Television

New WBGU-TV show captures sound, atmosphere of Howard’s Club H

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Dive is a moniker that Howard’s Club H wears proudly. While owners Steve Feehan and Tony Zmarzly have made a number of cosmetic improvements to the Bowling Green establishment, the essential gritty rock ‘n’ roll essence of the place remains. Joe Goodman, of WBGU-TV, recognized that spirit as soon as he came in. The graffiti, the concrete floors and the smell of well-aged beer, he said, “reminded me of all the places I loved in New York City that I was missing. … It’s where real rock is born. This is where people cut their teeth.” So the television producer started thinking about how he could share this place viewers. Working with bands and the owners, he brought in a crew to film. The result is “Live at Howard’s.” As the posters declare “the dive comes alive on WBGU-TV” on Thursday, Oct. 12 at 11 p.m., and in that time slot every week for the next nine. The shows will then be rebroadcast early Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at 3 a.m. The show’s premiere will be celebrated with a party at the club where the first episode will be shown. Goodman said the aim is for “Live at Howard’s” to be “a little manic, energetic” in keeping with the vibe of the gritty club. The aim is to feature up-and-coming bands both local and regional with a mix true to the club’s usual lineups. The first show features Howard’s regulars Tree No Leaves. The band headlined a show last December, when the first taping was done. Technical difficulties marred some of the taping. When Feehan…

Read More

Orange is the New Black stars to visit BG on behalf of Kelly Wicks

Submitted by the Kelly Wicks Campaign BOWLING GREEN, OH – Kelly Wicks, Democratic State House Candidate for District Three, will be joined Saturday, October 15, by stars of the Netflix series Orange is the New Black Taylor Schilling and Kate Mulgrew. Schilling and Mulgrew will speak at Wicks’ coffee shop, Grounds for Thought, at 1:00 p.m. about the importance of electing Kelly Wicks, and Democrats up and down the ballot, in November. Schilling and Mulgrew will encourage those in attendance to get involved in the campaign, and to canvass after the event on behalf of Kelly Wicks. Wicks said, “I’m thrilled to be joined by Taylor and Kate to talk about how important this year is for Democrats here in Wood County. I’m excited about the energy they will bring to our community.” The event is open to the public and free of charge.  


BGSU symposium looks at global response to 9/11

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News On the Friday in advance of the 15th anniversary of 9/11 attacks, students from Bowling Green State University shared what they had learned about how others viewed this defining act of terrorism. And the symposium Global Responses to 9/11 and the War on Terror: Literary, Media, and Film perspectives proved such a success that the organizers are considering whether this should be an annual event. The symposium grew out of Khani Begum’s graduate course of the same name offered in spring, 2015.  The 18 students, who represented a variety of academic disciplines including English, Literary and Textual Analysis, Creative Writing, American Culture Studies and Pop Culture, wrote papers of such distinction that late in the semester Begum mused that it was too bad they couldn’t present them as a group in a conference. Sarah Worman and Elena Aponte, members of ATLAS, an organization of students studying Literary and Textual Analysis, discussed the idea, and decided the organization would take on organizing the event. Begum and the graduate students decided to open symposium up to others who may want to present papers or organize panels. All it meant was working over the summer. Worman said the symposium was well attended with the keynote address by Jeffrey Brown, professor in the Pop Culture Department, on “Rewriting 9/11: Superheroes and the Remasculinization of America” drawing the largest audience. Begum had asked Brown to present the talk after hearing him give a class on the topic during last spring’s alumni college. More than a dozen other faculty members also volunteered to present papers or participate in panel discussions….


WBGU-TV gets Emmy nod for tea episode & addiction coverage

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences has nominated WBGU-TV staff for two 2016 Emmys. The nominations were given to Tom Zapiecki, production manager, and Marcus Harrison, producer/director and Bowling Green State University adjunct instructor. “I’m very excited that our work has gotten recognized beyond our immediate audience,” said Zapiecki, who has won two Emmys previously. Those awards were for the documentaries “Made in America: Lima Locomotive Works” and “Ketchup: King of Condiments.” This year’s nomination, Zapiecki’s 12th, was in the Magazine Program – Feature/Segment category for a segment of “Scenic Stops” called “Pappy’s Sassafras Tea.” Zapiecki produced and directed this segment, which told the story of a small, family-run business in Columbus Grove, Ohio, that that makes authentic sassafras tea with a worldwide demand. “Scenic Stops” featured unique, unusual and unknown stories of people and places in northwest Ohio. Harrison was nominated for the first segment of a yearlong series, “Addiction: Heroin and Pills,” which raised awareness and provided resources for opiate abuse and addiction. This was Harrison’s second nomination; last year he was nominated for the Magazine program category. This year’s nomination was in the Crafts: Research category. “It always feels good to be recognized for your work,” he said. “I think it’s a good thing for the station as well as the University to be put on that scale.” Earlier this year, Harrison won an Award of Excellence from the Impact Docs Awards, which are part of the Global Film Awards competition, for the same “Addiction” segment. “Adding to the significance of this honor for both Tom and Marcus…


