Health

Reports of elder abuse on the rise in Wood County

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Wood County Probate Court is seeing more cases of elderly abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Judge David Woessner who presides over the court, said Wednesday, that he hopes it is because of greater awareness leading to more reports. Raising that awareness was the purpose the program presented by Wood County Job and Family Services after the annual Flag Day Pause for the Pledge observance. Tying the two programs together is fitting Woessner said: “So today when we recognize the flag and all it stands for, we should also recognize our need and our responsibility to help the elderly avoid abuse, neglect, and exploitation.” Mark Briseno, the adult protective services supervisor at Job and Family Services, said that in all of 2016 his office handled 260 cases. So far this year, there have been 149 reports, putting the office on track to handle 300 in 2017. He said that the increase probably reflects both heightened awareness leading to people reporting more readily as well as more cases. “It’s hard to really tell,” he said. “It’s a combination of both. Hopefully the efforts we’re taking to get the word out is contributing to more reporting. On the other hand, the elderly population is growing.” And he knows there are many more cases. Nationally only 1 in 14 cases is reported. “We have abuse by family members, neglect by family members or someone who may be in charge of someone’s care or an elderly person who is neglecting themselves,” he said. This may be because of memory loss…


Young entrepreneurs counting on ZERO deodorant, other products, adding up to success

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Reid McEwen and Todd Platzer met while working up a sweat playing club tennis as kids in Bowling Green. Now the tennis buddies have launched a business selling a product they probably could have use back then – Odor Erasure, a natural deodorant. Like their friendship, the product also first started developing in Bowling Green. Now based in Wilmington, North Carolina, their original product ZERO deodorant is making an impression in the market. The all-natural product is even sold in a shop in Budapest, Hungary. The deodorant uses oxygenated African shea oil not just to mask body odor but to eliminate it by killing the bacteria that causes it. Now the partners have launched a Kickstarter campaign(tinyurl.com/zerocares1) to begin marketing an expanded line of skin care products – Odor Erasure, lotions, sun block, and bug repellant. These like the original ZERO deodorant will have a few simple ingredients, all easy to pronounce – shea butter, ozone, beeswax, essential oils, coconut butter. No baking soda, a common ingredient in other natural deodorants. And no aluminum that’s a common in traditional skin care products. Aluminum has been linked numerous health problems, including cancer, Platzer said. They noted that the federal Food and Drug Administration does not regulate skin care, deodorants, makeup and personal hygiene products. The skin, McEwen noted, soaks up whatever is put on it. As much as 64 percent of what’s rubbed on the skin ends up in the blood stream. ZERO’s marketing, he said, has a large educational component about all the harmful things in…


Organizers set gears in motion to stage Project Connect

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Shannon Fisher, co-chair of Project Connect, said someday she’d like the program to go out of business. Project Connect is one-day program that provides direct services and connections for the community’s most vulnerable residents. She told 30 or so people attending the kickoff meeting Thursday morning: “We would love not to do Project Connect Wood County because that would tell us everyone in our community has a safe place to live, enough food, and a job to support their family. Until we get there, though, we need to do this.” This is planning. This is putting the gears in motion to stage the multifaceted festival of community care. The kickoff meeting was held at St. Mark’s Lutheran where four and half months from now guests needing a plethora of services will arrive. Project Connect will be held at the church Oct. 18 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. When people arrive, Fisher said, they are not “clients” or “patients,” they are “guests.” Each guest is assigned a host, who helps guide them through the array of services. The aim is to breakdown the usual formality of a client on one side of a desk, covered with paperwork, and the service provider on the other side soliciting information. Project Connect takes a more personal approach to determining what someone needs, and then meets those needs if possible on the day of the event, as well as helping guests make connections that will assist them for the rest of the year. Jamie Brubaker, who chairs the provider…


Concerned Ohioans to rally at Latta’s office

Members of Concerned Ohioans will rally Friday, June 2, at noon at U.S. Rep. Bob Latta’s office, 1045 N. Main St., Bowling Green, to oppose the  American Health Care Act, the House Republicans’ inntnded replacement for the Affordable Care Act. Concerned Oioans contend the bill would take health coverage away from 23 million Americans and have a disastrous impact the AHCA would have on Ohio families and communities . Following the speeches, participants will visit Latta’s office and deliver letters, articles and fact sheets. Friday’s event is part of a week of action during the Congressional Memorial Day recess holding Republican Members of Congress accountable for their actions on health care. The attendees will send a clear message: Ohioans won’t let Rep. Latta get away with taking health coverage away from millions, gutting Medicaid, or cutting protections for those with pre-existing conditions.


