Books

At BGSU, Clarence Page reflects on Middletown & “Hillbilly Elegy”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Clarence Page is a story teller. That’s what all good journalists are, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner said. On Thursday at Bowling Green State University, though, he reflected on someone else’s story, J.D. Vance’s “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis.” Vance’s book has been selected as the university’s Common Read. Page was invited to BGSU to discuss Vance’s book. Meant to bring everyone together to read the same book and spark discussion, this year’s selection has done the trick. Social media is full of commentary on the book, and even its appropriateness as the Common Read. “Hillbilly Elegy” arrived at the same time as Donald Trump was elected to office, and many reviewers touted it as the book to read if you wanted to understand Trump voters. Vance takes a hard look at his people, who feel displaced in America and are plagued by dysfunctional families and unemployment. This demographic is the most pessimistic of any in the country.  Poor whites are more pessimistic than poor blacks. “Maybe because we’re used to it.” Page, who like Vance comes from Middletown, Ohio, said the book gave him a look at what was happening on the white side of town. Page noted he started out as “colored,” and has been a Negro, black, African-American, before now being a person of color. His family, he said, was “po’” because, according to his father, they were too poor to afford the “or.” But, he added, “ we were rich in spirit.” Page, 70, said he’s told Vance that save for the difference in age and race, it could be his story. But there were differences. Unlike Vance who chronicles a difficult family life, Page said his family was boring, a quality he’s come to appreciate as he’s gotten older. Like Vance’s grandfather, Page’s family moved north from the south to work in northern industry. Page’s people were part of the Great Migration that brought blacks north by rail seeking an escape from the segregated south and seeking greater…


Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Clarence Page to visit BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS As part of the Bowling Green State University 2017 Common Reading experience, BGSU will welcome Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Clarence Page, syndicated columnist and senior member of the Chicago Tribune editorial board, as the Common Reading Scholar-in-Residence. Page will participate in a number of events and give a public presentation at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26 in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom at the Bowen-Thompson Student Union, followed by a question-and-answer time. In his Oct. 26 presentation, Page will address issues of culture and identity in the United States and share his perspective on topics raised in this year’s common read “Hillbilly Elegy.” Like J.D. Vance, author of “Hillbilly Elegy,” Page grew up in Middletown, Ohio, where “Hillbilly Elegy” is set but a generation earlier, attended Middletown High School and went on to a successful writing career. Also during his visit, in a session designed especially for faculty and graduate students, Page will participate in a faculty panel discussion on “Migrations and Cultural Populations” from 3-4:15 Oct. 26 in 207 Union. Moderated by Dr. Ray Swisher, sociology, panelists include Drs. Melissa Miller, political science; Andrew Schocket, American culture studies; and Larry Smith, humanities and English, BGSU Firelands. Dr. Michael Ann Williams, chair of the Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology at Western Kentucky University, will speak about “Appalachian Cultural Landscapes” at 6 p.m. Nov. 2, also in 1007 Business. Vance will be on campus Nov. 29 to discuss his New York Times best-seller, “Hillbilly Elegy.” To register for Page’s talk visit registration.


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING  & COMMUNICATIONS Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison. Murchison is known as a varied performer, composer, arranger, educator, conductor and producer. He was a member of the River City Brass in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 2002-15, and was the principal solo euphonium for the last nine of those years. Since then, Murchison has performed solo and chamber music concerts across the U.S. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 13 – The BGSU Concert Band will perform as part of Homecoming festivities. The band will perform traditional repertoire and new compositions by the world’s leading composers, conducted by Dr. Bruce Moss. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and $7 for adults and available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. Oct. 15 – The Sunday Matinee Series presents “Bedroom, Parlor and Bath” (1931, U.S.A., 85 minutes, directed by Edward Sedwick, with Buster Keaton, Charlotte Greenwood and Reginald Denny), with an introduction by film historian Dr. Jan Wahl. It very well may be that Buster Keaton’s greatest achievements lay in the silent era when he was allowed to control the making of each film. Yet his was a genius that could not be entirely diminished, even by the bosses at MGM. Keaton was able to adapt to this new medium, so now we were able to hear the unique voice that went…


