Music

BGSU musicians mix it up in Wayland competition

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Like a lot of kids, Nick Fox used his family’s cookware for drums when he was little. Jerry Emmons was into drumming on his school desk with pencils. “I got in trouble,” he said. On Sunday night, Emmons and Fox  with fellow percussionist,  Emanuel Bowman, brought that childhood fascination with making rhythm to fruition and won the graduate division of the Wayland Chamber Music Competition at Bowling Green State University. “Catfish” by Mark Applebaum had Fox drumming on three cast iron pots that have passed down to him from his grandmother. And Emmons worked with three pieces of lumber while Bowman played a set of bongo drums. The piece doesn’t specify instruments, Fox explained, just three metals, three woods, and three skins so they could create their own version. Landlocked Percussion was one of 13 undergraduate and graduate small ensembles that competed in the event that began with the semifinals Saturday, culminating with the finals. The Undergraduate Division winners were the Autumn Trio with Ling Na Kao, violin, Gretchen Hill, clarinet, and Varissara Vatcharanukul, piano. Unlike the percussion trio, the Autumn Trio draws members from different instrumental areas. They may never have met each other had they not been brought together as an ensemble for the Wayland Competition. The three sophomores first assembled as freshmen. Hill said she didn’t remember who on the faculty initiated the creation of the trio. Hill said she and Kao do play together in the Bowling Green Philharmonia “but we sit on different sides of the ensemble, so we don’t get to interact much.” They are pleased that they had this opportunity to get to know each other. For Vatcharanukul and Kao playing in a small ensemble was a first. Figuring out how to work together was a challenge. “It was a new experience,” Kao said. “It was really hard,” she said, especially given they were venturing into playing contemporary music with Paul Schoenfeld’s “Freyiakh,” a piece influenced by klezmer music. Kao said she discovered the piece was searching for music for the trio…


Jazz composer Maria Schneider has high expectations for student performances of her music

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Maria Schneider has high standards for the members of the Maria Schneider Orchestra. They represent the best players on the New York jazz scene, and some of them have been with her since she launched the ensemble more than 25 years ago. When she visits colleges and universities, she expects top quality performances as well. “I never approach anything like this with anything but the highest expectations of what the music can convey,” the composer said in a recent telephone interview. Schneider, who has won Grammy Awards in jazz, classical for her collaboration with soprano Dawn Upshaw, and pop for her work with David Bowie, will visit Bowling Green State University for Jazz Week as the Hansen Musical Arts Series artist. Her three-day visit will culminate with a free concert Friday, March 30, at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall when the Jazz Lab Band I, directed by David Bixler, will play of program of Schneider’s music. She will also present master classes, participate in a question-and-answer session, and discuss digital rights for music during her stay, which begins Wednesday, March 28. Click here for more details. http://bgindependentmedia.org/composer-maria-schneider-bgsu-jazz-week-guest-artist/. She said she always coordinates with the college band’s director to get a sense of the ensemble’s strengths and weaknesses, and the soloists who will be featured.  Sometimes she’s working with a band at a liberal arts school where, unlike at BGSU, few of the band members are music majors. “You just work with what you have and the make the best of it. It’s really fun,” Schneider said. “When I work with students, I push them the way I would push my group or a professional group,” Schneider said.  “I push them to get the best possible result. The power of music doesn’t always depend on perfection. You want the intonation, and you want all those details. “I’ve had performances of my music with young groups where everybody had the right intent. They knew the sound they were going for.  The emotion came through the music so it made the hair…


One-woman opera “Emilie” celebrates female philosopher, physicist & mathematician

From VIVE! ENSEMBLE VIVE! Ensemble, conducted by Maria Mercedes Diaz Garcia, will perform the Midwest American premiere of the opera “Emilie,” by Kaija Saariaho, on Thursday April 5, 2018 at 6 p.m. at Kobacker Hall, Bowling Green State University. Soprano Hillary LaBonte will star and sing the role of Emilie. The renowned opera Emilie is based on Emilie de Chatelet, a French philosopher, mathematician, physicist, and female author who was born in France and lived in the early 18th century. Her most recognized achievement is the translation of and commentary on Isaac Newton’s book “Principia,” work that contains the well-known laws of physics. Based in Paris, France, Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho sets her music to the libretto by Lebanese author Amin Maalouf in this 90-minute monodrama for soprano, chamber orchestra and electronics composed in 2010. The work explores the last moments of Emilie’s life prior to her death due to childbirth during the period that she is writing the translation of Newton’s book. VIVE! Ensemble, founded by conductor Maria Mercedes Diaz Garcia, is a collective of performers and guest artists dedicated to bringing new compositions and revived versions of standard repertory works to broader audiences. Since its inception in 2015 the ensemble has performed chamber versions of the “Rite of Spring,” “Afternoon of a Faun,” and Mahler’s “Das Lied von der Erde” amongst many other works. They are engaged for a tour this coming spring and summer to perform a program of premieres of emerging American composers in Cincinnati, Nashville, and Dallas.  


