Books

Opera on Wheels’ ‘Big Bad Wolf” to help get summer reading program rolling to

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY The Wood County District Public Library’s Youth Summer Reading Program, “Libraries Rock!” begins Thursday, May 24. “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf,” presented by The Toledo Opera on Wheels will be performed at 10:30 a.m. in the Atrium. This Opera on Wheels touring show is a full experience for all ages. In an engaging adaptation of Mozart’s opera “Don Giovanni,” the Don himself becomes the infamous Big Bad Wolf. Little Red Riding Hood and The Three Little Pigs work together to show the Wolf the error of his ways. Using the music and themes from one of Mozart’s greatest operas, young audiences learn the dangers of bullying, the power of friendship, and the ability of music to bring people together. This live performance is free to the public and will last approximately 40 minutes.  It is generously supported through a gift from the estate of Marjorie Conrad. Registration for the Youth Summer Reading Program begins on Thursday, May 24, and continues throughout the summer. Rock Star Readers receive a free one-day pool pass to the BG Pool and Water Park upon registration as well as a one-day pass to the Wood County Fair toward the end of summer.  Reading minutes can be recorded in the Children’s Place “Concert Hall,” or online at wcdpl.readsquared.com. Everyone is encouraged to set their own goals to becoming a Rock Star Reader. Incentive prizes and coupons from local businesses will be awarded at various levels.  A final end of summer raffle will include all registered readers with more chances to win to those with more minutes. The Children’s Place is challenging everyone to begin as soon as possible and consider completing a reading log designed as full piano keyboard. A complete calendar of events, movies, parties, and programs through August is available online at www.wcdpl.org/CPCalendar and can be found in the WCDPL Family CONNECT magazine. Preschool Storytimes on Tuesdays at 10:30am and again at 7:00pm as well as Baby & Toddler Storytimes on Thursdays at 10:00am and again at 2:00pm continue all summer.   The Children’s Place is offering a weekly reading program each Thursday from 11am-Noon,…


Vietnam vet dogged for half a century by memories of his year at war

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Like most of his fellow Americans, Warren E. Hunt wanted to forget the Vietnam War. “You don’t want to think about it. You want to be done with it.” That was his attitude when he returned to Toledo after serving a year as a communications specialist in South Vietnam. The war wasn’t done with him though. “It doesn’t go away,” Warren, 70, said in a recent interview. It dogged him. The memories of what he experienced would surface at “inappropriate times.” “I was depressed a lot,” he said. “I never thought it was because of the war. I never put two and two together.” Warren came anxious to pick up where he’d left off when he was drafted in 1967. He was going to spend some time at home in rural southern Michigan where he grew up, and then attend the University of Toledo on the G.I. Bill. He did that, and went on to get a graduate degree in German. He wound up teaching German at Bedford High in Michigan. Still the war was always there.  “I just wanted it to go away. I didn’t think about it a lot until it was intrusive.” It wasn’t until later that he grasped the fact that “I had lived an entire year in a hostile environment where my life could have been extinguished at any moment.” Hunt confronts that experience in “Reflections on the Vietnam War: A Fifty-Year Journey” published in 2017 using CreateSpace Publishing. A part of “Reflections” was published in a special section put out by USA  Today.. Hunt will read from the book Monday, May 14, at 7 p.m. at Grounds for Thought, 174 S. Main St., Bowling Green. The book was prompted by a high school assignment. His goddaughter, Meghan Cremean, was given an assignment in high school to interview a Vietnam War veteran in 1998. She turned to Hunt. That planted the idea of his writing more extensively about his time in Vietnam. Then while attending a Memorial Day Service in 2014, the thought came to him: “It’s time.” He’d…


