Articles by David Dupont

BGSU & UT agreement boosts courses in world languages & cultures

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Before their respective football teams met on the Doyt Perry Stadium turf, the presidents of Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo met to sign an agreement that promises to be a winner for both institutions. Meeting on the third floor of the Sebo Center overlooking the field where the teams were preparing for kickoff, BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey and UT President Sharon Gaber signed an agreement giving more structure to the course exchanges in foreign languages between the two MAC rivals. That rivalry, Mazey said, is strong in sports, but when it comes to academics, BGSU and UT are committed to collaborating so they can to provide their students the most opportunities. In this case, those opportunities are in foreign languages. UT students already are taking online Italian course through BGSU, and in spring BGSU students will start taking Arabic courses at UT. In 2018 the two schools will share offerings in French and German. “We are pleased to enter into this partnership with The University of Toledo, which will provide exceptional educational experiences for both BGSU and UT students,” Mazey said in a statement announcing the agreement. “As one of BGSU’s core values, we welcome opportunities to collaborate. This agreement combines the strengths of both universities, resulting in efficiencies that support students’ degree completion.” The agreement was prompted by the Governor’s Task Force on Affordability and Efficiency that had state colleges and universities look at under-enrolled and duplicative programs…


Romantic comedy “Diana of Dobson’s” wears its age well

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Don’t be fooled by “Diana of Dobson’s.” The production of the 1908 play opens with some period song and dance. Dressed in turn of the previous century finery Anna Parchem and Geoff Stephenson invite us to go to the music hall. They deliver their invitation with a campy enthusiasm touched by cynicism. Something quite deeper and more satisfying awaits behind the curtain. “Diana of Dobson’s” by Cicely Hamilton will be presented by the Bowling Green State University Department of Theatre and Film opening tonight (Nov. 16) at 8 p.m. and running through Sunday in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. See details at end of story. Once the curtain rises, the glitter disappears. We find ourselves in the stark dorm of the shop girls who work at Dobson’s. As they disrobe for the night the young women played by Laura Holman, Lorna Jane Patterson, Hennessy Bevins, and Megan Kome talk about their lives and their troublesome co-worker Diana Massingberd (Camila Pinero). She’s a rebel who bristles at the petty rules and cruel economies of the company. She gets “five bob a week for my life,” and even then the company fines the employees for minor infractions. Diana has many of those. Diana wasn’t always in these straits. Her father was a country doctor, and she helped him until his death. He left her penniless. To her, even worse than being a fool “is being a pauper.” Her attitude not only…


Powerhouse Brahms performance to highlight Toledo Symphony program, Nov. 17 & 18

From THE TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Violin virtuoso Rachel Barton Pine, known for her cross-over performances of classical music and heavy metal covers on violin, will perform the celebrated Brahms Violin Concerto with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra on Nov. 17 & 18 at 8 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle Theater.   Rachel Barton Pine has been featured on programs including PBS Newshour, The Today Show, NBC Network News’ “Making a Difference,” and CBS Sunday Morning. She began violin studies at age 3 and made her professional debut at age 7. Today, she is renowned as a leading interpreter of the great classical masterworks who performs with major orchestras around the world under the baton of conductors including Charles Dutoit, John Nelson, Zubin Mehta, Erich Leinsdorf, Neeme Järvi, and Marin Alsop.   The Brahms Violin Concerto is one of Pine’s longtime favorites, she considers it one of the most fulfilling works she performs. Pine has been fascinated with the Brahms Concerto since her earliest violin lessons.  She began studying the work when she was 14, and it rapidly became a mainstay of her repertoire. It was with the Brahms Concerto that she won several of her international prizes and made many of her debuts in Europe, America, and Israel. Rachel Barton Pine shares a strong connection with the Brahms Violin Concerto. “I’m always working to find an effective balance between intellectual validity and instinct — good ideas won’t be effective if you don’t feel them inside, but what you…


