animals

Local Trout Unlimited to host Fly Fishing Film Tour

From FALLEN TIMBERS CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED Fallen Timbers Chapter of Trout Unlimited is proud to announce that it will be hosting the 2019 Fly Fishing Film Tour (F3T) at the Maumee Indoor Theater in Maumee on Saturday, March 2. Doors open at 6 p.m.; the film presentation begins at 7. The presentation is sponsored by Waterford Bank, N.A. and Wildwood Anglers. The original and preeminent exhibition of fly fishing cinema, The F3T is a one of a kind experience. Each year anglers of all ages gather in big cities and small towns alike to soak up films from around the world, spin a few yarns amongst friends and dream about casts yet unmade. In its 13th lap around the globe, the Fly Fishing Film Tour is packed with remarkable films, topnotch stories and imagery that will fuel your dreams for months to come! With an emphasis on the people, places and fisheries that help make up the vast world of fly fishing, the 2019 F3T will take you from Alaska to Florida, South Dakota to French Polynesia, British Columbia to the coast of Australia and more! This remarkable evening of outdoor cinema is in itself an adventure you won’t soon forget. Grab your fishiest friends and we’ll see you at the show! In addition to the films, we will have numerous door prizes, including hats, t-shirts, a pair of Costa Sunglasses, a Yeti Loadout Bucket, $50 gift vouchers from Stone Reels and much more. We will also have a silent auction for a full-day guided steelhead trip on the Lake Erie tributaries donated by Wildwood Anglers! Funds raised from the film presentation help the chapter with clean water conservation, youth activities including Trout in the Classroom and Boy Scout merit badges, STREAMGirls events, veteran and active military fly fishing events, and assisting other conservation groups with hands on improvement projects, to name a few of our efforts. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door on the day of the showing. Tickets are available at Wildwood Anglers in Sylvania or online at flyfilmtour.com. For additional information contact…

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Winners selected in Artists 4 Animals exhibit

From BOWLING GREEN ARTS COUNCIL The Bowling Green Arts Council has announced the prize winning art in the Artists 4 Animals 5 now on exhibit at the Four Corners Center, 130 S. Main Street, Thirty-six artists of all ages, kindergarten through adult contributed the exhibit. Winners are: Kindergarten through  fourth Grade: Kiera Novinsky, first, Spider Web; Alyssa Lenix, second, Bird in the Clouds; Eva Olivarez, third, Blue Dog with Color; and Griffin Fulford and Madelaine McAfee, honorable mention. Fifth through eighth grade: Quentin Trevino, first, Begging; Ty Strickland, second, Alone in the Woods; Ian Jones, third, Rabbit in Daisy Field; and Penelope Giammarco, Tyler Smith; Serenity Shimatzki, Logan Campbell, and Jansen DeMond, honorable mention. High school: Sydney Henninger, first, Buddy Boy;  2nd Olivia Sexton, second, Wisdom in the Darkness, and Marisa Gilbert, Dog News. Adults: Candace J. Hardy, first, Horse’s Eye; Derek Frey, second, Nelson; Jean Gidich-Holbrook, third, Pretty Girl, and Sarah Gorges, honorable mention, Winter. The show continues through Wednesday, Nov. 28.


Cats with attitudes taught to be more adoptable

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Cats are known for having attitude. While most dogs do their best to please humans, most cats feel no need to perform for their people. But sometimes, that “cattitude” is caused by fear. And at the Wood County Humane Society, that standoffishness can make some cats seem downright unadoptable. Take the cat named “Toothless.” The gray cat was so shy and nervous around people that the humane society staff wondered if he would end up as a barn mouser rather than a house cat. But after going through the Cat Pawsitive training, Toothless was a cat with a new attitude – who now has a new adoptive family. “He was a cat who went from hiding under his bed,” to reaching out with his paw at people passing by, said Megann Smith, administrative assistant at the humane society. “Shelters are pretty scary places, no matter how nice we try to make them,” Smith said. And scaredy cats are very unlikely to make a good impression on people looking to adopt a pet. So when Wood County Humane Society was selected earlier this year by the Jackson Galaxy Project to participate in the Cat Pawsitive Program, the animal-lovers jumped at the chance to make their cats more adoptable. The training program for shelter cats works to increase feline adoption rates as well as educate the shelter staff and volunteers on how to implement it. Jackson Galaxy – star of the television show “My Cat from Hell” on the Animal Planet network – developed Cat Pawsitive Pro with a team of feline behavior experts. Highlights of the program include:   Improving cat “adoptability” and feline social skills, particularly for shy or fearful cats and long-term shelter residents. Enriching day-to-day life for cats in shelters with physical and mental activity.   Promoting the human-cat bond.   Teaching and empowering animal shelter staff and volunteers. The program can help a shy cat learn to feel comfortable coming up to the front of the cage to meet an adopter, a feisty cat learn to play nice, and an outgoing…


