Arts and Entertainment

Works inspired by nature win top prizes at Art Walk

By BG INDEPENDENT NEWS With the gray dreary weather for Art Walk in Bowling Green, Carole Kauber’s paintings of brilliant Southwestern landscapes certainly had an added appeal “She’s not afraid to use striking colors,” Sara Busler, one of the jurors, said. With the large paintings set up in a back space in Coyote Beads, “I felt really small around them.” “It’s like you were there,” fellow juror Lauren Canavan said Her abstract realistic work won the top juror’s prize at the 25th Art Walk. The top People’s Choice honor went to a fixture at Art Walk, Tom Roller for his nature-inspired metal sculpture. Roller has been a frequent award winner. Last year, he won both the top jury prize and the top People’s Choice honor. Roller said this will be his last appearance at Art Walk. He’s already stopped doing other art fairs. This was the only show he did this year. Not that he’ll stop sculpting at his Clark Street workshop. “I have to do something to keep busy.” Other winners were: Ann Beck, jewelry, Ginny’s Inspired Fashion, second place, Jury Award. Mary Dennis, ceramics, Grounds for Thought, third place, Jury Award. Diana Bibler, sculpture, Mode Elle Boutique, second place, People’s Choice. Victoria Thompson, body painting, Encore Bridal, third place, People’s Choice. (BG Independent News will post an expanded story later.)


BGSU offers range of summer camps in science & the arts

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Summer is the perfect time for pre-college students to experience Bowling Green State University while expanding their knowledge, building life skills and exploring their interests. Deadlines are approaching for these exciting summer camps: Forensic Science Camp June 19 – 21 The combination of a world-class, on-campus Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation crime laboratory and criminal investigation facility with the resources of an internationally recognized academic institution have produced a unique interactive learning environment for high school students age 15 to 17 years old (as of January 1, 2017) who are interested in exploring the field of forensic science. Health Career Exploration Camp June 26 – 30 High school students interested in a career in the health field can gain insight into eight pre-professional areas during this camp. Attendees will participate in a lesson on personalized medicine, extract DNA, explore dentistry and optometry and more. Robotics July 10-12 The College of Technology, Architecture and Applied Engineering hosts this three-day robotics camp for students who will design and build their very own robot, use the robot in a game called “Hatch the Falcon Egg” and explore careers in engineering and robotics. Art and Robotics July 17 – 21 These weeklong camps held at the Toledo Museum of Art will give participants a crash course in the fundamentals of 2D and 3D media. The intensive workshops provide a great introduction and foundation for teen artists who wish to work in these exciting mediums. Courses include digital photography, mixed media painting and interactive art. Summer Music Institute June 11 – 30 BGSU’s Summer Music Institute features intensive…


Theater lovers should add “Every Brilliant Thing” to their to-do list

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Kendra Beitzel is alone on stage as “Every Brilliant Thing” starts. Her character is in many ways alone in her troubled life as the daughter of a chronically depressed mother. Beitzel relates the tale in an engaging tone that’s at once self-knowing and wryly objective. But Beitzel needs help telling  her story. It is a monologue that sometimes needs other bodies to fill out the story, so she will draw random audience members to stand in for her psychologist, her boyfriend, her father, even herself. Her character as well discovers over the course of her life that she needs help to cope with what life has handed her. Broken Spectacle Productions will present “Every Brilliant Thing” Wednesday, May 3 through Friday, May 5, at 7:30 each night at Grumpy Dave’s, 104 S. Main St., Bowling Green. Tickets are $12 from http://www.brokenspectacle.com/. There’s also a one drink minimum. The audience participation is part of what attracted director Sara Chambers to the script.  “Because the audience itself becomes a character,” Chambers said, “the implication is we’re part of a human community, and that’s part of what makes life good.” The play deals with “hard-wired depression,” yet “it is so hopeful.” “The show is not saying in any way you can choose not to be depressed,” Chambers said. Still there are choices. “I can still get help,” Chambers said. “I can continue to make choices about how I view the world. Things can get better, not always brilliant, but they can get better. “I think it’s important to talk about things that are really hopeful about the…


Players’ “Dixie Swim Club” offers comic, touching look at friendship over the years

