Music

Musical dreams come true at BGSU Concerto Concert

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News For Mei-Yi Wang performing the first movement of Sergei Prokofiev’s Third Piano Concerto with at the Concerto Concert at Bowling Green State University is a dream come true. Wang  is one of the winners in the College of Musical Arts’ annual Competitions in Musical Performance.  Last December 69 students vied for the chance to perform a concerto with the BG Philharmonia.  Wang first heard the Prokofiev concerto when she was in junior high school in Taiwan. “It was so amazing. The piano, the orchestra, the sound was very fantastic. So I’m dreaming I should play this piece someday.” That time will come as Wang and three other competition winners will perform with the Bowling Green Philharmonia, Saturday, Feb. 16, at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall. Tickets are available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling the box office at 419-372-8171. Other soloists are: Flutist Alec Porter, a junior, performing three movements from John Corigliano’s “Pied Piper Fantasy.”Saxophonist Johnathan Kierspe, a second year graduate student in music performance, performing Marius Constant’s Concertante for Saxophone.Erin Redick, a third year student from Fletcher, who will perform Emmanuel Séjourné’s Concerto for Marimba and Strings Also, receiving top prizes at the competition were: composer Emilio Jose Gonzalez who will have his piece performed at next fall’s New Music Festival, and Ariel Magno de Costa, who received the Virginia Marks Collaborative Piano Award. Erin Redick will perform Emmanuel Séjourné’s Concerto for Marimba and Strings at the Concerto Concert. Redick describes herself as shy and a percussionist who doesn’t like to play loudly even though she started in music because she wanted to be in a rock band. Third year student from Fletcher said she decided to compete this year because “it would force me out of my comfort zone. … I’m a more reserved player. This has broken me out of my shell.” Emmanuel Séjourné’s concerto, Redick said, is accessible. “It’s just tonal enough that it’s easy to listen to, but it’s challenging at the same time.” Her teacher Daniel Piccolo had her listen to three possible concertos to prepare for the competition. It…

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Sax 4th Avenue opens St. Tim’s music series

From ST. TIM’S DISCOVERS St. Tim’s Discovers, the chamber music series sponsored by St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, opens 2019 with a recital by Sax 4 th Avenue. Beginning Sunday, Jan. 20, at 3 p.m., the concert will be held in the sanctuary of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, 871 East Boundary Street, Perrysburg. St. Tim’s Discovers is dedicated to bringing classical music to communities throughout Northwest Ohio. The performance is free and open to the public; doors open to the public at 2:30 p.m. Formed by four BGSU alumni, Sax 4th Avenue is an exciting and innovative saxophone quartet. Since its formation in 1991, the quartet has entertained audiences throughout the Midwest with its unique brand of virtuosity, showmanship and humor. The quartet’s high-energy performances feature the classics of Bach, Haydn and Bizet; the unique jazz-fusion of Phil Woods; and the progressive rock of King Crimson and Emerson, Lake and Palmer. Sax 4th Avenue’s expansive repertoire includes the finest in saxophone literature, original compositions, jazz standards and music that incorporates improvisation and choreography. Among the members of the quartet are Bowling Green resident Stan George, who is well-known as a music teacher for in the Perrysburg schools. Another member, Shannon Ford, will be familiar to Toledo area audiences for her many appearances with various ensembles including the Toledo Symphony and local big band Swingmania. Over the years, Sax 4th Avenue has made numerous appearances at community events, concert series, festivals, colleges, and secondary schools throughout Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and Illinois. The quartet has performed as guest artists for the United States Navy Band Saxophone Symposium and has been featured at the Mid-West International Band and Orchestra Clinic, the Music Educator’s National Convention, the Ohio Music Education Association’s Queen City Conference and the Bowling Green State University New Music and Art Festival. Sax 4th Avenue has also been featured with the San Luis Potosí Orchestra, the Toledo Symphony Orchestra, the Lima Symphony Orchestra, the Southeastern Ohio Symphony Orchestra, the Toledo Concert Band, the Lima Area Concert Band, the Maumee Community Band, the Defiance Community Band, the Fremont North Shore Concert Band and…