Mozart’s opera ‘Cosi fan tutte’ is more than a pretty escape

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News These days even an opera from 1790 has to be viewed through the lens of #metoo. That Mozart’s “Cosi fan tutte” can withstand what some would see as an anachronistic framing is a credit to his work. Everything else aside, the music is gorgeous and the BGSU Opera Theatre’s production does full justice to its melodic and orchestral delights of the score while nodding to its social complexities. “Cosi fan tutte” by Mozart and his librettist Lorenzo Da Ponte will be presented Friday, March 23 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, March 25, at 3 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for BGSU students, and $20 the day of the show. Contact bgsu.edu/arts or 419-372-8171. The production, directed by Jane Schoonmaker Rodgers plays up the artificiality of the tale. The curtain comes up on a bare stage as the orchestra, conducted by Emily Freeman Brown, performs the gorgeous overture. As woodwinds duel and strings swell with punctuation by percussion and brass, a café proprietor (Tim Krueger) directs the setting of the scene as conceived by designer Bradford Clark. The curtains are half drawn and draped, and the silhouettes of large windows are projected on the back wall. A café table is set as a maid (Bethany Waldick) diligently sweeps the stage. The proprietor returns throughout the opera to direct the scene changes, a fitting nod to stage business given the plot revolves around deception. Once the scene is set, the young soldiers Ferrando (Mark Tenorio) and Guglielmo (Ben Ganger) arrive to meet with their older friend Don Alfonso (Nick Kottman). The conversation turns to love, and the young men lavish praise on their lovers, how beautiful and faithful they are. The subtext is that the men consider themselves such wonderful catches that they can’t imagine the women being attracted to anyone else. Alfonso begs to disagree. The women like all women – the title of the opera means “thus do all women” – will stray if given the opportunity. The…


Alain Trudel makes debut as Toledo Symphony’s music director

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Praised for his “immense talent as conductor, musician, and performer” by La Presse, acclaimed Canadian conductor Alain Trudel returns to the Peristyle stage to conduct his first ProMedica Classics Series concerts since being appointed Music Director of the Toledo Symphony. Trudel will join Van Cliburn gold medalist Jon Nakamatsu for an exhilarating program inspired by the iconic Dies irae motif, performing Liszt’s Totentanz and Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini. The program will finish with Symphonie Fantastique by Berlioz. Alain Trudel has conducted every major orchestra in Canada, as well as orchestras in the UK, Sweden, Brazil, Italy, Russia, Japan, Hong-Kong, Malaysia, and Latin America. First known to the public as “the Jascha Heifetz of the trombone” by Le Monde de la musique, Trudel has also been a guest soloist with orchestras worldwide, including Philharmonique de Radio-France, Hong-Kong Philharmonic, Austrian Radio Orchestra, Festival Musica Strasbourg (France), Klangbogen Festival (Vienna), and Akiyoshidai and Hamamatsu Festival (Japan). “Alain last appeared at the Peristyle in April 2017, when he conducted Tchaikovsky and Dvořák,” says Zak Vassar, President & CEO of the Toledo Symphony. “Little did we know then that he would win the hearts of our musicians, trustees, and administration and become our next Music Director. I’m thrilled for audiences to see Alain again and glimpse what future concerts will bring.” American pianist Jon Nakamatsu continues to draw unanimous praise as a true virtuoso of the keyboard, whose playing combines elegance, clarity, and electrifying power. A native of California, Nakamatsu came to international attention in 1997 when he was named Gold Medalist of the Tenth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, the only American to have achieved this distinction since 1981. Nakamatsu has performed widely in North and South America, Europe, and the Far East, collaborating with such conductors as James Conlon, Marek Janowski, Raymond Leppard, Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, Osmo Vänskä, and Hans Vonk. He also performed at a White House concert hosted by President and Mrs. Clinton. Performances will take place Friday, March 23, and Saturday, March 24 at 8 p.m. at the Toledo…