Writer reaches beyond trauma of rape, 9/11 to confront PTSD

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Julia Torres Barden grew up as the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center rose above the New York skyline. “I spent my whole childhood watching them get bigger and bigger,” she said in a recent interview. That childhood started in the projects in the South Bronx, amidst her fellow Puerto Ricans, and then later in Upper Manhattan. On the day of the 9/11 attacks she was back in Manhattan on business. She was watching the aftermath of the first plane striking on a large screen in Times Square with a group of strangers. At that moment they assumed it was an accident, then the second plane struck. “It was devastating … to see them collapse like that. Those towers were raise in glory throughout my childhood,” she said. Now there was a sense of the city being under attack. Torres Barden, now of Perrysburg, recalls in striking detail the next couple days, being trapped in her hotel room, watching far too much TV coverage. She remembers the constant bomb threats to the Empire State Building, Grand Central Station, the Lincoln Tunnel, which was her exit from the city, At the time, she said, she was just concerned with making it through the day, and getting back to her husband and three sons in Virginia. It would be a few years later when she would realize the toll the attack took on her, when suddenly found herself struggling to breathe. What she and doctors thought was an allergic reaction to nuts, turned out to be the emergence of Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome. Torres Barden has written a book “NewYoricanGirl … Surviving My Spanglish Life,” that deals with her life’s traumas and her recovery. On Saturday, Oct.  14, from 2 -4 p.m. she will sign and talk about the book at Gathering Volumes, 196 E. Boundary St., Perrysburg. Then at 4 p.m. there will be a community conversation about mental illness with a therapist. Torres Barden was born in South Carolina, where her father was stationed as a Marine, but she…


BGSU faculty committee finds no single solution to textbook costs

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News No one solution exists for addressing the costs of textbooks. The Textbook Affordability Committee report to the Faculty Senate recommended a multipronged approach that built on what is already being done at Bowling Green State University and approaches taken at other institutions. The report was presented to the Faculty Senate Tuesday by Ellen Gorsevski, who chaired the committee. The senate voted to accept the report and discharge the committee. In a separate vote senators submitted the report to the administration saying it should be used to guide the university’s policy on textbooks. BGSU and other state universities have been feeling pressure from Columbus politicians over the costs of textbooks. One proposal that worked its way through the legislative process before being killed would have limited the cost of textbooks to $300 a year and would have required universities to pay for textbooks. In the end, the legislature left it up to universities to develop policies to reduce the costs of textbooks. “That could change,” Gorsevski said. “This is an evolving issue.” The problem with these state approaches, Gorsevski said, is that they lacked data to back them up. How much the “object formerly known as a textbook” costs students and families is hard to determine. Now texts come bundled with digital and online resources, which can drive up the costs. The committee did some number crunching, but it is still uncomplete. One of its recommendations for the administration is to determine these costs, and then post those numbers so they are easily accessible to students and their families. What the committee did determine was a cap on spending would result in students in majors with low textbook costs, such as the Humanities, would end up subsidizing those in majors that typically have higher costs, such as the STEM disciplines. She said that as the committee studied the issue “we discovered many of you are doing a fantastic job.” The committee came up with “a flexible menu of options” built on what’s already being done. These include use on “open…


