Science

STEM on the Park embraces every day science & fun

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The STEM disciplines – science, technology, engineering and mathematics – are infused in daily living. Don’t believe it? Take a stroll through STEM in the Park that sprawled inside and outside of the Bowling Green State University Field House Saturday. You’ll see feats of engineering, and owls, starfish and other fauna from around the world, and bottles with multicolored water  that illustrate the ocean layers. You’ll also see kids making pizza dough, and taking those first tentative sounds on musical instruments. You’ll see kids tumbling and watching bubbles float high above them. And don’t forget the slime. That was the favorite of Melissa Works’ four children, age 4 to 10. Logan, 8, was especially enthusiastic about the slime, his sister Rozlyn, 6, liked the bubbles and gymnastics, and all including Benjamin, 10, and Serena. 4, were enjoying the free hot dog and mac and cheese lunch provided by Tony Packo’s. Well, Serena was more interested in leaving her mark with a crayon to the paper table coverings. Work said that the activities held the interest of her crew. They still had the outside to explore, she said. This is the eighth year the event has been staged on the campus of Bowling Green State University, Emilio Duran, who teaches in the College of Education and Human Development, said the idea for the event first occurred to him and his wife, Lena Duran, who also teaches in the college. The college, they realized, offers many events for students and teachers. “We wanted to do something for families,” Duran said. “This is a community event. It’s…

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Earth Month events planned throughout county

(Submitted by Wood County Solid Waste Management District) April is Earth Month and multiple agencies are collaborating throughout Wood County to provide events geared toward conservation, education and family fun. The Eighth Annual Community Earth Day Celebration will be the culminating event held on Sunday, April 30th, 2017 from 2-4 pm.  This free family event is open to all and is filled with fun hands-on learning stations. Try your hand at archery hosted by the Wood County Park District, take a nature walk with the Bowling Green Parks & Rec Department, power a light bulb with the City of Bowling Green’s power generating bicycle, give the Solid Waste Management District’s giant Earth Ball a roll, and hold a crayfish at ODNR’s Scenic Rivers station.  Interactive games will be provided by the Northwestern Water & Sewer District, BGSU, and Snapology.  The City of Perrysburg, the Wood County Master Gardeners, and Partners for Clean Streams will host earth friendly activities, and the Wood County Library’s CNG bookmobile will be onsite providing earth friendly stories! The Montessori School of BG, located at 515 Sand Ridge Road, provides an ideal backdrop for this Earth Day Celebration!  Enjoy 14 acres of land, visit a Learning Lab, play on the playground and spend some time at the Black Swamp Preserve and Slippery Elm Trail. We encourage you to get involved throughout the month of April to make Earth Day every day!  For a full list of volunteer and educational activities, please visit www.communityearthday.com.    


BGSU industrial & organizational psychology rank 2nd on U.S. News list

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS U.S. News & World Report has once again ranked Bowling Green State University’s industrial and organizational psychology program one of the best in the nation. The program is tied for No. 2 on the recently released list of 2018 Best Grad Schools. “We are excited by BGSU’s No. 2 ranking,” said Dr. Michael Zickar, a professor and chair of the Department of Psychology. “Our program’s reputation is a function of our great faculty and the success that our alumni have had over the years.” U.S. News & World report shared this about the ranking: “Industrial and organizational psychologists strive to make workplaces more efficient, pleasant and productive through research and application. These are the top psychology programs for industrial and organizational psychology.” BGSU’s industrial and organizational psychology program regularly appears on this list, having placed No. 4 and No. 3 in previous rankings. Rankings are based on input from department chairs and senior faculty. BGSU shares this year’s honor with Georgia Institute of Technology, University of Minnesota – Twin Cities and University of South Florida. Industrial and organizational psychology aims to prepare students for careers as active contributors to the psychology of work. Learning and developmental experiences are provided through coursework, research and applied projects. Graduates of BGSU’s program can be found in a variety of professional settings, from academic to applied. Employers include Dow Chemical, IBM, Procter & Gamble and Wells Fargo. “Industrial-organizational psychology has been labeled one of the fastest-growing occupations by Money Magazine and the Wall Street Journal,” Zickar said. “Our graduates help increase the productivity of organizations as well…


