Music

Bobby G brings taste of Delta blues to Howard’s

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Robert Gray first got hooked on the blues listening to sound standing outside the juke joint in his native Winterville, Mississippi. He and his friends didn’t have the money to get in so they absorbed the sounds that wafted from the homespun club. “We just loved what was going on,” he said, “so we would try to sing, just walking down the road singing. That’s when I first got it.” That was years before Robert Gray began Bobby G, the blues singer. Bobby G, now 73, will perform Saturday, July 15, at 7 p.m. at Howard’s Club H in downtown Bowling Green with Curtis Grant Jr. and the Midnight Rockers. Cover charge is $5. Bobby G will also perform Saturday, Sept. 9, at the Black Swamp Arts Festival. The performance celebrates the release of “Still Sanding” on Third Street Cigar Records. This is the bluesman’s first full-length album, and it’s giving the world – it’s charting in Italy, Australia, and elsewhere – its first taste of Bobby G. John Henry, a local blues impesario said, the bluesman is “a treasure.” Because Gray stayed around home, raised two children with his wife, and didn’t go out on the road and experience the hardships and bad habits that so often entails, “he’s well preserved.” His voice is clear, with a sweet high range, though he can growl when the tune demands it. That’s all on display on “Still Standing,” a set of originals written by Johnny Rawls. Before all this could transpire and he could take that love of the blues to the stage, he needed…

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BG community band celebrates with a lot of help from its friends

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green Area Community Band called in the Marines to help celebrate the band’s 10th year. Saturday night, 10 years to the day of the band’s first concert, the BG ensemble, directed by Thom Headley and Catherine Lewis, hosted two other community bands The North Coast Concert Band, directed John Kustec, and the Defiance College Community Band, directed by Scott Rogers and Catherine Booth. And to help conduct all those musicians the hosts invited Capt. Ryan Nowlin, one of the leaders of what’s considered the world’s greatest concert band, the U.S. Marine’s Washington D.C. band, “The President’s Own.” And if that wasn’t enough as a guest soloist, they invited Amy Horn, a 30-year veteran of that band, as French horn soloist. From the opening National Anthem, done by the Defiance band in the Marine Band arrangement to the curtain call of “God Bless America,” taken at brisk tempo, the event was  celebration not just of BG Area Community Band, but to the American band tradition. There were stops at picturesque places and fittingly tributes some Ohio band directors. Aside from the introductions each piece, the assembled musicians let the music do the talking, and it spoke in volumes, even when playing hushed passages. The spectrum of the American band was represented from its pinnacle in the persons of Nowlin and Horn. Nowlin conducted a number with all three bands and the finale when all 200 musicians crowded on the Performing Arts Center stage. Each band also played one of his compositions. Horn soloed on “Hunter’s Moon” with the BG band. The piece was…


Community band invites guest conductor, soloist and bands to its birthday concert

From the BOWLING GREEN AREA COMMUNITY BAND More than two hundred adult musicians on stage, a guest conductor from the United State Marine Corps Band, “The President’s Own”, a nationally- known soloist and a mayoral proclamation will be some of the highlights on Saturday, May 6, at 7 p.m. as the Bowling Green Area Community Band celebrates in grand style for its 10th anniversary. The Defiance College Community Band, the North Coast Concert Band and the Bowling Green Area Community Concert Band will perform separately and in combination for the special event, in the Bowling Green Schools’ Performing Arts Center. The guest conductor, Captain Ryan Nowlin, USMC, will lead each band in one of his own compositions. Capt. Nowlin has significant ties to northwest Ohio, as he graduated with a Bachelor of Music Education and Masters degree from Bowling Green State University. His student teaching was completed at Defiance City Schools, where he was mentored by the late Vince Polce, Kathy Booth and Scott Rogers. The latter two are the current Defiance College Community Band directors. Capt. Nowlin is the assistant director of “The President’s Own”, United States Marine Band, one of the four premier military bands stationed in Washington, D.C. Starting in 2010, as a staff arranger, Capt. Nowlin was commissioned a first lieutenant in 2014, promoting to his current rank in 2016. He has arranged and composed a variety of music for the Marine Band, as well as many works for school bands. Among his duties with the Marine Band, Capt. Nowlin has collaborated with singers Kelly Clarkson and Jordin Sparks, who performed a Nowlin setting of “The Star…


