Food

‘Can’vass Food Drive will go on, but plans are in place in case of snow emergency

Paul Valdez, associate director of BGSU Center for Community and Civic Engagement has issued the following statement: The winter storm this weekend is likely to impact the Annual MLK Jr. Day “Can”vass Food Drive in Bowling Green on January 19 and 20, 2019.  Organizers expect to operate the event as planned and will collect food at Grounds for Thought during the snowfall, but if a Level 2 snow emergency is issued volunteers and donors are requested to remain off the roads and encouraged to drop off donations at the Brown Bag Food Project Monday, Wednesday, or Friday between 5-8 pm at 115 West Merry Avenue, Suite B in Bowling Green.  Questions can be directed to brownbagfoodproject@gmail.com.  Please check the Brown Bag Food Project Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/brownbagfoodproject/  for updates. If the drive is canceled Saturday because of a Level 2 snow emergency, but that is lifted on Sunday, the food drive will resume.

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Guion Family loves to share its sweet holiday tradition

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Keith Guion’s family gathers at his mother’s house for the Thanksgiving dinner, the big meal will be a respite from the sweet toil that occupies them the rest of this week. More than a dozen members of the Guion family are continuing a candy making tradition that goes back four generations. The Guion family will be busy this week making up to 300 pounds of fudge, caramels, creams and toffees. Those will be packed in half-pound and pound boxes and shared with friends.  It’s a tradition that dates back to the Depression in Indiana when Guion’s grandmother and a friend decided they wanted to learn to make dipped chocolates, said Cassie Greenlee, Guion’s daughter. But the chocolates came out gray and streaky instead of smooth and glossy. So she approached a local candy maker to ask advice. Greenlee’s great-grandmother ended up getting a job as a window dipper, Greenlee said. She dipped chocolate in the shop’s window to lure people into the shop for a closer look. And because the family needed money, she and her husband started making chocolate, 300 pounds of it,  and sold it door to door, accompanied by their son, Guion’s father.  With the Depression passed, Greenlee said her great-grandmother said she’d had enough of the peddling.  “I never want to sell this again. I just want make it and give it away as gifts to friends.” That spirit of giving has continued for almost 90 years. Guion’s grandfather taught his wife the candy making craft, and they passed it along to their five children, including Keith. The Guions still love making candy, and still love sharing them. They’ll even teach others the craft. Earlier this month Guion and Greenlee presented a workshop on candy making at the Wood County Library. They set up shop the historic Carter House with Guion getting an early start making the fudge by boiling cocoa, sugar, corn syrup, and milk to bring it to 238 degrees.  Then he poured it onto a marble slap with a frame around it. Let it cool, but not too much, before using a putty knife he worked in butter then vanilla extract, and the secret ingredient, Sucrovert. He admitted that at this phase of the process, he always wonders: “Is this going to be an absolute disaster? I never now until it’s done.” He works it until the fudge is the right consistency until it can be rolled into strips and cut into bite-bite-size pieces that will be rolled further and dipped. During the family week of chocolate making this is when the grandkids get called into action to do the rolling and cutting. Greenlee said her aunt, though, is always on hand for quality control to make sure the pieces are the right size. The kids, Greenlee said, are usually excited…


Thanksgiving feast is about far more than the food

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Raymond Schmeltz scraped the last bit of pumpkin filling off the pie crust. “I don’t like the crust,” he explained. He closed his eyes and smiled – completely content after filling up on the Thanksgiving feast. “They do a wonderful job with all of this,” Schmeltz said. That’s probably because the volunteers from Christ’s Church in Bowling Green have been serving up the Community Thanksgiving Feast a couple days before the holiday for 27 years. They have the meal preparations and serving working like an assembly line. The meal features the traditional turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy, green beans, rolls and dessert. Renee Baker has been volunteering at the annual feast for its 27-year history. She knows just how important the meal is for the community. “We had a line out the door already at 2:30 p.m.,” and the meal wasn’t scheduled to start until 3 p.m., she said on Tuesday as she took a brief break in the kitchen of the Bowling Green community center. About 50 volunteers worked to prepare the meal with all the trimmings, and another 40 served it up. The church members were prepared for up to 600 diners over the four-hour meal this year – roasting 30 turkeys for the feast. “That’s five more this year than last year,” since they came close to running out last year, Baker said. To complete the meal, more than 50 desserts were also prepared – with the pecan pie proving to be the most popular. Many who come to the feast are in need and this will be their only Thanksgiving dinner this year. But for others, Tuesday was just the first round of big dinners this week. And that’s just fine with Christ’s Church members. “Absolutely anyone is welcome,” Baker said. Making a feast for so many can be exhausting, but Baker and the other volunteers would have it no other way. “We love serving,” she said. “A lot of people don’t have an opportunity to have a good Thanksgiving meal with all the fixings.” To many eating the turkey and dressing, it’s about far more than the food. “It’s helping the community. It gets everybody together in the community. I see all my friends from school,” said Sharon Bechstein as she took a break from working and ate dinner herself. Her favorite part? “All of it. That’s my downfall,” she said. A few tables over, Marcelle Hahn, of Bowling Green, was taking a breather in between her meal and her pecan pie. “It’s delicious. It’s very filling, very good,” she said, picking the mashed potatoes as the best part of the dinner. But Hahn also recognized the feast as far more than a meal. “It’s one more thing to bring the community together,” she said. At another table, church volunteer Jeff…