Lee Meserve delivers his swan song in Last Lecture series

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When you teach at a university for 44 years as Lee Meserve has at Bowling Green State University, a lot happens. Yes, there are the budget committee meetings, the lectures and labs, the advising sessions with students, the research, and presenting research results at conferences. There’s discussions of various bodily functions and demonstrations of the male and female sexual response Sometimes there’s even an airborne mouse. Lee Meserve gave a Last Lecture Monday night. Not his last lecture – he doesn’t retire until the end of the semester. But rather a talk in a series sponsored by the Mortar Board Senior Honor Society. The conceit is: If this was the last lecture you would give what would you talk about? In a twist that Meserve relishes, this was in fact his second Last Lecture. Meserve, a professor of biology, used the occasion to review his long career at BGSU. It started not long after receiving his doctorate at Rutgers University. The journey started before then, growing up on a “hard scrabble” dairy farm in Maine where the family milked 25 to 40 cows. The farm was a place he learned that of there was something to do, you’d best get to doing it whether it was fixing the milk parlor floor or the barn roof. That’s a work ethic he brought to academia where a 50, 60 hour week is the norm. He poured himself into the institution to such an extent that his wife, Marge, once gave him a t-shirt that read: “Stop me before I volunteer again.” He didn’t get the message….


BGSU’s Eric Dubow named Distinguished Research Professor for work of a lifetime

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Eric Dubow, professor of clinical psychology, takes on a research project, he’s in it for the long run. One study he’s been involved in started about the time he was born. Now his graduate students are using its data as the basis for their theses. That’s more than a life’s work. Earlier this month the Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees designated Dubow as a Distinguished Research Professor. From the beginning of his graduate work at the University of Illinois-Chicago, Dubow’s scholarship has focused on “how the observation of aggression and violence, whether it’s in the media, the family, the neighborhood, leads someone to be more aggressive. … We develop a way of thinking, attitudes that justify violence as a behavioral choice. … But certainly there are some kids who observe these things who don’t become aggressive. So we look at protective factors.” Positive parentings, social engagement, education, all can help foster resilience in young people, he said. His graduate mentors were working on a longitudinal study of a cohort of people in Columbia County in New York, an area on the east side of the Hudson between Albany and New York City. The study started in 1960. Researchers interviewed all the third graders in the county and their parents. Those subjects were 30 when Dubow joined the study as a graduate student. Now they are about 65, and the study includes interviews with their children. In a longitudinal study ‘“you keep going back and interviewing them again and again and again.” The study is now being conducted through the Institute for…


BG searches for science to clear up pipeline confusion

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green Mayor Dick Edwards is tired of hearing conflicting “facts” about the pipeline proposed to cross city property and run close to the city water treatment plant. So he set out himself to find some “good science” instead of “unsubstantiated political statements.” The city has been asked by those opposed to the Nexus pipeline to try to intervene in the FERC approval process, but council has been reluctant to get into a losing court battle. So Edwards turned to two scientists for help. One is Dr. Charles Onasch, professor emeritus of geology at BGSU, a researcher who has probably studied the BG Fault more than anyone else on record, Edwards said. The other is Larry Wickstrom, president of Wickstrom Geoscience of Worthington, Ohio, who is the former chief of the Ohio Division of the Ohio Geological Survey. “In that important role, he warned of some of the potential dangers associated with fracking in southeastern Ohio, and as a result lost his job,” Edwards said of Wickstrom. While other geologists have presented some alarming information about the pipeline route, the geologists the mayor talked with do not share those concerns. “I take science very seriously,” Edwards assured those at the council meeting. “We’ve been doing a lot of investigating and trying to reach out to some of the best minds we know.” The geologists the mayor contacted said the most recent activity on the Bowling Green Fault can be no younger than the 10,000- to 20,000-year-old glacial sediments that are undisturbed by the fault. An extensive network of pipelines cross various fault…


Photochemist Alexis Ostrowski brings $850,000 in grants to BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University photochemist Dr. Alexis Ostrowski and her lab are venturing into a whole new world of materials with properties as yet unknown, but that offer the promise of beneficial applications in health, industry, agriculture and other fields. In recognition of the potential of Ostrowski’s work, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded her a CAREER grant of nearly $600,000 to fund her research over the next five years. Ostrowski also recently learned that she has received another $250,000 in funding for a second project looking at using the power of light to transform animal waste into usable fertilizer. “The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who most effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their organization,” according to the NSF. “Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of integrated contributions to research and education.” “The overall goal of my lab is to make photoresponsive materials,” Ostrowski said. “And those materials have in them metal ions for unique reactivities.” By mixing metal ions with polymers, or plastics, and exposing the resulting materials to light, Ostrowski aims to open up new avenues of discovery. “We may be making materials with really interesting properties we don’t even know yet. This is fundamental research,” she said. “Alexis is a rising star in the field of inorganic photochemistry, applying well-constructed experiments and syntheses to novel materials and photochemical reactivity,” said Dr. Malcolm Forbes, director of the…