Campus

Free speech & hearing screenings offered at BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The Bowling Green State University Speech and Hearing Clinic is celebrating Better Hearing and Speech Month early this year, in April instead of May. The clinic will provide free hearing screenings and speech/language screenings for children and adults of all ages. Screenings are available by appointment April 10, 12 and 14 at the BGSU Speech and Hearing Clinic in 200 Health and Human Services Building on Ridge Street. Call 419-372-2515 for an appointment. Everyone is invited to take advantage of this offer — faculty, staff, family and friends and both the on- and off-campus communities. The BGSU Speech and Hearing Clinic offers state-of-the-art diagnostic and therapeutic speech, language, and hearing services while acting as a training facility for master’s- and doctoral-level speech-language pathologists. Professionally experienced faculty and clinical staff are state licensed and nationally certified speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Under the supervision of these professionals, enthusiastic graduate students receive valuable academic and clinical experiences.


BGSU taps state grant to get ideas flowing at Collab-Lab

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A state Third Frontier grant will help Bowling Green State University launch new research, teaching and commercial ideas. The money comes part of $8.7 million in funding that’s half state money and half matching funds from the institutions. The money was awarded by the  to NextTech, a collaborative organization comprised of BGSU, Mercy Health, ProMedica, and the University of Toledo, which is the Entrepreneurial Service Provider for Northwest Ohio. Michael Ogawa, BGSU vice president for research and economic engagement, said the university’s share is about $707,000, half from the state, half from BGSU. That money will help to create the Collab-Lab, a new initiative to help faculty staff, and students work together to create new ideas. The lab will be in the first floor of Jerome Library, across from the elevators. Now there’s a technical support lab and a classroom in the space. That area, said Jerry Schnepp, the lab director, will be gutted to create a 2,000-square foot lab. Work begins May 10 and the lab will open of the start of the fall semester. The library as the intellectual heart of campus is the right place for the lab, Ogawa said. Though the space tself isn’t open, the initiative is already getting the ideas flowing. Schnepp said he’s been approached by faculty members who have ideas but need other skills to bring it to fruition. Workshops have been held to bring together faculty members, who have ideas to share, with other colleagues. One of the matches was someone from Women’s Study who has a store of oral histories with a librarian who…


Muslim students build bridges with BG community

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Some bridges were strengthened Sunday between local Muslims, Christians and Jews. The ravine between Muslims and other faiths in America has grown during the past year – emphasizing the differences rather than the similarities between people of varying faiths. So on Sunday, Muslim students from Bowling Green State University, asked the community to join them for a “Meet the Muslims” gathering at the Wood County District Public Library. “This is how it starts,” a Muslim student said, pointing out that both Islam and Christianity  promote love for others. “We are all brothers and sisters in humanity. It’s on us to get to know one another.” Adnan Shareef, president of the Muslim student group, said that stereotypes are allowed to fester and grow if nothing is done to stop them. “All of us are affected by stereotyping,” Shareef said. “Unless we communicate and interact with people. Through interaction, stereotypes can change.” In the current political climate in the U.S., the community gathering was a serious undertaking for students of the Muslim faith. “It takes a lot of courage,” said Marcia Salazar Valentine, executive director of the BGSU International Programs and Partnership. But the students were not alone, reminded Bowling Green City Councilman Daniel Gordon. “Events like this today are needed now more than ever,” Gordon said, speaking of the “venom of Islamaphobia” being spread since the presidential campaign and election. He spoke of the growing number of hate crimes targeting Muslims, and the travel ban executive order signed by President Donald Trump. “This is not our America,” Gordon said. This has become a…


