same names. Don’t ask. It’s Shakespeare.   Now the Syracuse Antipholus (Terra Sloane) with the Syracuse Dromio (Charlotte Perez) have gone off to find their lost siblings, and the father has gone off seeking them, and they’ve unbeknownst to each other all landed in Ephesus. And Ephesus just happens to be where the lost siblings they are seeking live. That’s just the start. Now with the Syracuse twins set loose on the street of Ephesus — which seems about the size of Bowling Green given the way people just happen to run into each other — all manner of high jinks ensue. Now this involves a high degree of suspension of disbelief for the audience who are seated close up and personal on the stage. Antipholus of Ephesus (Maddy Depinet) and Dromio of Ephesus (Hudson Pendleton) bear no resemblance to their Syracuse counterparts. Yet no one, master nor friend, nor even wife, can tell them apart. Must be because they’re dressed alike.  So when Syracuse Antipholus sends his servant off to squirrel away some money, and he meets the Ephesus Dromio he’s angry that the servant has not a clue of what he’s talking about. And he beats him about the head.  All this is reported back to…


‘Most Happy Fella’ at BGSU is a most wonderful show

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Frank Loesser’s “The Most Happy Fella” is a tricky devil of a musical. Or is it an opera? Loesser said it was a musical, and yet it is filled with soaring operatic moments to go along with the toe-tapping numbers.  The Bowling Green Opera Theatre has the talent to do justice to both genres. That will be on display this weekend when “The Most Happy Fella” is performed Friday, Nov. 2 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 4 at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center at Bowling Green State University. For tickets click here. .Directed by Geoffrey Stephenson, the musical compresses the original three acts into two with the elimination of dance numbers. That puts the focus even more on the singing, and the cast comes through, which is no surprise to anyone who follows the sounds emanating from the College of Musical Arts. Leading the cast are Caroline Kouma as Rosabella and Nick Kottman as Tony.  They are an unlikely pair of lovers. The elderly vineyard owner sees her waiting table in a restaurant in San Francisco and falls in love. He leaves a note and keepsake indicating he’d like to develop a relationship. They correspond, and when she asks for a photo he’s afraid she’ll reject him because of his age, instead he sends a photo of the handsome itinerant foreman Joe (Luke Serrano). And when Rosabella — the name given her by Tony — finally  arrives at the Napa Valley vineyard, she finds the wedding feast all spread out and Joe waiting for her. Only then do Joe and Rosabella discover the deception. But not before a couple of the exuberant production numbers that make the show so enjoyable. This leads up the revelation that takes both Joe and Rosabella by surprised. She’s about to leave, despite Joe’s protestations that Tony may be a “grampa,” he’s a nice guy as shown by all his friends gathered to greet his bride. Then Tony arrives, on a stretcher, after his truck overturned. Knowing she has few options in life, Rosabella goes through what may be a deathbed wedding anyway, only to follow it up with an intimate indiscretion with Joe. Rosabella is at a loss and Joe only wants to help, yet they are carried away on waves of emotional confusion. Now in most musicals the old guy,…


