Music

Mustard’s Retreat brings “defiantly hopeful” folk music to Pemberville Opera House

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Mustard’s Retreat steps on the Pemberville Opera House stage Saturday night, they’ll arrive as old friends who haven’t stopped by in a spell. The duo of David Tamulevich and Michael Hough were regulars in Bowling Green a few years ago. Anne Tracy brought them to BG first for her concert series back in the late 1990s, and since they’ve played the Black Swamp Art Festival. Most recently they visited as part of the Yellow Room Gang, a songwriting collective from Ann Arbor, playing at the festival and Grounds for Thought. It’s been a few years, though. When the Ann Arbor- based singer-songwriters return, they’ll bring an old friend, Libby Glover, an original member of the group when it formed in 1974. The show is part of the Live in the House series and starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12. Mustard’s Retreat is all about friendship. The members met back in Ann Arbor when they were working in the college town’s bars and restaurants, not as entertainers but cooking food and serving drinks. Tamulevich and Hough worked as short order cooks. They shared a love of music so they pulled together three songs, and brought their act to the stage of The Arc, the legendary folk venue. Glover was tending bar at another place where Tamulevich was performing, and she started joining him on stage to sing harmony. “The blend of the voices was captivating,” Tamulevich said in a recent telephone interview. The three together performed as Mustard’s Retreat until Glover left town…


Toledo Symphony establishes $10,000 scholarship for BGSU composition students

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Toledo Symphony Orchestra is pleased to announce an exciting new scholarship opportunity for Bowling Green State University students. Each year, two Toledo Symphony Composition Scholarships will be awarded to incoming students in the Master of Music in Composition degree program at BGSU. To be considered for this award, composition applicants must include a previously written work for orchestra and/or a large instrumental ensemble in their application portfolio.  A jury of composition faculty members reviews the candidates’ work based on an evaluation of their current abilities as well as the prospect of their continuing development as a composer of orchestral music. Scholarship recipients are awarded $10,000 for demonstrating such musical excellence in their program. During the second year of their degree, each scholarship recipient is guaranteed a spot in the annual Toledo Symphony BGSU Student Composition Reading Session. The annual TSO Readings at BGSU are a unique opportunity for students to hear their work read by a professional orchestra along with gaining knowledge and insight from guest composers. Once the scholarship recipients are chosen, the Toledo Symphony Orchestra has the ability to request exclusive performance rights for the newly composed works. Zak Vassar, President & CEO of the Toledo Symphony, considers the scholarship program an investment in the future of classical music and the Toledo community. “BGSU’s College of Musical Arts has cultivated many wonderful composers, and writing new music has become a major point of differentiation for the College. I am proud to further the relationship between our organizations by helping BGSU to attract the…


Arts beat: NRBQ right at home at Howard’s Club H

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Anyone who doubts that Howard’s Club H is having a revival as a music venue wasn’t at Saturday night’s NRBQ show. The venerable rock quartet was right at home in the stylish grit of the venerable club. And the sound system did justice to the band’s mix. NRBQ responded with 100 minutes of effervescent groove-based music delivered with a sly smile. The band opened with founder Terry Adams’ ”Rhythm Spell” and wrapped things up with Johnny Cash’s “Get Rhythm” as an encore. That was fitting because there was plenty of rhythm on display between the two. Whether they were sunny rock, the blues, or mambo, the beat was the thing throughout the night. The set bounced with little time between numbers from one highlight to another – the NRBG standard “Me and the Boys” or a rendition of Stevie Wonder’s “You Are the Sunshine of My Life” among them. The show had its odd turns, as when the Adams summoned drummer John Perrin from behind his set to sing a number, supposedly for a woman in the audience. He ambled to the front of the stage and consulted with bassist Casey McDonough and guitarist Scott Ligon about what to sing. Then they eased into Roger Miller’s hit “King of the Road.” Adams took his place behind the drum set, He treated those drums far gentler than he did his two keyboards, which he treated like percussion throughout the night, slapping, punching, and then executing flowing runs. That’s the secret of NRBQ. Why after 50…


