Visual art

2016 BGSU grad Brach Tiller finds his artistic vision through hard work & Instagram

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Brach Tiller graduated from Bowling Green State University just over a year ago, he faced an existential question. “What the hell am I going to do now? What am I going to paint?” he wondered. The 26-year-old has spent his first year after receiving his Bachelor’s in Fine Arts degree discovering the answer. What he found is now on display in River House Arts’ Gallery 6, on the sixth floor of the Secor Building at 425 Jefferson on downtown Toledo. The work he created while studying for his BFA at BGSU was photorealistic with dark and disturbing overtones. It showed the ability to render realistic images in detail. “I decided it wasn’t providing me what I needed,” Tiller said. So he found himself a studio and began to paint. “I was getting a lot of bad paintings out of the way,” he said. In the past year he figures he’s discarded 30 paintings. While in each one he’d find something to reject, he’d also find some element worth exploring further. That would get worked into the next work. While engaged in this process, “I was exploring Instagram to see what people were doing in the contemporary art world.” BGSU as an art school is “a hidden gem,” he said. Still it is isolated from any center of art. So Tiller used Instagram to reach out, as well as to document his own work. “I had to use Instagram as that tool to find art in the world because you want to be part of the conversation of what’s going on out there.” Instagram…

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Art brightens a dreary day as downtown BG hosts 25th Art Walk

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Art work filled a variety of nooks and crannies in shops downtown Saturday for the 25th Art Walk. The annual event offers people a chance to view the work of a variety of artists, from school kids to elders, and visit shops downtown they may never have been in. That was the case at the Painted Clover on South Main Street. One woman walked in, exclaiming “I haven’t been here since it was Art-a-Site!” as she looked around. The shop’s manager Morgan Savage said traffic was better than a usual Saturday and a number of those who came into shop were there specifically for Art Walk. For many, it was their first time in the store that sells hand painted furniture and home décor. Painted Clover was displaying silk-screened prints of birds created by Savage, a graduate of the Bowling Green State University School of Art. Savage was happy to have the opportunity to show her work. A few doors down in Encore Bridal, Michael Neal, son of the owner, said “a lot of people came strictly for that, for the art.” Foot traffic ebbed and flowed during the day. “I think the weather kept a lot of people away,” he said. Still Mary Dennis said she was pleased with the number of people who stopped by her display inside Grounds for Thought. This was the first time she’d exhibited and was glad she did. Across the room painter Randy Bennett was at work. He didn’t have paintings out for sale. Instead he set up his easel and was dabbing paint on one of…


Works inspired by nature win top prizes at Art Walk

By BG INDEPENDENT NEWS With the gray dreary weather for Art Walk in Bowling Green, Carole Kauber’s paintings of brilliant Southwestern landscapes certainly had an added appeal “She’s not afraid to use striking colors,” Sara Busler, one of the jurors, said. With the large paintings set up in a back space in Coyote Beads, “I felt really small around them.” “It’s like you were there,” fellow juror Lauren Canavan said Her abstract realistic work won the top juror’s prize at the 25th Art Walk. The top People’s Choice honor went to a fixture at Art Walk, Tom Roller for his nature-inspired metal sculpture. Roller has been a frequent award winner. Last year, he won both the top jury prize and the top People’s Choice honor. Roller said this will be his last appearance at Art Walk. He’s already stopped doing other art fairs. This was the only show he did this year. Not that he’ll stop sculpting at his Clark Street workshop. “I have to do something to keep busy.” Other winners were: Ann Beck, jewelry, Ginny’s Inspired Fashion, second place, Jury Award. Mary Dennis, ceramics, Grounds for Thought, third place, Jury Award. Diana Bibler, sculpture, Mode Elle Boutique, second place, People’s Choice. Victoria Thompson, body painting, Encore Bridal, third place, People’s Choice. (BG Independent News will post an expanded story later.)


Angelwood Gallery opens new show FLUX

Submitted by ANGELWOOD GALLERY Angelwood Gallery is pleased to present FLUX celebrating our 24 years in business. The show opens on April 29 and runs until June 18. There will be a weekend long Open House to kick off the show on Saturday, April 29 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday, April 30 from noon to 5 p.m. The weekend will also feature pottery demonstrations, specialty food tasting and refreshments. Angelwood Gallery, which has featured regional artists since its inception, will continue that tradition with a wonderful line up of talented artists. The artists will include, gallery owner and potter Julie A. Beutler. She will be featuring over a 100 new pots with a strong emphasis on functional/kitchen ware as well as garden inspired pottery. Her work will feature finishes from wood kiln as well oxidation and raku firings. Other artists featured are mixed media artists Andrea Feller and Shannon Eis who both work with found objects to create funky animal sculptures, jewelry and wall work. They use common household goods, pieces of wood, found objects and other interesting finds to make these cool sculptures and 2D works. Glass artists joining the show are: Lars Glass, Beth Ziss, and Peg Briggs featuring home and garden glass as well as jewelry. Potters Brandon Knott, Joyce Donahue, Maggie Trzcinski, Rachel Burks and Scott Jones will be have an impressive collection of functional pottery as well as some sculpture. Metal artists will include furniture, wrought iron wall pieces and sculptures by Mike Leady of Southpaw Metal Studio and silverware jewelry, kitchen ware and garden pieces by Nadine Musser. New acrylic paintings by Jenny…