Historical museum revisits panic-inducing ‘War of the Worlds’ broadcast

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Eighty years ago the world was on the brink of global war, and the American people were spooked by a fictional invasion. Tuesday, Oct. 30, marks the 80th anniversary of the first broadcast of “The War of the Worlds,” Orson Welles’ radio adaptation of the H. G. Wells’ novel. The Wood County Historical Center will celebrate the anniversary by presenting a recreation of the broadcast at 8 p.m. that night. Tickets are $10. The cast and crew of the show doesn’t expect to induce panic the way the original reportedly did. How many people back in 1938 actually took the broadcast to be actual news is subject of debate. Jane Milbrodt, who provides the music, isn’t surprised if some people did. “It sounds like it’s really happening.” Kent and Janet McClary at the request of Historical Center Director Kelli Kling assembled a cast of local thespians. This is the fourth time the couple has been involved in a recreation of the broadcast. “It’s nostalgic,” Janet McClary said. “It’s a piece of history. People like to see it performed.” She will join Jim Barnes, who also participated in those earlier productions, in providing the sound effects. And they have enlisted a real radio personality Clint Corpe, of the WBGU-FM’s “Morning Show,” for a central role. Others involved include Tom Milbrodt doing sound and actors Lane Hakel, Jeremy Kohler, and Jim Toth. The show will be taped for possible future broadcast. Together they will bring to life the story of Martians landing in Grover’s Mill, New Jersey, and then running roughshod toward New York. Welles staged the story as a series of news bulletins interrupting an evening of musical entertainment. The urgency of those bulletins gave the script a vivid sense of reality. “It’s really a super adaptation,” Tom Milbrodt said. The next day newspapers reported of cases of people in panic because they thought the invasion was real. Some, Janet McClary said, may have tuned in late, missing Welles’ introduction. Some even thought it was Germans, not Martians attacking. While the Martians never conquered the earth, the broadcast and its effects certainly captured the imaginations of many. Kling said the show is a perfect fit for the season and with the Leisure Time theme at the museum this past year. Radio has been a big part of it. It shows that entertainment can go awry,…


Horizon Youth Theatre’s younger actors take flight with ‘Silly Goose’

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Seldom is a goose chase this much fun. But it sure is when the younger members of the Horizon Youth Theatre take a romp through fairy tale land in “Silly Goose” this weekend  at the Otsego High School. (Check out details.) Keith Guion, who directs the production, wrote the script. The show takes a goose, Silvia, through three tales involving geese, starting when she’s just an egg and following her into adulthood, at least in terms of goose years. The script has some playful recognition that this is a play, starting with a game of goosey goosey gander as the curtain rises. At times the three actors playing Silvia at different stages in her life playfully  interact. And the middle Silvia (Hannah Campbell) in true teenage mode complains about the many idioms involving her species. What does a goose egg, as in a lump on a human head have to do with geese? And why are goosebumps called “goose” bumps? The story takes flight before Silvia has hatched.  Sarah Keller as the gosling relates how her mother (Lauren Clifford) was constantly having her eggs stolen and eaten by a mischievous fox (Aidan Thomas). The troubled mother is befriended by Channer (Drew Thomas), a mysterious fellow who can talk to animals. He builds her a house, and that’s where Silvia is hatched. The mother uses her wits help keep herself and her young ones safe from the clutches of the fox.  Channer serves as a link among all the stories. He enlists the teen Silvia in helping a young shy maid (Alice Walters) with a secret. And with Silvia’s help the maid achieves her rightful place. The final tale has the grown Silvia (Reece Hall), who in her travels with Channer has turned into a golden goose, help that maid’s mourning daughter (Addie Smith) laugh again. It’s a roundabout adventure in which the put-upon youngest brother of a family, Jack (Liam Rogel) comes in possession of the golden goose. That leads to a hilarious predicament. A string of people – just about the entire 30-plus cast members — gets stuck together in a long line. As we follow the tale of “Silly Goose” a few lessons are taught about perseverance, bullying, and the value of kindness and generosity sometimes with a contemporary twist. When Jack is offered the princess’ hand in marriage, the hero’s usual prize,…


