Television

Family values at the heart of star sport broadcaster Jay Crawford’s life

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The first image Jay Crawford flashed on the student union ballroom screen Tuesday night was one of him on his graduation day in 1987. Here he was in all his 22-year-old finery, gold necklace visible because his shirt collar was unbuttoned, and long locks hanging underneath his mortar board. The image was a fitting introuction to his talk “You Can Get There from Here,” in which he talked about his journey from Bowling Green State University to a tiny TV station in Hazard, Kentucky, and over 30 years all the way to ESPN’s flagship show SportsCenter.  That “really groovy picture of me,” he said, caught him on the first step of his journey. In the talk the Sandusky native offered advice and encouragement to students about how to pursue a career. That photo also introduced an important undercurrent to Crawford’s success story. He was flanked by his parents. “The people on left and right had an undying faith and belief in me,” he said. They worked hard to put him through college debt-free. “It was my job to never let them down,” Crawford said.  “I want my parents to be proud of me. I want them to understand I appreciate the sacrifices they made for me.” Crawford is spending this academic year as an executive in residence in the School of Media and Communications. In April as part of a cost cutting move, ESPN bought out his contract. The terms of his separation agreement with ESPN will keep him from taking another media job…

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WBGU part of emergency alert system

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS WBGU-TV is collaborating with Ohio’s 12 public television stations in developing and introducing a secure, alternative delivery system to provide the public with emergency information. OEAS Public AlertNet is a new statewide, multilingual, technology backbone that uses television signals to deliver critical emergency alerts and messaging to other broadcasters and public safety officials, who in turn deliver them to the public. OEAS will automatically provide the Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) alerts and messaging in both English and Spanish. Ohio’s public stations are partnering with the Ohio Emergency Management Agency (EMA) and the state’s Broadcast Educational Media Commission to make this new technology the strongest and safest way to get the emergency information to the people who deliver it to the public. “Existing emergency systems have sometimes failed during crisis periods such as Hurricane Sandy, but OEAS relies on broadcast signals immune to the hacking and information congestion that commercial Internet services can experience when the need is greatest,” according to Dave Ford, Communications Branch Chief, Ohio EMA. A single digital data stream with all digital emergency messaging for the state of Ohio will be sent from the EMA headquarters in Columbus and distributed to the 12 public television stations for broadcast in support of the legacy Emergency Alerting System (EAS). OEAS has been built with the flexibility to accept new messaging formats as they are developed. Funding for OEAS was made possible through a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting through the collaboration of Ohio public television stations in partnership with the…


Piper Kerman found friends, a book & a cause in prison

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Piper Kerman was a just a couple years out of college when she stepped over the line. She’d been traveling all over the world with her drug dealing girlfriend. She tried to keep out of her lover’s business until she was asked to carry a suitcase full of money from Chicago to Brussels. Kerman knew what she’d done, and soon after broke off the relationship, returned to the United States and put that life behind her. That’s what she thought. About five years later federal authorities rang her doorbell in New York City, and the time came to pay for her crime. Kerman ended up serving 15 months in federal prison, and came out to write the best seller “Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison.” On Tuesday night she spoke at Bowling Green State University as the guest of University Libraries’ Ordinary People: Extraordinary Lives series. Being in prison meant more than serving time. Kerman said when she had carried that money from Chicago to Brussels she didn’t think about the consequences her actions. In prison she came face to face with those whose lives had been devastated by drugs. “My closeness and connection to those women led me to realize the harm of my own actions, and I’m very, very grateful for that,” she said. Kerman said she was grateful to Jenji Kohan who produced the Netflix series based on the book, for keeping the issues she wanted to highlight in the book in the forefront. Among those…


Orange is the New Black stars to visit BG on behalf of Kelly Wicks

Submitted by the Kelly Wicks Campaign BOWLING GREEN, OH – Kelly Wicks, Democratic State House Candidate for District Three, will be joined Saturday, October 15, by stars of the Netflix series Orange is the New Black Taylor Schilling and Kate Mulgrew. Schilling and Mulgrew will speak at Wicks’ coffee shop, Grounds for Thought, at 1:00 p.m. about the importance of electing Kelly Wicks, and Democrats up and down the ballot, in November. Schilling and Mulgrew will encourage those in attendance to get involved in the campaign, and to canvass after the event on behalf of Kelly Wicks. Wicks said, “I’m thrilled to be joined by Taylor and Kate to talk about how important this year is for Democrats here in Wood County. I’m excited about the energy they will bring to our community.” The event is open to the public and free of charge.  