Youngsters share the stories of Hispanic heroes

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Joan Medina was a little intimidated by portraying his character during the Celebrate Dia! literacy program Monday evening. Medina was called on to portray Cesar Chavez, “an icon in the culture.” Nerves or not, the 17-year-old Penta student, dressed in a white shirt, stood up and told the farm labor leader’s story, first in English and then in Spanish. He was proud to do it. Chavez fought for the rights of farm workers, but he did so non-violently, inspired by the methods of Gandhi. “He showed that people are people, and they deserve to be treated fairly.” Medina said. He was one of eight young people, portraying seven notable Latino figures at the Wood County District Public Library. El Dia de los Ninos/El Dia de los Libros (Children’s Day/Book Dy) is a national event initiated by the American Library Association. Children’s Librarian Maria Simon said she was grateful the library could hold its own celebration in partnership with La Conexion. This is the fifth year the library has hosted the celebration. Each year a book is selected to build the program around. This year it was “Bravo!” written by Margarita Engle and illustrated by Rafael Lopez. Beatriz Maya, the director of La Conexion, said the event was a way to help young people learn more about their Hispanic heritage and then to share it with the community. Also, some may be encouraged to learn or maintain their Spanish when they see their peers using it in their presentations, she said. The figures offered a wide range of characters from a diplomat to a baseball star to, fittingly given the setting, a librarian. Beside Medina’s portrayal of Chavez, other presentations were: Adolfo Martinez Alba portrayed Juan de Miralles, a Spanish messenger to the early American Congress. Shanaia Cellis portrayed Juana Briones, a Mexican rancher and healer. Jonathan Ortega portrayed Louis Agassiz Fuertes, an ornithologist and painter. Eduardo Matta portrayed Arnold Rojas, who chronicled the life and lore of the California vaquero, or cowboy. Ivan Ortega portrayed Baseball Hall of Famer and humanitarian Roberto Clemente. Francis…


Facts are what ignites author & illustrator Don Tate’s imagination

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Perry Field House at Bowling Green State University Saturday hosted scores of future Don Tates. Tate, a prolific illustrator of children’s books who has turned his talents to writing as well, was the guest author for Literacy in the Park. The Austin, Texas-based author and illustrator started out just like all the kids who raised their hands when he asked: Who likes to draw? He’s been drawing since before he could remember, and showed a picture he made when he was 3 of his mother, and baby sister, and some poop falling out of the infant’s diaper. Even then, he liked to include realistic details. When he was a kid growing up in Des Moines, Iowa, Tate said he particularly liked non-fiction, including the “Family Medical Guide,” which had pictures of bloody ulcers and pus-filled toe sores. And when he turned to writing his own books, as well as illustrating them, he turned to non-fiction, writing about strongman Eugen Sandow and early African-American poet George Moses Horton. Those themes were among those reflected in the dozens of activities available to children throughout the field house. Nothing, though, about pus or bloody sores. Still the activities showed how literacy is intertwined with construction, natural science, art, drama, and nutrition. Tate encouraged his young listeners to follow what they loved whether it was dancing, theater, or soccer. Tate said as a child he wasn’t as good at basketball as his father would have liked. He instead wanted to make puppets. He realized he could make a simple puppet with patterns and cloth. He wasn’t satisfied. Using an old wig his mother gave him, he made a more elaborate puppet modeled on the Muppets made by his idol Jim Henson. His mother loved it, but Tate’s father wasn’t impressed. “Your son is making dolls,” he told Tate’s mother. Young Tate persisted drawing, painting, doing macramé. His work progressed along the way and led to a career in illustration. He’s illustrated more than 50 books, including work by such notable writers as Jack Prelutsky and Louis Sachar. When…


People’s brains are wired to accept bunk, BGSU historian contends

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even scholars fall for bunk history. Andy Schocket, a professor of history and director of American Culture Studies at Bowling Green State University, knows a lot of the historians who provided promotional blurbs that appear on the back of Michael Bellesiles’ “Arming America: The Origins of American Gun Culture.” “These are really good historians,” Schocket said. The book argues that gun ownership and violence was rare before the Civil War, and that the current gun culture is wholly the product of a campaign by arms manufacturers. “Arming America” even won a prestigious prize from Columbia University. “The only one problem with the book is that it’s entirely bunk,” Schocket said. That became clear when scholars started to look at the book’s evidence and logic. Bellesiles’ employer Emory University convened a commission to investigate concerns about the book’s scholarship. That commission concluded the book “foundered by a consistently biased reading of sources and careless use of evidence.” Bellesiles no longer teaches at Emory. The prize was rescinded, and the publisher pulled the book, though the author has since republished it privately. Schocket recently spoke on “Bunk Peddlers: Alternative History and Why It Matters.” He first distinguished bunk history from alternative history, a genre of fiction that builds its stories based on history taking a divergent path. Philip K. Dick’s “The Man in the High Castle” being a prime example. Bunk history, he said, adopts the methodology and trappings of history – “you’ve got to have footnotes, that makes it history” – but it “presents a preconceived conclusion” in search of proof. This includes Holocaust deniers and those who promote the “pernicious false claim” that the Civil War was fought over states’ rights, not slavery. These narratives “become weaponized in public debate as a way to bolster one’s side in the current political debate.” Schocket also looked at David Barton’s “The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You’ve Always Believed about Thomas Jefferson.” The book contends that Jefferson opposed slavery and argues despite “the pretty much overwhelming evidence” that did not father the children of Sally Hemmings, a…


