animals

Pizza sales at Black Swamp Fest benefit Humane Society

From WOOD COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY For anyone who enjoys the arts, pizza, and animals there is a perfect opportunity to engage in all three this coming weekend. September 8th – 10th Wood County Humane Society will be running the Pisanello’s Pizza booth at the Black Swamp Arts Festival in downtown Bowling Green, Ohio. All of the proceeds will benefit Wood County Humane Society. The Black Swamp Arts Festival (BSAF) is an annual, top rated event that showcases art and music. There are over 150 booths selected by a juried panel. As with most festivals and fairs food and drink bring the experience full circle. The BSAF focuses on this portion with a food and beer garden. The Pisanello’s Pizza Booth will be in this area located near the center stage. Please join us in this fun event, grab a bit to eat, listen to the live entertainment, and help our animals. The WCHS, located in Bowling Green, Ohio, is a private, non-profit managed admission shelter providing care for homeless and abused pets and investigating cruelty complaints in Wood County. The organization receives no funding from government organizations, The United Way, or national humane organizations, instead relying on earned revenue and the generosity of individual donors and businesses to fund our programs such as Safe Haven and food assistance programs, spay/neuter transport, and educational presentations. The WCHS provides care for hundreds of animals each year—from dogs and cats, to horses, goats, and pocket pets. All animals admitted into our adoption program are housed and cared for as long as it takes to find their fur-ever home. For more information on adopting…

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Volunteer Gary Jones thanks Dana Corp for hosting Adopt-a-Pet event

I would like to commend the Dana Corporation on Technology Drive in Maumee for hosting an Adopt-a-Pet day for their employees. Jenny Miranda organized the event because she loves animals, she supports the work of rescue sites and humane societies and she wanted a fun day where employees might adopt a pet. What a remarkable event for a corporate company to support local efforts. It was a fun day and pets were adopted. And generous gifts of toys, food and blankets, enough to fill the bed of a pickup truck were given to each of the participating humane groups. To me, it was a remarkable day spent with enthusiastic Dana employees. Kudos to Dana and Miranda. Gary Jones, Volunteer Bowling Green


Wood County Humane Society appreciates Kroger donation

This May, The Kroger Company designated $10,000 to be split among three deserving local nonprofits as part of the Grand Re-Opening Event for its recently remodeled and expanded Bowling Green location. All three of the recognized nonprofits—The Black Swamp Arts Festival, The Cocoon, and The Wood County Humane Society (hereafter The WCHS)—make valuable contributions to this community and we at The WCHS count ourselves lucky and proud to stand beside our peers in those organizations and be recognized for the important work that all of us do in and for this community. We also count ourselves incredibly fortunate to live in a community with such generous support from community partners like The Kroger Company. The WCHS is a private, non-profit, managed admission shelter providing care for homeless and abused pets and investigating cruelty complaints in Wood County. Our organization receives no funding from government organizations, The United Way, or national humane organizations, instead relying on the generosity of community partners and individual supporters to fund our programs and to allow us to provide care for hundreds of animals each year until those animals can find their forever homes. In 2016, for instance, our amazing staff managed to place 825 animals thanks to the donations of our individual members and our community partners. On behalf of all of our staff and the animals at The WCHS, we would like to whole-heartedly and sincerely thank The Kroger Company for its altruism and for its very generous donation to our mission of bringing about the best possible treatment and quality of life for all animals in Wood County. Dr. Heath A. Diehl, Board…


Earth Week speaker to explain how a grizzly killing changed the face of national parks

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Nature has a way of asserting itself. Jordan Fisher Smith noted a small example of that as he walked into Hanna Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. During his talk to the 40 students in Amilcar Challu’s American Environmental History class, he showed them a shard of limestone. The building represents human ideas of architecture set in stone. Now nature, through freezing, thawing and the movement of water, is having its way with human design. Or maybe it’s the dandelion, an invasive species, rising up through the concrete sidewalk. “That’s wildness,” he said. “That’s the unexpected that happens without human intervention and design.” Or maybe, that assertion comes during the 1972 celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of Yellowstone Natural Park. In the midst of all the activities, a hiker Harry Eugene Walker is pulled off the trail, killed and eaten by a grizzly. That’s the subject of Smith’s book “”Engineering Eden: The True Story of a Violent Death, a Trial, and the Fight Over Controlling Nature,” a finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. He’ll speak about the book and the National Park system tonight (April 18) at 7 p.m. in the Student Union theater. Though Yellowstone was created in 1872, people knew nothing about how to run them. They served as “nature management kindergarten,” Smith told the class. Officials were guided by a few “crude rules.” Plant-eating animals were good, and the predators who ate them were bad. Fire was bad. So after human market hunters killed off the elk and bison, park officials decided they…