BGSU symposium looks at global response to 9/11

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News On the Friday in advance of the 15th anniversary of 9/11 attacks, students from Bowling Green State University shared what they had learned about how others viewed this defining act of terrorism. And the symposium Global Responses to 9/11 and the War on Terror: Literary, Media, and Film perspectives proved such a success that the organizers are considering whether this should be an annual event. The symposium grew out of Khani Begum’s graduate course of the same name offered in spring, 2015.  The 18 students, who represented a variety of academic disciplines including English, Literary and Textual Analysis, Creative Writing, American Culture Studies and Pop Culture, wrote papers of such distinction that late in the semester Begum mused that it was too bad they couldn’t present them as a group in a conference. Sarah Worman and Elena Aponte, members of ATLAS, an organization of students studying Literary and Textual Analysis, discussed the idea, and decided the organization would take on organizing the event. Begum and the graduate students decided to open symposium up to others who may want to present papers or organize panels. All it meant was working over the summer. Worman said the symposium was well attended with the keynote address by Jeffrey Brown, professor in the Pop Culture Department, on “Rewriting 9/11: Superheroes and the Remasculinization of America” drawing the largest audience. Begum had asked Brown to present the talk after hearing him give a class on the topic during last spring’s alumni college. More than a dozen other faculty members…


WBGU-TV gets Emmy nod for tea episode & addiction coverage

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences has nominated WBGU-TV staff for two 2016 Emmys. The nominations were given to Tom Zapiecki, production manager, and Marcus Harrison, producer/director and Bowling Green State University adjunct instructor. “I’m very excited that our work has gotten recognized beyond our immediate audience,” said Zapiecki, who has won two Emmys previously. Those awards were for the documentaries “Made in America: Lima Locomotive Works” and “Ketchup: King of Condiments.” This year’s nomination, Zapiecki’s 12th, was in the Magazine Program – Feature/Segment category for a segment of “Scenic Stops” called “Pappy’s Sassafras Tea.” Zapiecki produced and directed this segment, which told the story of a small, family-run business in Columbus Grove, Ohio, that that makes authentic sassafras tea with a worldwide demand. “Scenic Stops” featured unique, unusual and unknown stories of people and places in northwest Ohio. Harrison was nominated for the first segment of a yearlong series, “Addiction: Heroin and Pills,” which raised awareness and provided resources for opiate abuse and addiction. This was Harrison’s second nomination; last year he was nominated for the Magazine program category. This year’s nomination was in the Crafts: Research category. “It always feels good to be recognized for your work,” he said. “I think it’s a good thing for the station as well as the University to be put on that scale.” Earlier this year, Harrison won an Award of Excellence from the Impact Docs Awards, which are part of the Global Film Awards competition, for the same “Addiction” segment. “Adding to…


BGSU grad speakers tell of different paths to success

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Speaking at Commencement ceremonies Saturday morning at Bowling Green State University, ESPN personality Jay Crawford remembered his first college class. It was a speech course that met in South Hall in 1983, and as an exercise the professor asked them to tell the class what they hoped to achieve. The freshman from Sandusky said: “I’m here to be a television sports anchor.” “I had no idea how crazy that sounded, and I’m glad I didn’t,” he told the graduates from the College of Arts and Science. “I heard the chuckles in the back of the room, but I didn’t listen to them.” He cautioned the graduates that for every friend and family member who supports them there will be “many more who will stand between you and what you dream of and what you want the most. Hear those voices but let them fuel you.” So the kid from Sandusky persisted. Armed with a degree in radio, television and film, he went into broadcast. Now the 1987 graduate is at the top of his field as co-host for the midday edition of ESPN’s flagship program “Sports Center.” Crawford has “wildly exceeded the dreams” he had that first day in class at BGSU, he said. Honorary doctoral degree recipient Maribeth Rahe, president and chief executive officer of Fort Washington Investment Advisors, took a less direct route to success. “Career paths are not linear,” she told the graduates. Her mother urged her to go to college to pursue the opportunities denied women of older generations. She…