Music

Noted young pianist Stewart Goodyear to perform ‘Emperor’ concerto with Toledo Symphony

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Proclaimed “a phenomenon” by the Los Angeles Times and “one of the best pianists of his generation” by the Philadelphia Inquirer, Stewart Goodyear is an accomplished young pianist, concerto soloist, chamber musician, recitalist, and composer. Goodyear will perform Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5 “Emperor”- known for its virtuosic style and wide dynamic ranges – with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra on January 12 & 13 at 8:00 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater. Goodyear began his musical training at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto and later went on to receive his bachelor’s degree from the Curtis Institute of Music, where he studied with legendary pianist Leon Fleisher. He then received his master’s degree from the Juilliard School of Music. Mr. Goodyear has performed with major orchestras all over the world including the Philadelphia Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, Pittsburgh Symphony, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Cleveland Orchestra, Montreal Symphony, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Atlanta Symphony, Baltimore Symphony, Seattle Symphony, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, and NHK Symphony Orchestra. Following Beethoven’s heroic Piano Concerto No. 5, Maestro Giordano Bellincampi will conduct Brahms’s radiant Symphony No. 2 on Friday and Saturday evening. “This is a great concert to attend if you’re looking for an experience to start your year off on the right note. The dazzling Beethoven’s Emperor coupled with Brahms’s Second and its ability to draw you into the music from the very first notes will leave you feeling uplifted and refreshed.” said Felecia Kanney, Director of Marketing for the Toledo Symphony. Two performances of Beethoven’s Emperor will take place January 12 & 13 at 8 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle…


Rocker Corky Laing taps into fountain of youth at Howard’s show

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Rock drummer Corky Laing says he’s a “22 year old with 50 years of experience.” Celebrating his 70th birthday at Howard’s Club H Saturday night, he demonstrated the truth in the quip. Appearing with the new edition of Corky Laing Plays Mountain, the veteran drummer performed with the energy of the musician who joined Mountain 50 years ago. And his drumming had the verve, precision and a way of shaping the music that’s honed over decades behind a drum set. Yes, the music is 50 years old, but Saturday night it had the freshness and power of newly minted hits. For the older fans in the mixed aged group, they could have stepped back to the time when that record one fan carried to get autographed were brand new. Laing was joined on stage by two stalwarts of the Toledo rock scene, Mark Mikel, on bass, and Chris Shutters, on guitar and flute. All three took turns singing. They provided an additional jolt of energy earning the applause of the audience and the praise of the leader. More than praise really. He said he wants this to be his last band. Working with him reminds him of those days when he first joined Mountain. Toledo is going to become his second home, he promised. The trio commanded the stage like a working unit, with tightly executed riffs, and driving groove. Shutters’ solos were blistering, and exploratory. The band delivered the promised Mountain hits – “Mississippi Queen,” “For Yasgur’s Farm.” Traveling in the Dark,” “Sitting on a Rainbow” and more. After pounding out the opening numbers, Laing announced he’d be telling some stories. It was…


Toledo rockers helping Corky Laing move the Mountain

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Corky Laing will celebrate his birthday at Howard’s Club H Saturday night. The rock drummer known for his decades with Mountain, is turning turn 70.  That’s not how he looks at it though. “I’m 22 with 50 years of experience,” Laing said a few days before the gig. The show starts Saturday at 9 p.m. at the club at 210 N. Main St. That youthful feeling has much to do with his current bandmates, guitarist and vocalist Chris Shutters and multi-instrumentalist and producer Mark Mikel, on bass. They’ve convened at the un-rock hour of 10 a.m. at Mikel’s Maumee studio to put some work in on the Mountain songs as well as a couple originals they’re writing together. This is more than a one-off pick up band. The trio plans to head out on the road in 2018. The Howard’s show will be recorded for a CD and DVD release. Though booked as Corky Laing Plays Mountain, the veteran drummer sees this as a new beginning, maybe even with a new band name. “This is the genesis,” he said. This new venture is rooted in Toledo, where Mikel and Shutters cut their teeth and are still based. Laing likened his time in Mikel’s studio with how he felt when he first joined Mountain back in 1969. “I’m getting a lot of flashbacks.” Shutters is his link to Toledo. Laing heard the guitarist playing in New York with fellow drummer Kofi Baker’s Cream Experience band. “I was blown away by Chris’ playing and his voice,” Laing said. He offered him a job on his tour of Canada and the United States early last year. It…