BGSU Arts Events through April 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 6 — Academy Award-winning actress Eva Marie Saint will attend a special showing of “The Trip to Bountiful,” the 1953 television production she starred in with Lillian Gish, at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater at BGSU’s Hanna Hall. Gish and Saint reprised their roles on Broadway the following year, earning Saint the Drama Critics Award and the Outer-Circle Critics Award. Following the screening, Saint, a BGSU alumna, will discuss her career and her work with Gish. Free   April 6 — World Percussion Night will feature multiple drumming styles, including performances by the Taiko and Steel Drum ensembles from the College of Musical Arts. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $10 for other adults; tickets the day of the concert are, respectively, $10 and $13. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 6 p.m.weekdays at 419-372-8171. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. April 11 — The Faculty Artist Series presents Matthew McBride-Daline on the viola. Since his debut in Carnegie Hall, McBride-Daline has performed worldwide as a viola soloist. An avid chamber musician, he has performed at numerous international festivals including the Banff Center for the Arts, Verbier Academy, the Music Academy of the West, the New York String Orchestra Seminar and Sarasota Music Festival. His performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 12 — Continuing its focus on exile and migration, the International Film Series presents “Balseros (Rafters)” (2002, Spain, 120 minutes, directed by Carles Bosch and Josep Maria Domenech), with an introduction by Dr. Pedro Porbén from the Department of World Languages and Cultures, Latin American Studies. Filmed in Cuba, Guantanamo Bay and the United States, this transnational film gives insight into the “human adventure of people who are shipwrecked between two worlds.” The award-winning documentary tracks the lives of Cubans who fled Cuba by raft during the economic depression of the so-called “Periodo especial” in the early 1990s. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater, located in…


Holocaust survivor urges BGSU audience to fight against injustice

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Irene Butter survived the Holocaust. Now she sees signs that people have forgotten its lessons. She sees people being dehumanized, stigmatized because of their nationality, families being broken up and deported. “I see all that happening.” People from the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and African-Americans are called criminals. “Some people in this country try to get rid of them all,” the 87-year-old Holocaust survivor said Wednesday at Bowling Green State University in a talk sponsored by Hillel. White supremacy is on the rise. “When Trump says ‘make America great again,’ sometimes it means make America white again,” she said.  That echoes the Nazis’ desire to make Germany “clean of Jews because the blood of Jews contaminates the Aryan race.” That’s what gave rise to the killing machinery of the Holocaust.  “I don’t see that,” Butter said. “I see something like the way it all began in Nazi Germany.” Butter of Ann Arbor, knows well the outcome. She had a happy childhood in Germany with her parents and her older brothers. If anyone had asked about their identity, they would have said German, first, and then, Jewish. After Hitler took power in 1933, the signs started to appear with the swastika, an ever present symbol of the new regime. Her brother was beaten up at school and she was ostracized. Then her grandfather’s bank was seized, and her father was out of work. He moved to the Netherlands where he got a job with American Express. Soon the rest of the family joined him in Amsterdam where they lived happily for two and a half years. Then Germany invaded. Jews had to wear yellow Stars of David. Their movements were restricted. They could only shop after 3 p.m. when few of the scarce rations were left. Even their bicycles were confiscated. The Jews had to go to segregated schools. They were sad places, Butter said, as there were more and more empty desks. Some because students and their families were able to emigrate from the Netherlands. Others were in hiding.  But more because Jews…


Susan Brownmiller delivers history lesson on the fight for abortion rights & against rape

