Music

Paul Simon mixes new work with fan favorites in Toledo Zoo concert

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent Media The dilemma of Paul Simon came to the fore in one brief moment at Sunday night’s concert at the Toledo Zoo. He’d just performed “Stranger to Stranger” the title track from his latest album. That was new, he said, now I’ll play something old. A female voice exclaimed from the audience: “Oh, yeah!” Simon knows that most of those who packed the Zoo Amphitheatre were there to hear the hits, especially those dating back to his Simon and Garfunkel days. That was evident from the rapturous greeting those numbers received. But Simon has never stopped growing as a songwriter and musician in the almost half century since the duo broke up. Each album – and that really starts with “Bridge Over Troubled Waters,” the last Simon and Garfunkel studio effort that is a bridge into Simon’s solo career – has been a sonic experiment, first in the textures of the sounds of the American soul – rock, jazz, gospel, rockabilly – and later extending to South African, Brazil, and electronics. He’s grown into the most sophisticated American pop songwriter, whose evocative lyrics float over complex, multi-rhythmic grooves. Encapsulating such multidimensional body of work into a single concert is daunting. Simon and his wildly talented band of musical wizards managed it easily. Like his albums, the zoo show had a unified sound that captured the textures of Simon’s various musical phases. He opened with a blast – “Boy in the Bubble” from 1986’s “Graceland.” “A bomb in a baby carriage shattering a shop window,” he sang, a line sadly still current. The “Graceland” album was…

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Music Industry Club presenting multi-act show at Common Good April 21

From SAMANTHA JO SHARP BGSU Music Industry Club Members of the Music Industry Club at Bowling Green State University have been planning the Burlywood Music Festival since the beginning of January. The event will take place at The Common Good community center house, 113 Crim St., Bowling Green, with musicians performing from 2 to 10 p.m. on Friday, April 21. The event is free and open to the public, all ages are welcome. The Common Good House is a family friendly environment and alcohol is absolutely prohibited on the premises. More than five different musical acts will perform inside and outside the house at the festival. WBGU-FM’s Battle of The Bands competition winners, Indian Opinion will headline, other artist include: The Sugar Creek, Marbin, RadioBlack and Fire Sloths From Mars. Artists who have performed at MIC BGSU’s Open Mic nights throughout the year will be also be featured at the event. Music Industry minor and festival performer Zach Rzicznek is an active member of MIC and has performed at MIC’s other live events. “I am happy to be performing, I’ve been performing at BG open mics all year,” Rzicznek said. “I am really looking forward to performing at the festival.” Communications major/Music Industry Minor Alyssa Rosselot is a founding member of the MIC and plans to use the experience she has gained in an internship in NY this summer at The Syndicate in NYC. “Discussing the event and how we should market it has helped me learn more about social media and the marketing strategies that work best,” Rosselot said. BGSU’s Music Industry Director and Instructor Terry Tompkins advises the…


Student-run benefit intends to keep the jazz coming to BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Jeff Bouck was looking around for places to get a master’s degree in jazz studies, Bowling Green State University stuck out in part because of the number of guest artists it featured. More than a chance to hear these master musicians, the program offered plenty of time with them to learn the craft first hand. At the end of his first year here, Bouck and fellow jazz graduate student Mitchell Borchardt have organized a benefit for the Student Jazz Association to help ensure that continues. The SJA is a BGSU campus organization which promotes jazz in the community, primarily by bringing in guest artists. Those have included recently vocalist Kim Nazarian, drummer Carl Allen, trombonist and composer Alan Ferber, pianist Jon Cowherd, and many others over the years. These artists provide lessons, master classes as well as rehearsing and performing with students. This means students get to experience playing music with the guidance of the composer. The benefit for the Student Jazz Association will be held Thursday, April 27, starting at 7:30 p.m. at the Clazel in downtown Bowling Green. The event will feature a show by the BGSU Lab Band I giving the premier performance of pieces by Borchardt and Bouck as well as performing work by Duke Ellington, Sammy Nestico, and others. They along with Ian Palmer will conduct the band, BGSU’s premier jazz ensemble. In addition to the music there will be card games and raffle baskets. A $2 cover charge will be collected at the door. The student composers penned their charts specifically for this show. Bouck’s is a…