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even if you didn’t go to Pemberton College, you’ll probably know with the women from its championship swim squad. They are a familiar line up of southern female types – overachiever, perfectionist alpha woman, sex-obsessed diva, screwball redneck, and cheerful naif. These archetypes mean the writer, Jones Hope Wooten, doesn’t have to spend time establishing characters. You know, sometimes before the character enters, where they fit in this theatrical ecosystem. The fun is seeing what twists the script and the particular cast can put on them, so we see them a little fresh. The Black Swamp Players’ production of “The Dixie Swim Club” opens Friday, April 28, at 8 p.m. in the First United Methodist Church, 1526 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green. The play continues Saturday (April 28), Friday, May 5, and Saturday, May 6, all at 8 p.m. with Sunday matinees April 30 and May 7 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $12 and $10 for students and seniors at Grounds for Thought or at: https://www.blackswampplayers.org/. Directed by Aggie Alt, in her first effort for the Players, “The Dixie Swim Club” is set on a vacation house on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Members of the swim club have reunited here for more than 20 years when we first encounter them. Now 44 they are facing the various discontents and joys of middle age, and realizing those are sometimes hard to distinguish. One of the characters even shows up pregnant. That birth gives the play its circle-of-life feel. When the play ends 33 years after this first scene, one of the five team members is…


Community band invites guest conductor, soloist and bands to its birthday concert

From the BOWLING GREEN AREA COMMUNITY BAND More than two hundred adult musicians on stage, a guest conductor from the United State Marine Corps Band, “The President’s Own”, a nationally- known soloist and a mayoral proclamation will be some of the highlights on Saturday, May 6, at 7 p.m. as the Bowling Green Area Community Band celebrates in grand style for its 10th anniversary. The Defiance College Community Band, the North Coast Concert Band and the Bowling Green Area Community Concert Band will perform separately and in combination for the special event, in the Bowling Green Schools’ Performing Arts Center. The guest conductor, Captain Ryan Nowlin, USMC, will lead each band in one of his own compositions. Capt. Nowlin has significant ties to northwest Ohio, as he graduated with a Bachelor of Music Education and Masters degree from Bowling Green State University. His student teaching was completed at Defiance City Schools, where he was mentored by the late Vince Polce, Kathy Booth and Scott Rogers. The latter two are the current Defiance College Community Band directors. Capt. Nowlin is the assistant director of “The President’s Own”, United States Marine Band, one of the four premier military bands stationed in Washington, D.C. Starting in 2010, as a staff arranger, Capt. Nowlin was commissioned a first lieutenant in 2014, promoting to his current rank in 2016. He has arranged and composed a variety of music for the Marine Band, as well as many works for school bands. Among his duties with the Marine Band, Capt. Nowlin has collaborated with singers Kelly Clarkson and Jordin Sparks, who performed a Nowlin setting of “The Star…


Film production experience gives students a taste of Hollywood

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The students in Bowling Green State University’s film production class are getting ready to deliver their newest movie. The short film “Well Born” will premiere Friday, April 28, in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts on campus. The film is the culmination of a three-semester Studio Experience. Through that time students worked with Lucas Ostrowski, who taught the course, refining his concept and script, then actually filming it, and finally editing and promoting it. The production is run like a professional union operation. Each member of the class has an assigned position. “You have your specific job and that’s what you’re going to do,” Ostrowski said. Students must apply to be in the course. That involves a written statement, and then an interview with Ostrowski. Their experiences are important and, as in workplace, their attitude. “Arrive on time, have a good attitude and ask a question only once.” “Well Born” is a science fiction story set in a dystopian future where reproduction is carefully controlled. Cynthia Stroud, an adjunct instructor in the department with a doctorate from BGSU, plays a reproduction specialist who has a say in who gets to bear “the presidential seed.” And she’s one of those selected. The president is played by David Engel, a Toledo chiropractor and actor. Theater students Sarah Drummer and MacKenzie Baumhower also have roles. All are donating their services to the film. This is a society with no crime and violence, but cracks appear in its façade. While there are certain echoes of “Handmaid’s Tale,” this focuses more on the “science,” and…