BGSU arts events through Oct. 17

Oct. 5 – The International Film Series presents “The Mermaid” (2016, China, 94 minutes, directed by Xingchi Zhou [Stephen Chow]), with an introduction by Elizabeth Niehaus, doctoral student in American culture studies. Breaking box office records to become China’s highest-grossing film to date, “The Mermaid” sees hit director Chow (“Shaolin Soccer,” “Kung Fu Hustle”) bring his zany, comic style to a modern fairytale with an environmentalist message. After their peaceful existence is destroyed by pollution and underwater sonar, a group of merfolk send an alluring mermaid to kill the young businessman responsible. Their revenge scheme hits a snag when mermaid and tycoon fall in love. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Oct. 5 – The Visiting Writer Series features poet Christopher Kempf, author of “Late in the Empire of Men,” which won the 2015 Levis Prize from Four Way Books. He is also the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University. His poetry, essays and reviews have appeared in Gettysburg Review, Kenyon Review Online, The New Republic, PEN America and Ploughshares. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Oct. 5 – The BGSU Trumpet Guild will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison. Murchison is known as a varied performer, composer, arranger, educator, conductor and producer. He was…


Astronaut & author Mark Kelly to speak at BGSU, Oct. 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS As part of events commemorating the celebration of Jerome Library’s 50th anniversary, University Libraries will host astronaut and author Mark Kelly as part of its Ordinary People, Extraordinary Stories lecture series Oct. 24 with a free presentation at  7 p.m. Lenhart Grand Ballroom | Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Kelly’s talk will be preceded by a VIP reception at 5: p.m. Tockets, which include premium reserved seating for the lecture, are $100. To tickets click here https://commerce.cashnet.com/cashnetg/selfserve/EditItem.aspx?PC=LIB-VIPTIC&ItemCount=1 To register for free lecture click here  https://www.bgsu.edu/library/about/ordinary-people-extraordinary-stories-markkelly/register-for-free-lecture.html With an extraordinary career of service to our military, our nation and humanity, Kelly has secured his place in history as a role model, modern-day pioneer and leader of distinction. Together with his identical twin brother, Scott, he has laid the groundwork for the future of space exploration as the subjects of an unprecedented NASA study on how space affects the human body. Kelly, author of “Gabby: A Story f Courage and Hope,” is known for captivating audiences with lessons learned from his extensive travels and experiences in the Navy, outer space and on the ground. From leading teams in some of the most dynamic environments imaginable, to the thrill of spaceflight, and the recovery and resilience of his wife Gabrielle Giffords, he will reveal what he believes are the foundations for success to accomplish your mission in life and work.


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 5

Sept. 27 – The Faculty Artist Series presents Cole Burger on the piano. As a solo and collaborative pianist, Burger has performed throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia – including at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall, Rome’s Teatro di Marcello, the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, the Goethe Institute in Bangkok, the American Cathedral in Paris, and the United States Ambassador’s home in Malaysia. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 28 – The International Film Series presents “Mad Detective” (2007, Hong Kong, 89 minutes, directed by Johnnie To and Wai Ka-Fai), with an introduction by Thomas Castillo, assistant professor in the Department of Theatre and Film. “Mad Detective”exemplifies the stylish visuals, spectacular violence and outrageous humor that have brought a worldwide cult following to Johnnie To and Wai Ka-Fai’s crime thriller collaborations. Forced into retirement for his erratic behavior, brilliant but possibly unhinged detective Chan Kwai-Bun is tapped by Inspector Ho Ka-On to lend his psychic abilities to solving a series of crimes. Kwai-Bun soon discovers that rather than dealing with one criminal, they must vanquish seven villainous spirits. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 28 – The BGSU Wind Symphony will present its first concert of the season, featuring music by Jim Dooley, Paul Hindemith and Steven Mackey, who is one of the featured composers at the upcoming New Music and Art Festival, Oct. 18-21. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and $7 for adults and available at bgsu.edu/artsor by calling 419-372-8171. All tickets are $10 the day of the concert. Sept. 29 – The third annual Orchard Guitar Festival, featuring renowned jazz guitarist John Scofield, kicks off its two-day celebration with master classes and a concert. The master classes, all in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center, will be led by Stephen Aron of Oberlin Conservatory at 3:30 p.m.; Craig Wagner of the University of Louisville at 4 p.m. and duo Fareed Haque and Goran…