UN official comes home to Ohio to address the plight of refugees

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even as the global refugee crisis grows, efforts to resettle them have stalled. Anne-Marie McGranaghan, an associate resettlement officer for the United Nations High Commission on Refugees, reported that the number of refugees resettled this year will be about 70,000, less than half the number resettled in 2016, This comes, she said, after several years of increased numbers. That reflects the United States cutting the number of refugees it will resettle in half while other countries has so many now in the pipeline that have put a pause on their programs. The United States resettles the most of any country, though on a per capita basis other countries, particularly Nordic European nations, do far more. McGranaghan was the keynote speaker Tuesday (Nov. 14) at the Immigrant Ohio Symposium at Bowling Green State University. The focus was “Refugees Past and Present.” Resettlement, McGranaghan said, is just one solution for the world’s 65.6 million refugees. That’s the largest number ever, she said, and is expected to continue to grow. Three countries Syria, Afghanistan, and South Sudan account for half that number. Next year, McGranaghan said, she expects members of the Rohingya people fleeing to Bangladesh from Myanmar will join that list. Just since August more than 600,000 have left the country formerly known as Burma. McGranaghan said that according to the Geneva Convention on Refugees, passed in 1951 to deal with Europeans cast adrift after World War II, “a refugee is a person who has a…


Chemists honor STEM n the Park at BGSU as part of centennial celebration

Submitted by TOLEDO LOCAL SECTION OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY The Toledo Local section of the American Chemical Society (ACS) celebrated their centennial during a Chem-tennial Banquet on Saturday, November 11, 2017, at the Radisson Hotel at the University of Toledo with nearly 70 chemists and friends. The key note speaker was the esteemed, Toledo native, and former DuPont executive, Dr. Tom Connelly, Jr., Executive Director and CEO of the American Chemical Society. The Toledo Section of ACS (includes the NW OHIO counties of Fulton, Henry, Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky, Seneca and Wood; plus Lenawee County in SW Michigan) has existed since the charter was signed on April 10, 1917. A 100th Anniversary Proclamation, signed by current ACS President Allison Campbell, Ph.D. and 2015 ACS President Diane G. Schmidt, Ph.D., was presented to members of the section by ACS District 2 Director Dr. Christine Bodurow of Indianapolis. In addition, two awards were presented. Dr. Andy Jorgensen, retired Associate Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry at University of Toledo, received an ACS Salute to Excellence Award for his commitment to improving the public’s perceptions of chemistry by serving as a Climate Chemistry Educator/Ambassador (presenting over 170 invited talks) and serving as Section Councilor for nearly 18 years. The Northwest Ohio Center for Excellence in STEM Education at Bowling Green State University was also honored with an ACS Salute to Excellence Award for their commitment to improving the public’s perceptions of CHEMISTRY and other STEM fields by organizing and hosting the largest free, family-fun,…


Glostik Willy to headline triple bill at Clazel, Nov, 30

Submitted by GLOSTIK WILLY Glostik Willy, a three-piece power trio from Indiana, will perform Thursday, Nov. 30, for a party at Clazel Entertainment, Bowling Green. Listeners are told to: “Expect heavy-hitting drums that will make you move and groove, with progressive thundering bass lines and guitar that sizzles and crackles all the way through your brain and explodes out into the galaxy. This is ‘Hippy Metal’ for those who like their jambands with a dose of head-banging and horn-checks!” Also on the bill will be  PeanutButter Williams and Get Right Band. The band was formed in early 2008 by Jameson “Jay Moe” Bradford (guitar), his brother Ralf Mowf (drums) and childhood best friend Buddha Aguilar (bass). At the time, they were already five year veterans of the Midwest music scene, having started their first band together at age 12.  Since then, Glostik Willy has grown to be a driving force in the National Jamband scene, bridging the gap between rock and jam and forming their own genre of music that can only be described as “Hippy Metal.. To date, Glostik Willy has logged more than 600 performances in more than 25 states and two countries. The band has hosted eight Midwest music and arts festivals, including their signature Willy Fest (headlined this past year by Molly Hatchet), and performed sets at over 70 festivals around the country. In Spring of 2017, the band completed their first National Tour playing 23 shows from Florida to Califiornia. “This band is a good…