Downtown BG to host Art Walk on Saturday

From MARY HINKELMAN, Managing Director, Downtown BG This is our 25th annual Art Walk and with the help of the Bowling Green Arts Council, we have paired up local artists with our downtown business so they can display and sell their works of art. It’s fun way to acquaint people with our beautiful downtown and great day to get out for families and groups of friends to get out and enjoy the arts and our shops and restaurants. The event happens April 29th, galleries are open 10 – 4 pm. No admission. We will have 32 artists this year and they have works in many mediums; fine art including drawings, paintings, sculptures and print making and decorative art in fibers, jewelry. We will also have performing artists at Grumpy Dave’s; starting at 11 am with Julies Dance Studio. We will have a total of 6 awards 1st, 2nd and 3rd place for the Juried Awards and 1st 2nd and 3rd place for our Peoples Choice Awards. Prizes were sponsored by BGSU School of Art, Bowling Green Arts Council, Art Supply Depo as well as some individual donations from members of the Bowling Green Arts Council. Our Downtown Office is in the Four Corners Center at 130 S. Main Street, also know as the historic Wood County Bank. During Art Walk the Gallery area will feature the Quilt Show, Project Silver Shoe and a couple of very exciting raffles. Quilt Show Exhibit and demonstrations organized the Black Swamp Quilters and the Busy Thimble Quilt Shop. Last year this was very well attended and we are looking forward to this being another…


Record Store day is a hit at Finders

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News National Record Store Day has turned into a record-setting day for sales at Finders Records in downtown Bowling Green. “The last three or four years for Record Store Day have been record-setting days for us in the history of Finders,” said the shop’s founder and owner Greg Halamay. He was standing inside the door greeting people as he let them in. With 200-300 people waiting outside the downtown Bowling Green shop for the 10 a.m., opening he was controlling how many people were in so the store didn’t become too crowded. The most popular area was the crates of vinyl records. In its 10th year, Record Store Day was founded to celebrate the resilience of the local record store. Getting ready for the day is a lot of work, Halamay said. “But it’s a celebration of what we are, who we are, and where we’ve been down the path.” The beginning of Record Store Day coincided with the rediscovery of vinyl records, the music format of choice when Finders first opened its doors in 1971. “Vinyl is back,” Halamay said. “Vinyl has been embraced at Record Store Day with all the special editions that’ve come out and created a lot of enthusiasm for the record collectors.” Some of the earliest arrivals were from Columbus and Cincinnati, Halamay said. And collectors travel from Michigan to shop. Zachary Weymer drove up from Sidney with his best friend from childhood for Record Store Day. They’d previously gone to a store in Lima, but decided the extra miles were worth a trip to Bowling Green. “These guys have…


Angelwood Gallery opens new show FLUX

Submitted by ANGELWOOD GALLERY Angelwood Gallery is pleased to present FLUX celebrating our 24 years in business. The show opens on April 29 and runs until June 18. There will be a weekend long Open House to kick off the show on Saturday, April 29 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday, April 30 from noon to 5 p.m. The weekend will also feature pottery demonstrations, specialty food tasting and refreshments. Angelwood Gallery, which has featured regional artists since its inception, will continue that tradition with a wonderful line up of talented artists. The artists will include, gallery owner and potter Julie A. Beutler. She will be featuring over a 100 new pots with a strong emphasis on functional/kitchen ware as well as garden inspired pottery. Her work will feature finishes from wood kiln as well oxidation and raku firings. Other artists featured are mixed media artists Andrea Feller and Shannon Eis who both work with found objects to create funky animal sculptures, jewelry and wall work. They use common household goods, pieces of wood, found objects and other interesting finds to make these cool sculptures and 2D works. Glass artists joining the show are: Lars Glass, Beth Ziss, and Peg Briggs featuring home and garden glass as well as jewelry. Potters Brandon Knott, Joyce Donahue, Maggie Trzcinski, Rachel Burks and Scott Jones will be have an impressive collection of functional pottery as well as some sculpture. Metal artists will include furniture, wrought iron wall pieces and sculptures by Mike Leady of Southpaw Metal Studio and silverware jewelry, kitchen ware and garden pieces by Nadine Musser. New acrylic paintings by Jenny…