Composer Maria Schneider BGSU Jazz Week guest artist

From  BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Composer and band leader Maria Schneider will conduct and teach at Bowling Green State University March 28-30 as the 2018 Hansen Musical Arts Series guest artist. Schneider’s music has been hailed by critics as “evocative, majestic, magical, heart-stoppingly gorgeous, and beyond categorization.” She and her orchestra became widely known starting in 1994 when they released their first recording, “Evanescence.” There, Schneider began to develop her personal way of writing for what would become her 18-member collective, made up of many of the finest musicians in jazz today, tailoring her compositions to distinctly highlight the uniquely creative voices of the group. The Maria Schneider Orchestra has performed at festivals and concert halls worldwide. She has received numerous commissions and guest-conducting invitations, working with more than 85 groups from more than 30 countries. At BGSU, Schneider will conduct the Jazz Lab Band I as it performs her music at 8 p.m. March 30 in Kobacker Hall. Her residency activities include a question-and-answer session at 3:45 p.m. and a composition master class at 5:15 p.m. March 29, and a digital rights/music business master class at 2:30 p.m. March 30. All events are in Kobacker Hall and are free and open to the public. Schneider’s music blurs the lines between genres, making her long list of commissioners quite varied, stretching from Jazz at Lincoln Center, to The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, to collaborations with the late David Bowie. She is among a small few to have received Grammys in multiple genres, including both the jazz and classical categories, as well as for her work with Bowie. Her recent collaboration with her orchestra and Bowie resulted in his single called “Sue (Or in a Season of Crime),” and brought her a 2016 Grammy (Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals). Schneider and her orchestra also received a 2016 Grammy for their latest work, “The Thompson Fields” (Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album). Her distinguished recording career with the orchestra has earned them 12 Grammy nominations and five Grammy awards. Unique funding of projects has become a hallmark for Schneider through the trend-setting company, ArtistShare. Her 2004 album, “Concert in the Garden,” became historic as the…


Renowned soprano Dawn Upshaw brings a world of vocal artistry to BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Soprano Dawn Upshaw and pianist Gilbert Kalish share an easy rapport. That was evident Sunday night as they performed a recital in Kobacker Hall at Bowling Green State University. They were entertain us, and it seemed each other. As Upshaw would say later, she likes to create a true “chamber” setting for the music “like we’re in a living room rather than a big hall.” When Kalish played a solo piece, “The Alcotts” movement from Charles Ives’ second Piano Sonata,  the singer stayed on stage and listened, enjoying the piece as much as the paying customers. “It’s nice when one can enjoy one’s work,” she said in an interview on Monday. Upshaw, one of the most renowned singers of our time, is on campus through Tuesday. Her Helen McMaster Endowed Professorship in Vocal and Choral Studies residency started Sunday with the evening recital, and continues through today (March 20) with a question and answer session at 1 p.m. in the Conrad Choral Room in the Wolfe Center, followed by a master class at 2:15 p.m. She now heads the vocal arts program at Bard Conservatory in the Hudson River Valley, where she lives. “I’m very focused on that.” That’s one of the reasons that Upshaw has cut back on her performing schedule. “I feel like it’s been great for my voice I don’t find I get vocally fatigued as when I was at the peak. “I would love for my life to be a little simpler at this point,” she said. Anyone who has been at their profession for as long as she has will want to change. Her career dates backs to 1984 when she was a member of the Metropolitan Opera’s Young Artist development program. She went on to perform in 300 productions. In 1992 she was the soloist in the landmark recording of Hendrik Gorecki’s “Symphony of Sorrowful Songs,” the rare contemporary music recording that sold millions. She’s won five Grammy Awards, most recently for “Winter Morning Walks,” a collaboration with composer Maria Schneider, who coincidentally…


Composer Ben Taylor brings together music & entrepreneurship to create a ‘blessed’ life

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Benjamin Dean Taylor has been making up his own music since he was a young child. He would play his original songs on the family piano. His mother was impressed, and, as mothers are wont to do, she’d ask him to play that song she’d heard a few days ago for his grandmother. “And I couldn’t remember them,” the now grown composer said. When he was 8, she started having him take piano lessons “so I could write down songs so I could play them for grandma.” Now his music entertains grandmas, mothers, and listeners of all ages. Taylor spent a couple days this week in the Bowling Green High and Middle schools, working with students who were preparing to perform his music in concert. The residency culminated with a Thursday night show with the eighth grade, concert and symphonic bands each playing one of his pieces. A saxophone quartet from Bowling Green State University were guests at the concert playing another of Taylor’s compositions. He went on to learn other instruments, including trumpet. “In college I loved playing,” he said, “but the thrill of writing and having all those sounds in my head come to fruition was the real kicker. That’s what got me started.” Devoting himself to composition meant graduate school. He came to BGSU for his masters where he studied with Marilyn Shrude and Elainie Lillios, graduating 2011. After BGSU he earned a doctorate at the University of Indiana in Bloomington where he and his wife, Allyson, and their five sons, one month to 9 years old, still live. It’s where he makes his living as a freelance composer.  He works by commission only, and has a year’s worth of commitments on the books. The demand for his work grew at first from friends, then others he knew through conferences and other encounters. Just recently, he said, he was approached by two strangers who asked him to write a piece for them. That was a first.  Taylor said he’ll accept after they talk for a bit….


