Music

BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 31

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Through Nov. 9 – “Milestones: A Celebration of BGSU School of Art Alumni Featuring Studio Arts, Design and the 25th Anniversary of the Digital Arts Program” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit is part of the 38th annual Bowling Green State University New Music and Art Festival. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m.Sundays. Admission is free. Oct. 20– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents Concert 6, featuring the mixed-chamber group Latitude 49 (L49), whose focus on commissioning and supporting living composers has resulted in more than 30 works written for them. Their performance will begin at 8 p.m. at Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents a panel discussion at 10:30 a.m. at the Marjorie E. Conrad, M.D. Choral Room, located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents Concert 7, featuring electroacoustic works by Kong Mee Choi, Asha Srinivasan, Mike McFerron, Scott Miller, Jay C. Batzner and Konstantinos Karathanasis. The performance will begin at 2:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, in…


New Music Festival guest composers embrace the weird & beautiful in their work

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Steve Mackey and Sarah Kirkland Snider came into contemporary music through back doors. A rock musician in the mid-1970s Mackey was majoring in physics as his fall back plan if his rock star dream didn’t come true. Growing up Snider studied cello, piano and attended choir camp in the summer “Music was my favorite thing to do,” she said. That included writing music which she never showed anyone.  When she went to college she studied psychology and sociology and after graduating ended up working for the Center of Reproductive Justice. To fulfill a requirement in college Mackey took a music history class. Thus exposed him to the world of classical music including Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring,” which he called “his gateway drug” to new music. At the time, music industry types who heard his band were impressed but said the music was “spacey, weird and undanceable.” Well, Stravinsky’s ballet music was also spacey, weird and famously difficult to dance to. Mackey was impressed that in the “Rite” and other classical pieces “all of human experience was distilled into a listening experience. “ With the rock band he was accompanying beer drinking, flirtation, and fending…


Audra McDonald to perform with Toledo Symphony, talk at UT

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The winner of a record-breaking six Tony Awards, two Grammy Awards, and an Emmy Award, Broadway icon Audra McDonald will be here in Toledo for a one-night-only Spotlight performance with the Toledo Symphony on Nov. 4, 8 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater. Named one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2015 and recipient of the 2015 National Medal of the Arts—America’s highest honor for achievement in the arts—from President Barack Obama, Audra McDonald is unparalleled in the breadth and versatility of her artistry as a singer and actress. In addition to her Tony-winning performances, including “Carousel,”A” Raisin in the Sun,” and”The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess,” she has also appeared on Broadway in “The Secret Garden,” “Marie Christine” (Tony nomination), and “110 in the Shade” (Tony nomination). On television, Audra McDonald was seen by millions as Mother Abbess in NBC’s “The Sound of Music Live!” and played Dr. Naomi Bennett on ABC’s “Private Practice.” She won an Emmy Award for her role as host of PBS’s Live from Lincoln Center. On film, she has appeared in “Seven Servants,” “The Object of My Affection,” “Cradle Will Rock,” “It Runs in the Family,”…


The arts can save the world, opera composer Jake Heggie believes

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When composer Jake Heggie comes to campus next week, he has a charge for music students – bring back the arts to schools. “This is a critical moment,” he said. “Arts can save the world.” They build empathy and understanding, and without that human beings’ more destructive tendencies take hold. Heggie, composer of the operas “Dead Man Walking,” “Moby-Dick,” “It’s a Wonderful Life,” and others, will visit Bowling Green State University Sunday, Oct. 22 through Tuesday, Oct. 24 as guest resident for the Edwin H. Simmons Creative Minds Series. He will give a free public lecture on Sunday at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. He will also give talks about his work, present workshops, and offer master classes Monday and Tuesday. Visit for www.bgsu.edu/CreativeMinds the schedule. All events are free. Heggie knows well the power of music to give solace and bring people together. Growing up in Bexley outside of Columbus, he started to study classical piano, and around the house he heard the big band music his father, an avocational saxophonist, loved. His father had dreamed of becoming a musician, but the son of Hungarian…


BG community bands scares up film favorites in Spooktacular concert

From the BOWLING GREEN AREA COMMUNITY BANDS With a nod to iconic movie characters, the Bowling Green Area Community Bands present A Halloween Spooktacular Family Concert on Sunday, October 22 at the Bowling Green Schools’ Performing Arts Center. Doors open at 3:30, by the downbeat of the concert at 4 p.m. The Concert Band, under the direction of Thomas R. Headley, opens with a new  setting of our National Anthem,  “The Star Spangled Banner,”  followed by   Gershwin’s “Strike Up the Band,” “Entry March of the Boyares”  and  “America”,  from “West Side Story,”  music by Leonard Bernstein. Consistent with the concert’s movie theme, both the Gershwin and the Bernstein are from musical and movie scores. The year also represents the 100 birthday of the legendary Leonard Bernstein. BiG Band BG, the jazz component of the BG Community Bands, led by William Lake, will also honor the 100th birthdays of music luminaries Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk. Included in their set will be Gillespie’s “ A Night in Tunisia” and Monk’s signature tune “Round Midnight”. Concluding the night-themed program will be Cole Porter’s “Night and Day”. BiG Band BG soloists include Adam Young, William Tabron, Dan Schellhas, Lily Young, Keith Bernhard and Danny Rodriguez….