Pelletier to revisit old friend, Mozart’s fourth horn concerto, with BG Philharmonia

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For French horn players, there’s no escaping the four Mozart concertos. Andrew Pelletier, professor of horn at the College of Musical Arts, has played the fourth Horn Concerto as many as nine times with full orchestra, and he doesn’t know how many times with just piano. And it is a staple of the repertoire for his students. They know whenever they go out for auditions, whether for scholarships, competitions, graduate school admission or orchestral work, movements from the second and fourth will be required. Their soaring melodies, flourishes and ebullient calls serve as the foundation of the instrument’s literature. Pelletier will perform Mozart’s Horn Concerto in E-Flat Major with the Bowling Green Philharmonia Sunday, April23, at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. The orchestra also will perform Brahms’ Symphony No. 2 and Stravinsky’s “Firebird” Suite. The fourth of Mozart’s horn concertos is “the most involved” of the set, Pelletier said, with two cadenzas. In Mozart’s time, Pelletier said, horn was the most featured wind instrument. The instrument had not long before come in from the field. The hunting horn made its first orchestral appearance in opera, whenever a hunting scene was involved. Horn players of the time developed techniques to allow them to play more notes than the natural bugle-like overtone series. This enabled the horn to play virtuosic passages “and “beautiful singing melodies,” Pelletier said. “It’s the sound of the horn that captures so many different emotions that caught me.” Mozart made full use of the instruments resources and associations. “Whenever I play Mozart I feel I’m…


K.S. Letts’ art explores ancient myth in the future tense

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ancient myths tell us what the future holds for humanity. That’s the underlining theme of artist K.A. Letts’ new show, Trans Human, at the River House Arts in the Secor Building in downtown Toledo. The exhibit opens with a reception tonight (Thursday, April 20) at 6 p.m. at the gallery at 425 Jefferson Ave. Regular gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 4-10 p.m., and by appointment by calling 419-441-4025). “I’m very interested in where we’re at as a species,” Letts said in a recent interview. “We’re at a point of being very close to the point of controlling our own evolution, and looking forward you wonder how the changes we make in ourselves will affect us as human beings.” Bio-engineering, including gene therapy and neuro-prosthetics, and robotics which threaten to make much human work obsolete, pose existential questions about where humanity is headed. One of the guides, Letts believes, “is through the stories we tell.” So the artist takes stories either from Ovid’s Metamorphosis or the Bible and uses “them to discuss what human beings are and what we’re going to be.” These are not illustrations, Letts said, “as much as making an image around the story.” She translates her vision of those stories in to bold, graphic designs. Her work draws a number of influences. The Chicago imagist school played a key influence as did Matisse and aboriginal art. She uses a limited palette. Black and white dominate. She uses silver and gold in a way that’s reminiscent of religious icons. Other tones are muted, and used sparingly. In “Original Sin” there’s a…


BG High’s musical “Shrek” delivers a message about acceptance on way to a fairy tale ending

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A musical based on an animated film shouldn’t feel this timely. But you can’t escape the echoes of the news when a host of refugees flood onto the stage of the Bowling Green Performing Arts Center. Yes, the refugees are a motley assortment of your favorite fairy tale characters. Still one feels the very real pang of people displaced. These refugees end up in a swamp, the home of the misanthropic ogre, Shrek, who wants no part of them. “Shrek: The Musical” like its predecessors “Shrek” the movie and the original picture book by William Steig turns fairy tales on their heads. The show, directed by JoBeth Gonzalez, still delivers a happily-ever-after ending. Along the way there’s plenty of comic patter, tuneful melodies, dances, and a few heart-tugging moments. “Shrek, the Musical,” Bowling Green High’s all-school musical, opens tonight (April 20) at 7 p.m. continuing Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. in the PAC. The animated film really sets the bar for the cast and crew. Technical director Ryan Albrecht and his team capture the atmosphere and settings, and manage to make these shifts without interrupting the action. The dragon is a particularly nice piece of stage puppetry. Justin McKenzie does a good job as the gruff Shrek. He shows that a lot of that grouchy exterior is an affectation. He lets the ogre gradually open up emotionally. That process begins with his relationship with Donkey played with a sure sense of comic timing by Josh Coleman, who is able to capture the antic spontaneity of Eddie Murphy from…