Winners crowned in Competitions in Musical Performance at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Last week 87 students from the College of Musical Arts each had their eight minutes in the spotlight to vie for a chance to perform as a soloist with the Bowling Green Philharmonia. The instrumentalists and vocalists were part of the largest field ever for the Competitions in Musical Performance at Bowling Green State University, said  Caroline Chin, who teaches violin at the school and coordinated the event this year. In the preliminaries, the students performed for a panel of five outside judges. On Saturday, the eight finalists, four each in the undergraduate and graduate divisions, returned for a full reading of their selections, for a new panel of six judges. Those selected to perform on the Feb. 25 concert with the orchestra are: undergraduates Andrew Hosler, alto saxophone, and Zhanglin Hu, piano, and graduate students Kyle McConnell, trombone, and Caroline Kouma, soprano. Also, Kory Reeder won the composition award for “The Location of Lines.” The piece will be performed by the Philharmonia in October during the New Music Festival. Rhys Burgess received the Virginia Marks Collaborative Piano Award. Burgess, a student of Laura Melton, performed with three students during the competition and all three were finalists, including Kouma. Chin said the large field of competitors “shows the devotion of the studios to giving their students a lot of experience.” “For the competitors, it is a wonderful experience to learn what it’s like to compete, to figure out how to deal with their nerves. Some students compete every year, and you see a lot of improvement.” The competition offers them a way to prepare for moving on to the next stage of their careers,…


Toledo Symphony, Toledo Ballet present classic “Nutcracker”

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Toledo Ballet and Toledo Symphony will work closer than ever before in this December’s production of “The Nutcracker.” It will be the Toledo Ballet’s 77th annual presentation of Tchaikovsky’s beloved masterpiece. This is a partnership rooted in history, as the Toledo Symphony and Toledo Ballet have collaborated artistically on “The Nutcracker” since the 1940s. This year, the Toledo Ballet has committed to presenting “The Nutcracker” with the full Toledo Symphony in the orchestra pit. This makes the Toledo Ballet’s presentation of “Nutcracker” the only local production to include a full orchestra of professional musicians. The Toledo Ballet’s “Nutcracker,” presented in collaboration with the Toledo Symphony, will be performed December 9th at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. and December 10th at 2 p.m. at the Stranahan Theater. Tickets range from $24-$56 and can be purchased by calling 419-246-8000 or visiting toledosymphony.com. The Toledo Ballet’s “Nutcracker,” the longest-running annual production of the ballet in the nation, brings to life E.T.A. Hoffman’s magical story of Clara and her Nutcracker Prince. “As two arts organizations, we individually present meaningful and relevant music and dance to our audiences, but we can do it so much better together. So, if you’re going to see ‘The Nutcracker’ this season, I want to make sure that you see the one with the full orchestra. Only then will you really grasp what Tchaikovsky was trying to achieve,” said Zak Vassar, President and CEO of the Toledo Symphony.“We are excited to partner with the Toledo Ballet in this special way. In an age where many ballet companies dance to prerecorded music, I am proud that the Toledo Ballet will perform with a full, live orchestra….