Choirs plan mighty celebration of 500th anniversary of Luther’s theses

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Saturday morning, the trumpet called and about 100 vocalists and instrumentalists gathered in St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Bowling Green to put the final touches on the J.S. Bach Cantata “Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott.” The familiar strains of “A Mighty Fortress” rang out, with voices entwined in harmony, bolstered by trumpet flourishes. The jubilant sound was fitting for a celebration. The University Choral Society will join the St, Mark’s Adult Choir and university soloists and instrumentalists for a presentation on the cantata Sunday at 4 p.m., at the church to mark the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s declaration of his 95 theses, the central event in the Protestant Reformation. The anniversary is Tuesday, Oct. 31. Luther was also a prolific composer of hymns, the most famous being “A Mighty Fortress.” “You just can’t let a big anniversary like that go by without observing it,” said Mark Munson, of Bowling Green State University and director of the University Choral Society. “Bach was one of the great church musicians of the Lutheran church. We have a big active Lutheran church in town, so here we are.  It’s a perfect marriage of a great piece of music on a special day.” The concert will open with a contemporary setting of “A Mighty Fortress” set by Nancy Raabe. She employs the original rhythm, Munson said. “The way we sing ‘A Mighty Fortress’ in our churches now does not swing quite the way it did back then. …  So the contemporary setting uses the original rhythm and…


The music plays on at the Clazel

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The new operators of the 91-year-old Clazel in downtown in Bowling Green are not looking to teach the old venue new tricks. This summer Darrin and Cierra Karcher, of Findlay, purchased the Clazel business from Ammar Mufleh, who retains ownership of the building and property. The vision for the venue spelled out by John Carroll, the general manager, follows along the lines of what Mufleh did from the time he purchased the old theater in mid-2008. He ran the club nights on Fridays and Saturdays until last December when he stopped them out of concern for the wear-and-tear on the theater and his staff. Now the late night lights and DJs are back. Carroll worked security and on other projects for the Clazel since 2011. “I have a lot of respect for the building and definitely want to make sure it’s taken care of.” The Karchers, Carroll said, who own several bars in Findlay and Upper Sandusky, were interested in branching out. This will be the first night club the couple will operate. The Clazel continues to be available for weddings, corporate meetings and parties, and fundraisers.  “The big one being Fire and Ice,” a February benefit for the American Red Cross, Carroll said. Working with A.L. Entertainment, the owners are also bringing back regular live music to the Clazel. Carroll said that the Columbus-based jam band ekoostik hookah was interested in hosting a holiday show at the venue. That show will be Friday, Dec. 8 and also feature Tropidelic, Rustik Waters, and Tree…


Composer Jake Heggie’s life is the stuff of opera

By DAVID DUPONT BG INDEPENDENT NEWS   Before the opera, before music, or the words, comes the story, said composer Jake Heggie. “I call this ‘the well,’” he said. “If the well is deep and rich and filled with big emotions and transformation, it just might inspire wonderful words, a strong architecture and potentially beautiful, powerful music.” Heggie have the Edwin H. Simmons Creative Minds series keynote talk, Sunday. He is on campus through Tuesday working with students. For Heggie the most attractive stories are those about the search for belonging and identity, the longing for family. Maybe someone should write an opera about Heggie’s own life. The theme would be the redemptive power of music. When Heggie was 10 his father committed suicide. “He suffered from crushing depression,” the opera composer said. But all Heggie and his three siblings knew is he had abandoned them. “A bomb went off in the family. There was emotional shrapnel and wreckage everywhere.” A week later Heggie turned 11, and he started composing his first songs. He lost himself in the arts. Spending days at the movie theater, watching films, especially musicals. His first goddess was Julie Andrews. “I felt safe and secure with music,” he said. “I spent all my paper route money on music, records, and movies. … I never felt alone though I often felt lonely.” When his family moved from Bexley, Ohio, to southern California, Heggie, who started playing piano at 7, took his first composition lesson. When he graduated from high school, he went to study in Paris…