Big Bad Voodoo Daddy to join Toledo Symphony for Jan. 26 show

From  TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA On Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 8 PM at the Stranahan Theater, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy takes center stage with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra (TSO) for a night of jazz, swing, and more. Since its formation in the early 1990s, the band has toured virtually nonstop, performing over 150 shows a year, and has produced a sizable catalog of recorded music, with sales of over 2 million albums to date. This eight-piece ensemble features Scotty Morris on vocals and guitar, Joshua Levy on piano, Kurt Sodergren on drums and percussion, Dirk Shumaker on bass and vocals, Glen “The Kid” Marhevka on trumpet, Karl Hunter on tenor, alto, and soprano saxophones and clarinet, Alex Henderson on trombone, Andy Rowley on baritone saxophone and vocals, and Mitchel Cooper on lead trumpet. “We are so excited to present Big Bad Voodoo Daddy as part of our 75th Anniversary season,” says Zak Vassar, President & CEO of the Toledo Symphony. “They were responsible for the 1990s swing revival and have continued to make amazing music for the past several years. I can’t wait to see the energy they bring to the TSO. They’ll certainly have us singing and dancing along!” Big Bad Voodoo Daddy’s efforts to promote and revitalize swing music have taken shape as much more than a simple tribute. Taking inspiration from the creators of this uniquely American art form, the band’s original horn-infused music and legendary high energy show introduces the genre to a new and younger generation while remaining cognizant and respectful of the music’s rich legacy. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy has appeared in countless films and television shows, including The Wild, Despicable Me, Phineas & Ferb, Friends, Third Rock From The Sun, Ally McBeal, and So You Think You Can Dance. They have appeared live on Dancing With The Stars, Late Night With Conan O’Brien, NBC’s Christmas in Rockefeller Center, The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, a remarkable seven appearances on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and the Super Bowl XXXIII Halftime Show. The band has also appeared as special guests with many of the country’s most distinguished symphony orchestras, and has performed for three U.S. Presidents.


Nordic Air concert reunites Toledo Symphony’s Alain Trudel with violinist Augustin Hadelich

From  TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA On Friday, January 11 and Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 8 PM at the Toledo Museum of Art’s Peristyle Theater, Grammy award-winning violinist Augustin Hadelich returns to Toledo and reunites with Music Director Alain Trudel to perform Sibelius’ breathtaking Violin Concerto on a program inspired by the icy landscape of Northern Europe. Known for his phenomenal technique and beautiful tone, Augustin Hadelich takes center stage for one of the most captivating openings in violin repertoire. Alain Trudel will also lead an exciting performance of Sibelius’ “Finlandia,” Grieg’s “Peer Gynt” Suites No. 1 and 2, and conclude with Nielsen’s “Aladdin March.” “This concert gives cause to celebrate,” says Toledo Symphony President & CEO, Zak Vassar. “When Augustin Hadelich was last here in April 2017, he wowed us with Dvořák’s rarely performed Violin Concerto. His tone and warmth were very special, and we all knew that we were working with greatness. Of course, that was also the concert that convinced us to engage Alain Trudel as our Music Director, so it was a special week in many ways. I can’t wait for Augustin and Alain to reunite and make more musical magic in this community.” At the age of 34, Augustin Hadelich has firmly established himself as one of the great violinists of today. Named “2018 Instrumentalist of the Year” by Musical America, he has performed with every major orchestra in the U.S., as well as an ever-growing number of orchestras in the UK, Europe, and Asia. “I am so excited to share the stage with Augustin Hadelich again,” says Alain Trudel, Toledo Symphony Music Director. “This concert features great music that I think the audience is going to love. Sibelius’ Violin Concerto is incredibly challenging and takes full advantage of the violin’s colorful range. Augustin has a remarkable tone, and he will be able to showcase his expressiveness through this magnificent work.” Two performances of Nordic Air will take place on Friday, January 11 and Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 8 PM at the Toledo Museum of Art’s Peristyle Theater. Tickets are available at toledosymphony.com or by…