Transient Canvas takes contemporary music to unexpected places

Transient Canvas should feel right at home when the contemporary music duo shows up in Bowling Green to play a show at the Clazel Monday, Nov. 20. Amy Advocat on bass clarinet and Matt Sharrock on marimba have played all manner of venues, including being featured on a series of concerts at microbreweries in their home-base Boston where brewers concocted a special beer to serve with the music. “One of the things we love about this group is so we’re so mobile,” Advocat said in a recent telephone interview. “We want to reach people in unexpected places.” Transient Canvas will perform at 8 p.m. Nov. 20 in a free Music at the Forefront concert presented by the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music at Bowling Green State University. On Sunday, Nov. 19 at 3 p.m., the duo will perform in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Great Gallery. Advocat said the programs for the two shows are tailored for the different venues. The museum concert will featured “a thoughtful program, more classically oriented.” On the program “Looking Forward, Looking Back,” the program notes state: “The composers featured … have created something new and fresh by evoking the past, acknowledging their influences without directly emulating them.” At the Clazel, Transient Canvas will turn up the volume, and play a set of electro-acoustic works, that draw on a range of influences including pop and acid rock. All the pieces on both programs have been written expressly for Transient Canvas. Advocat and Sharrock first got…


36 immigrants take oath to join the ranks of Americans

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ping Liu came to the United States 16 years ago from southern China. In the intervening year, she’s come to love her adopted home, and on Monday she sealed that by becoming a citizen. Now she wants to use her new power as a citizen to insure the openness to immigrants that she experienced is maintained. Ping, who has studied for a Master’s in Business Administration program at Bowling Green State University, was one of 36 immigrants from 20 countries from four continents who became citizens at the Naturalization Ceremony hosted by BGSU. As U.S. District Judge James R. Knepp told them: “You don’t just live here, now you own the place.” Liu, who is a senior development engineer in research and development at First Solar, said that the United States gave her, her husband, and her son, himself a newly naturalized citizen who studies at Ohio State, a chance to advance their educations. Both Liu and her husband came to study for doctorates at Michigan State. Liu said she’d already worked for about eight years in industry in China before she arrived not long before the 9-11 terrorist attacks. She worked in Arizona after getting her PhD before returning to the region to work first at Owens-Illinois and now at First Solar. “In this country, there’s a lot of opportunity and they’re open to foreigners,” she said before the ceremony. “Those are the two sides we appreciate a lot.” Still she’s seen in…


Scarlet Sevits: Fear & stigma of refugees “distort the very ideals this nation was founded on”

  The fact that we associate the area of the Middle East with terrorism is a fundamentally incorrect generalization.  This generalization has grown into a dangerous stigma that puts blinders on our view of the world, and it’s time we acknowledge and fight it. Imagine a person from the Middle East.  It’s more than likely that the image you conjure in your mind includes two very essential links: Muslim and terrorism.  We tend to associate the general area of the Middle East with the religion of Islam, and Islam has become linked to terrorism.  This stigma surrounding Middle Eastern countries has come to play a dangerous role in how we consider immigration reform in the United States.  Because we associate entire nations with the threat of terrorism, entire nations are barred from entry into the U.S.   Some context might help.  The immigration ban in this country has gone through three iterations.  The first barred entry for citizens from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen.  The second iteration excluded Iraq from the list of nations.  The most recent version includes Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Chad, North Korea, and Venezuela.  Six of these nations have Muslim-heavy populations, an attribute of the immigration law that has not changed throughout the iterations, and from which most of the constitutional problems with the law arise.  In the latest ban, criteria given for why the specific countries were chosen was boiled down to the fact that these nations did not comply with…