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News To celebrate the history of Women’s Studies at Bowling Green State University, the program invited a woman who made history. Susan Brownmiller, author of the landmark best seller “Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape,” delivered the keynote address Thursday night. Now known as Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies the program is marking 40 years of existence. Brownmiller was part of the second wave feminists who help usher in the era when women’s studies blossomed on college campuses. As much as she would have liked to say differently, Brownmiller said years have not been marked by steady progress for women’s rights. “The pendulum always shifts,” the author and activist said. “And when the pendulum shifts you can lose a lot of the gains you thought you had forever just a decade before. I’ve seen that.” While praising the emergence of the #metoo movement, the 83-year-old feminist said she feels young activists lack a sense of history. Not surprising, she said. Her generation didn’t appreciate what the suffragettes went through to earn the vote. While her generation expected those women coming behind them to pick up the cause, they were disappointed. “When we did consciousness raising we found these truths for the first time. For the next generations, it’s received wisdom, not something they discovered. Received wisdom doesn’t have the power.” Not that the male radicals of the 1960s necessarily recognized the importance of these early consciousness raising sessions. The women who gathered in living rooms to discuss their lives were dismissed for “navel gazing” by those they had struggled with in the anti-war and Civil Rights movement. Brownmiller has worked in Mississippi during Freedom Summer in 1964. With all the energy in the air, women began asking “what about us?” In these sessions, “we were on the verge of discovering new truths. It was like spontaneous combustion.” As they talked, the issue of abortion came up. One woman talked about being blindfolded to be taken to a Mafia-protected abortion doctor. Another received a therapeutic abortion in a hospital. That meant that two doctors had…


Gordon Korman, Youth Community Reads author, to visit BG & area schools

From WOOD COUNTY LIBRARY Families, meet Wood County District Public Library’s 2018 Youth Community Reads author, Gordon Korman. Gordon Korman is the best-selling author of over 90 Middle Grade and Young Adult novels, including Slacker, Restart, Ungifted, and the Swindle series. He is also a contributing author to the popular multi-author series 39 Clues. For more information and a complete list of his titles, please visit his website, gordonkorman.com. He was first published as a 7th grader with a novel he wrote during English Class. Mr. Korman is a much sought-after speaker who spends much of his time traveling to libraries and schools around the country. WCDPL is bringing Mr. Korman to Wood County March 21st and 22nd. His visit is funded through a gift from the estate of Majorie Conrad, and with support of the Bowling Green Community Foundation. Mr. Korman will speak at the Wood County District Public Library on Wednesday, March 21 at 7 p.m., and at the Walbridge Library on Thursday, March 22, at 7 p.m. During the day on Wednesday and Thursday, Mr. Korman will visit Bowling Green, Lake, and Northwood Schools. During his visit to Wood County District Public Library, Mr. Korman will speak, answer questions, and be available to sign books. Two paperback titles will be for sale by the Friends of Library. Several additional copies of his soon-to-be released novel #WhatsHisFace will be raffled off and available for autographing as well. The audience is encouraged to bring any personal copies of Mr. Korman’s books for signing as well. For more information, contact the Children’s Place at 419-352-8253.


Book about tiny mouse is a big deal to BG students

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Two years ago, the school district’s first “1 Book BG” about Humphrey the hamster caused hamster sales to spike in the Bowling Green area. Parents should be warned that this year’s district-wide reading book is “Ralph S. Mouse.” Bowling Green City Schools has officially started its third annual 1 Book BG program, which engages all 1,700 of its pre-kindergartners through its fifth graders to read the same book. This year, the book is “Ralph S. Mouse.” The unveiling of the 1 Book BG title had students waiting for the big announcement Friday afternoon. The kids filled the gymnasium at Crim Elementary School, as third grade teacher Jonelle Semancik gave them some clues. First, the book heads back to school. Second, the main character is small but mighty. And third, readers should be prepared for an “a-maze-ing” time. Students cheered and gave a drum-roll as Semancik revealed the book they will all be reading – “Ralph S. Mouse” by Beverly Cleary. “I wonder if we can get Ralph to come and say ‘Hi’ to you guys,” Semancik shouted. With that cue, a staff member disguised as a mouse appeared on stage, with a small motorcycle. Those readers familiar with “Ralph” may remember the cute rodent from two earlier stories in Cleary’s “The Mouse and the Motorcycle” series. In this year’s book, Ralph has the ability to speak, but only to certain people – primarily those who are loners. The 1 Book BG program gets everyone in the three public school elementaries, plus Montessori and St. Aloysius, on board reading the same book – whether it’s being read aloud to the younger students, or being read themselves by the older students. The goal is to team up as a community to build a love of reading with the kids. So the program doesn’t stop at the school doors. The entire community is asked to get involved. Again this year, several Bowling Green businesses have gotten involved by becoming trivia question sites for the students. Each week, new trivia questions about the book are posed…