Plants for pollinators take root in solar sanctuary

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News A “solar sanctuary” for butterflies, bees and birds was created Tuesday just north of Bowling Green. More than 300 shrubs were planted on the north side of the city’s 165-acre solar field near the corner of Newton and Carter roads. The plants will serve four purposes – attract pollinators, provide food for birds, offer habitat for rabbits and deer, and work on water quality. The team met Tuesday morning to put the plants in place. Helping with the project was the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Ohio Division of Wildlife, BGSU students, the City of Bowling Green, and volunteers. The deep-rooted native plants included serviceberry bushes, hazelnut, dogwood, hawthorn, winterberry, plum, buttonbush and elderberry bushes. “These are all native plants – host plants with nectar,” to attract native pollinators like Monarch butterflies and bees, said Donnie Knight, of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. The north side of the solar field was completed Tuesday, and more plantings are planned for the south side, Knight said. That will be a total of about 14 acres of “solar sanctuary” for bees, butterflies, birds and bunnies. Though many solar fields also have wildflowers planted alongside the solar panels, Knight said that isn’t happening at this field, yet. “We weren’t able to strike an agreement with the power company,” Knight said of Next Era Energy. “We have a lot of examples of that in Ohio. But we couldn’t make it happen here yet.” Each plant will have a protective wrap around its base to keep rabbits and deer from nibbling away too much. “The deer will be able to browse the tops,” but not destroy the shrubs, Knight said. As part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, the project is also designed to help improve water quality, as the planting area filters water heading to the ditch, destined for Lake Erie. Helping with the planting from the city of Bowling Green were Arborist Grant Jones, Natural Resources Specialist Cinda Stutzman and Sustainability Coordinator Amanda Gamby. When workers arrived Tuesday morning, the 300-plus holes had already been…


Artists from kindergarten through seniors invited to submit work for Animals 4 Animals exhibit

From BOWLING GREEN ARTS COUNCIL The Bowling Green Arts Council and Four Corners Center will be hosting Artists 4 Animals 5 at the Four Corners Center, 130 S. Main Street, with an opening reception from 4:30-6:30 pm .on Friday, November 9. Interested artists can find information about the show and how to sign up on the Bowling Green Arts Council website, www.bgartscouncil.com. Artists of all ages, kindergarten through adult, will be exhibiting their animal- themed work in the show, which is free and open to the public, during regular Four Corners hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Exhibit of all artists can be viewed through November 28. The show features selected top winners in each age category as well as best domestic and wild animal. The winning images will be reproduced on note cards that available for purchase at the Four Corners Center and other Bowling Green venues. Sales of the cards will benefit the Wood County Humane Society and the Bowling Green Arts Council.


Hold the tuna — ocean explorer Sylvia Earle offers recipe for saving the sea

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Sylvia Earle wants to take tuna off the menu. The same with swordfish and orange roughy. The appetite for fish is depleting the fish population, and that disrupts the ecosystem of the ocean, and that’s a threat to the human population. Large scale commercial fishing is one of many attack on the oceans. “We’ve become so skilled at extracting wild life from oceans, streams and lakes that we’re seeing an unprecedented decline in population,” the marine biologist and explorer said. Earle was at Bowling Green State University Tuesday to give a talk based on her book “The World Is Blue.”  When she was a child, she said, people couldn’t see Earth from outer space. Now children grow up knowing the photo of the blue planet. Yet humans are just coming round to understanding the importance of protecting those vast blue stretches. “No ocean,” Earle said,” no us. No blue, no green. We need water.” Those oceans, whether saltwater or the vast freshwater bodies such as Lake Superior, rely on intricate systems. Just like a computer, removing one small part means it doesn’t work so well. “The attitude has been the ocean is too big to fail,” Earle said. But “never before has the change happened so rapidly or as comprehensively.” Except, she added, 65 million years ago when a comet hit Earth. Those changes have brought increased prosperity for humans, but not so much for wildlife, except cockroaches and rats. That period has also been a great age for exploration. Only in the last several decades could people venture beyond where light penetrates, into the dark depths of the ocean. Earle was on the forefront as the first woman aquanaut. She had to convince officials that a woman could handle the job. Now she’s one of the most prominent explorers. In 1986 when she went on her first mission she was the only woman among 79 men. Recent photos she projected as part of her talk included a larger number of women. The vastness of the ocean leaves much to explore. The average depth is…


Storytime volunteers to help socialize dogs & cats

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Turns out kids aren’t the only ones who love storytime. Magellan the cat cuddled and purred this week at the Wood County Humane Society as a story about a fellow feline was read aloud. But it could have been anything – a magazine, homework, even a book about Clifford the Big Red Dog or Old Yeller. So the humane society is starting a reading programs for volunteers. “It helps the animals,” said shelter manager Erin Moore. “They get to spend time with people – that helps reduce their stress and anxiety.” So far there is only one volunteer reader, but the humane society is prepared for more. “There’s a bookshelf full of books,” Moore said. But it can really be anything – reading from cell phones or magazines. “College kids can do their homework,” she said. The volunteers can sit on chairs, on the floor, on the dog beds, or outside by the outdoor kennels. It’s all about socialization for the dogs and cats, Moore said. And that can speed up an animal’s opportunity to find a home, according to Andrea Szymkowiak, public relations chairperson for the Wood County Humane Society “It helps to move along the adoption process,” Szymkowiak said. Furry companions are not so different from humans when it comes to gaining some benefits from reading, she said. Research shows that shelter animals who have the opportunity to be read to decrease their anxiety and stress. Furthermore, the animal “listeners” develop socialization skills. And the animals aren’t the only ones to benefit. Reading to animals is a non-threatening way for a child to work on reading skills, Szymkowiak said. “It helps them to gain some confidence in reading. They have a non-judgmental audience,” Szymkowiak said. Avid readers boost their knowledge base, expand their vocabulary, reduce stress, improve memory, enhance focus and concentration, and are provided with mental stimulation. This volunteer program is also designed to allow all ages to participate. “It’s all about looking for opportunities to get everyone in our community involved,” Moore said. “It pulls in not only…