Television

WGTE offers radio, TV holiday specials

From WGTE PUBLIC MEDIA The holidays are a time for traditions. WGTE’s holiday program line up is a favorite tradition throughout northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan.   FM 91 Schedule   Wednesday, December 20 7 p.m.:Toledo Jazz Orchestra Holiday Concert – a jazzy tradition for many families, the TJO presents arrangements of well-known holiday tunes for all to enjoy. 8 p.m.: Paul Winter’s 36th Annual Winter Solstice Celebration – celebrate the return of the sun and the warming of the heart at New York’s Cathedral of St. John the Divine to hear The Paul Winter Consort and the glorious Cathedral Pipe Organ.    Thursday, December 21 8 p.m.: Handel’s Messiah from the Toledo Symphony – The TSO joins forces with local choirs and international vocalists for an annual Holiday tradition, performed at Rosary Cathedral.   Friday, December 22 8 p.m.: Christmas with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir – The choir continues its tradition of great artistry with touching arrangements of familiar carols, and surprises with lesser-known melodies that are fast becoming the new classics. 9 p.m.: Carols & Cheer – Host Scott Blankenship joins forces with Matthew Culloton, artistic director of The Singers, to review their favorite carols this holiday season.   Sunday, December 24 10 a.m.: A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols – The 30-voice King’s College Choir performs the legendary Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols service of biblical readings and music. 12 p.m.: Welcome Christmas! – A perennial Christmas favorite from VocalEssence, one of the world’s premier choral ensembles.  1 p.m.: The New Standards Holiday Special – A unique twist on traditional holiday concerts – one-part variety show, one-part homage to the season, one part irreverent, free-wheeling spectacle presented by The Current. 2 p.m.: The Big Tiny Desk Holiday Special – Celebrate the season with amazing holiday…

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BGSU trustees approved software engineering major

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University hopes a new software engineering major will compute with new students. The University Board of Trustees approved the new major Friday. The new major will equip students to enter an expanding job field. When the measure was considered by Faculty Senate, Professor Robert Dyer said that the openings were growing by 17 percent a year. In introducing the new major, Provost Rodney Rogers said it aligned with areas of strength that already exist within the university. President Mary Ellen Mazey said it also fills a niche. When talking with prospective students about what they’d like to see at BGSU, engineering is the top request. Now, BGSU will have a software engineering program as part of its offerings. The Department of Computer Science, which is within the College of Arts and Sciences, already has a specialization in software engineering that was established two years ago. This will be only the second such program in the state, Rogers said. He knows of at least one student now studying out of state who plans to transfer to BGSU. David Levey, chair of the trustees, asked how faculty would be hired for the new program. Rogers said that the department has a strength in software and has hired one professor in each of the last four years. The specialization now enrolls 17 students, according to the proposal. The university expects to enroll 50 students in the new major in the first year and have 200 within the first five years. “It’s a very rigorous program,” Rogers said. The major must now be approved at the state level. The possibility of another new major related to…


WBGU part of emergency alert system

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS WBGU-TV is collaborating with Ohio’s 12 public television stations in developing and introducing a secure, alternative delivery system to provide the public with emergency information. OEAS Public AlertNet is a new statewide, multilingual, technology backbone that uses television signals to deliver critical emergency alerts and messaging to other broadcasters and public safety officials, who in turn deliver them to the public. OEAS will automatically provide the Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) alerts and messaging in both English and Spanish. Ohio’s public stations are partnering with the Ohio Emergency Management Agency (EMA) and the state’s Broadcast Educational Media Commission to make this new technology the strongest and safest way to get the emergency information to the people who deliver it to the public. “Existing emergency systems have sometimes failed during crisis periods such as Hurricane Sandy, but OEAS relies on broadcast signals immune to the hacking and information congestion that commercial Internet services can experience when the need is greatest,” according to Dave Ford, Communications Branch Chief, Ohio EMA. A single digital data stream with all digital emergency messaging for the state of Ohio will be sent from the EMA headquarters in Columbus and distributed to the 12 public television stations for broadcast in support of the legacy Emergency Alerting System (EAS). OEAS has been built with the flexibility to accept new messaging formats as they are developed. Funding for OEAS was made possible through a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting through the collaboration of Ohio public television stations in partnership with the Ohio EMA and the Broadcast Educational Media Commission. Participants in the project also include the Ohio Association of Broadcasters and…