Expect the unexpected when NRBQ plays Howard’s Club H, founder Terry Adams promises

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Back in 1966, a teenage Terry Adams used to push his piano into the bedroom and jam with brother, Donn, and a few other musical friends. A half century later Adams is still pushing his keyboards across the country playing concert halls, clubs, and bars with that band born in the outskirts of Louisville. NRBQ – originally for New Rhythm and Blues Quintet, and then Quartet – purveyors of off-kilter, off-beat pop rock is heading to Howard’s Club H, Saturday, Oct. 28, starting at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20. Click to purchase. A few home recordings mark the launch of a band that has persisted over the years, reaching music lovers ears in concerts, recordings, and the soundtrack of “The Simpsons,” where their loving irreverence was a perfect fit. In a recent telephone interview, Adams said “you don’t want to lose the reason you got into it.” “Music affected me when I was a young guy. Listening to it gave me something I couldn’t get anywhere else. It showed me the world, gave me insight into living. You can have times when you need a true friend and the music really reaches you. It’s there for you.” He started “messing around” on piano around sixth grade. “I didn’t know I was going to be a musician. I just loved listening to it, and slowly I realized I was making it myself, and I never turned back.” At the beginning during those bedroom sessions, “we just started playing music. Whatever we wanted. Different guys would stop…


Toledo Symphony to premiere Liebermann’s Cello Concerto

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Toledo Symphony announced on Monday that it will perform the world premiere of Lowell Liebermann’s Cello Concerto on its Classics series at the Toledo Museum of Art’s Peristyle Theater on October 27 and 28. This is the first of two world premieres by the Toledo Symphony during the 2017-2018 concert season. “The world premiere of Liebermann’s Cello Concerto allows the Symphony to advance the orchestral repertoire and present the finest contemporary music to our audiences,” said Zak Vassar, President and CEO of the Toledo Symphony. “We just received the parts hot off the press, and we’re excited to rehearse and perform this gorgeous piece of music for all of you.” Cellist Julian Schwarz is the featured soloist on the program. He was born in Seattle into a musical family—father Gerard Schwarz is a famous American conductor—and is already being recognized as a cellist destined to rank among the finest of the 21st century. He made his orchestral debut at the age of 11 with the Seattle Symphony with his father on the podium. Since then, he has performed around the world. Julian performs on a cello made in Naples by Gennaro Gagliano in 1743. Composer Lowell Liebermann is one of America’s most frequently performed and recorded living composers. He has written more than 130 works in all genres, some of which have become standard repertoire for their instruments. He is the recipient of many awards and honors, including the inaugural American Composers Invitational Award by the 11th Van Cliburn Competition. He is head of the…


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 31

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Through Nov. 9 – “Milestones: A Celebration of BGSU School of Art Alumni Featuring Studio Arts, Design and the 25th Anniversary of the Digital Arts Program” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit is part of the 38th annual Bowling Green State University New Music and Art Festival. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m.Sundays. Admission is free. Oct. 20– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents Concert 6, featuring the mixed-chamber group Latitude 49 (L49), whose focus on commissioning and supporting living composers has resulted in more than 30 works written for them. Their performance will begin at 8 p.m. at Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents a panel discussion at 10:30 a.m. at the Marjorie E. Conrad, M.D. Choral Room, located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents Concert 7, featuring electroacoustic works by Kong Mee Choi, Asha Srinivasan, Mike McFerron, Scott Miller, Jay C. Batzner and Konstantinos Karathanasis. The performance will begin at 2:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents the final concert, Concert 8, featuring the Bowling Green Philharmonia and Percussion Ensemble in a performance of a series of orchestral and percussion works. Tickets are $7 in advance and can be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. The concert will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, at…