Library concert offers great piano music from BGSU studios

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Some of the greatest music written for piano will be performed in the atrium of the Wood County Library, Monday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. Performing on the library’s Steinway concert grand will be piano students from the Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts. Masterworks from German and French composers, from J.S. Bach to Maurice Ravel and Claude Debussy will be the focus of the program. The performance continues a series of recitals by BGSU piano students, who hail from around the world. “It has been such a pleasure to have our beautiful piano in use,” said Michele Raine, the library’s assistant director. “The students give excellent performances, and I appreciate that they are so willing to share their talents with the community.” Thomas Rosenkranz of the BGSU faculty coordinates the programs. “These kind of community concerts are important for our piano majors because it allows them to get out of campus and share their music with people who might not normally be exposed to classical music,” he said. “Too often in academia, things are quite insulated and these kind of concerts allow for a more real life experience for our piano majors.” The concert will feature 10 pianists performing music by Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Chopin, Debussy and Ravel. College of Musical Arts attracts musicians from around the world. Among those performing on Monday will be Mengqian Lin, from China. Lin is working on a one-year piano performance certificate from BGSU. In selecting a piece to perform at the library, she reflected on hearing a friend play at the venue. She decided to play the first movement of Beethoven’s Sonata, Opus 109. Considering the library’s “beautiful…


Guitarist Mike Bryce grooves in many styles on new album

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Mike Bryce graduated from Bowling Green State University he already had experience producing two albums. Bryce, a jazz guitar performance major, had founded the Roots Music Club on campus, and took the lead in producing the club’s annual compilations. Now he’s releasing his own CD, “Eclectic Guitar,” featuring 10 originals that cover the gamut of styles he’s explored over the years. Bryce will celebrate the new album with a show Saturday, Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. at Grounds for Thought, 174 S. Main St., Bowling Green. More information is available at www.mikebrycemusic.com. While some of the tunes date back to his senior recital, Bryce said he didn’t really get started in earnest on the project until the beginning of this year. Part of the delay was working it in with his teaching schedule. He has about 40 private students at his own studio, Studio Connection, and in Bluffton. True to the title, “Eclectic Guitar” reflects a variety of styles. Those styles are in part driven by the singers and instrumentalists Bryce recruited to join him. At the core is the rhythm section of Devonte Stovall, on bass, electric bass, and cello, and JP Stebal on drums. He’s worked with them dating back to his time at BGSU, and in the band The Barncats. “It’s comfortable,” he said of collaborating with his bandmates. They are joined by vocalists and violinists on the rest of the tracks, some are folks he knew from the Roots Music Club, or jazz classes, or are friends. He said he tailored the songs to fit the approaches of the various singers. “A lot of it is not jazz,” he said….


Glostik Willy to headline triple bill at Clazel, Nov. 30

Submitted by GLOSTIK WILLY Glostik Willy, a three-piece power trio from Indiana, will perform Thursday, Nov. 30, for a party at Clazel Entertainment, Bowling Green. Listeners are told to: “Expect heavy-hitting drums that will make you move and groove, with progressive thundering bass lines and guitar that sizzles and crackles all the way through your brain and explodes out into the galaxy. This is ‘Hippy Metal’ for those who like their jambands with a dose of head-banging and horn-checks!” Also on the bill will be  PeanutButter Williams and Get Right Band. The band was formed in early 2008 by Jameson “Jay Moe” Bradford (guitar), his brother Ralf Mowf (drums) and childhood best friend Buddha Aguilar (bass). At the time, they were already five year veterans of the Midwest music scene, having started their first band together at age 12.  Since then, Glostik Willy has grown to be a driving force in the National Jamband scene, bridging the gap between rock and jam and forming their own genre of music that can only be described as “Hippy Metal.. To date, Glostik Willy has logged more than 600 performances in more than 25 states and two countries. The band has hosted eight Midwest music and arts festivals, including their signature Willy Fest (headlined this past year by Molly Hatchet), and performed sets at over 70 festivals around the country. In Spring of 2017, the band completed their first National Tour playing 23 shows from Florida to Califiornia. “This band is a good old, down and dirty rock and roll machine. These guys blew me away…!” exclaims Buckeye Music Magazine. “An insanely manic band!” writes MusicFestNews. Glostik Willy’s mission is to create an…