Piper Kerman found friends, a book & a cause in prison

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Piper Kerman was a just a couple years out of college when she stepped over the line. She’d been traveling all over the world with her drug dealing girlfriend. She tried to keep out of her lover’s business until she was asked to carry a suitcase full of money from Chicago to Brussels. Kerman knew what she’d done, and soon after broke off the relationship, returned to the United States and put that life behind her. That’s what she thought. About five years later federal authorities rang her doorbell in New York City, and the time came to pay for her crime. Kerman ended up serving 15 months in federal prison, and came out to write the best seller “Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison.” On Tuesday night she spoke at Bowling Green State University as the guest of University Libraries’ Ordinary People: Extraordinary Lives series. Being in prison meant more than serving time. Kerman said when she had carried that money from Chicago to Brussels she didn’t think about the consequences her actions. In prison she came face to face with those whose lives had been devastated by drugs. “My closeness and connection to those women led me to realize the harm of my own actions, and I’m very, very grateful for that,” she said. Kerman said she was grateful to Jenji Kohan who produced the Netflix series based on the book, for keeping the issues she wanted to highlight in the book in the forefront. Among those were friendship. Kerman said she didn’t go into prison expecting to find friends, but wouldn’t have survived without them. Kerman…


Orange is the New Black stars to visit BG on behalf of Kelly Wicks

Submitted by the Kelly Wicks Campaign BOWLING GREEN, OH – Kelly Wicks, Democratic State House Candidate for District Three, will be joined Saturday, October 15, by stars of the Netflix series Orange is the New Black Taylor Schilling and Kate Mulgrew. Schilling and Mulgrew will speak at Wicks’ coffee shop, Grounds for Thought, at 1:00 p.m. about the importance of electing Kelly Wicks, and Democrats up and down the ballot, in November. Schilling and Mulgrew will encourage those in attendance to get involved in the campaign, and to canvass after the event on behalf of Kelly Wicks. Wicks said, “I’m thrilled to be joined by Taylor and Kate to talk about how important this year is for Democrats here in Wood County. I’m excited about the energy they will bring to our community.” The event is open to the public and free of charge.  


BGSU symposium looks at global response to 9/11

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News On the Friday in advance of the 15th anniversary of 9/11 attacks, students from Bowling Green State University shared what they had learned about how others viewed this defining act of terrorism. And the symposium Global Responses to 9/11 and the War on Terror: Literary, Media, and Film perspectives proved such a success that the organizers are considering whether this should be an annual event. The symposium grew out of Khani Begum’s graduate course of the same name offered in spring, 2015.  The 18 students, who represented a variety of academic disciplines including English, Literary and Textual Analysis, Creative Writing, American Culture Studies and Pop Culture, wrote papers of such distinction that late in the semester Begum mused that it was too bad they couldn’t present them as a group in a conference. Sarah Worman and Elena Aponte, members of ATLAS, an organization of students studying Literary and Textual Analysis, discussed the idea, and decided the organization would take on organizing the event. Begum and the graduate students decided to open symposium up to others who may want to present papers or organize panels. All it meant was working over the summer. Worman said the symposium was well attended with the keynote address by Jeffrey Brown, professor in the Pop Culture Department, on “Rewriting 9/11: Superheroes and the Remasculinization of America” drawing the largest audience. Begum had asked Brown to present the talk after hearing him give a class on the topic during last spring’s alumni college. More than a dozen other faculty members also volunteered to present papers or participate in panel discussions. The subjects ranged from a panel of Muslim women talking…


WBGU-TV gets Emmy nod for tea episode & addiction coverage

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences has nominated WBGU-TV staff for two 2016 Emmys. The nominations were given to Tom Zapiecki, production manager, and Marcus Harrison, producer/director and Bowling Green State University adjunct instructor. “I’m very excited that our work has gotten recognized beyond our immediate audience,” said Zapiecki, who has won two Emmys previously. Those awards were for the documentaries “Made in America: Lima Locomotive Works” and “Ketchup: King of Condiments.” This year’s nomination, Zapiecki’s 12th, was in the Magazine Program – Feature/Segment category for a segment of “Scenic Stops” called “Pappy’s Sassafras Tea.” Zapiecki produced and directed this segment, which told the story of a small, family-run business in Columbus Grove, Ohio, that that makes authentic sassafras tea with a worldwide demand. “Scenic Stops” featured unique, unusual and unknown stories of people and places in northwest Ohio. Harrison was nominated for the first segment of a yearlong series, “Addiction: Heroin and Pills,” which raised awareness and provided resources for opiate abuse and addiction. This was Harrison’s second nomination; last year he was nominated for the Magazine program category. This year’s nomination was in the Crafts: Research category. “It always feels good to be recognized for your work,” he said. “I think it’s a good thing for the station as well as the University to be put on that scale.” Earlier this year, Harrison won an Award of Excellence from the Impact Docs Awards, which are part of the Global Film Awards competition, for the same “Addiction” segment. “Adding to the significance of this honor for both Tom and Marcus is that each of these productions used BGSU student employees…