New Music Festival guest composers embrace the weird & beautiful in their work

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Steve Mackey and Sarah Kirkland Snider came into contemporary music through back doors. A rock musician in the mid-1970s Mackey was majoring in physics as his fall back plan if his rock star dream didn’t come true. Growing up Snider studied cello, piano and attended choir camp in the summer “Music was my favorite thing to do,” she said. That included writing music which she never showed anyone.  When she went to college she studied psychology and sociology and after graduating ended up working for the Center of Reproductive Justice. To fulfill a requirement in college Mackey took a music history class. Thus exposed him to the world of classical music including Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring,” which he called “his gateway drug” to new music. At the time, music industry types who heard his band were impressed but said the music was “spacey, weird and undanceable.” Well, Stravinsky’s ballet music was also spacey, weird and famously difficult to dance to. Mackey was impressed that in the “Rite” and other classical pieces “all of human experience was distilled into a listening experience. “ With the rock band he was accompanying beer drinking, flirtation, and fending off requests for Doobie Brothers’ covers. Living in New York, Snider was called on by friends to write music for theatrical productions. She was so involved she was being called on the carpet for missing work to compose. She decided to make the transition into music. Since she had not majored in music at 24, she set about undertaking a…


Audra McDonald to perform with Toledo Symphony, talk at UT

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The winner of a record-breaking six Tony Awards, two Grammy Awards, and an Emmy Award, Broadway icon Audra McDonald will be here in Toledo for a one-night-only Spotlight performance with the Toledo Symphony on Nov. 4, 8 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater. Named one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2015 and recipient of the 2015 National Medal of the Arts—America’s highest honor for achievement in the arts—from President Barack Obama, Audra McDonald is unparalleled in the breadth and versatility of her artistry as a singer and actress. In addition to her Tony-winning performances, including “Carousel,”A” Raisin in the Sun,” and”The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess,” she has also appeared on Broadway in “The Secret Garden,” “Marie Christine” (Tony nomination), and “110 in the Shade” (Tony nomination). On television, Audra McDonald was seen by millions as Mother Abbess in NBC’s “The Sound of Music Live!” and played Dr. Naomi Bennett on ABC’s “Private Practice.” She won an Emmy Award for her role as host of PBS’s Live from Lincoln Center. On film, she has appeared in “Seven Servants,” “The Object of My Affection,” “Cradle Will Rock,” “It Runs in the Family,” “The Best Thief in the World,” “She Got Problems,” “Rampart,” “Ricki and the Flash,” and most recently, Disney’s live-action “Beauty and the Beast.” Audra McDonald is as much at home on Broadway and opera stages as she is in roles on film and television. In addition to her theatrical work, she maintains a major career as a concert and recording…


The arts can save the world, opera composer Jake Heggie believes

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When composer Jake Heggie comes to campus next week, he has a charge for music students – bring back the arts to schools. “This is a critical moment,” he said. “Arts can save the world.” They build empathy and understanding, and without that human beings’ more destructive tendencies take hold. Heggie, composer of the operas “Dead Man Walking,” “Moby-Dick,” “It’s a Wonderful Life,” and others, will visit Bowling Green State University Sunday, Oct. 22 through Tuesday, Oct. 24 as guest resident for the Edwin H. Simmons Creative Minds Series. He will give a free public lecture on Sunday at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. He will also give talks about his work, present workshops, and offer master classes Monday and Tuesday. Visit for www.bgsu.edu/CreativeMinds the schedule. All events are free. Heggie knows well the power of music to give solace and bring people together. Growing up in Bexley outside of Columbus, he started to study classical piano, and around the house he heard the big band music his father, an avocational saxophonist, loved. His father had dreamed of becoming a musician, but the son of Hungarian immigrants, he went into medicine and became a doctor. He suffered from depression and committed suicide when Heggie was 10. Music helped Heggie deal with the emotional “shrapnel” of his father’s death.  “I found solace in piano and musical theater. That’s where I found strength.” He started about this time to write songs with his idols in mind, Barbra Streisand,…