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING  & COMMUNICATIONS Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison. Murchison is known as a varied performer, composer, arranger, educator, conductor and producer. He was a member of the River City Brass in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 2002-15, and was the principal solo euphonium for the last nine of those years. Since then, Murchison has performed solo and chamber music concerts across the U.S. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 13 – The BGSU Concert Band will perform as part of Homecoming festivities. The…


St. Tim’s to present music history talks by Samual Adler, opening brass concert

From ST. TIMOTHY’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH St. Timothy’ Episcopal Church, Perrysburg, proudly announces the opening concert of the 2017-18 St. Tim’s Discovers Series.  Perrysburg’s own, the Academy Brass Quintet will perform on Sunday, October 15, at 3 p.m. The series is also adding  a music history lectures series by the eminent scholar and composer Dr. Samuel Adler, formerly on the faculties of the Eastman School of Music and Juilliard. The topic for the noon, October 15 is “The Classical Period into the Romantic Era.”  A soup and salad lunch is available preceding the lecture, at 11:30 a.m. Call the church office, 419-874-5704, by noon, Thursday, October 12, for luncheon reservations.  The cost of lunch is $10. Formed in 1994, the Academy Brass Quintet (ABQ) is a professional brass quintet comprised of outstanding brass musicians from across northwest Ohio. Founding members include Michael Smith, trumpet, who is the director of orchestras for Perrysburg Schools, and Pete Vavrinek, horn, who also creates many original arrangements for the ABQ.   Other members currently include Bruce Heuring, trombone; Perrysburg Junior High band director Jason Jordan, tuba; and Dr. David Kosmyna, trumpet.  Dr. Kosmyna, a Toledo native, has had an extensive performing career across North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Presently, he serves on…


Arts beat: VIVE! has right stuff in performance of orchestral masterpieces

Ed.  Note: This is the first is a series of commentary and observations on area arts events. This will supplement, not replace, the coverage BG Independent news already provides. By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Usually when Debussy’s “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun” or Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring” are performed, the size of the orchestra approaches 100. On Sunday (Oct. 8) VIVE! Ensemble conducted by Maria Mercedes Diaz Garcia took on those early 20th Century masterworks with a dozen musicians on each. The performance in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Great Gallery, was stellar. What the pieces might have missed in orchestral heft they gained in translucent textures with subtleties of voicing ringing out through the ensemble. Diaz, a student in Bowling Green State University’s Doctorate in Contemporary Music program as are a number of the other musicians in the ensemble, shaped these pieces with clarity and a sure sense of form. As the “Rite” roared to a finish, two sets of timpani and a bass drum provided enough boom to drive the piece home. But the three percussionists on the “Rite” never overwhelmed the rest of the ensemble. Instead it was the audience that was overwhelmed and…


New WBGU-TV show captures sound, atmosphere of Howard’s Club H

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Dive is a moniker that Howard’s Club H wears proudly. While owners Steve Feehan and Tony Zmarzly have made a number of cosmetic improvements to the Bowling Green establishment, the essential gritty rock ‘n’ roll essence of the place remains. Joe Goodman, of WBGU-TV, recognized that spirit as soon as he came in. The graffiti, the concrete floors and the smell of well-aged beer, he said, “reminded me of all the places I loved in New York City that I was missing. … It’s where real rock is born. This is where people cut their teeth.” So the television producer started thinking about how he could share this place viewers. Working with bands and the owners, he brought in a crew to film. The result is “Live at Howard’s.” As the posters declare “the dive comes alive on WBGU-TV” on Thursday, Oct. 12 at 11 p.m., and in that time slot every week for the next nine. The shows will then be rebroadcast early Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at 3 a.m. The show’s premiere will be celebrated with a party at the club where the first episode will be shown. Goodman said the aim is…


Contemporary concert music rocks at BGSU’s New Music Festival

From MIDAMERICAN CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY MUSIC The 38th Annual Bowling Green New Music Festival will  showcase the work of more than 30 guest composers and performers October 18-21. The four-day international festival includes concerts, lectures and an art exhibition. This year’s featured guests include composers Steven Mackey and Sarah Kirkland Snider, guest ensemble Latitude 49, and a special performance by vocalist Shara Nova. Organized by the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music (MACCM), the College of Musical Arts and the Fine Arts Center Galleries at BGSU, the festival supports the creation of new work and engages both the University and city communities in the process of music appreciation and awareness. Founded in 1980, the New Music Festival has hosted such notable composers as John Adams, Milton Babbitt, John Cage, Chen Yi, John Corigliano, George Crumb, Philip Glass, John Harbison, Lou Harrison, David Lang, Pauline Oliveros, Terry Riley, Christopher Rouse, Frederic Rzewski, Joseph Schwantner, Bright Sheng, Steven Stucky, Joan Tower, and more than 400 other guest composers and musicians. Most festival events are free and open to the public. For a complete schedule of events, visit festival.bgsu.edu or contact the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music at 419-372-2685. Guest Bios: Deemed “one of the…


