Visual art

Angelwood Gallery opens new show FLUX

Submitted by ANGELWOOD GALLERY Angelwood Gallery is pleased to present FLUX celebrating our 24 years in business. The show opens on April 29 and runs until June 18. There will be a weekend long Open House to kick off the show on Saturday, April 29 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday, April 30 from noon to 5 p.m. The weekend will also feature pottery demonstrations, specialty food tasting and refreshments. Angelwood Gallery, which has featured regional artists since its inception, will continue that tradition with a wonderful line up of talented artists. The artists will include, gallery owner and potter Julie A. Beutler. She will be featuring over a 100 new pots with a strong emphasis on functional/kitchen ware as well as garden inspired pottery. Her work will feature finishes from wood kiln as well oxidation and raku firings. Other artists featured are mixed media artists Andrea Feller and Shannon Eis who both work with found objects to create funky animal sculptures, jewelry and wall work. They use common household goods, pieces of wood, found objects and other interesting finds to make these cool sculptures and 2D works. Glass artists joining the show are: Lars Glass, Beth Ziss, and Peg Briggs featuring home and garden glass as well as jewelry. Potters Brandon Knott, Joyce Donahue, Maggie Trzcinski, Rachel Burks and Scott Jones will be have an impressive collection of functional pottery as well as some sculpture. Metal artists will include furniture, wrought iron wall pieces and sculptures by Mike Leady of Southpaw Metal Studio and silverware jewelry, kitchen ware and garden pieces by Nadine Musser. New acrylic paintings by Jenny…

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BGSU Arts Events through April 12

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 31 – Jazz Week continues with a trombone performance from Jazz Lab Band I with Grammy-nominated guest artist Alan Ferber. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. April 1 – Bravo! BGSU celebrates the very best of the arts. Experience a magical evening of vocal, instrumental and theatrical performances, plus exhibitions and demonstrations by student and faculty artists in glass, ceramics, metals and digital arts. Enjoy a festive atmosphere and an array of appetizers and tasty treats. The celebration will begin at 7 p.m. in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. To purchase tickets to the event, contact Lisa Mattiace in the President’s Office at 419-372-6780 or by email at lmattia@bgsu.edu April 1 – Students from BGSU’s College of Musical Arts will be featured in an afternoon chamber music concert at 1 p.m. at the Way Public Library, 101 E. Indiana Ave., Perrysburg. Hosted by Pro Musica, friends of music at the college, the program will feature students who have received travel grants from the organization. The concert is free and open to the public. April 2 – The Gish Sunday Matinee series kicks off with the 1945 film “And Then There Were None,” directed by René Clair. Agatha Christie’s celebrated who-done-it “Ten Little Indians,” under the deft guidance of French director…


BGSU arts events through March 29

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 16 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features visiting writer Dustin M. Hoffman. Author of the story collection “One-Hundred-Knuckled Fist” and winner of the 2015 Prairie Schooner Book Prize, Hoffman earned his MFA in fiction from BGSU.  The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free March 17 – The Brown Bag Music Series continues with Opera! The performance will begin at 11:45 a.m. in the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free March 17 – Elsewhere productions continue with “Jimmy and Sally.” The show will begin at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. on March 18 and 19. Free March 18 – The ARTalk series presents “Where Next: The Future of Art.” Prominent artists and scholars will discuss the future of art in work, education and careers. Featured speakers include Cynthia Crow, program officer for the Fulbright Scholar Program in New York; Regin Igloria, multidisciplinary artist and arts administrator in Chicago, and John Jennings, graphic designer and associate professor at the University of Buffalo. The ARTalk will begin at 4 p.m. in room 204 of the Fine Arts Center. Free March 18 – The opening reception for the BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition will begin at 7 p.m. in the Bryan and Wankelman Galleries located in the Fine Arts Center. Free Through March 31 – The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Bryan and Wankelman Galleries, located in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m….


Michael Harris finds BGSU much improved for black students since his days on campus

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Michael Harris settled comfortably on the couch in the lounge that serves as home base for Bowling Green State University’s Arts Village in the basement of Kreischer Compton dorm. The 1971 BGSU graduate remembers the dorm well from his student days. His girlfriend lived in the dorm, and she became his wife, then his ex-wife. Looking around campus, Harris said, he saw a lot that hadn’t changed, including the School of Art where he studied with Bob Mazur, Willard Wankelman and Paul D. Running, and the baseball diamond where he played ball. He was the only black on the team, he recalled, and one of fewer than 100 African-Americans in the student body. Harris came back to campus last week as the keynote speaker for the Africana Studies Student Research Conference. His speech was on “Conjuring an Africana Aesthetic,” but now the talk was less formal. A handful of students spread through the launch as his host at the Arts Village art professor Joel D’Orisio occasionally asked a few questions. Harris lived in Harshman, which he was advised he better go see because it was slated to be razed. Harris said he found BGSU much improved from when he was here. He helped found the Black Student Union. Now there were offerings in ethnic studies that would have “brought tears to my eyes back then.” He’d come to BGSU hoping to escape the racism of his native Cleveland. Racism that left innumerable “papercuts and bruises” on his psyche. At BGSU though he couldn’t readily hear the music he grew up on. When he took…


