Health

Too many gyms in BG may be unhealthy for business

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   As Bowling Green area residents try to work off their butts or guts, the city is seeing a glut of gyms in the community. Gym members trying to burn off calories on cardio equipment and build muscles on weight machines may benefit from the exercise options – but the number of gyms could be unhealthy for the businesses. There are many similarities at the gyms – lots of equipment for those who prefer solitary exercise, or classes in spinning, zumba or pilates for those who thrive on group motivation. There are some differences at each location. The community center has a track, basketball and volleyball courts. St. Julian’s Fitness has free classes with memberships and is the official Silver Sneaker location in the city. Anytime Fitness is open round the clock and allows use of any other Anytime Fitness in the world. BGSU Recreation Center has a couple indoor pools. And Crossfit offers its own brand of specialized workouts. Soon, people looking for just the perfect fit to perfect their bodies, will have another choice. Planet Fitness has announced plans to open a gym on South Main Street, near the Staples store. Generally, Kristin Otley, director of the Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Department, is in favor of new business growth to the city – especially since that means new tax revenue – even if it is another gym. “I think competition is a great thing. It keeps us all on our game,” she said. However, this latest entry has some gym officials breaking out into a sweat. “That is concerning. This…

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Health care for underserved focus of Sunday talk

From MAUMEE VALLEY UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CONGREGATION Health care benefits expert Joe Hessling will present “Healthcare for the Underserved,” Sunday, June 25, from 12:30-2 p.m. at Maumee Valley Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 20189 N. Dixie Highway (Route 25) Bowling Green. Hessling is currently a Partner at RL King, an employee benefits consulting company. His passion remains encouraging access to healthcare by the underserved, as well as the forgotten middle class, who many times find this necessity out of reach. He promises a very non-political discussion of the current industry, potential changes and necessary changes. For more than 20 years, Hessling has served in a variety of roles within The Diocese of Toledo, including vice president and treasurer, overseeing healthcare and retirement benefits for the diocese’s nearly 3,000 employees. He currently serves as vice chair of the board of directors of a local Medicaid clinic serving more than 25,000 patients per year. . The session is free of charge and open to the public.. There is no need to pre-register. No offering will be taken. This event is part of the “Sunday Specials” series offered by the MVUUC. BGSU students needing free transportation to the event can call (419) 885-1162 to make arrangements


Reports of elder abuse on the rise in Wood County

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Wood County Probate Court is seeing more cases of elderly abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Judge David Woessner who presides over the court, said Wednesday, that he hopes it is because of greater awareness leading to more reports. Raising that awareness was the purpose the program presented by Wood County Job and Family Services after the annual Flag Day Pause for the Pledge observance. Tying the two programs together is fitting Woessner said: “So today when we recognize the flag and all it stands for, we should also recognize our need and our responsibility to help the elderly avoid abuse, neglect, and exploitation.” Mark Briseno, the adult protective services supervisor at Job and Family Services, said that in all of 2016 his office handled 260 cases. So far this year, there have been 149 reports, putting the office on track to handle 300 in 2017. He said that the increase probably reflects both heightened awareness leading to people reporting more readily as well as more cases. “It’s hard to really tell,” he said. “It’s a combination of both. Hopefully the efforts we’re taking to get the word out is contributing to more reporting. On the other hand, the elderly population is growing.” And he knows there are many more cases. Nationally only 1 in 14 cases is reported. “We have abuse by family members, neglect by family members or someone who may be in charge of someone’s care or an elderly person who is neglecting themselves,” he said. This may be because of memory loss or physical conditions that prevent them from taking care of…


Young entrepreneurs counting on ZERO deodorant, other products, adding up to success

