Science

BGSU research touches lives near and far

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The research agenda at Bowling Green University produces advances in knowledge while having benefits close to home. That was evident at the October Board of Trustees meeting when four recently hired faculty made presentations on their work. In introducing them, Vice President for Research and Economic Engagement Michal Ogawa reported that external grant funding for research has had “a strong upward trajectory.” In the current fiscal year, BGSU has received 7 percent more than 2016, and 2016 had seen a 22-percent increase from the previous year. These grants, he said, are highly competitive. Only 15 percent of applications are successful. The four faculty members presenting – Alexis Ostrowski, chemistry, Julie Halo Wildschutte, biological sciences, Jonathan Bostic, teaching and learning, and Kimberly Rogers, mathematics and statistics – have all been successful in securing external funding. Ostrowski said her research is connected with teaching as well as real world applications and entrepreneurship. She noted that one graduate student Giuseppi Giamanco was a contestant in the 2016 Hatch program. He developed gel beads for use in consumer products to replace chemical ingredients that are now banned because of water quality concerns. Ostrowski said the gel beads are made by combining iron with biopolymers from natural ingredients. One project has phosphate enclosed into the gel beads. These are put into the soil and slowly release their contents. These are being tested on kale plants. “We’ve got some exciting initial results.” Working with Bob Midden, chemistry, they are investigating…

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BG high science teacher Gloria Gajewicz finalist for national honor

Bowling Green High School teacher Gloria Kreischer Gajewicz is in the running for the Presidential Awards in Mathematics and Science Teaching.   Gajewicz, who teaches physics and geoscience, is one of four Ohio science teachers of grades 7-12 named finalists in science. Two Ohio teachers are finalists in math. All will move forward to the national competition. In the coming academic year, a panel will choose 108 teachers to receive national honors. For more information, visit: http://education.ohio.gov/Media/Ed-Connection/June-26-2017/Finalists-selected-for-presidential-award-in-mathe#.WWF6ixPNEVc.facebook


Michael McLaughlin, Robert Snyder win BGSU classified staff awards for caring for lab animals

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Like most classified staff members, Michael McLaughlin and Robert Snyder serve the needs of students and faculty. But their responsibilities also include nonhuman clients. As the Bowling Green State University Animal Facilities technicians, they care for research subjects such as pigeons and rats. In addition, they maintain the research facilities for faculty and students in the areas of biology, forensic science and psychology. Their dedication to their wards and to enabling research to be conducted in a clean, safe and compliant situation have earned them the 2017 Classified Staff Team Award. The award was presented May 17 at the annual Classified Staff Council reception and ceremony. The team will share a $1,500 award and their names will be displayed on a commemorative plaque in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Caring for animals is a seven-day-a week job, with no holidays and no two days the same. The University has two on-campus facilities plus a satellite location. McLaughlin and Snyder work diligently to ensure that not only are the needs of the animals met, but also the needs of the faculty, staff and students who utilize the facilities in their own important work, said Jenifer Baranski, director of BGSU animal research facilities. Each research project is different, with different requirements, but all must meet strict federal guidelines for safety and the well-being of the animals. McLaughlin and Snyder are thorough and careful in maintaining these standards while making sure that researchers have what they need…


Children urged to honor Earth Day all year long

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   “Bob” the crayfish was a big hit at the eighth annual Earth Day Community Celebration on Sunday. But it was his bigger buddy “Chompers” with very active pinchers that drew shrieks from the young children. “You can touch a Maumee River crayfish and go tell your friends,” tempted Christina Kuchle, of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. The annual Earth Day event on the open field next to the Montessori School in Bowling Green was focused on fun – with the hope that children and their parents would go home knowing a bit more about how to protect the environment. “It kind of ties everything together,” said Amanda Gamby, of the Wood County Solid Waste Management District. “It brings us all together for one last hurrah. It drives home the Earth Day, Every Day message.” At one booth, Jamie Sands of the Wood County Park District was pushing the message that bees are not bad. Though much maligned creatures, they are very important to humans, she said. “Ninety-five percent of what we eat is possible because of pollinators,” Sands said. “We love bees. Yeaaaaa bees.” Next to the booth, children were trying to “pollinate” towering flowers by throwing balls into the centers of the posies. “We want them to know the importance of pollinators and the importance of pollination,” Sands said. And in the process, maybe parents were learning a bit, too. Instead of spraying to kill bee hives, Sands suggested a…