For 20+ years, Red Wanting Blue has embraced its bar band status with live shows & new songs

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Scott Terry of the rock band Red Wanting Blue  imagines  the audience he’s writing sings for, he sees them in venues from coast to coast. It may be the Bowery Ballroom in New York City or the Tractor Tavern in Seattle. It may also any of a dozen venues in the American Heartland including Northwest Ohio. Red Wanting Blue was a regular for years on the local music scene playing Howard’s Club H and Cla-Zel in Bowling Green and more recently the Civic Music Hall in Toledo. That’s where the veteran rockers will perform Friday, Dec. 28, at 7 p.m. Tickets for the show at the club at 135 S. Byrne Road, Toledo are $18 in advance and $20 at the door. Every band has a different trajectory, Terry said during a recent telephone interview. For Red Wanting Blue that started more than 20 years ago in Oxford, Ohio. The band — Terry on lead vocal, ukulele, tenor guitar; Mark McCullough, bass and vocals, Greg Rahm, guitar, keyboard, vocals; Eric Hall, guitar, lap steel. vocals; and Dean Anshutz, drums and percussion — cut their teeth in Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, as well as their home state of Ohio. “These places are very middle American,” Terry said. “We’re playing for people who work in middle America, and when they go out to cut loose on a Friday night they want to drink and have a good time. They want to listen to music they can relate to and appreciate. We very much wanted to be that band.” That’s the audience they cater to. Red Wanting Blue isn’t a household name, Terry admits. Some people call them a bar band, a term not usually meant as a compliment, Terry said. “But there is something to be said about singing songs that are aimed at people in a bar. Songs that people will be captivated by. It better be melodic. It better be engaging right there in the moment. … That’s the stream we’ve been on. That’s where the river took us.” Over the more than two…



Joe Baker celebrates with Howard’s show a year after knockin’ on heaven’s door

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A year ago musician Joe Baker was on “tour” — a tour of Northwest Ohio hospitals. A heart attack on Nov. 29, 2017, sent him first to Wood County Hospital, where he was told it was good he came as soon as he did, at the guidance of his wife, Peg. He headed to St. Vincent’s for surgery. That didn’t go well. He was transferred to Medical Center of Ohio. After an operation that lasted nine days, he didn’t wake up.  During the operation he had a stroke.“I lost all of December,” he said.  Baker, who has been active on the Bowling Green music scene since he came to Bowling Green State University in 1969, wondered about how much he’d lost. “I was concerned I wouldn’t get back,” he said. “I couldn’t walk. I couldn’t raise myself. Those were major hurdles.” On June 24, though, Baker was back on stage singing with his band at City Park. Now Saturday, Dec. 29, at 7 p.m. the Joe Baker Band will perform at Howard’s Club H in Bowling Green.  The concert is aptly titled Joe Baker’s Home for the Holidays Christmas Jam. His cognition and speech came back fairly quickly, he said. The neurologist told his wife that her husband had “the best kind of stroke.” While peripheral areas of the brain were affected, no major areas were wiped out. Baker got moving again. He still has problems lifting his right arm, so he can’t get it over the body of his acoustic guitar. He discovered he can get it over the body of his electric. Music, he said, has helped him recover. “Even just working this hand and giving it something to do,” he said of his right hand. “I can’t imagine not being able to play. So even if I could just play for myself it was a good thing.” His musician friends visited him while he was hospitalized, he said, though he was “in wonderland” and wasn’t sure where he was. Baker said he’d look out the window and see the awning, and…