BGSU research touches lives near and far

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The research agenda at Bowling Green University produces advances in knowledge while having benefits close to home. That was evident at the October Board of Trustees meeting when four recently hired faculty made presentations on their work. In introducing them, Vice President for Research and Economic Engagement Michal Ogawa reported that external grant funding for research has had “a strong upward trajectory.” In the current fiscal year, BGSU has received 7 percent more than 2016, and 2016 had seen a 22-percent increase from the previous year. These grants, he said, are highly competitive. Only 15 percent of applications are successful. The four faculty members presenting – Alexis Ostrowski, chemistry, Julie Halo Wildschutte, biological sciences, Jonathan Bostic, teaching and learning, and Kimberly Rogers, mathematics and statistics – have all been successful in securing external funding. Ostrowski said her research is connected with teaching as well as real world applications and entrepreneurship. She noted that one graduate student Giuseppi Giamanco was a contestant in the 2016 Hatch program. He developed gel beads for use in consumer products to replace chemical ingredients that are now banned because of water quality concerns. Ostrowski said the gel beads are made by combining iron with biopolymers from natural ingredients. One project has phosphate enclosed into the gel beads. These are put into the soil and slowly release their contents. These are being tested on kale plants. “We’ve got some exciting initial results.” Working with Bob Midden, chemistry, they are investigating…


The bell may be tolling for Ohio’s bellwether status in presidential elections

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ohio has an enviable record of being on the winning side of Presidential elections. Since 1896, it has voted for the winner in every election, except when it voted for Republicans Thomas Dewey in 1952 and Richard Nixon in 1960, both extremely close elections. Author Kyle Kondik said those bellwether days may well be over. Recently, Kondik, the editor of “Sabo’s Crystal Ball,” the University of Virginia Center for Politics’ newsletter, gave a local history award talk at Jerome Library on the Bowling Green State University campus. He was being honored for his 2016 book “Bellwether: Why Ohio Picks the President.” Kondik said he may have written the book just in time. The book covers the period from 1896 through 2012. And while Ohio went for Donald Trump by a comfortable margin, the election points to changes that have Ohio out of step with the national electorate. When looking at a state’s predictive power, he said, how closely the winner’s margin of victory in the popular vote in the state matches the national margin of victory must also be considered. Over the years, Ohio has reliably been within 5 percentage points of the national popular vote total.  In 2016 Trump won Ohio by 8 percentage points, 51.3 percent to 43.2 percent for Hillary Clinton. However nationally Trump trailed Clinton by 2 percentage points in the popular vote, 46.1 percent to 48.2 percent. This, along with the changing demographics of Ohio and the nation, may…


Downtown BG decorates for the holidays

From DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN As the holiday season comes upon us, Downtown Bowling Green is beyond elated to unveil the new seasonal décor.   Through fundraising and generous donations of our community we have been able to replace all the arrangements for the commercial planters that line the downtown as well as purchase four new banners to tout the new Bowling Green distinction of “Best Home Town” 2017-2018 for our region from Ohio Magazine. Norm Tolles who works at McKenzie’s Flower Basket was so eager to help create a beautiful selection with white birch poles, evergreen, ornaments and pinecones.  Tolles headed up a group of volunteers that pre-assembled some of the decorations and again instructed a group that installed the new arrangements.  In all 360’ of white birch was cut and bound, 500 pinecones and 500 ornaments wired and an immeasurable amount of evergreen will make for a beautiful seasonal setting in our downtown.   Many thanks Rick and Carl’s Tree Farm, Lewallen Construction for their donations and for all the volunteers.  In all we accumulate almost 200 volunteer hours from start to finish, not just assembling but also removal of the summer foliage and installing the new arrangements. The BG Central Business Special Improvement District dba Downtown Bowling Green reminds everyone to shop local during this holiday season.  Of every dollar spent at a locally owned and operated business 68 cents stays local through wages, taxes and reinvestment.  It’s easy to do this with the purchase of Downtown Dollars…