Businesses join in Perrysburg Rocks! promotion

Submitted by GATHERING VOLUMES  You may have already discovered a brightly painted rock hiding in a park, on a bench, or beside a flower pot. Painted Rock hunting has become a fun unplugged pastime across the country. A group of 20 local businesses is inviting you to join in the fun with Perrysburg Rocks! this fall. The stores will be hiding hand painted rocks inside their businesses and are inviting you search for the rocks and win prizes. You are even invited to join them and paint a rock to be hidden! Anyone who wishes to paint a rock has two opportunities to do so at local businesses. On Monday, September 25 at 6 p.m. there will be a painting event at Bettyanne’s Things Worth Repeating in downtown Perrysburg. All rocks and necessary painting supplies will be provided. On Thursday, September 28 there will be rocks and painting supplies available all day during the Nationwide Wishing Day celebration at Gathering Volumes. If you wish to paint a rock, please contact Bettyanne’s at (419) 874-9696 or Gathering Volumes at (567) 336-6188 to ensure they will have enough rocks for everyone. Additionally, if you are already a rock painter, you are welcome to drop already painted rocks off at Gathering Volumes to be included in the event. If you are not interested in painting, you are invited to search for the rocks starting on October 1. You can pick up a “Perrysburg Rocks!” passport with the names of all the participating sites, and get your passport stamped or signed when you spot a rock. Collecting store stamps or signatures at fifteen or more businesses will entitle diligent seekers to a small prize as well as entry into a grand prize drawing on October 31 at Gathering Volumes. For those that painted a rock, if they find their own rock in a participating business they will receive a prize immediately. Parks, playgrounds and family-friendly hiking trails are popular spots to hide the painted rocks. “When we first started considering a rock painting activity we were informed by a park ranger that they would prefer that we found indoor spaces…


Gathering Volumes to host Wishing Day event, Sept.28

From GATHERING VOLUMES BOOKSTORE What is your wish for your community?  In Katherine Applegate’s new book, “Wishtree,” no wish is too small as long as it comes from the heart. Ms. Applegate is the author of Newberry Medal winning “The One and Only Ivan” as well as “Crenshaw” which spent over twenty weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. In preparation of the release of “Wishtree” Macmillan Publishing Group is partnering with independent bookstores around the country to host a Nationwide Wishing Day to engage communities and help others. Gathering Volumes Bookstore in Perrysburg will be partnering with Macmillan and hosting a Nationwide Wishing Day event in Perrysburg in partnership with The Promise House Project. The Promise House Projects works to promote and advance the dignity and safety of all housing insecure and homeless youth through barrier free direct service, advocacy, service infrastructure, and housing support. Since 2014, they have led efforts to raise awareness about Youth Homelessness in Northwest Ohio. The event will be from 6 to 7 pm on Thursday, September 28 at Gathering Volumes in Perrysburg.  “Wishtree is about the power of wishes and hope to transform a community, and the importance of helping others,” says Denise Phillips, owner of Gathering Volumes. “The story revolves around and is told by an old oak tree that is in danger of being cut down after being in the community as a Wish Tree for over 200 years.” Many cultures have some sort of Wish Tree as part of their folklore. In the United Kingdom townspeople and tourists would drive coins into Wish Trees as far back as the eighteenth century, believing that they would be granted a wish or cured of an illness once the coin was through the bark. One of the most famous Wish Trees is in Lam Tsuen in Hong Kong, where people travel from all over the world during Chinese New Year to cover its branches in wishes written on paper. New Zealand has a famous Wish Tree in the Rotoma Hills near the Bay of Plenty.  Per legend, a Maori princess hid…