BGSU’s “Twelfth Night” has Shakespeare doing Jazz Age shimmy

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As the matches are made in “The Twelfth Night” the characters gather on stage for a Charleston inspired dance number to that 1920s hit “Masculine Women! Feminine Men!” I could well imagine that peppy song with its refrain “which is the rooster which is the hen” inspiring the BGSU Department of Theatre and Film’s production of the Shakespeare comedy. The confusion of gender lies at the heart of the comedy. Director Jonathan Chambers has set the play in the days of the flappers, 1929 in particular. He injects period touches such as mentions of accordions, Jack Dempsey and the shimmy, as well as having people playing golf, into the script. The sound design is packed with period hits that reflect on the action. In his notes he explains that just as in 1929 the world was poised on the brink of a new era, when Shakespeare wrote the play England was pondering what would come after the reign of Queen Elizabeth. In both cases there was much frivolity with an undertow of apprehension. This “Twelfth Night,” though, does not linger on the darker shades. It just wants to have fun and keep the audience laughing, and succeeds in grand fashion. The play opens Thursday (April 20) at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts on the Bowling Green State University campus. It continues with shows Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. with matinees Saturday and Sunday. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for students and children. Available at the Wolfe Center box office or by calling 419-372-8171, or…


Earth Week speaker to explain how a grizzly killing changed the face of national parks

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Nature has a way of asserting itself. Jordan Fisher Smith noted a small example of that as he walked into Hanna Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. During his talk to the 40 students in Amilcar Challu’s American Environmental History class, he showed them a shard of limestone. The building represents human ideas of architecture set in stone. Now nature, through freezing, thawing and the movement of water, is having its way with human design. Or maybe it’s the dandelion, an invasive species, rising up through the concrete sidewalk. “That’s wildness,” he said. “That’s the unexpected that happens without human intervention and design.” Or maybe, that assertion comes during the 1972 celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of Yellowstone Natural Park. In the midst of all the activities, a hiker Harry Eugene Walker is pulled off the trail, killed and eaten by a grizzly. That’s the subject of Smith’s book “”Engineering Eden: The True Story of a Violent Death, a Trial, and the Fight Over Controlling Nature,” a finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. He’ll speak about the book and the National Park system tonight (April 18) at 7 p.m. in the Student Union theater. Though Yellowstone was created in 1872, people knew nothing about how to run them. They served as “nature management kindergarten,” Smith told the class. Officials were guided by a few “crude rules.” Plant-eating animals were good, and the predators who ate them were bad. Fire was bad. So after human market hunters killed off the elk and bison, park officials decided they…


Music Industry Club presenting multi-act show at Common Good April 21

From SAMANTHA JO SHARP BGSU Music Industry Club Members of the Music Industry Club at Bowling Green State University have been planning the Burlywood Music Festival since the beginning of January. The event will take place at The Common Good community center house, 113 Crim St., Bowling Green, with musicians performing from 2 to 10 p.m. on Friday, April 21. The event is free and open to the public, all ages are welcome. The Common Good House is a family friendly environment and alcohol is absolutely prohibited on the premises. More than five different musical acts will perform inside and outside the house at the festival. WBGU-FM’s Battle of The Bands competition winners, Indian Opinion will headline, other artist include: The Sugar Creek, Marbin, RadioBlack and Fire Sloths From Mars. Artists who have performed at MIC BGSU’s Open Mic nights throughout the year will be also be featured at the event. Music Industry minor and festival performer Zach Rzicznek is an active member of MIC and has performed at MIC’s other live events. “I am happy to be performing, I’ve been performing at BG open mics all year,” Rzicznek said. “I am really looking forward to performing at the festival.” Communications major/Music Industry Minor Alyssa Rosselot is a founding member of the MIC and plans to use the experience she has gained in an internship in NY this summer at The Syndicate in NYC. “Discussing the event and how we should market it has helped me learn more about social media and the marketing strategies that work best,” Rosselot said. BGSU’s Music Industry Director and Instructor Terry Tompkins advises the…