Young conductor brings Mahler masterwork to BGSU stage

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In “Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth)” the composer Gustav Mahler tried to trick fate. Diagnosed with a health ailment, and emotionally reeling from the death of his eldest daughter, he didn’t want to write what would be his Ninth Symphony. For other composers the ninth symphony was their last. So he wrote “The Song of the Earth,” a six movement work of symphonic proportions, but didn’t call it a symphony, said Bowling Green State University musicologist Eftychia Papanikolaou. The piece also called for a large orchestra so was difficult to perform. But in the early 20th century a group of Viennese musicians including Arnold Schoenberg decided this work should be performed more often. So a reduction of the score for 14 musicians was created. Conductor Mercedes Diaz Garcia, a doctoral student at the College of Musical Arts, was drawn to the piece and decided that she wanted to present it to the Bowling Green community. So she recruited the musicians and the two vocal soloists. They’ve been rehearsing the difficult hour-long work for weeks and will present it Wednesday, April 19, at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall on campus. The project is an act of love for all concerned. Diaz Garcia can’t pay anyone, and the project is not part of her doctoral studies. “‘The Song of the Earth’ is not about the physical earth but about the inner world, it’s about the depth of the human soul. So it’s very deep, it’s very exhausting,” the conductor said. For all its challenges she found musicians who are up to…


Chris Buzzelli presents new jazz choir, CB Singers, at April 30 concert

From FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH First Unitarian Church, 3205 Glendale Ave. will host the CB Singers, a jazz choir of 11 accomplished singers, at 1 p.m. Sunday, April 30. The choir, founded by BGSU Professor Emeritus of Music Chris Buzzelli, will perform jazz arrangements 11 songs including “Both Sides Now,” “Bridge over Troubled Water/Lean on Me”, and “It’s De-Lovely.” Suggested donation $8.Solo and tight-harmony choral music in the style of groups such as Manhattan Transfer and The New York Voices will be performed by the CB Singers under the direction of Bowling Green State University Professor Emeritus of Music, Chris Buzzelli. For years, Buzzelli directed the Bowling Green Vocal Jazz Ensemble. When he retired last year, he fulfilled his dream for starting an independent jazz choir. The CB Singers is an intergenerational group of accomplished singers, mostly professional musicians and music teachers. It is one of very few volunteer jazz choirs in the country. (See related story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/chris-buzzelli-still-in-tune-with-jazz/) The group’s repertoire consists mostly of Buzzelli’s arrangements of songs, many of them familiar, for example, “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” “So Many Stars,” “Both Sides Now,” and “Let There Be Peace on Earth.” Most have a small jazz combo as accompaniment, but some are sung without accompaniment. Readers can hear the BGSU Vocal Jazz Ensemble singing Buzzelli’s arrangement of “Bridge over Troubled Water,” at http://tinyurl.com/mst2gew. Buzzelli has his own “harmonic vocabulary.” He started arranging for instrumental groups in high school. Since then, he has always arranged for the groups he was working with. “The advantage of that,” he says, “is that you get to hear your arrangement immediately.” He had written only a handful of…


Bill Mathis ready to move arts at BGSU into a new era as music dean

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News William Mathis takes charge as dean of the College of Musical Arts at a crucial time for arts education. Focusing on the traditional paths of performance and music education will not be enough for higher education music programs. “It’s a different arts and musical landscape then when I was coming up,” said Mathis, 56. While making sure students continue to achieve “technical and musical mastery,” the college needs to broaden its offerings. “We talk a lot about musical entrepreneurship, and I’ve been thinking about citizenship in the arts, arts advocacy and the connection to communities, and how the arts can impact the life of society in our local community,” he said. “The skills that requires are not part of a traditional music curriculum. How can we give that to them? I’ve been thinking about this a lot this year.” Music programs, and arts programs in general, need to prepare their student for a new entrepreneurial environment. “Twenty years from now the schools of music adapting to this will be around,” Mathis said. The fate of those sticking to the more traditional approach is less certain. Mathis wants BGSU to in the forefront of those that survive. Mathis stepped into the role of interim dean last July after Jeff Showell announced his retirement. After a national search, he was named dean in February. Mathis said he felt his administrative background made him a prime internal candidate for the permanent position. He’s served as chair of the Department of Performance Studies and as the college’s graduate coordinator. “I have a disposition that lends itself to this…


BGSU arts events through April 28

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 13 – The International Film Series continues with the Swedish film “Force Majeure,” directed by Ruben Östlund. An award winner at the Cannes Film Festival, the Toronto Film Festival, and other internationally recognized venues, the film deftly explores the emotional dimensions of the legal term “force majeure,” an unexpected event (such as a hurricane) that releases both parties from the obligations of a contract. In this story, the ski vacation of a seemingly ideal family takes a sudden turn when an avalanche approaches them as they are having a pleasant lunch at the lodge. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 13 – Prout Readings conclude with B.F.A. student readings at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free April 13 – Bowling Green Opera Theater presents a variety of opera scenes. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 14 – The University Choral Society and Early Music Ensemble present Bach’s “St. John Passion.” The moving and sacred oratorio of Johann Sebastian Bach is a dramatic representation of the Passion as told in the Gospel of John for the Good Friday Vespers of 1724. Revel in the extravagant, expressive music of the season. The performance will begin at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, East Wooster St., Bowling Green. Free April 14 – The Toledo Museum of Art and BGSU’s College of Musical Arts present EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art. The performance and discussion…