Ag advocate urges farmers to open up to consumers

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Emily Buck, an educator, communicator and farmer, was on friendlier ground recently when she addressed the Northwest Ohio Ag-Business Breakfast Forum than she was about a month before in Washington D.C. The proof was right there on the menu. The local group was munching on an egg and cheese dish and tiny sausages. When Buck was a member of the panel at a conference sponsored by Food Tank, lunch was hummus and mushroom burgers. Food Tank, a group that advocates for sustainable agriculture, is not a friend of conventional farming, Buck said.  She even called it “scary” at one point. But she felt she needed to be there. She didn’t hide who she was. She and her husband, John Buck, raise corn, soybeans, and some wheat on about 1,000 acres in Marion County. She also maintains a sheep herd. And the corn and soybeans are grown from genetically modified seed. “This is not a friendly group by any means,” she said. “But I put myself out there because we needed someone from our side be part of the conversation. “There are people making decisions who have never set foot on a farm. They don’t understand why GMOs are allowing me to use less herbicides, letting me have better water quality.” People who care about sustainability are worried about air, soil, water, and habitat. “We have to find a way to talk to people who are concerned about these things in the right way,” Buck said. The associate professor at Ohio State urged farmers to get out of their comfort zones to engage the consumers…


Local boy unleashes a lot of love for shelter dogs

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   When Drake Stearns turned 8 last recently, he got some unusual birthday gifts – giant bags of dog food, old blankets, and pet toys. Drake, a second-grader at Elmwood, had decided that he had enough toys himself and wanted his birthday party guests to bring gifts for the four-legged lodgers at the Wood County Dog Shelter. “We looked at all his toys,” and discussed a different option this year, his mom Christina Stearns said. “I wanted to do it. I wanted to make these dogs happy,” Drake said as he sat at the dog shelter next to King, who was wagging his tail furiously at meeting a new friend. So his mom sent out birthday party invitations, asking that in lieu of presents for Drake, that guests bring dog food, treats, towels or toys. The party netted nearly 200 pounds of dog food, plus lots of collars, leashes and other items. “Parents said they had a tough time not getting him toys,” Drake’s mom said. But Drake had no reservations. As he dropped off more items at the dog shelter last week, he quickly bonded with King. “He’s chosen me,” Drake said to his mom as King licked him. “He wants me. Can I get him?” Drake – who has big plans to be either a dancer, magician, artist or pet store worker – has a big heart for animals. “He actually said he wants to do this every year,” his mom said. Wood County Dog Warden Andrew Snyder said in his 12 years at the dog shelter, he can remember less…


Large farms must meet strict regs, ODA official says

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The Wood County Commissioners often hear about problems with CAFOs – concentrated animal feeding operations.  So last week, they met with the person in charge of keeping track of those large farms and the manure produced by them. Kevin Elder, chief of the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Division of Livestock Environmental Permitting, gave the county commissioners an overview of CAFOs in Ohio, including the regulations and the numbers in the state. Wood County has three dairy cow CAFOs and one chicken CAFO. Dairy cattle statistics for Ohio show the greatest number of operations with dairy cows as 39,000 farms in 1950. Those farms had more than 1.1 million dairy cows. “That was back when my grandpa taught me how to milk cows,” Elder said. And that was back when it was common for most farms to have their own dairy cows, Wood County Commissioner Doris Herringshaw said. “Everybody had cows.” By 2016, the number of farms with dairy cows had dropped to 2,671, and the number of dairy cows in Ohio had decreased to 266,000. Wayne County leads the state in dairy cows, followed by Mercer and Holmes counties. Ohio ranks 11th in milk production and first in Swiss cheese production. Ohio has the most robotic milkers, Elder said, with one dairy in Wood County being robotic. Cows are also producing so much more milk than in the past, with an average per cow output in the past of 4,000 pounds a year, increasing up to 40,000 pounds a year, he said. The only livestock group that has expanded in the last…