K.S. Letts’ art explores ancient myth in the future tense

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ancient myths tell us what the future holds for humanity. That’s the underlining theme of artist K.A. Letts’ new show, Trans Human, at the River House Arts in the Secor Building in downtown Toledo. The exhibit opens with a reception tonight (Thursday, April 20) at 6 p.m. at the gallery at 425 Jefferson Ave. Regular gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 4-10 p.m., and by appointment by calling 419-441-4025). “I’m very interested in where we’re at as a species,” Letts said in a recent interview. “We’re at a point of being very close to the point of controlling our own evolution, and looking forward you wonder how the changes we make in ourselves will affect us as human beings.” Bio-engineering, including gene therapy and neuro-prosthetics, and robotics which threaten to make much human work obsolete, pose existential questions about where humanity is headed. One of the guides, Letts believes, “is through the stories we tell.” So the artist takes stories either from Ovid’s Metamorphosis or the Bible and uses “them to discuss what human beings are and what we’re going to be.” These are not illustrations, Letts said, “as much as making an image around the story.” She translates her vision of those stories in to bold, graphic designs. Her work draws a number of influences. The Chicago imagist school played a key influence as did Matisse and aboriginal art. She uses a limited palette. Black and white dominate. She uses silver and gold in a way that’s reminiscent of religious icons. Other tones are muted, and used sparingly. In “Original Sin” there’s a…


BGSU art faculty honored for excellence by Ohio Arts Council

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Two Bowling Green State University faculty members, Charles Kanwischer and Lou Krueger, were among the artists to receive Individual Excellence Awards from the Ohio Arts Council. For Kanwischer, who was honored for his graphite drawings on panel, said that it is remarkable that Ohio continues to honor individual artists. “It’s such a statement that individual artists are valued. It’s such a nice validation.” Having a state give support to individual artists is becoming rare. Many arts councils only give grants to organizations. Some states have abolished their state arts councils, he said. Kanwischer and Krueger were among 77 artists to receive funding from among the 465 who applied. The council distributed $375,000 in grants, almost all for $5,000. “You have to give credit to the politicians, Republicans and Democrats,” he said. “It’s hard to complain about support for the arts.” Kanwischer’s portfolio features his landscapes. The settings can be rural, suburban or urban. He said he was interested in the cyclical change in the landscape. Some of the drawings now on display at Shaheen Modern and Contemporary Art in Cleveland, depict road construction. One drawing from 2010 “Route 24 Road Project – Support Columns” shows at once construction while also evoking images of ancient ruins. Kanwischer said his work has not undergone any dramatic shifts. Instead he feels he is able to get deeper and deeper into “landscape that reveals stories.” He’s appreciative that the arts council supports “long-term careers” not just the new and novel. This is his seventh grant in the 19 years since he joined the BGSU faculty. In return for…


BGSU arts events through April 28

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 13 – The International Film Series continues with the Swedish film “Force Majeure,” directed by Ruben Östlund. An award winner at the Cannes Film Festival, the Toronto Film Festival, and other internationally recognized venues, the film deftly explores the emotional dimensions of the legal term “force majeure,” an unexpected event (such as a hurricane) that releases both parties from the obligations of a contract. In this story, the ski vacation of a seemingly ideal family takes a sudden turn when an avalanche approaches them as they are having a pleasant lunch at the lodge. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 13 – Prout Readings conclude with B.F.A. student readings at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free April 13 – Bowling Green Opera Theater presents a variety of opera scenes. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 14 – The University Choral Society and Early Music Ensemble present Bach’s “St. John Passion.” The moving and sacred oratorio of Johann Sebastian Bach is a dramatic representation of the Passion as told in the Gospel of John for the Good Friday Vespers of 1724. Revel in the extravagant, expressive music of the season. The performance will begin at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, East Wooster St., Bowling Green. Free April 14 – The Toledo Museum of Art and BGSU’s College of Musical Arts present EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art. The performance and discussion…