Record Store day is a hit at Finders

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News National Record Store Day has turned into a record-setting day for sales at Finders Records in downtown Bowling Green. “The last three or four years for Record Store Day have been record-setting days for us in the history of Finders,” said the shop’s founder and owner Greg Halamay. He was standing inside the door greeting people as he let them in. With 200-300 people waiting outside the downtown Bowling Green shop for the 10 a.m., opening he was controlling how many people were in so the store didn’t become too crowded. The most popular area was the crates of vinyl records. In its 10th year, Record Store Day was founded to celebrate the resilience of the local record store. Getting ready for the day is a lot of work, Halamay said. “But it’s a celebration of what we are, who we are, and where we’ve been down the path.” The beginning of Record Store Day coincided with the rediscovery of vinyl records, the music format of choice when Finders first opened its doors in 1971. “Vinyl is back,” Halamay said. “Vinyl has been embraced at Record Store Day with all the special editions that’ve come out and created a lot of enthusiasm for the record collectors.” Some of the earliest arrivals were from Columbus and Cincinnati, Halamay said. And collectors travel from Michigan to shop. Zachary Weymer drove up from Sidney with his best friend from childhood for Record Store Day. They’d previously gone to a store in Lima, but decided the extra miles were worth a trip to Bowling Green. “These guys have…


Pelletier to revisit old friend, Mozart’s fourth horn concerto, with BG Philharmonia

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For French horn players, there’s no escaping the four Mozart concertos. Andrew Pelletier, professor of horn at the College of Musical Arts, has played the fourth Horn Concerto as many as nine times with full orchestra, and he doesn’t know how many times with just piano. And it is a staple of the repertoire for his students. They know whenever they go out for auditions, whether for scholarships, competitions, graduate school admission or orchestral work, movements from the second and fourth will be required. Their soaring melodies, flourishes and ebullient calls serve as the foundation of the instrument’s literature. Pelletier will perform Mozart’s Horn Concerto in E-Flat Major with the Bowling Green Philharmonia Sunday, April23, at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. The orchestra also will perform Brahms’ Symphony No. 2 and Stravinsky’s “Firebird” Suite. The fourth of Mozart’s horn concertos is “the most involved” of the set, Pelletier said, with two cadenzas. In Mozart’s time, Pelletier said, horn was the most featured wind instrument. The instrument had not long before come in from the field. The hunting horn made its first orchestral appearance in opera, whenever a hunting scene was involved. Horn players of the time developed techniques to allow them to play more notes than the natural bugle-like overtone series. This enabled the horn to play virtuosic passages “and “beautiful singing melodies,” Pelletier said. “It’s the sound of the horn that captures so many different emotions that caught me.” Mozart made full use of the instruments resources and associations. “Whenever I play Mozart I feel I’m…


Music Industry Club presenting multi-act show at Common Good April 21

From SAMANTHA JO SHARP BGSU Music Industry Club Members of the Music Industry Club at Bowling Green State University have been planning the Burlywood Music Festival since the beginning of January. The event will take place at The Common Good community center house, 113 Crim St., Bowling Green, with musicians performing from 2 to 10 p.m. on Friday, April 21. The event is free and open to the public, all ages are welcome. The Common Good House is a family friendly environment and alcohol is absolutely prohibited on the premises. More than five different musical acts will perform inside and outside the house at the festival. WBGU-FM’s Battle of The Bands competition winners, Indian Opinion will headline, other artist include: The Sugar Creek, Marbin, RadioBlack and Fire Sloths From Mars. Artists who have performed at MIC BGSU’s Open Mic nights throughout the year will be also be featured at the event. Music Industry minor and festival performer Zach Rzicznek is an active member of MIC and has performed at MIC’s other live events. “I am happy to be performing, I’ve been performing at BG open mics all year,” Rzicznek said. “I am really looking forward to performing at the festival.” Communications major/Music Industry Minor Alyssa Rosselot is a founding member of the MIC and plans to use the experience she has gained in an internship in NY this summer at The Syndicate in NYC. “Discussing the event and how we should market it has helped me learn more about social media and the marketing strategies that work best,” Rosselot said. BGSU’s Music Industry Director and Instructor Terry Tompkins advises the…


Student-run benefit intends to keep the jazz coming to BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Jeff Bouck was looking around for places to get a master’s degree in jazz studies, Bowling Green State University stuck out in part because of the number of guest artists it featured. More than a chance to hear these master musicians, the program offered plenty of time with them to learn the craft first hand. At the end of his first year here, Bouck and fellow jazz graduate student Mitchell Borchardt have organized a benefit for the Student Jazz Association to help ensure that continues. The SJA is a BGSU campus organization which promotes jazz in the community, primarily by bringing in guest artists. Those have included recently vocalist Kim Nazarian, drummer Carl Allen, trombonist and composer Alan Ferber, pianist Jon Cowherd, and many others over the years. These artists provide lessons, master classes as well as rehearsing and performing with students. This means students get to experience playing music with the guidance of the composer. The benefit for the Student Jazz Association will be held Thursday, April 27, starting at 7:30 p.m. at the Clazel in downtown Bowling Green. The event will feature a show by the BGSU Lab Band I giving the premier performance of pieces by Borchardt and Bouck as well as performing work by Duke Ellington, Sammy Nestico, and others. They along with Ian Palmer will conduct the band, BGSU’s premier jazz ensemble. In addition to the music there will be card games and raffle baskets. A $2 cover charge will be collected at the door. The student composers penned their charts specifically for this show. Bouck’s is a…