Humorous & soulful sounds on tap as BGSU pianists take center stage at library atrium

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Laughter is not the usual response to music performed at a piano recital, but that’s the reaction Varis Vatcharanukul has gotten when he’s performed “The Body of Your Dreams.” The composition by Dutch contemporary composer Jacob Ter Veldhuis, known as JacobTV, will close the piano concert in the atrium of the Wood County Public Library Monday March 19 at 7 p.m. The rest of the program will features classics by Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann, and Chopin. Vatcharanukul said he wanted to tackle some contemporary music and his teacher Thomas Rosenkranz suggested “The Body of Your Dreams” for piano and boom box. JacobTV is an apt stage name for someone who uses fragments of TV dialogue to build his compositions around. In the case of “Body” he has sampled an advertisement for a body conditioning device. He shaped music lines inspired by the rhythms of the hyperbolic sales pitch. The pianist performs these in counterpoint to cut-and-pasted shards of male and female voices. The result is music easy to understand even for listeners new to contemporary music. “It’s not like that kind of new music,” Vatcharanukul said. It’s tonal and not particularly dissonant, with rhythms that evoke jazz rock. “That can catch audience,” he said. “Body” is also highly rhythmic, and it grows in intensity as the sales pitch continues. The piece is not simple though. Vatcharanukul said he’s not able to pay too much attention to the audience’s reaction because he has to concentrate, listening both what he’s playing and making sure it locks in with the voices on the tape. Vatcharanukul, who comes from Bangkok, Thailand, is in his last semester as an undergraduate piano performance major. He came to study with Rosenkranz. Over his five years at Bowling Green State University, he has played numerous times in the library’s atrium. He likes the mix of listeners. Some are knowledgeable about music, others aren’t. “It’s really nice I can do something for those people,” he said. Rosenkranz, who organizes the library recitals, said the students enjoy playing for…


Arts beat: A night of song benefits La Conexion

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When singer-songwriter Richard Shindell moved to Argentina, his wife’s homeland, he did what you’d expect a singer-songwriter to do: he wrote a song about it … in Spanish. That was one of the songs he sang Monday night at a house concert hosted by Greg and Linda Rich as a benefit for La Conexion. He acknowledged that “Que Hago Ahora” was written in elementary Spanish to an audience that included a number of native Spanish speakers, such as Beatriz Maya, a native of Argentina and executive director of La Conexion. Shindell said he realized just how elementary his Spanish was as he penned the song, so he wove his deficiencies in grammar into the lyrics, one of the few songs ever written that refers to the subjunctive case. It seemed appropriate to have an American living abroad help raise money for La Conexion, which helps immigrants to this area. That coincidence was not the reason he was there. He was there because he’s an expert enough to write a song, in a language foreign to him, and refer to the subjective case. He’s a strong enough writer to pick up an image of a bird flying off in the horizon while a wave crushes a sand castle and turn it into a ballad. He’s a strong enough musician to back his voice with atmospheric strings that provide fills, strums, bell-like resonances, and percussive accents. And Shindell is a good enough storyteller to weave these pieces together into an engaging evening of entertainment When his host Greg Rich, himself a songwriter, referenced the country song “Good Year for the Roses” in one of the three songs in his introductory set,  Shindell opened his set with the song itself. Rich’s song was about how he had mistakenly included this classic breakup tune in the playlist for his and Linda’s wedding reception. “Good Year for the Roses” was playing as they entered. Shindell quipped looking at his own setlist that the theme could very well be songs inappropriate for wedding receptions. He…