BGSU researchers find virus may have been accomplice in Toledo water crisis

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS In August 2014, toxins from algal blooms in Lake Erie shut down the city of Toledo, Ohio’s water supply, leaving half a million residents without potable water for more than two days. A new study co-authored by Bowling Green State University researchers shows that a virus may have been involved in the crisis and suggests methods for more stringent monitoring of water supplies. Michael McKay, Ryan Professor of Biology, and George Bullerjahn, Professor of Research Excellence, both at BGSU, worked with a team of 25 researchers to examine the physiological traits of Microcystis, the cyanobacterial organism responsible for scum-like algal blooms in Lake Erie. They found that it was consistent with algal blooms from 2012 and 2013 except for one thing – the Microcystis cells had a viral infection. Typically, toxins from algal blooms are trapped within the cell until the cell dies. But virus infections can cause cells to break open, leaking the toxin into the water and subsequently into water facility intake pipes and treatment centers. The viruses analyzed in this study infect only bacteria and do not infect humans. “The study changes the way we think about how the toxin moves around aquatic systems and gets into water supplies,” said Steven Wilhelm, Mossman Professor of Microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, who led the study. “It may help us understand how these organisms persist in nature.” The study was published recently in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. Co-authors included Wilhelm and his team from the University of Tennessee;…


Sharma earns doctorate in osteopathic medicine

Submitted by Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine Saurabh Sharma of Bowling Green was among the students who received a doctor of osteopathic medicine (D.O.) degree from Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine at the college’s May 6 commencement exercises. In 2008 Dr. Sharma earned a B.S. and M.S. in biology from Bowling Green State University, and is a 2000 graduate of Don Bosco School in Siliguri, India. After graduation, Dr. Sharma will begin a residency in internal medicine in Columbus. The 2017 graduating class was the 38th to graduate from the Heritage College, which was created by the Ohio Legislature in 1975, and is the only institution in the state accredited to educate osteopathic physicians.


Fight against cancer continues under gray skies at Relay for Life

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Cancer hasn’t kept those involved in the Relay for Life down, so rain in the forecast certainly wasn’t going to scare them off. The annual Relay for Life for Southern Wood County was held Saturday from 11 to11 at the Wood County Fairgrounds. Liz Bostdorff, one of the chairpersons for the event, said that before the relay kicked off, it had already raised $50,000 toward its $80,000 goal. Fundraising continues through the summer. Speaking at noon she was expecting about 250 to participate. “Especially for the cancer-fighting community, this is a big event for us.” Julie Rehard, as a radiology therapist at the Maurer Family Cancer Center, is on the front lines of that fight. “This is another way to support my patients,” she said of her participation in the relay.  “It’s a way for the community to come together and show support for all the cancer survivors and those who have cancer.” Rehard said she’s been participating in Relays for Life since 1993 and in Bowling Green for three. She was on hand as a member of the Wonder Walkers, a team of people affiliated with the Wood County Hospital, both cancer survivors and hospital employees The team is organized by Cindy Rossow, who is both. She works as a medical coder. In 2005 she was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. On Saturday she was getting ready to serve the survivors luncheon. For her the relay is “a way to raise money to fight cancer.” Ann Avina is part of the BG Catholic Community…


‘Die-in’ shows grave concerns about GOP health plan

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   A strip along North Main Street was turned into a makeshift “cemetery” Thursday as supporters of the Affordable Care Act laid on the ground and held up cardboard tombstones. “Last Thursday, the House passed a bill that will have this effect on people,” said Sara Jobin, one of the organizers of the “die-in.” One “tombstone” read “Beloved daughter chose college over health care.” Another stated, “Killed by heartless lies.” And another, “RIP Democracy.” The protest was held in front of the office of U.S. Rep. Bob Latta, R-Bowling Green. Latta was not present and the office closed shortly after the “die-in” began. Molly Tomaszewski, of Northwood, held signs protesting the projections that 24 million Americans will lose coverage under the American Health Care Act passed by the House GOP members, including Latta.  She believes the answer is a single payer system. “Universal health care is not a partisan issue. It’s a life issue,” she said. “We need health care.” Tomaszewski said her husband has good health insurance through his job. But she has 27 pre-existing conditions as listed in the new GOP plan. Without insurance, her prescriptions would cost $5,000 a month. “They could put lifetime caps on,” she said, worrying about how she would then afford her medications. Of the 30 people gathered for the protest, the majority were women. Anesa Miller, of Bowling Green, said her husband died last month after a long illness. She was insured through him, and is two years away from qualifying from Medicare. So she…