Heart Association speaker serves up food for thought about healthy holiday eating

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News First the good news on the holiday eating front — scientific studies find people are not likely to gain 10 pounds over the holidays. A few people might, though. And some may very well might feel like they did. Those were some of the takeaways from “Finding a Heart-Heathy Balance for the Holidays,” a presentation at he Wood County Library by Jessica Hover, of the American Heart Association. “People do not gain significant weight over the holidays,” Hover said, though they may pick up three or four pounds, and feel bloated. She added their moods worsen and the incidence of heart and other diseases increases. “So it is time to rethink some of our habits.” The holiday rush and stress lead to heightened emotions. “How can we take care of ourselves?” Hover said it’s not just about the heart, but about the brain, which she likened the brain to an engine that must be fueled.  “We have to fuel it with high quality foods that have vitamins and minerals that our neurons need. That protects us from all the stress. The healthy nutrition protects our brains.” Hover added: “Heart disease is the number one killer of men, women and children.”  One person every 80 seconds dies of heart disease, she noted. “But  80 percent of heart disease can be prevented with lifestyle changes, exercise and diet. We need to start addressing health. As Americans were not doing a great job of that.” On the diet front that means more fruits and vegetables, four to five servings of each daily. A serving can be a cup of raw greens, a medium size fruit or vegetable, or a half-cup of cut up raw or cooked. A good measure is that a dinner plate should half full of veggies or a half cup of chopped vegetable or fruit, with the rest protein and starches. Incorporating more whole grains, nuts and legumes, and fish is also recommended. Using healthier preparation— roasting, sautéing, stir-frying, blanching, and steaming — helps as well as using a healthy oil such as olive oil, or Hover’s favorite, avocado oil. But don’t overcook the vegetables. Vegetables can be slipped into soups, stews and omelets to help increase intake. She advised “experimenting with things like different spices, or vanilla or peppermint extract, that add flavor without affecting health.” The holidays pose a particular calling for following this general advice. Hover offered “The 12 Days of Parties” with ways to navigate the holidays. 1.Don’t skip breakfast. “Our bodies need nourishment in morning.” 2. Don’t forget about exercise. That may include shoveling your driveway or other chores. Avoid sitting too long. Set an alarm to get moving. Work standing up. “All the new research shows sitting is the new cigarette. It’s just as bad for our health as smoking,” Hover said. Exercising…


Chocolate makers to share family tradition

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY Around 80 years ago, Carolyn Morgan attempted to make chocolate at home and found she needed help learning how to make fine chocolate.  She found a local chocolatier and traded work as a dipper in the shop for lessons on how to make the treats.  When the Great Depression hit, Carolyn began working at the chocolate shop to help support her family.  When the Great Depression ended, Carolyn Morgan never wanted to sell chocolate again. She wanted to give it away to friends and family. Now, four generations later the Guion family is continuing Carolyn Morgan’s mission of  passing on chocolate-making lessons. “We are going on four generations of chocolate making as a family,” said Cassie Greenlee, Carolyn Morgan’s great-granddaughter. Cassie and her father Keith Guion will teach a chocolate-making class at the Wood County District Public Library on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018 at 10 am.  “Three branches of our family come to Bowling Green each year and we make about 250 pounds of chocolate,” said Greenlee.  “This year, we are looking forward to sharing this tradition and cooking tips with the community.” The class will take place in the historic Carter House and registration for the event is required. Attendees will learn the entire process, from cooking the centers to hand-dipping the finished product. To register, please call the Library’s Information Services Department at 419-352-5050.