BGSU arts events through March 1

From BGSI OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Feb. 16—The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Bridget Adams and Benji Katz. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Feb. 16—The Department of Theatre and Film’s production of “The Penelopiad” will open at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. “The Penelopiad” is Margaret Atwood’s version of Homer’s “Odyssey” told through the voices of Penelope and her 12 hanged maids. Speaking from beyond the grave, Atwood’s characters explore this mythic tale of love, betrayal, responsibility and power. Additional performances are at 8 p.m. Feb. 16-18 and Feb. 23-25, with matinees at 2 p.m. on Feb. 18, 19 and 25. Advance tickets are $15 and can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, 419-372-8171 or online at www.bgsu.edu/arts. All seats the day of the performance are $20. (See story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/bgsus-the-penelopiad-shows-the-tragedy-on-the-ancient-greek-homefront/) Feb. 17—The Brown Bag Music Series will present a musical extravaganza in celebration of Black History Month. Students and faculty from the College of Musical Arts will perform starting at 11:45 a.m. at the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free Feb. 17—The BGSU Wind Symphony will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 and can be purchased at the Wolfe Center for the Arts box office, 419-372-8171 or online at www.bgsu.edu/arts. All seats are $10 the day of the performance. Feb. 18—The University and Concert Bands will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 and can be…


River House Arts opening two exhibits in two weeks

Submitted by RIVER HOUSE ARTS River House Arts and Contemporary Art Toledo will present “Heterogeneous: States of American,”opening Tonight (Feb. 16) with a reception from 6-9 p.m. at the gallery in the first floor of the Secor Building, 425 Jefferson Ave., Toledo. In this provocative and timely new exhibition of paintings and mixed media, three Toledo artists, Josh Byers, David Cuatla Cuatl, and Faith Goodman express the fractures and symmetry of millennial life. The show remains on exhibit through March 4. Riverhouse Arts is also opening the Sien Collective’s “Sweeping Close… and Now”  Friday, Feb. 22, at 6:30 p.m. in the Owens Community College’s Walter E Terhune Gallery. The Sien Collective is Meagan Shein of Ann Arbor and Siobhan Arnold of San Diego. The two artists use historic photographic processes of Cyanotype and the paper negative, as well as drawing, encaustic and hand sewing to investigate the properties of trees and our place in the contemporary world. It continues through March 22. Also continuing in the Gallery 6 of River House Arts are the paintings of Croatian artist Nevenka Arbanas. Created in the early 1990s during the Bosnian War and its aftermath, the works were sourced from a local collector and are priced to sell. The gallery on the sixth floor of the building. River House Arts is a full service gallery offering exhibitions of modern and contemporary artists. Hours are Tuesday through Friday, noon to 8 p.m. and by appointment.


Kehinde Wiley’s portraits bring people from the street to museum walls

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Kehinde Wiley found his direction as a painter on a street in Harlem. He’d recently finished his graduate studies in art at Yale and had enrolled the Studio Museum of Harlem’s art residency program in 2001. At Yale he painted black males with extravagant hair styles. Thursday in a talk at the Toledo Museum of Art, he said that had completed his study “at the feet of the fathers,” and was in a crisis as to where to go next. There at his feet he found a piece of paper. A rap sheet. On it was the young man’s mug shot. Wiley said at that instant he thought: “This is a really cool portrait. I know that’s kind of screwed up. If you’re thinking like I think which is to use your life to tell a story about the world you live in, finding this piece of paper tells a story about the world we live in.” He turned the mug shot into a portrait, and that painting is now hanging in the Toledo Museum of Art’s exhibit Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic. The major retrospective of the Brooklyn-based artist’s career is now on exhibit through May 14. In the 15 years since finding that mugshot Wiley has achieved “super star status,” said Brian Kennedy, director of the Toledo Museum. That was evident by the standing-room-only crowd that gathered in the Peristyle on Thursday to hear the artist’s talk on his work. Wiley has achieved fame by both celebrating and challenging the notions of Western art. He has highlighted the lack of black bodies…