Jeff Fearnside delivers short stories worth the wait

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jeff Fearnside has his new year’s goal set out for himself – finish his novel. And he’s hoping that novel, when finished, won’t take as long to see print as his first book of fiction, “Making Love While Levitating Three Feet in the Air.” The Bowling Green native who now lives in Corvallis, Oregon, completed that manuscript in 2005. The stories had already won awards including the Santa Fe Writers Project Literary Award. The collection was a finalist for the New River Press MVP award. Publishing, he thought, at the time “was just around the corner.” But what was right around the corner was frustration. “Then it didn’t go to the next level,” he said in a recent telephone interview. “I lost faith and stopped sending it out. Something I now really regret. That put me behind.” He advises other writers not repeat to that mistake. “Keep the faith.” When he decided to start submitting the manuscript again, it wasn’t long before he struck a deal with Stephen Austin State University Press. The book was published in 2016. “It all worked out in the end,” he said. “Making Love” brings together 13 short stories, including the six he submitted for his Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing thesis from Eastern Washington University in 2000. The stories are “stylistically all over the board,” the author said. There’s realism, allegory, magic realism, and surrealism. “I like a collection that has a little bit of eclecticism to it.” What holds them together is keen psychological insight expressed in clear, shapely prose. The collection opens with the quirky realism of “Nuclear Toughskins,” about coming of age in the shadow of the bomb and includes the allegory, “Cat People,” in which feline overlords dish out just desserts to those who have treated them well or badly. For the record, Fearnside has two cats and is assured of rewards should his fantastical vision come true. On the other end of the spectrum is “Going for Broke,” a straightforward piece of historical fiction. Fearnside tells of a talented Japanese American…


Vegan Toledo hosts discussion of ‘How Not to Die’

Submitted by VEGAN TOLEDO Vegan Toledo will present a book discussion of New York Times bestseller “How Not to Die” by Michael Greger, M.D. at Gathering Volumes Bookstore, 196 E South Boundary St, Perrysburg, on Thursday, March 8 at 6:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public, and will include free food samples as well as drawings for food baskets, T-shirts and books. The book offers a detailed account of how our American lifestyle can cause preventable diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It gives practical advice about not only what foods to avoid, but many positive suggestions about delicious foods that are particularly useful in protecting our health and promoting longevity. Attendees may have read the book, or they may participate even if they are just considering reading it in the future and wish to learn more about it. “This is an eye-opening, evidence-based book,” shared Mike Zickar of Vegan Toledo. “We are excited to partner with Gathering Volumes to bring this important discussion to our community. We all struggle with our food choices and we’ve found this book to offer clear and manageable strategies to help lead to a longer and healthier life.” “Our motto at Vegan Toledo is you don’t have to ‘be’ vegan to eat vegan,” shared Rachel Zickar of Vegan Toledo. “For many of us, it’s more effective to take small steps over time toward a healthier lifestyle. This book is a great way to start, or continue, that journey. Folks with all kinds of eating habits are welcome to join this discussion. We will all do better with the support of others as we strive to become healthier together.” Vegan Toledo, founded by Rachel and Mike Zickar, is an organization dedicated to healthy lifestyle choices as well as making it easier for travelers and residents to find vegan options in the area via their web site, VeganToledo.com, as well as through Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