Toledo author to discuss his supernatural fiction, Sept. 16

From PHIL FARINA Phil Farina, Toledo author, will be appearing at Gathering Volumes, to discuss his newest supernatural works of fiction, “Gravesend” and “The Enochian Dilemma” Saturday, Sept. 16, 2-4 p.m. “Gravesend” is loosely based on the author’s personal experiences with the supernatural. The main character is a young man named Robbie Mauro, who as a young boy often had experiences. Sometimes he heard things; sometimes he saw things; but most often he had premonitions. These experiences had a profound effect on his life. One day he and his friends came across a very old Ouija Board. Unable to resist, the boys played with the board to some death defying results. In the “Enochian Dilemma,” the author takes a page out of the book of Enoch. We are told by Enoch that God created first the angels, then man. He loved man most of all and sent the Angels to watch over man. These special Angels were called Watchers; for they were tasked to watch over man but not interfere.  The angels did not like this much, so they disobeyed Gods commands and mated with women whom they found beautiful. The results were the Nephilim, or the Giants of Old. This angered God and resulted in their destruction by the Great Flood of Noah. All the Watchers were destroyed save one, Azazel who swore vengeance against the Almighty. The Enochian Dilemma takes the reader on a fantastic journey of how to stop a renegade Angel who is hell bent on destroying God’s creations. Both books have been features at Wizard World Comic Cons and have been well received by both young and old. One reader commented “Robbie was my favorite character ever. He has so much power yet he is just like me. I can’t wait until the next installment.” Phil Farina was born in New York to immigrant parents. He grew up in Brooklyn among his very close-knit Italian family. Cousins, Aunts, Uncles and Grandmother were a major influence on his life. After a brief stint in New England, Phil returned to the Big…


Lawrence Coates cultivates a sense of place in his fiction

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In his lecture “Temporary Landscape: Literature of Place,” novelist Lawrence Coates made an observation that to the young writers in the audience may have seemed like a challenge: no great novel of place has been written about Toledo or its environs. Ohioan Sherwood Anderson posited the metaphor that each place is a brick in the wall that is America. And each brick, whether it is William Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpha County or Anderson’s own Winesburg, Ohio, modeled after Clyde, is needed to make that wall complete. This is according to Susan Straight’s map and essay “The American Experience in 737 Novels.” Coates, who teaches in Bowling Green State University’s Creative Writing program, has worked on adding his own brick to the wall. The native of northern California has focused on the Santa Clara Valley, now known as Silicon Valley. Before that it was known by other more fanciful names – The Glorious Garden Without Walls, The Valley of the Heart’s Delight, The Poor Man’s Paradise, and The Garden of the World. The last name Coates plucked for the title of his novel about winemaking in the 1920s. In his Spotlight in the Arts lecture, Coates focused on his first novel, “The Blossom Festival” and his most recent “The Goodbye House.” He opened his talk with a passage from “The Blossom Festival.” Boys are playing on the site of what was a railroad yard. All they know is that it’s a place to play, not that it was once an orchard, or a place the Spaniards grazed cattle, or friars raised grapes, or a seed meadow for the native Ohlone people. The Blossom Festival of the title was started by the preacher Sunshine Williams to celebrate the flowering of the valley’s million fruit trees. The event had parades, concerts, all you’d want for a civic celebration, including speeches. Coates said to research the novel set between the World Wars, he read, on microfilm, all the coverage of the festival by local newspapers. A speech delivered by politician James Phelan caught his attention….