NAMI to offer mental health conferences on trauma

(Submitted by the National Association on Mental Illness Wood County) Trauma is at the root of many emotional, psychiatric, and social problems. According to a recent study, survivors of trauma are fifteen times more likely than the general population to attempt suicide, four times more likely to become alcoholic, four times more likely to inject drugs, and three times more likely to experience depression. “Trauma survivors represent nearly eighty percent of clients at mental health clinics,” according to the same study (Breslau and Kessler, Biological Psychiatry, Issue 50, 2001.) Trauma is defined as “an occurrence wherein an individual sees or experiences a risk to their life or physical safety, or that of other people, and feels terror, fear, or helplessness” (Psychology Dictionary.org.) Post-traumatic Stress Disorder is common among military veterans (The U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs reports that around eleven to twenty of every 100 Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans suffer with PTSD, for example.) With these facts in mind, NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Wood County is focusing on trauma at its spring mental health conference mini-series. Series sessions will take place at three locations in Wood County. There will be a nominal fee for each session, and CEUs for counselors, social workers, and marriage and family therapists are pending. On May 31 from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Wood County Public Library, Candice Schmitt, LISW, will address trauma-informed care and dementia. Candice is a family therapist in the University of Toledo Medical Center’s Senior Behavioral Health Program, and has been an instructor at Defiance College. Pam…


Latta’s “communication with his constituents is subpar” – Deborah Schwartz

From DEBORAH SCHWARTZ The article “Latta’s Health Care Vote Leaves Some Constituents Feeling Sick,” published May 5, 2017, did an excellent job covering both sides of the political healthcare story in District 5: Bob Latta ‘s oft-repeated Republican poppycock about the failures of “Obamacare” and his constituents’ concerns about the deleterious effects “Trumpcare” will have on their health. But thankfully, it went one step further in reporting on Latta’s lack of communication with his constituents. As someone who has emailed him, called him, gone to his Bowling Green office, and worked on planning town halls to which he was invited but did not attend, I can attest to the fact that his communication with his constituents is sub-par: · He does not hold or attend town halls. · His telephone town halls are one-sided, with no notice of when they are scheduled, screening of questions, and no time for follow-up questions. · His District Director and office staffers respond blandly to questions about Mr. Latta’s votes and opinions, as in “Mr. Latta hasn’t communicated with us about that yet.” · His schedule is not posted in advance of events – anywhere – although a BG office staffer said that press releases on his website told where he would be. · He doesn’t respond to comments on his posts on Facebook. · His email newsletter is full of superficial reports on legislation and his letters are form letters that do not respond to constituents’ questions or concerns. Last Friday, while two Wood County residents braved the rainstorm to stand on Main…


Latta’s health care vote leaves some constituents feeling sick

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green Congressman Bob Latta said the nation needs rescuing from the “disaster that is Obamacare.” So on Thursday he became one of the 217 Republicans who voted to push out the Affordable Care Act to replace it with the American Health Care Act. The vote was followed by cheers from Republican members of Congress who had promised for seven years that they would get rid of the ACA. “It’s very evident that Obamacare is failing the American people, and its problems continue to grow,” Latta posted on his website. “The promises of Obamacare have been thoroughly broken, and the problems it has foisted on hardworking families can’t be ignored.” “Constituents in my district have told me about skyrocketing premiums, difficultly using their insurance, and the lack of choices they face thanks to Obamacare,” Latta stated. But many constituents in Wood County were left wondering Thursday if Latta listened at all to their concerns. Those citizens, who support the ACA, peacefully protested each week outside the congressman’s Bowling Green office. They wrote countless letters and made countless phone calls. The local citizens pleaded to be heard. They begged for a chance to meet with Latta. But on Thursday, he voted without a single town hall meeting on the health care issue. Some constituents did receive letters back from Latta – but they were identical form letters mailed out months after the local residents sent letters voicing their concerns. “In his bogus form letter that many of you received, he wrote that premiums…