Local organist to perform in Fayette

Submitted by ED DULING Ed Duling will be the featured performer at the last concert of the Fine Arts Season on Sunday, March 18, at 3 p.m. at the Fayette Opera House in downtown Fayette, Ohio. The event will center upon hymns (music and words) and other concert and church music of four generations of the Wesleys, starting with the father of John and Charles, founders of Methodism, and extending to Samuel Sebastian Wesley. Coshocton native, Ed Duling, a semi-retired music education professor, is the organist at First Presbyterian Church of Bowling Green and is nearing 50 years as an organist or choir director in churches in several Ohio areas. He continues to teach part-time for Kent State University’s online MMME program and holds interests in church history, rural life, and sheet music, and local history.  This program will marry two of Dr. Duling’s interests in history and music as he is currently serving as president of the United Methodist Historical Society of Ohio.  This special concert will focus upon the reed organs that have been restored by Don Glasgow, a talented restorer of reed organs, including a seldom-seen three-manual (and pedal) Mason and Hamlin (ca. 1890), salvaged in pieces from a Toledo carriage house, and now powered by an electric blower. Duling will also play upon the 19th-century Alexandre and Sons harmonium, probably built in Paris. This pre-Easter concert will also showcase the histories of the Fayette and the West Franklin United Methodist Churches and will include the pianists and organists for these two area churches. The audience will be invited to sing some of the well-known Wesleyan hymns with organ and piano accompaniment.  Refreshments will be served in the lower level pavilion of the Opera House after the concert. Tickets may be purchased at the door and will cost between $10 and $12.


BG native Maria Sampen returns home to perform recital at Toledo Museum

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Maria Sampen and violin did not get off to the best start. As a 4-year-old Suzuki student, she stepped on her violin. It was an accident. She says. Her parents decided maybe she should take piano lessons. She did eventually find her way back to her original instrument. Now Sampen teaches violin at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma Washington, and she performs around the world as a soloist with orchestras and smaller ensembles. Until January she hadn’t presented a solo recital in the area since she graduated from Bowling Green High School in 1993. She and pianist Thomas Rosenkranz played the first of two concerts titled “Brahms in Context” at the Toledo Museum of Art. The second concert will be presented Sunday at 3 p.m. in the museum’s Great Gallery. The concept for the concerts is to play all Johannes Brahms’ pieces for violin and piano and pair them with contemporary pieces, and in one case a piece by Clara Schumann, a friend and possible unrequited love interest of Brahms. The idea for the recital first germinated first in China. In 2015, Sampen had traveled to teach and perform at Szechuan Conservatory in China with her parents John Sampen and Marilyn Shrude, both members of the faculty of Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts. Sampen needed a pianist and her parents suggested their BGSU colleague Rosenkranz, who was in Chengdu on sabbatical. The concert went well. So well in fact that several months later Rosenkranz contacted Sampen with the idea of performing the Brahms pieces in a recital with contemporary works. Performing with Sampen, had led him to reconsider the music of Brahms, which he had previously “never warmed up to,” he said. At the January concert he explained he discovered innovations and rhythm subtleties “under the surface” of the music. Rosenkranz suggested the museum’s Great Performances series as a good venue for the performance. That performance included William Bolcom’s jazzy Violin Sonata No, 2. Sampen knows Bolcom’s work well from her time as an…


Community band features saxophone soloist Stan George

From BOWLING GREEN AREA COMMUNITY BAND A Sax-Sational! Mid-Winter Concert is presented by the Bowling Green Area Community Bands this Sunday, March 18 at 4 p.m. Featuring saxophonist Stan George, a  Bowling Green resident and Perrysburg Schools’ music educator, the bands offer a great variety of music guaranteed to chase away the winter blues. Stan George is a second-generation music teacher; his father, Jim George, will share the stage with him on Sunday. Stan has performed around the area, nationally and internationally as both a jazz and classical artist. He has been a member of the former Ohio Air National Guard Band of the Great Lakes “The Triple Nickel”, the professional saxophone quartet Sax Fourth Avenue and many appearances as  guest soloist with area bands and orchestras. Currently, George has an active schedule performing with the Toledo-based swing band Hepcat Revival. For Sunday’s performance, Stan will perform two works with the BGACB Concert  Band: Gunther Schuller’s tribute to the 1920s era saxophone pioneer Rudy  Wiedoeft entitled “Saxophobia” plus a virtuosic arrangement of the well-known Hungarian folk tune “Czardas.” BiG Band BG, the jazz band of the BGACB program will offer three selections at the midpoint of the concert, all of which will feature the saxophone. The band’s saxophone section is highlighted with “Four Brothers”, a tune synonymous with the innovative big bands of Woody Herman and “Sticks”, often associated with the great saxophonist Cannonball Adderly. The BiG Band BG closes with the ballad “Body and Soul”, with Stan George returning in a solo role. In celebration of Leonard Bernstein’s centenary, the BGACB has been programming his compositions on each concert this season. For the Mid-Winter event, the Concert Band is playing “Make Our Garden Grow” from the Bernstein musical Candide. Several programmatic works are scheduled, including de Meij’s ‘Aquarium,” Patrick Russell’s “Drive!” and a circus-style march” The Stormchasers” by Robert Sheldon. The BGACB performs in the Bowling Green Schools’ Performing Arts Center, 530 West Poe Road, Bowling Green. The facility is fully accessible to those with physical challenges and there is ample parking. The BGACB…