BGSU Theatre offers early 20th century romantic comedy

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University’s Department of Theatre and Film will present “Diana of Dobson’s,” Cicely Hamilton’s Edwardian comedy of manners, in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts for one weekend only, Nov.16-19. When London department store employee Diana comes into an unexpected sum of money, she fulfills her dream of vacationing abroad. Posing as a wealthy widow, she attracts the romantic attentions of Captain Bretherton, a fellow traveler she meets in Switzerland. Are his affections genuine, or are he and his aunt merely after Diana’s supposed fortune? “Diana of Dobson’s” explores this question, as well as ones regarding the limited options available to working-class women in the early 20th century, in a style that mixes the witty intelligence of George Bernard Shaw with elements of classic romantic comedy. BGSU faculty member Jonathan Chambers has directed the production of the 1908 play with traditional early 20th-century “music hall” embellishments, including live music provided by BGSU Lecturer Geoffrey Stephenson and theatre student Anna Parchem. Jarod Dorotiak is the accompanist. “Diana of Dobson’s” features Camila Piñero as Diana and Jarod Mariani as her suitor, Captain Bretherton. The cast also includes students Harmon R. Andrews, Hennessey Bevins, Kelly Dunn, Adam Hensley, Laura Hohman, Megan Kome, Lorna Jane Patterson, Fallon Smyl, and Gabriyel Thomas. BGSU Lecturer Kelly Wiegant Mangan has designed scenery and properties to capture the play’s 1908 charm, and Professor Margaret Cubbin provides costumes that showcase the period’s…


Toledo Symphony gives voice to BGSU student composers work

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Before Tuesday, this music was just a complicated series of marks on score paper, residing on computer hard drives and in the composers’ heads. Then the Toledo Symphony Orchestra and conductor Michael Lewanski rolled into Kobacker Hall, and it all came to life in vivid orchestral colors. It filled the hall with brass chorales, tuba solos, swirling clarinets, flute melodies, the drone of double basses, harp glissandi, and swelling waves of strings. Sometimes the music was barely a whisper with the violins scraping their strings tonelessly and the brass players breathing through their horns. The music of future had arrived. Tuesday the sixth Toledo Symphony Student Composer Reading Session was held at Bowling Green State University. Each year five student composers, undergraduates and graduates, are selected to have their short orchestral pieces performed by the symphony. The five composers this year were: Kory Reeder, Graeme Materne, Adam Kennaugh, Chuanhao Zhang, and Ashlin Hunter. “For students to really hear these sounds played by high level professionals is quite exceptional. It’s really quite unusual,” said guest composer Andrew Norman, who would later meet with the composers to discuss their work. The Los Angeles-based composer said when he was asked to come to BGSU, “I expected to hear fabulous new music. “This university is known all over the country for being a center of really interesting progressive new music, and I wasn’t disappointed,” he said. “There was so many different kinds of music being made, such a…


Paralympian Jessica Long tells fans only a negative attitude can sink their dreams

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Shoe shopping can be a problem when you don’t have any feet. Double amputee Jessica Long said she dreaded trips to the shoe store because of it reminded her she didn’t have legs. The way the clerk would look at her and her prosthetic legs and feet made her feel disabled. She just wanted shoes that were comfortable and cute. Long wondered if she’d ever be able to wear high heels or flip flops. Now at 25 new developments mean she can wear flip flops and has high heel prosthetics. She considers her prosthetic legs as “really tall shoes.” She loves to show her legs. And, along the way, she’s won 25 medals, 13 of them gold (the only ones she counts,) at the Paralympic Games. Long, the second most decorated Paralympic athlete, was in Bowling Green this week, as the special guest of We Are One Team Bowling Green. She met with athletes on the Bowling Green State University campus, addressed a crowd of 500 in the Stroh Center Wednesday night, and talked to fourth graders from Crim and Conneaut at the Wood County Library on Thursday morning. As WA1T president and founder Yannick Kluch said at both events, the organization was created to promote diversity and social justice through sports. Long’s mission is to encourage everyone, regardless of their situation, to strive to excel and persevere. “I believe the only disability in life is a negative attitude,” she told both crowds. Long…