Food

Aldi customers brave rain to celebrate store’s reopening

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News More than 100 customers lined up in on dank, grey, rainy morning to be the first to see the bright new interior of the Aldi store in Bowling Green. The supermarket reopened Wednesday (Oct. 12) morning after having been closed for a remodeling since Aug. 14. All Aldi stores in the United States are getting upgraded said district manager Nathan Terhark. “It’s all part of accompany initiative to improve the look of every store.” The store features a brighter look, with new signs, and wider aisles. The store’s footprint remains the same. “We made it a better customer experience to be able to maneuver through the store,” he said. Store Manager Maria Croninger said she especially liked that the store now has refrigerated produce area, the major addition to the product line. Also, wine will have a new display area. The store, said Terhark, focuses on efficiency. It carries a wide variety of items and brands, but only in a couple types of packaging. He said the chain tried to work with customers to help them while the store was closed. Other area stores in Rossford, Sylvania, and Findlay did see a bounce in customers from the Bowling Green area. Just before the ribbon cutting, Terhark stood in the rain and thanked the customers for their patience and for coming up to celebrate the reopening of the store. The first customers through the doors on opening day got golden tickets good for discounts, Customers coming in throughout the day were entered in a drawing for free produce for a year. Diane Petteys, Bowling Green,…

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Golf carts must pass inspections to be on city streets

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green residents who like to drive golf carts on city streets may soon be able to do so legally. The first step in the process was accomplished Monday evening when City Council passed an ordinance regulating under-speed vehicles. The next step must be taken by the golf cart drivers, whose vehicles must pass an inspection process. As of Jan. 1, a state law deemed it illegal to operate under-speed or utility vehicles on public streets unless they are registered, Municipal Administrator Lori Tretter told City Council on Monday evening. The city ordinance will allow the golf carts on city streets with speed limits of 25 mph, except for Main and Wooster streets. The inspection program has been set up with the local police division. The vehicles must have proper brakes, lights, turn signals, tires, windshield wipers, steering, horns and warning devices, mirrors, exhaust systems, windshields and seat belts. Once an inspection is passed, the golf cart or other slow-moving vehicle can be registered and titled just like other vehicles. Stickers indicating registration will have to be placed on the carts. Police Chief Tony Hetrick said after the council meeting that two inspection events will be scheduled for golf carts. After that, the police will do inspections by appointment only. Also on Monday evening, council passed an ordinance authorizing the trade of property with First Presbyterian Church, and the donation of land to the Wood County Committee on Aging to be used for a new senior center. Former city administrator Colleen Smith praised council for its decision to donate the property for…


Brown Bag Food founder, Amy Holland, honored as Hometown Hero

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Thursday was a good day for the Brown Bag Food Project, an endeavor that is usually the group doing good. At a Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours social, Brown Bag received two checks generated by the ACT BG’s recent Amazing Race fundraiser. The check from ACT BG was for just over $4,800, and the Modern Woodman matched $2,500 of those funds. Then Nathan Eberly, a member of the Brown Bag board and a Modern Woodman rep, surprised Brown Bag founder Amy Holland with a Hometown Hero award. “All this is because of what you do,” Eberly said. Her work inspired him to join the effort. The honor came with a $100 check for the charity of her choice, and there was little doubt what that would be. As usual Holland had little to say. She lets her actions speak for her. She got into action starting Brown Bag in early 2016. She learned that some of her fellow workers at Walmart were having trouble feeding themselves and their families some because they were out on medical leave. She took it upon herself to buy a few bags of food and deliver it to them. That has grown into a project that provides parcels of food to more than 300 people a month. Holland said that’s 60-70 families. The parcels have a value of about $60. The idea is to provide emergency food assistance to tide people over for five days, though often the parcels can last as long as a week, until they can seek assistance elsewhere. The food is given…