Downtown Farmers Market moving indoors

From DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN One of the many tell-tale signs of summer and favorite for all locals in Downtown Bowling Green is the Downtown Bowling Green Farmer’s Market. For years this annual event has brought hundreds to downtown to sample, purchase and enjoy local vendors and artisans from the area, and spend more time in our voted Best Small Town! Downtown BG is so thrilled to announce we are not done yet! On October 24th, with new winter hours of 3-6 p.m., Downtown BG will open their first Winter Market for the community! The cozy indoor space is directly attached to Calico, Sage, and Thyme & the new Tea Room along Clay and Main Street. While the weather is willing to cooperate, vendors will also be placed outside around the gorgeous iconic tree! What vendors are coming along you may ask? Can produce still be purchased this time of year? We’re happy to say YES! 10-15 market vendors will be present each week providing everything from fresh produce including; squash, pumpkins, mushrooms, microgreens, asparagus, and more! On top of that, there will be baked goods from both Bella Cuisine & Country Grains- and sweet treats and bars from 2 Sharp Cookies! River Valley Pasta will be back with a variety of difference flavors to try each week, and Viking Coffee will have fresh roasted options for all the caffeine enthusiasts! There will also be amazing artistic vendors like Bottles by Ada, providing soy candles and recycled wine bottles with succulents, stunning holiday wreaths from Clay Hill  and tie dye clothing from Magical Mystery Shop! Vendors will constantly be changing as each week goes by, so make sure to stop in an see who is new to the lineup! Riehm Produce Farm will have their CSA bags available for pick-up at our new location through the holiday as well! Great Lakes Custom Sharpening will not be sharpening tools on site, but our market location will be a drop off/pick-up for your sharpening needs each week! WIC and SNAP programs will also continue into our Winter Market season with vendors who are eligible for them. Downtown Dollars can still be purchased and used for market shopping from our market manager Sam. BGSU Dining & Training Kitchen will also play a fun role during our market. Each week a new chef will utilize local ingredients from our vendors and make a fun new free sample for market customers to try the following week! This partnership is a wonderful connection to campus for us, and we hope to see an increase in students for this new winter event! The market also recently brought on a student representative, Nicole Lembo, who will be showing students each week the perks to shopping local and fresh even with her crazy student schedule! Make sure to follow her on instagram for weekly updates…


Get Inspired Nutrition helps smooth out a healthy diet

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Get Inspired Nutrition, 157 N. Main St., Bowling Green, is about more than serving up tasty smoothies. The club, as it is called, is about promoting an approach to nutrition and healthy eating using Herbalife Nutrition products. Owner Bobbi Henry is a believer because the system worked for her. Five years ago after having four children she’d almost given up hope of losing weight. But she knew she needed to do something because of a family history of diabetes. Then a friend told her about the Herbalife approach. And when she started learning more about it she learned it was possible to lose 50 pounds in six months. Now Henry said, she had a goal. It took her five months — the Christmas holidays intervened — but she lost the weight, and she maintained it until a year ago when she decided she wanted to lose more, and dropped another 30 pounds. “It’s not typical, but it’s what’s possible,” Henry said. “This isn’t a diet, it’s a lifestyle change.” While some diets are so strict people can’t stick with them, with this approach “I didn’t feel so deprived.” She consumed the smoothies and planned out meals or snacks. “If people are interested in getting started on a meal plan we can help them with that.” Or someone can stop by at Get Inspired and enjoy the products. The smoothies are 200 to 350 calories and 24-30 grams protein “so it’s a meal replacement,” Henry said. The smoothies come in more than 100 varieties with fruity, coffee, cookie, and candy flavors. They start at $6. They contain a range of natural ingredients, including oatmeal, kale, and peanut butter powder. They can be combined with energy tea to boost metabolism and aloe shots for digestive health, Henry said, for a couple dollars extra. The combinations, she said, can help boost energy and improve focus. Get Inspired opened its doors early last week. It’ll have an official grand opening in early November. Already Henry is a seeing a steady stream of customers. Many were customers of the clubs from other locales in the state. Henry was affiliated with Get Healthy in Perrysburg. She realized Bowling Green would be a good market because of the number of customers, many students who would patronize that club. She was looking for a location near campus. The North Main storefront was a good fit because it has parking out back and a rear entrance, and is just a block away from the courthouse. She and her husband, Darren Henry, did the renovation of the space, that had been home to Main Street Photo, and before that Blue Ribbon Photo. Henry remembers coming to buy black and white film and photographic paper here when she was a student. She and her husband are now finishing up the…