BGSU professor helps young people find their voice to protest gun violence

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Young people singing their original songs about the impact of gun violence and the desperate need for a change took the stage at the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival in San Francisco recently. Their songs and others’ are part of a new album called “Raise Your Voice: The Sound of Student Protest.” The 11 tracks came from students across the United States, performing as soloists or in groups, from hip-hop to rock to spoken word to voice and piano. They are united in their insistence that gun violence has to stop. The impetus for the album came from Dr. Katherine Meizel, an associate professor of musicology in the Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts. With the help of the Little Village Foundation, she found a way to preserve those voices and share the students’ message. “The project has two goals: to encourage young people to vote and to raise money for gun safety,” Meizel said. Proceeds from the album will be donated to the nonprofit Everytown for Gun Safety organization, which works to end gun violence, create safer communities and assist victims of gun violence. “Raise Your Voice: The Sound of Student Protest” is available at Grounds For Thought, for a discounted price of $16.50. For each album sold, $15 will go to Everytown for Gun Safety (https://everytown.org). The album is available for download and streaming on Amazon, iTunes, Spotify and Google Play. “It’s important for young people to feel they can make a difference, and these students are demonstrating that in a really powerful, beautiful way,” Meizel said. “One of the reasons I’m so impressed with this movement is that they don’t imagine they can’t make a difference; it’s absolutely clear to them they can make a difference, and they are doing it. They don’t sit back and say, ‘My voice doesn’t count.’ They are making it count. “The students have different ideas about what reform should look like, but they all want to be safe in school and they all want to help heal people who have been harmed. They want to tell their representatives to care more about young people than about the gun lobby. Some want to tell policymakers they will soon be able to vote and will be making an impact politically. The want to encourage other young people to use their voices the way they have, and vote.” Last spring, as…


Female figure at center of Martha Gaustad’s art

“Liberated Figuratively,” art by Martha Gonter Gaustad, is now on exhibit through  Nov. 9 in the  Fisher/Wall Gallery of the Marathon Center for the Performing Arts, 200 W. Main Cross St. Findlay. This show contains 15 works across the spectrum of 2D media including paintings, drawings and photography. At the heart of Gaustad’s art is the female figure, its beautiful forms, tones, and textures revealed by the light cast in both contrived and natural settings. The work evokes the viewer’s appreciation for the visual subtlety and complexity of the human form as well as a psychological response to the posture, expression and narrative composition of each piece. Since 2013, Martha has received varied recognitions and awards for her participation in international, national and regional juried gallery and museum shows. In addition to exhibition catalogs, her work has been published in surveys of contemporary painting. A native of Buffalo NY, “Marti” has lived and worked in the Toledo area for over 30 years. After retiring as a professor and administrator from Bowling Green State University, she returned there as an art student for five years; also traveling to study art conservation and painting techniques in Florence, Italy. She currently maintains a studio in downtown Toledo.


Toledo Museum of Art is in a family way

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Van Campen Family is having a reunion at the Toledo Museum of Art. Other 17th Century Dutch families have joined as well as families, biological and social, from across time and the globe. That includes the museum’s neighbors. Even I’m invited. The international exhibit “Frans Hals Portraits: A Family Reunion” is now at the Toledo Museum of Art.  The centerpiece is a reunification of three parts of the “Van Campen Family Portrait in a Landscape,” a painting from around 1623-25. Over the years this family portrait of the Van Campens and their 14 children has been cut apart. Two parts, the larger portrait and a smaller fragment “Children of the Van Campen Family with a Goat-Cart” first appeared on an auction list in 1810 as separate works. In 2011 the Toledo Museum acquired the main section, knowing there was another part to the painting owned by the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels.   It has since been discovered that there was indeed a third part, and when set side by side there is likely at least one more fragment.  Lawrence Nichols, the senior curator at the Toledo Museum who oversaw the exhibit, holds out faint hope that remainder may be discovered. He speculates that the painting probably was damaged, maybe in a fire, and that was the reason it was disassembled. Other theories are posited, including it no longer fit in a smaller house. None will likely ever be proven. The exhibit also brings together the four other family portraits by Hals, who was known mostly as a portrait painter of individuals.  That and other related works form the core of the exhibit. That’s what will travel to Brussels and then Paris after the exhibit closes Jan. 6 in Toledo. The Toledo Museum, though, is using these works to reflect on the meaning of family as an ever changing concept.  So the viewer will find in the first of the exhibit’s four galleries  a Yoruba mask, “The Mother of Twins,” next to a Albrecht Durer’s 15th century print of Adam and Eve. The definition is stretched to include sub-cultures including portraits of “Ghoullies” taken by contemporary Dutch photographers. Even before arriving in that gallery, the visitor sees a mural made up of 75 photos of area families, some submitted to the museum and some taken by a museum photographer during the…