St. Tim’s Discovers features local jazz duo of Dickey & Lemle

From ST. TIMOTHY’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH The concluding concert of the 2017-18 season of St. Tim’s Discovers presents two well-known Toledo jazz musicians.  Saxophonist Mark Lemle and pianist Eric Dickey are performing a program featuring music from their new recording, “Wind, Stone and Ivory”. The Sunday, March 18 performance offers a great variety of jazz styles, including tunes by Duke Ellington, Bill Evans, Thad Jones, Keith Jarrett and Michael Brecker. Dickey and Lemle, both area natives, are familiar to audiences from many venues. Mark Lemle has performed with the Toledo Jazz Orchestra, the Toledo and Adrian Symphonies, Ramona Collins and Line One and the Homewreckers among others. As a vocalist, Mark has been heard with the Toledo Diocesan Choir, Christ the King Church choir and the Toledo Opera Chorus. Lemle also is the owner of Lemle’s Piano Services, a full-service piano repair and restoration business. The St. Tim’s performance will utilize a completely restored Steinway series “O” grand piano for which Mark was the lead technician. Eric Dickey has performed and composed in a vast array of genres, including classical, jazz, Broadway and liturgical music. Locally, Eric has performed with the Toledo Symphony, the Adrian and Northwest Michigan Symphonies and the Perrysburg Symphony. His jazz performances include collaborations with trumpeters Clark Terry and Terence Blanchard, Al Jarreau and Peter Erskine. Currently, Dickey is the music director at Community of Christ Lutheran Church in Whitehouse and performs extensively as a freelance musician. Beginning at 3 p.m., the concert will be held in the sanctuary of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, 871 East Boundary Street, Perrysburg, Ohio.  St. Tim’s Discovers is dedicated to bringing classical music to communities throughout Northwest Ohio. The performance is free and open to the public; doors open to the public at 2:30 p.m.  St. Timothy’s is fully accessible with plenty of convenient parking. Information on all upcoming events in the series is available at www.saint-timothy.net.  


Renowned soprano Dawn Upshaw to sing & teach at BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Soprano Dawn Upshaw, a five-time Grammy Award winner, is devoted to sharing her compelling love of music along with her tremendous vocal talent with people the world over. Now she returns to Bowling Green State University to present a public recital and work with BGSU voice students. With her will be her longstanding collaborator, pianist Gilbert Kalish, who will accompany her in performance and teach master classes to piano students. Except for the recital, all events are free and open to the public.Gilbert Kalish Upshaw and Kalish’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. March 18 in Kobacker Hall at Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are just $7 for adults and $3 for students, thanks to support from the Helen McMaster Endowed Professorship in Vocal and Choral Studies, sponsor of their BGSU residency. All tickets will cost $10 the day of the performance. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center for the Arts, by calling 419-372-8171, or purchased online. The concert will open with a selection of songs by Franz Schubert. Also on the program will be songs by Charles Ives, Bela Bartok, William Bolcom, Rebecca Clake, and Sheila Silver. Kalish will perform Ives’ “The Alcotts, from Piano Sonata No. 2, Concord, Mass.” “Dawn Upshaw’s visit to Bowling Green State University is an opportunity for our students to experience a singer of international stature live in concert,” said Christopher Scholl, an associate professor and coordinator of voice in the College of Musical Arts. “Ms. Upshaw is also well known for her passion to develop young artists. Her interaction with our students will be a priceless experience for our aspiring young professionals. The voice faculty and students are eagerly anticipating a residency filled with new concepts and professional inspiration.” Upshaw made her first appearance on the Kobacker stage in November 1998 as part of the former Festival Series, which brought world-class performers to campus. During the McMaster residency, Upshaw will hold voice master classes from 4:30 to 6 p.m. March 19 in the Marjorie Conrad, M.D. Choral…