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Reid McEwen and Todd Platzer met while working up a sweat playing club tennis as kids in Bowling Green. Now the tennis buddies have launched a business selling a product they probably could have use back then – Odor Erasure, a natural deodorant. Like their friendship, the product also first started developing in Bowling Green. Now based in Wilmington, North Carolina, their original product ZERO deodorant is making an impression in the market. The all-natural product is even sold in a shop in Budapest, Hungary. The deodorant uses oxygenated African shea oil not just to mask body odor but to eliminate it by killing the bacteria that causes it. Now the partners have launched a Kickstarter campaign(tinyurl.com/zerocares1) to begin marketing an expanded line of skin care products – Odor Erasure, lotions, sun block, and bug repellant. These like the original ZERO deodorant will have a few simple ingredients, all easy to pronounce – shea butter, ozone, beeswax, essential oils, coconut butter. No baking soda, a common ingredient in other natural deodorants. And no aluminum that’s a common in traditional skin care products. Aluminum has been linked numerous health problems, including cancer, Platzer said. They noted that the federal Food and Drug Administration does not regulate skin care, deodorants, makeup and personal hygiene products. The skin, McEwen noted, soaks up whatever is put on it. As much as 64 percent of what’s rubbed on the skin ends up in the blood stream. ZERO’s marketing, he said, has a large educational component about all the harmful things in skin care products. According to McEwen: “Skin absorption should be…


Organizers set gears in motion to stage Project Connect

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Shannon Fisher, co-chair of Project Connect, said someday she’d like the program to go out of business. Project Connect is one-day program that provides direct services and connections for the community’s most vulnerable residents. She told 30 or so people attending the kickoff meeting Thursday morning: “We would love not to do Project Connect Wood County because that would tell us everyone in our community has a safe place to live, enough food, and a job to support their family. Until we get there, though, we need to do this.” This is planning. This is putting the gears in motion to stage the multifaceted festival of community care. The kickoff meeting was held at St. Mark’s Lutheran where four and half months from now guests needing a plethora of services will arrive. Project Connect will be held at the church Oct. 18 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. When people arrive, Fisher said, they are not “clients” or “patients,” they are “guests.” Each guest is assigned a host, who helps guide them through the array of services. The aim is to breakdown the usual formality of a client on one side of a desk, covered with paperwork, and the service provider on the other side soliciting information. Project Connect takes a more personal approach to determining what someone needs, and then meets those needs if possible on the day of the event, as well as helping guests make connections that will assist them for the rest of the year. Jamie Brubaker, who chairs the provider committee, said, Project Connect is about being more than a…


Concerned Ohioans to rally at Latta’s office

Members of Concerned Ohioans will rally Friday, June 2, at noon at U.S. Rep. Bob Latta’s office, 1045 N. Main St., Bowling Green, to oppose the  American Health Care Act, the House Republicans’ inntnded replacement for the Affordable Care Act. Concerned Oioans contend the bill would take health coverage away from 23 million Americans and have a disastrous impact the AHCA would have on Ohio families and communities . Following the speeches, participants will visit Latta’s office and deliver letters, articles and fact sheets. Friday’s event is part of a week of action during the Congressional Memorial Day recess holding Republican Members of Congress accountable for their actions on health care. The attendees will send a clear message: Ohioans won’t let Rep. Latta get away with taking health coverage away from millions, gutting Medicaid, or cutting protections for those with pre-existing conditions.


BGSU researchers find virus may have been accomplice in Toledo water crisis

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS In August 2014, toxins from algal blooms in Lake Erie shut down the city of Toledo, Ohio’s water supply, leaving half a million residents without potable water for more than two days. A new study co-authored by Bowling Green State University researchers shows that a virus may have been involved in the crisis and suggests methods for more stringent monitoring of water supplies. Michael McKay, Ryan Professor of Biology, and George Bullerjahn, Professor of Research Excellence, both at BGSU, worked with a team of 25 researchers to examine the physiological traits of Microcystis, the cyanobacterial organism responsible for scum-like algal blooms in Lake Erie. They found that it was consistent with algal blooms from 2012 and 2013 except for one thing – the Microcystis cells had a viral infection. Typically, toxins from algal blooms are trapped within the cell until the cell dies. But virus infections can cause cells to break open, leaking the toxin into the water and subsequently into water facility intake pipes and treatment centers. The viruses analyzed in this study infect only bacteria and do not infect humans. “The study changes the way we think about how the toxin moves around aquatic systems and gets into water supplies,” said Steven Wilhelm, Mossman Professor of Microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, who led the study. “It may help us understand how these organisms persist in nature.” The study was published recently in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. Co-authors included Wilhelm and his team from the University of Tennessee; Tim Davis of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Great…