BG community bands scares up film favorites in Spooktacular concert

From the BOWLING GREEN AREA COMMUNITY BANDS With a nod to iconic movie characters, the Bowling Green Area Community Bands present A Halloween Spooktacular Family Concert on Sunday, October 22 at the Bowling Green Schools’ Performing Arts Center. Doors open at 3:30, by the downbeat of the concert at 4 p.m. The Concert Band, under the direction of Thomas R. Headley, opens with a new  setting of our National Anthem,  “The Star Spangled Banner,”  followed by   Gershwin’s “Strike Up the Band,” “Entry March of the Boyares”  and  “America”,  from “West Side Story,”  music by Leonard Bernstein. Consistent with the concert’s movie theme, both the Gershwin and the Bernstein are from musical and movie scores. The year also represents the 100 birthday of the legendary Leonard Bernstein. BiG Band BG, the jazz component of the BG Community Bands, led by William Lake, will also honor the 100th birthdays of music luminaries Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk. Included in their set will be Gillespie’s “ A Night in Tunisia” and Monk’s signature tune “Round Midnight”. Concluding the night-themed program will be Cole Porter’s “Night and Day”. BiG Band BG soloists include Adam Young, William Tabron, Dan Schellhas, Lily Young, Keith Bernhard and Danny Rodriguez. The closing set of the Concert Band begins with “Tuba Tiger Rag”, a Canadian Brass favorite, featuring the terrific tuba talents of Andrew Kalmar, Katie Ferren, William Lake and Rob Cintron.  Closing the Spooktacular Concert is a John Higgns arrangement of “Hollywood Milestones”, a medley of block-buster movie themes. The BGACB is comprised of the concert band, directed by Thomas…


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING  & COMMUNICATIONS Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison. Murchison is known as a varied performer, composer, arranger, educator, conductor and producer. He was a member of the River City Brass in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 2002-15, and was the principal solo euphonium for the last nine of those years. Since then, Murchison has performed solo and chamber music concerts across the U.S. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 13 – The BGSU Concert Band will perform as part of Homecoming festivities. The band will perform traditional repertoire and new compositions by the world’s leading composers, conducted by Dr. Bruce Moss. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and $7 for adults and available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. Oct. 15 – The Sunday Matinee Series presents “Bedroom, Parlor and Bath” (1931, U.S.A., 85 minutes,…


St. Tim’s to present music history talks by Samual Adler, opening brass concert

From ST. TIMOTHY’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH St. Timothy’ Episcopal Church, Perrysburg, proudly announces the opening concert of the 2017-18 St. Tim’s Discovers Series.  Perrysburg’s own, the Academy Brass Quintet will perform on Sunday, October 15, at 3 p.m. The series is also adding  a music history lectures series by the eminent scholar and composer Dr. Samuel Adler, formerly on the faculties of the Eastman School of Music and Juilliard. The topic for the noon, October 15 is “The Classical Period into the Romantic Era.”  A soup and salad lunch is available preceding the lecture, at 11:30 a.m. Call the church office, 419-874-5704, by noon, Thursday, October 12, for luncheon reservations.  The cost of lunch is $10. Formed in 1994, the Academy Brass Quintet (ABQ) is a professional brass quintet comprised of outstanding brass musicians from across northwest Ohio. Founding members include Michael Smith, trumpet, who is the director of orchestras for Perrysburg Schools, and Pete Vavrinek, horn, who also creates many original arrangements for the ABQ.   Other members currently include Bruce Heuring, trombone; Perrysburg Junior High band director Jason Jordan, tuba; and Dr. David Kosmyna, trumpet.  Dr. Kosmyna, a Toledo native, has had an extensive performing career across North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Presently, he serves on the faculty at Ohio Northern University, teaching trumpet, music composition and theory and directs the Jazz Ensemble. The Academy Brass Quintet performs music from many styles, appealing to a wide variety of musical tastes.  For the St. Tim’s performance, the ABQ is planning Adagio by Mozart,  Pavane  by Faure’,  a suite of folk songs by Edward Elgar, and a medley…