BGSU Arts Events through Jan. 23

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Jan. 10 — BGSU’s Guest Artist Series welcomes back former faculty member and pianist Yu-Lien The. A prizewinner of the 12th International Piano Competition Viotti-Valsesia and the Deutsche Musikwettbewerb, The has performed at the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival and at Carnegie Hall, with the new music ensemble Opus21. Frequent collaborations with saxophonists Joe Lulloff and Henning Schröder have led to several world premieres of new commissions for both piano and saxophone. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 13 — Sigma Alpha Iota members will present a Winter Musicale at 6 p.m. in the Choral Rehearsal Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 14 — Praecepta, the student chapter of the Society of Composers, Inc., will present a performance of their work titled “24/24.” The group promotes new music activities in the Bowling Green community. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 16 — Violinist Harvey Thurmer is the next performer in the Guest Artist Series. Thurmer is active in the promotion and recording of new music. His recording of Kurtag’s “Kafka Fragmente” with soprano Audrey Luna, available on the Ars Moderno label, represents the first recording of this monumental work by American artists. The performance will begin at 8 pm in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical ArtsCenter. Free Jan. 18 — Visiting Writer Clifford Chase will read from his fiction. Author of “Winkie” and “The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir),” Chase teaches at Wesleyan University. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 18 — The Guest Artist Series presents Li-Shan Hung on the piano. She made her Carnegie Hall debut at Weill Hall in 2003 and was invited to present a second Weill Hall recital in 2005. The recipient of numerous music performance prizes, she has performed and taught around the world. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19 — BGSU presents EAR | EYE: Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art in conjunction with the Toledo Museum of Art. The performance series explores…


KKK history in Wood County unmasked by BGSU prof

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   When the Ku Klux Klan took root in Wood County in the early 1920s, the members wore the traditional white robes and hoods, but there was little secrecy about their activities. There was no need to conceal their hatred since the membership roster included many local politicians, businessmen and ministers. Every Ohio county in the 1920s had an active Klan group, according to Michael E. Brooks, author of the book, “The Ku Klux Klan in Wood County, Ohio.” “Wood County is not particularly unique in having a history of the KKK,” said Brooks, a historian who teaches at BGSU. “What is unique is that the records survived.” Included in those records is a membership ledger that was reportedly rescued from a burn pile in 1976. The ledger, which is included in Brooks’ book, reads like a “Who’s Who” of Wood County, with familiar surnames recorded from every community. Brooks explains that economic uncertainty in the 1920s was one of the most significant factors in the rise of the reborn KKK in Ohio. Newspapers told of historically high unemployment rates, declining farm incomes and sluggish postwar economic growth. Membership records in the Center for Archival Collections at BGSU show that nearly 1,400 members paid dues to the Wood County KKK in 1924 and 1925. Once accepted into the Klan, the new members would be fitted for robes and hoods. Measurements would be taken at the local KKK office, and the information would be submitted to the national Klan headquarters for tailoring. No women or children were allowed. A 1927 phone book lists the KKK as having an address at 182½ S. Main St. in Bowling Green. “They didn’t have to sneak around at night. They could parade around in their robes,” Brooks said. “It was fashionable to be in the Klan.” The Klan was welcomed into many local churches during Sunday morning services. Many of the local ministers were members of the organization, like Rev. Rush A. Powell of the United Brethren Church in Bowling Green. Powell, a charter member of the Klan,…


Earl returns in Tom Lambert’s second book

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Despite the big tell at the end of his first book, “Living with Earl,” Tom Lambert is not done with his quirky character. The first book, a series of vignettes that started as Facebook posts, told the story of a character very much like Lambert and his relationship with a convivial stranger who dresses and acts like Mark Twain. Tom refuses to call him Mark or Sam, for Sam Clemens, Twain’s given name, instead calls him “Earl,” since the character described himself as “the Earl of prose.” The book is a breezy read, with veins of humor and wisdom, and it takes a heart-felt turn in the end. Lambert said after the first book he heard from people who wanted to know what happened to Earl. Lambert posted a couple letters from Earl that whetted readers’ appetites. He now has the sequel “Dying with Earl” in hand, and ready for purchase. On Saturday, Dec. 16, at 1 p.m. he’ll celebrate the new book with a reading and reception at the Wood County District Public Library. Lambert hit on the title before he really got down to work on the second book. Not only was it a play on the title of the first book, Lambert said, but “I thought the premise would be fun to ride.” As “Dying with Earl” begins, Earl has found his way down in Florida where he meets colorful characters as is his wont and gets entangled in their affairs. Tom’s misreading of one of his letters leads him to head down to Florida. The change in locale doesn’t alter the relationship nurtured in Bowling Green. Tom and his friend end up lighting out on a road trip. As with the previous book, Lambert is working with donors to get it placed in Veterans Administration Hospitals around the country. Lambert, 71, said he’s surprised he ever wrote a first book, never mind a second. He was a poor student in high school, he said, though he later audited classes in writing at Bowling Green State University and received encouragement. “Everybody…