Earth Month events planned throughout county

(Submitted by Wood County Solid Waste Management District) April is Earth Month and multiple agencies are collaborating throughout Wood County to provide events geared toward conservation, education and family fun. The Eighth Annual Community Earth Day Celebration will be the culminating event held on Sunday, April 30th, 2017 from 2-4 pm.  This free family event is open to all and is filled with fun hands-on learning stations. Try your hand at archery hosted by the Wood County Park District, take a nature walk with the Bowling Green Parks & Rec Department, power a light bulb with the City of Bowling Green’s power generating bicycle, give the Solid Waste Management District’s giant Earth Ball a roll, and hold a crayfish at ODNR’s Scenic Rivers station.  Interactive games will be provided by the Northwestern Water & Sewer District, BGSU, and Snapology.  The City of Perrysburg, the Wood County Master Gardeners, and Partners for Clean Streams will host earth friendly activities, and the Wood County Library’s CNG bookmobile will be onsite providing earth friendly stories! The Montessori School of BG, located at 515 Sand Ridge Road, provides an ideal backdrop for this Earth Day Celebration!  Enjoy 14 acres of land, visit a Learning Lab, play on the playground and spend some time at the Black Swamp Preserve and Slippery Elm Trail. We encourage you to get involved throughout the month of April to make Earth Day every day!  For a full list of volunteer and educational activities, please visit www.communityearthday.com.    


BGSU industrial & organizational psychology rank 2nd on U.S. News list

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS U.S. News & World Report has once again ranked Bowling Green State University’s industrial and organizational psychology program one of the best in the nation. The program is tied for No. 2 on the recently released list of 2018 Best Grad Schools. “We are excited by BGSU’s No. 2 ranking,” said Dr. Michael Zickar, a professor and chair of the Department of Psychology. “Our program’s reputation is a function of our great faculty and the success that our alumni have had over the years.” U.S. News & World report shared this about the ranking: “Industrial and organizational psychologists strive to make workplaces more efficient, pleasant and productive through research and application. These are the top psychology programs for industrial and organizational psychology.” BGSU’s industrial and organizational psychology program regularly appears on this list, having placed No. 4 and No. 3 in previous rankings. Rankings are based on input from department chairs and senior faculty. BGSU shares this year’s honor with Georgia Institute of Technology, University of Minnesota – Twin Cities and University of South Florida. Industrial and organizational psychology aims to prepare students for careers as active contributors to the psychology of work. Learning and developmental experiences are provided through coursework, research and applied projects. Graduates of BGSU’s program can be found in a variety of professional settings, from academic to applied. Employers include Dow Chemical, IBM, Procter & Gamble and Wells Fargo. “Industrial-organizational psychology has been labeled one of the fastest-growing occupations…


Lee Meserve delivers his swan song in Last Lecture series

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When you teach at a university for 44 years as Lee Meserve has at Bowling Green State University, a lot happens. Yes, there are the budget committee meetings, the lectures and labs, the advising sessions with students, the research, and presenting research results at conferences. There’s discussions of various bodily functions and demonstrations of the male and female sexual response Sometimes there’s even an airborne mouse. Lee Meserve gave a Last Lecture Monday night. Not his last lecture – he doesn’t retire until the end of the semester. But rather a talk in a series sponsored by the Mortar Board Senior Honor Society. The conceit is: If this was the last lecture you would give what would you talk about? In a twist that Meserve relishes, this was in fact his second Last Lecture. Meserve, a professor of biology, used the occasion to review his long career at BGSU. It started not long after receiving his doctorate at Rutgers University. The journey started before then, growing up on a “hard scrabble” dairy farm in Maine where the family milked 25 to 40 cows. The farm was a place he learned that of there was something to do, you’d best get to doing it whether it was fixing the milk parlor floor or the barn roof. That’s a work ethic he brought to academia where a 50, 60 hour week is the norm. He poured himself into the institution to such an extent that his…