BGSU Arts Events through Dec. 3

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Nov. 26 – Praecepta, the student chapter of the Society of Composers Inc. at BGSU’s College of Musical Arts, will give a performance at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 27 – The Graduate String Quartet will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 28 – The University Choral Society will perform a festive holiday program titled “Joyous Sounds: A Yuletide Celebration,” featuring the BGSU Graduate Brass Quintet and Michael Gartz, organist at First United Methodist Church. The performance will begin 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church of Bowling Green. Free Nov. 29 – Trombonist Brittany Lasch will give a Faculty Artist Series performance. Lasch was the winner of the 2015 National Collegiate Solo Competition hosted by the U.S. Army Band and the 2010 Eisenberg-Fried Brass Concerto Competition, and was the recipient of the Zulalian Foundation Award in 2014. Her trombone quartet Boston Based was just named the winner of the 2017 International Trombone Association’s Quartet Competition. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 30 – The Concert Band will give a concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $10 for other adults; tickets the day of the concert are, respectively, $10 and $13. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 6 p.m. weekdays at 419-372-8171. Dec. 1 – Celloist Deborah Pae will conduct a free master class at 3:30 p.m. in the Choral Rehearsal Hall and give a free performance at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, both at at the Moore…


Art Beat: Jon Hendricks left his mark on jazz world & Toledo scene

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Sad to learn this morning that jazz vocalist and lyricist Jon Hendricks has died at 96 on Wednesday (Nov. 22, 2017). You can easily find the extensive obituaries spelling out his importance in jazz, and his career that extended well into his 90s. He didn’t invent the concept of creating words to go along with jazz instrumentals and improvised solos, but his persistence and longevity meant his work gained the most prominence. My memories of him date to 2000 when he moved back to Toledo, where he spent his formative years, including singing with legendary pianist Art Tatum. He came back not just to teach, but to preside over the local jazz scene. He didn’t show up just to sing, but to listen. When the Toledo Museum of Art opened the sculpture garden he was there, always resplendent in a solid, candy colored suit and his captain’s cap. Even when off-stage, Hendricks always had stage presence. I heard him sing several times on stage at the Art Tatum Jazz Heritage Festival. But I also heard him sing in the audience. During a break at an early festival, he was expounding on the virtues of an evergreen ballad to one of his many fans, leaning over as he illustrated his point with softly sung gem-like phrases. Let me say this, I really wanted to hear Hendricks sing standards. His voice was warm and gruff, weathered, but never world weary, perfect for the classic lines of the Great American Songbook. As a writer himself, he knew how to get inside a lyric. He was a great supporter of the festival. When it moved to International Park,…


Justin Payne brings his music home for album release party

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News No sooner had Justin Payne released his second recording, he headed out of town. This fall, the Bowling Green-based singer songwriter embarked on a five-week solo with company tour that took him to points west and east including his first show in New York City. Accompanying him on the tour was fellow singer-songwriter Zach Wilson. They played solo and accompanied each other for a few numbers. The two singer-songwriters will present a double CD release party Friday, Nov. 24, at Howard’s Club H. The 8 p.m. show will feature sets by each of them, then a set by Corduroy Road, culminating in some “beer-brined” jamming at the end. Wilson, who plays bass with the Justin Payne and Co. band on “High Water,” will mark the release of “Send Scenery.” The show reunites Payne with the quartet that played on “High Water,” which also includes guitarist Calvin Cordy, who also engineered the recording, and drummer Adam Rice. The session was collaborative and inclusive. “Most of the stuff I like about the project was brought by my collaborators,” Payne said. The recording was also inspired by the space in which it was made. Payne said he spent the summer cleaning out his late mother-in-law’s barn. When the hay loft was finally empty he realized that “it’s a picture perfect recording environment. If you’re going for a rootsy sound that’s the room you want to use.” Payne grew up in Newark. His grandparents encouraged him to play violin when he was about 4, though his parents were not as enamored of those early screeches. He went on to play in his school orchestra as well as acting…