Artist Beth Genson receives Arts Commission grant

Beth Genson, a northwest Ohio resident, is the recipient of an Accelerator Grant from The Arts Commission of Toledo.  The Accelerator Grant is a competitive program offering financial support with quick turn-around for artists to advance their creative projects, thereby advancing their careers.  Genson received the grant for encaustic painting equipment to enable her to provide a traveling workshop experience.  “Encaustic painting allows the participant to get creative without fear,” said Genson.“Whether you are an artist or just want to have fun, you can’t help but be inspired as you discover the process of applying hot wax and pigment along with other materials to create abstract or representational works of art.” Genson has two upcoming workshops scheduled with two 3-4 hours sessions per day, Intro to Encaustics, a beginner-level encaustic workshop will give participants a hands-on introduction to the encaustic process and Encaustic Studio will explore techniques and best practices for using wax including brushwork, fusing, layering, mark making and mixed media. A few spots remain in the workshop this Saturday, October 27, 2018 at Schooner Farms / Inspired by Nature, 14890 Otsego Pike, (Corner of Rt. 6 & Rt. 235), Weston, Ohio for half-day or full-day workshops exploring the medium of encaustic. Genson will host the same workshop on Saturday, November 17, 2018 at Art-a-Site! Gallery & Studio, 139 W Wooster St, Bowling Green, Ohio.  Full details and registration are available on her website at www.BethGenson.comunder ‘Events’.  All equipment, tools and supplies for the workshops are included in the cost. Beth Genson is a graduate of Bowling Green State University with degrees in Fine Art and Education.  She recently completed an Advanced Teaching Encaustics course at R&F Paints in New York.  In her own practice, Genson explores the nature of light on water and specializes in transforming your favorite vacation photo into a beautiful oil painting for your home.  Contact the artist at BethGensonArt@gmail.comor 419-308-7530.


Tickets available now for HYT’s Silly Goose

Submitted by HORIZON YOUTH THEATRE Award-winning Horizon Youth Theatre is proud to present Silly Goose, written and directed by Keith Guion, October 26th and 27th at 7 p.m. and October 28 at 2 p.m. at Otsego High School. According to its author, Silly Goose is the life story of a goose named Silvia who finds herself in three separate fairy tale adventures. As one of The Young Goslings, she and her mother and siblings have to contend with a determined fox who wants to eat them all. A mysterious man named Channer builds an iron house to protect the geese from the fox, and the fox tries several ways to trick them into opening the door so he can get at them.When Silvia is a bit older, Channer takes her to join the royal flock of geese at King Delroy’s palace. There, she meets The Goose Girl, a sad and lonely maid with a terrible secret that she cannot divulge to a human soul. So she tells Silvia, and Silvia,, with some guidance from Channer, helps the Goose Girl achieve her happy ending. After that adventure, Silvia and Channer form a partnership and travel from kingdom to kingdom helping other people achieve their happy endings and punishing the evil people who stand in their way. At some point, Silvia becomes The Golden Goose who is found by a young lad who travels to the castle with an assortment of people stuck to the goose and each other, thanks to Channer’s magic, and when the princess sees this odd parade, she laughs for the first time in years. So Silvia and Channer achieve a happy ending for the young lad and the princess. But what about Silvia’s own happy ending? Where will she find that? Is her life one wild goose chase after another? And what is it with all these goose idioms anyway?  The play features 33 student actors and crew members ages 6 to 14 from several area schools including Bowling Green Public (and St. Al’s, BG Christian, BG Montessori and Sleek Academy); Perrysburg, Rossford, and Otsego. The rest of the production team: Haven Bradham, stage manager; Stephanie Truman, producer; Christina Hoekstra, costumer; Wendy Guion, props; Steve Rieske, set designer; Anne Weaver, set artist; Gray Frishman, light board operator; and Calista Wilkins, crew chief.  Cast: Aidan Thomas – Fox Hannah Campbell – Silvia 2 John Simpson – Dirk Lilly Koralewski – Peasant 1…