BGSU grad speakers tell of different paths to success

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Speaking at Commencement ceremonies Saturday morning at Bowling Green State University, ESPN personality Jay Crawford remembered his first college class. It was a speech course that met in South Hall in 1983, and as an exercise the professor asked them to tell the class what they hoped to achieve. The freshman from Sandusky said: “I’m here to be a television sports anchor.” “I had no idea how crazy that sounded, and I’m glad I didn’t,” he told the graduates from the College of Arts and Science. “I heard the chuckles in the back of the room, but I didn’t listen to them.” He cautioned the graduates that for every friend and family member who supports them there will be “many more who will stand between you and what you dream of and what you want the most. Hear those voices but let them fuel you.” So the kid from Sandusky persisted. Armed with a degree in radio, television and film, he went into broadcast. Now the 1987 graduate is at the top of his field as co-host for the midday edition of ESPN’s flagship program “Sports Center.” Crawford has “wildly exceeded the dreams” he had that first day in class at BGSU, he said. Honorary doctoral degree recipient Maribeth Rahe, president and chief executive officer of Fort Washington Investment Advisors, took a less direct route to success. “Career paths are not linear,” she told the graduates. Her mother urged her to go to college to pursue the opportunities denied women of older generations. She graduated in 1970 with a BA in Spanish with a…


Two sled hockey events planned next weekend

Two sled hockey events are planned in the region next weekend. The first is a fundraiser, the second annual FIRE & ICE Charity Sled Hockey Game on Saturday April 16 at Tam O’Shanter in Sylvania.  The Toledo Fire Hockey team will take on the Arctic Wolves in a game of hockey in sleds. The second is the following day, Sunday, April 17 at 12:30 p.m., when the Bowling Green High School Bobcat Hockey team takes on the Northwest Ohio Arctic Wolves at the BGSU Ice Arena, again in sleds. The puck drop will be by BG Superintendent Francis Scruci, and the National Anthem will be performed by the BGHS Madrigals. Tickets are $5 per person. Those attending will be able to try sled hockey, participate in the chuck-a-puck, and a 50/50 raffle. NWO Arctic Wolves Sled Hockey Team is hosting the 2nd Annual Fire & Ice Charity Hockey Game taking place in Sylvania on April 16. The event will feature the Toledo Fire Hockey Team vs. Arctic Wolves Sled Hockey Team at Tam O’Shanter Sports, 7060 Sylvania Ave., Sylvania, 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. Sled hockey is fully competitive ice hockey for people with physical disabilities on a competitive team. It is a paralympic sport where ice hockey is played sitting in sleds using two sticks to propel across the ice. The Arctic Wolves Sled Hockey Team is a 501c3 organization under Ohio Sled Hockey. In our 2nd season, the Northwest Ohio Arctic Wolves Sled Hockey Team consists of young people ranging in age from 5-21 who have varying physical disabilities that prevent them from playing stand up hockey. It is…


BGHS grad Clayton Krueger helped bring ‘Mercy Street’ to TV

Viewers of the PBS Civil War drama “Mercy Street” have been primed for an explosive finale to the limited series. Rebels are planning an attack on President and Mrs. Lincoln when they visit the hospital at the center of the action. The climax to the series will play out Sunday at 10 p.m. on WBGU. Another cliffhanger awaits: Will “Mercy Street” be back for a second run? Among those awaiting final word is Clayton Krueger, a 1999 Bowling Green High School graduate, who is a senior vice president for television at Scott-Free Productions, which worked developing the series for PBS. In a recent telephone interview he said the company was working on scripts for a second season pending the go ahead from top brass at PBS. The production of “Mercy Street” broke from PBS pattern of importing its drama series from BBC in England. And, he said, more may be on the way. The Civil War potboiler didn’t start as a drama series. The creator Lisa Wolfinger was planning a documentary series about medicine during the Civil War, and she brought in writer David Zabel to help with the scripting. Over the course of development the idea of a fictional series emerged. They sought out Scott Free, owned by blockbuster producer Ridley Scott, “to lend some oversight to the production,” Krueger said. They met with Zabel and developed scripts. “PBS incredibly supportive,” Krueger said. “They know their audience so well.” While some networks “can get really prescriptive… PBS never took that approach.” The episodes were filmed on location in Richmond and Petersburg, Virginia. Using two directors, each in charge of…