Fantasy tale makes Chelsea Bobulski’s literary dream a reality

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News “The Wood” that gives the title to Chelsea Bobulski’s debut novel is located along Route 315 that travels along the Olentangy River as it winds along the route to Columbus. That’s a familiar stretch of road for Bobulski who grew up in the Columbus area and attended Ohio State University. She always enjoys the drive. Her imagination has conjured a darker, fantastic image of those woods. It’s a place where a teenage girl finds purpose, loss, and romance in a mysterious world. Sometimes people wander into The Wood from other time periods. The teenage Winter serves as a guardian, as her father was before and she is responsible for guiding them back to their own times lest the historic continuum collapse. But now something is seriously wrong and aided by a handsome young stranger from 18th century England, Winter must find out what’s happening. She also finds romance. In “The Wood,” Bobulski, 27, has taken the first steps to literary success. This gripping fantasy will be issued Aug. 1 by the major publisher Macmillan. The night before, Bobulski will celebrate the publication with a book release party in her Perrysburg hometown. Gathering Volumes, 196 E. Boundary St., will host the party Monday, July 31 from 7 to 9 p.m. Bobulski will be on hand to sign books, and talk with readers. She said she’d be happy to answer any questions people have about her “publishing journey.” Cupcakes from Cake in a Cup will be served. “I was telling stories since I was very little,” Bobulski said in a recent telephone interview. When she was in third grade, an author visited her school and she got her first sense that maybe writing could be a career. But while she dreamed, she never thought she could be a published writer. “I put other authors on pedestals.” She read the Harry Potter books “which was everything to me as a kid.” But, she added, “I mostly read what I could find at my local Kmart, which was usually like paperback romances.” It wasn’t until she was attending…


WGTE-FM personality Haley Taylor summer library guest

Submitted by WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY Wood County District Public Library (251 N. Main, Bowling Green) offers adults a double-helping of appealing events on Saturday, July 15. First up, author Gwendolyn Hiles and her collaborator, Dick Rogers, talk about Hiles’ book, Jersey Gold, a true story of the Gold Rush of 1849. Hiles and Rogers share stories of fortune, lawlessness, and scandal, and reveal the roles played by unique family heirlooms in creating this exciting story. Catch the Jersey Gold book talk starting at 11 am in the 2nd floor meeting room. Free and open to all. Then, at 2 p.m., members of book groups and readers of all stripes will want to join us in the first floor meeting room for our “Summer Scoop Ice Cream Social.” You’ll get the inside scoop on summer’s coolest reads, enjoy refreshments from our ice cream bar, and hear keynote speaker, Haley Taylor, host of WGTE’s “The Rough Draft Diaries.” Space is limited and registration is required for this program. To register call,419-352-5050. For more information, contact the library at 419-352-5050


Local artists promote awareness through book “Migraine365”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Elizabeth Roberts-Zibbel doesn’t take her migraines lying down. Migraine disease may immobilize her at times, but she’s resolved to be a voice for others who suffer. It means being active on social media as Lady Migraine at ladymigraine.com. It means writing for migraine.com, and appearing in videos being the face for the many tormented by the silent demon. It means teaming with her husband John Roberts-Zibbel to write a graphic journal, “Migraine 365,” that looks at daily life for someone with migraine disease and their loved ones. In their case that includes two daughters Isobel, 8, and Alexandra 12. The book was self-published and can be purchased at blurb.com. “I don’t remember a time when I didn’t have them,” she said of the severe headaches and array of symptoms that accompany them. She was diagnosed when she was a child and remembers always having at least one per week, but the headaches didn’t become chronic, fifteen or more per month, until she was 30. “It was always a big problem,” Roberts-Zibbel said. “It took me a lot longer to get through college.” She persisted, but so did the migraine disease. Her first pregnancy was debilitating, and her second even worse. “Sometimes the pain gets so bad you want to shoot yourself in the head.” The disease forced her out of jobs. Now as a partner in Zibbel Media, she is a key player on the BG Independent News team, handling advertising, posting obituaries, and occasionally contributing articles. John Roberts-Zibbel got the idea for “Migraine 365” in 2014 while the family was on vacation in Cape May, New Jersey. Everything was going wrong, including no air conditioning in the middle of summer. And weather, Elizabeth said, “is one of my worst triggers.” John has been involved in the world of fantasy and comics for years, both as an illustrator and with his live rapping character The Mechanical Cat, who makes regular appearances at local clubs. Drawing during that hellish vacation, he got the idea of chronicling the daily life of the family,…