Jazz guitar master John Scofield takes wing at BGSU festival

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jazz guitarist John Scofield is devoted to the art of improvisation, even when he’s presenting a master class. “Improvising to me is as natural as music,” he said at Bowling Green State University Saturday, The headliner for the Orchard Guitar Festival said he was there to answer questions. “I don’t have any teaching system,” Scofield said. “I do talk a lot” Everyone, whether or not they go to music school, is self-taught, he said.  “You have to teach yourself especially jazz. “ Ultimately, the self-described “music nerd” went into music because he liked it. “The more you learn about music, the more you learn it comes out of you, not the instrument.” The doors of Bryan Recital Hall were locked, he said in jest, and no one gets out without asking a question. Scofield said questions could be about anything, and even include “a plug for your band.” He told the first person who posed a question that he could leave now. He didn’t, and none of the other 100 or so attendees did either. For an hour Scofield, 65, talked about the lessons he’s learned in his almost 50 years as a professional…


Rockin’ prof explores ways pop music has been trashed over the decades

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Popular Culture Professor Matthew Donahue took listeners on a trip through the hit parade Thursday at Jerome Library on the Bowling Green State University campus. His hot tracks weren’t just there because they were popular, but because they were also unpopular with authorities, pastors, parents, politicians, and even white supremacists. Donahue’s presentation, “Popular Music Controversies and Banned Popular Music: The Ascent from Low Culture to High Culture,” in the Pallister Conference room was held in conjunction with Banned Books Week and to celebrate Jerome Library’s 50th anniversary. Donahue’s trip down memory lane began at the dawn of the previous century when blues was labeled devil’s music, as was its close cousin, jazz. Maybe concerns about those styles provoking illicit coupling was warranted, since they gave birth, with some country added to the gene pool, to rock ‘n’ roll. The emergence of rock ‘n’ roll opened a chasm between America’s teenagers and their parents and others. Drawing on YouTube videos, Donahue showed one Rev. Jimmy Snow declaring that young people were marching on the road to hell to the beat of rock ‘n’ roll. More sinister condemnation came from a member of the Alabama White Citizens…


Master guitarist John Scofield brings street smarts to class at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For jazz guitarist John Scofield was coming up as a teenager in Connecticut in the late 1960s, his classrooms were the Fillmore East, the Village Vanguard and other New York City music hotspots. His teachers were the stars on stage, Jimi Hendrix, Thelonious Monk, B.B. King, and Miles Davis. His school bus was the train into the city and then back where his parents were waiting to pick him up at 1 a.m. the next morning. They were all maybe a little naïve, he conceded. “It was dangerous.” But he’s survived to become part of the scene, and one of the most respected guitarists in music, playing straight-ahead and groove-based jazz. On Saturday he’ll travel to Bowling Green State University to headline the Orchard Guitar Festival. Scofield studied guitar from the time he was 11. He studied all styles. His first love was the blues, but he didn’t see a place for himself in the blues. Instead after his guitar teacher introduced him to jazz, he headed down that path. Yes, there was a stage band back in his high school, but “it was pretty bad.” He only knew one person in his town…


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 5

Sept. 27 – The Faculty Artist Series presents Cole Burger on the piano. As a solo and collaborative pianist, Burger has performed throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia – including at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall, Rome’s Teatro di Marcello, the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, the Goethe Institute in Bangkok, the American Cathedral in Paris, and the United States Ambassador’s home in Malaysia. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 28 – The International Film Series presents “Mad Detective” (2007, Hong Kong, 89 minutes, directed by Johnnie To and Wai Ka-Fai), with an introduction by Thomas Castillo, assistant professor in the Department of Theatre and Film. “Mad Detective”exemplifies the stylish visuals, spectacular violence and outrageous humor that have brought a worldwide cult following to Johnnie To and Wai Ka-Fai’s crime thriller collaborations. Forced into retirement for his erratic behavior, brilliant but possibly unhinged detective Chan Kwai-Bun is tapped by Inspector Ho Ka-On to lend his psychic abilities to solving a series of crimes. Kwai-Bun soon discovers that rather than dealing with one criminal, they must vanquish seven villainous spirits. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Gish Film Theater located in…


American Brass Quintet gets down to business during BGSU residency

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even at the top of their game, the members of the American Brass Quintet still understand the importance of daily practice. John Rojak, the bass trombonist for the ensemble, said he started practicing for four hours a day back when he was an undergraduate, and he’s just now easing off on that routine. Not that it’s easy given the musicians’ heavy workloads as teachers, freelance performers, and members of a pioneering brass ensemble. The American Brass Quintet has been in residence at Bowling Green State University since Wednesday as guests of the Hansen Musical Arts Series. They’ve performed a mini-recital, held instrumental classes, coached, and consulted with student composers. Their visit will culminate tonight (Friday, Sept. 22) with a free concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. On Thursday afternoon they met with students to talk about the business side of music. While the quintet represents the core of their work artistically, it is just part of how they earn their livings. They all play in a variety of settings, from chamber orchestras such as Orchestra of St. Luke’s or the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra to Broadway shows. Rojak…