Powerhouse Brahms performance to highlight Toledo Symphony program, Nov. 17 & 18

From THE TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Violin virtuoso Rachel Barton Pine, known for her cross-over performances of classical music and heavy metal covers on violin, will perform the celebrated Brahms Violin Concerto with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra on Nov. 17 & 18 at 8 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater.   Rachel Barton Pine has been featured on programs including PBS Newshour, The Today Show, NBC Network News’ “Making a Difference,” and CBS Sunday Morning. She began violin studies at age 3 and made her professional debut at age 7. Today, she is renowned as a leading interpreter of the great classical masterworks who performs with major orchestras around the world under the baton of conductors including Charles Dutoit, John Nelson, Zubin Mehta, Erich Leinsdorf, Neeme Järvi, and Marin Alsop.   The Brahms Violin Concerto is one of Pine’s longtime favorites, she considers it one of the most fulfilling works she performs. Pine has been fascinated with the Brahms Concerto since her earliest violin lessons.  She began studying the work when she was 14, and it rapidly became a mainstay of her repertoire. It was with the Brahms Concerto that she won several of her international prizes and made many of her debuts in Europe, America, and Israel. Rachel Barton Pine shares a strong connection with the Brahms Violin Concerto. “I’m always working to find an effective balance between intellectual validity and instinct — good ideas won’t be effective if you don’t feel them inside, but what you feel needs to be backed up by something more meaningful than ‘I like it that way.’ Basically, every performance needs to be a true collaboration between the performer and the…


Transient Canvas takes contemporary music to unexpected places

Transient Canvas should feel right at home when the contemporary music duo shows up in Bowling Green to play a show at the Clazel Monday, Nov. 20. Amy Advocat on bass clarinet and Matt Sharrock on marimba have played all manner of venues, including being featured on a series of concerts at microbreweries in their home-base Boston where brewers concocted a special beer to serve with the music. “One of the things we love about this group is so we’re so mobile,” Advocat said in a recent telephone interview. “We want to reach people in unexpected places.” Transient Canvas will perform at 8 p.m. Nov. 20 in a free Music at the Forefront concert presented by the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music at Bowling Green State University. On Sunday, Nov. 19 at 3 p.m., the duo will perform in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Great Gallery. Advocat said the programs for the two shows are tailored for the different venues. The museum concert will featured “a thoughtful program, more classically oriented.” On the program “Looking Forward, Looking Back,” the program notes state: “The composers featured … have created something new and fresh by evoking the past, acknowledging their influences without directly emulating them.” At the Clazel, Transient Canvas will turn up the volume, and play a set of electro-acoustic works, that draw on a range of influences including pop and acid rock. All the pieces on both programs have been written expressly for Transient Canvas. Advocat and Sharrock first got together to play a piece he had performed at conservatory. They also read through other pieces, hardly a handful, written for clarinet and marimba. They liked the sound and working…


Toledo Symphony gives voice to BGSU student composers work

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Before Tuesday, this music was just a complicated series of marks on score paper, residing on computer hard drives and in the composers’ heads. Then the Toledo Symphony Orchestra and conductor Michael Lewanski rolled into Kobacker Hall, and it all came to life in vivid orchestral colors. It filled the hall with brass chorales, tuba solos, swirling clarinets, flute melodies, the drone of double basses, harp glissandi, and swelling waves of strings. Sometimes the music was barely a whisper with the violins scraping their strings tonelessly and the brass players breathing through their horns. The music of future had arrived. Tuesday the sixth Toledo Symphony Student Composer Reading Session was held at Bowling Green State University. Each year five student composers, undergraduates and graduates, are selected to have their short orchestral pieces performed by the symphony. The five composers this year were: Kory Reeder, Graeme Materne, Adam Kennaugh, Chuanhao Zhang, and Ashlin Hunter. “For students to really hear these sounds played by high level professionals is quite exceptional. It’s really quite unusual,” said guest composer Andrew Norman, who would later meet with the composers to discuss their work. The Los Angeles-based composer said when he was asked to come to BGSU, “I expected to hear fabulous new music. “This university is known all over the country for being a center of really interesting progressive new music, and I wasn’t disappointed,” he said. “There was so many different kinds of music being made, such a wide diversity of approaches to the orchestra, and each composer had such a different sonic identity.” Merwin Siu, principal second violin and artistic administrator with the orchestra, echoed those sentiments….