Organizers set gears in motion to stage Project Connect

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Shannon Fisher, co-chair of Project Connect, said someday she’d like the program to go out of business. Project Connect is one-day program that provides direct services and connections for the community’s most vulnerable residents. She told 30 or so people attending the kickoff meeting Thursday morning: “We would love not to do Project Connect Wood County because that would tell us everyone in our community has a safe place to live, enough food, and a job to support their family. Until we get there, though, we need to do this.” This is planning. This is putting the gears in motion to stage the multifaceted festival of community care. The kickoff meeting was held at St. Mark’s Lutheran where four and half months from now guests needing a plethora of services will arrive. Project Connect will be held at the church Oct. 18 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. When people arrive, Fisher said, they are not “clients” or “patients,” they are “guests.” Each guest is assigned a host, who helps guide them through the array of services. The aim is to breakdown the usual formality of a client on one side of a desk, covered with paperwork, and the service provider on the other side soliciting information. Project Connect takes a more personal approach to determining what someone needs, and then meets those needs if possible on the day of the event, as well as helping guests make connections that will assist them for the rest of the year. Jamie Brubaker, who chairs the provider committee, said, Project Connect is about being more than a…


Sense of community blossoms in Common Good’s garden

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Common Good’s community garden at Peace Lutheran Church grows the usual beans, tomatoes, lettuce and eggplants. It also grows a sense of community. The produce that grows in the 3,500-square-foot plot can nourish a body. It can also nourish a sense of being connected to the earth. A core group of 15 people cultivate the plot so what grows there can be shared with everyone. The community garden was inspired by a cultural immersion trip to Mexico in 2008, said Megan Sunderland, director of the Common Good, a community and spiritual development center. The students came back stuffed with food for thought about globalization, access to land for gardens, and access to nutritious food. They also were committed to doing more than thinking about the issue. They were ready to get their hands dirty planting the seeds of action locally. The idea for the community garden grew from that. Sutherland said they approached Pastor Deb Conklin of Peace Lutheran about using some of the space on the church’s property between Pearl and West Wooster streets. The church was interested in the collaboration, providing the garden space, a tools and a place to store them, and access to the church. All this is in keeping with the creation care that’s a central tenet of the church’s mission. The core of about 15 people who regularly show up for planting, weeding and harvesting have a variety of motivations. Some are interested in sustainable agriculture, others in providing space so anyone can garden, and others providing quality food to the community. On Memorial Day Weekend, the…


Kroger adds finishing touch to new marketplace

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The transformation of the Kroger Store on North Main Street into a Kroger Marketplace has been a work in progress for all, employees and customers, alike to see and experience. And that experience has been trying at times, conceded store manager Kim Richmond. Every day the store’s associates had to answer queries. Where’s the bread today? And for her it meant late night calls reporting problems at the store. Once it was even a fire. Turned out to be a minor blaze. As a bright new produce section opened up in the north end, in the south end other sections looked like a grocery store in a sci-fi dystopia. On Wednesday the Marketplace put those day behind it. Everything is bright and new. The shelves are packed, and the aisles lined with folks offering free tastes of some of the store’s new products – fried Japanese peppers, all-beef hot dogs and more. There’ll even be a new service starting Thursday that those befuddled customers of a few weeks back would have appreciated – ClickList, a service that allows customers to shop online, drive to the store and have their groceries delivered to them while they wait outside, never having to get out of their cars. The marketplace will also offer The Little Clinic, staffed by nurse practitioners, who will be able to diagnose, treat, and prescribed medications for common illnesses. The store features an extensive deli and cheese area. Roberts, who grew up in Pemberville, started her career at Kroger as a meat counter clerk in 1994. Times and expectations of customers have changed….


“Smoke Signals screening, food in the trenches on tap at library

Thursday, April 13 Community Reads presents the award-winning film, “Smoke Signals,” based on Sherman Alexie’s short story collection, “The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fist Fight in Heaven.” The PG-13 film, with screenplay by Alexie and featuring Adam Beach, Evan Adams, and Irene Bedard, will be shown in the second Floor Meeting Room at 10 a.m., with an encore presentation at 6:45 p.m. Ever wonder what American dough boys ate in the trenches of World War I? Saturday, April 15, come hear author and food historian Nathan Crook (“A Culinary History of the Great Black Swamp”) talk about the good, the bad, and the unusual food that fueled the front for U. S. soldiers during the Great War. The library will be closed Sunday, April 16, and will resume regular hours on Monday, April 17. All programs are free and open to all. For more information, contact the library at 419-352-5104,