Faculty members urge BGSU to be a leader in addressing sexual violence

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Sandra Faulkner wants Bowling Green State University to be the leader in combating sexual assault on campus. The director of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies hopes that the recent protests over the way BGSU handles sexual assault will lead to innovation, not duplication of other universities’ “best practices.” “No institution in higher education handles sexual violence well,” she said. Faulkner and her colleague Sarah Rainey, an associate professor in the School of Cultural and Critical Studies, met with Dean of Students Jodi Webb Friday in the wake of a protest that drew about 200 students. In their meeting with Webb, Faulkner and Rainey brought with them a list of actions, drafted by members of the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies faculty, that BGSU could take immediately to start addressing the problem. On Monday President Mary Ellen Mazey announced the formation of Task Force on Sexual Assault. Rainey is one of 17 members appointed to the task force. The task force includes faculty, staff, students, the student member of the Board of Trustees, and a representative from The Cocoon. (http://bgindependentmedia.org/mazey-to-launch-task-force-on-sexual-assault/) According to President Mary Ellen Mazey’s letter announcing its creation, the task force’s charge is: “to review our policies and procedures for Title IX and sexual assault, benchmark our efforts against best practices across the country, and provide recommendations to improve the campus culture and our policies. In addition, the task force will examine our services for supporting sexual assault victims and evaluate our awareness and prevention efforts.” Both Faulkner and Rainey were encouraged by…


Seat belts are the best defense against crash injuries

From WOOD COUNTY SAFE COMMUNITIES Wood County Safe Communities announced today that there have been six fatal crashes in Wood County for calendar year 2017, compared to four for the same time frame in 2016. During a crash, being buckled up helps keep you safe and secure inside your vehicle, whereas being completely thrown out of your vehicle almost always leads to injury. Seat belts are the best defense against impaired, aggressive, and distracted drivers. In 2015, the use of seat belts in passenger vehicles saved an estimated 13,941 lives of occupants ages 5 and older. The Click It or Ticket campaign focuses on safety education, strong laws, and law enforcement officers saving lives. Though some believe airbags can replace seat belts in the event of an accident, the force of being thrown into a rapidly opening airbag could injure or even kill. Airbags were designed to work in conjunction with seat belts to maximize safety efforts. Your pelvis and rib cage are more able to withstand crash force than other parts of your body, which is why it’s important to secure your seat belt over these areas. If impact should occur, these areas will be able to take more of the pressure from seat belts and airbags to protect the rest of the body. There are several steps you can take to get the best seat belt fit for your safety. When buying a car, test the belts provided to see if they are a good fit for you. You can talk to your car dealer about options for…


BG dental office offers ‘Stars, Stripes & Smiles’ for veterans

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   A Bowling Green dental office is hoping to bring smiles to the faces of local veterans next month. Free dental treatment will be offered to veterans on May 12 through the Stars, Stripes and Smiles program at Drs. Phipps, Levin and Hebeka, at 970 W. Wooster St. The care will be provided from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., on a first come, first serve basis. The dentists and staff will perform dental cleanings, fillings and extractions. The entire staff will spend the whole day providing care to area veterans. “We’re trying to serve as many people as we possibly can,” said Dr. Ryan Phipps, who has worked with the Stars, Stripes and Smiles program in Toledo with Dr. Rick Hires, a Navy veteran, who started the program. “It was very near and dear to his heart to give veterans dental care,” Phipps said. “It’s a real unmet need.” The Veterans Administration provides dental care only to those who are 100 percent disabled, were prisoners of war, or who received an injury affecting their dental health while serving. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 30 percent of uninsured veterans have not received needed dental care because they can’t afford it. Homeless veterans rank dental care as their third unmet need, right after housing and childcare. Phipps has worked with the Stars, Stripes and Smiles program for four years with Hires office in Toledo, and decided to try it this year in the Bowling Green office. The Toledo office averaged 120 veterans each…


Creation Care Celebration to be held on Sunday

The Black Swamp Green Team’s second Creation Care Celebration will take place Sunday, April 23 from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm at Peace Lutheran Church, 1201 Martindale Rd at W. Wooster in Bowling Green. The event celebrates local efforts, organizations and leaders practicing good stewardship by increasing awareness and practices for sustainable renewable energy use and healthy living. Lunch will be included, as will music by the Peace Band. Keynote presentation and panel will be on the topic of sustainable and regenerative agriculture by Don Schooner of Schooner Farms, Alan Sundermeier from the Ohio State University Extension Office, and Paul Herringshaw of Bowling Green. There will be recognitions, displays, and electric car test drives. A tour of Schooner Farms will immediately follow the event at 3:30 pm. The Black Swamp Green Team is a collaboration of faith communities, advocacy groups, non-profit entities, and individuals engaged in promoting and practicing good creation care among itself and its constituents so as to: implement energy efficiency; the use of renewable energy; the production and delivery of local renewable energy; and, thereby, improve its overall stewardship of creation.