Arts earn applause & money at Bravo! BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The creativity at Bravo! BGSU Saturday night couldn’t be contained. It spilled out into the hallways, where artists mingled with guests, and the work of the arts happened up close. This was a show and a party all in one, and everyone was a member of the cast. Bravo! BGSU was started three years ago as a way to raise money for arts scholarships. Lisa Mattiace, the president’s chief of staff, said that 285 tickets were sold, 50 more than last year. The event raised an estimated $85,000 for scholarships, and about $15,000 more. Mattiace said she was pleased to see so many new faces. Dr. Mary Ellen Mazey said she hopes the event continues to grow, and becomes recognized as the premier arts event in the area. On Saturday night, performers showed the investment in the arts was well-placed. As guests arrived at the Wolfe Center, they were greeted by the drumming of the Kazenodaichi Taiko ensemble. Inside a tableau of the arts was set up on half the lobby’s grand stairway. The mannequins representing the different disciplines were the only things not moving. Guests milled around tables laden with savory food, as waiters moved about offering tiny cupcakes and truffles. The event got under way with a blast of horns and a swirl of color as the Afro-Caribbean ensemble marched in. From there guests dispersed throughout the center where they found attractions behind every door and around every corner. Benji Katz was performing his poetry accompanying himself on guitar. Baylee Sheets was doing theatrical makeup. Paul Verdell was painting a hip-hop inspired…


Mike Kuhlin puts a face on philanthropy in class taught by BGSU president

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The students in Matching Faces with Places are all in their first year at Bowling Green State University. The teacher for the class wants them to start thinking now of their life after graduation, when she hopes their BGSU education will be serving them well. At that point the professor, President Mary Ellen Mazey, hopes they will remember the university and give back. In the class, co-taught with Lisa Mattiace, the president’s chief of staff, the students meet models for that kind philanthropy. At a recent class they were seated in a second-floor classroom in the Michael and Sara Kuhlin Center, and their guest speaker was Mike Kuhlin, for whom the building was named. It was, he told the students, Mazey who insisted the building name use “Michael.” And it was Mazey’s inspiration that led to the donation that put his and his late wife’s name on the state-of-the-art home of the School of Media and Communications in what had been South Hall, widely considered one of the dumpiest buildings on campus. That was before a $24 million makeover. Kuhlin, a 1968 graduate in journalism, said for many years, he’d not had much contact with the university. After working for a few years for the university in the placement office and doing graduate work in higher education administration, he went to work for Ohio Bell, and continued with the company through a series of mergers. He ended up retiring as Ameritech’s director of corporate communications. Over many of those years, he told the students, he questioned the direction of his alma mater. As in…


BGSU celebrates the entrepreneurial spirit during E-Week

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University will celebrate and encourage entrepreneurial spirit through a variety of lunch and learn sessions, panel discussions and presentations during Entrepreneurship Week, April 3-7. The week kicks off April 3 with the first of three lunch and learn sessions: “From Student Worker to Owner” with Julie Harbal. Adam Goldberg will present the second lunch and learn April 4: “From Artist to Entrepreneur.” And Elsa Vogel will complete the series April 5 with “Pieces of Me – Building a Brand from Scratch.” This year’s Entrepreneur-in-Residence is Rick Kappel, a 1969 BGSU alumnus. Kappel, president and CEO (retired) of Advanced Computer Systems and 2015 Hamilton Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership Hall of Fame honoree, will be available to meet with students, faculty, staff and community members April 4 and 5. Appointments are required. Also on April 5 is one of E–Week’s signature events: Hamilton Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership Hall of Fame. This invitation-only event recognizes innovative BGSU alumni who have achieved distinction founding, leading or building a new business. This year’s honorees are alumni Maribeth S. Rahe, Peggy Schmeltz and David Stickler. This is the Hall of Fame’s 10th year. In addition to The Hatch (information to come), April 6 will include a Women in Leadership presentation with Rebecca Li, CEO and lifestyle curator at Rebecca Total Wellbeing. The week concludes April 7 with the Sebo Series in Entrepreneurship – Entrepreneurial Success: Pursuing Your Passion. Named in honor of BGSU alumnus J. Robert Sebo, this sold-out lecture series features dynamic speakers to spark the entrepreneurial spirit among students and community members. Sir Ken…


BGSU Arts Events through April 12

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 31 – Jazz Week continues with a trombone performance from Jazz Lab Band I with Grammy-nominated guest artist Alan Ferber. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. April 1 – Bravo! BGSU celebrates the very best of the arts. Experience a magical evening of vocal, instrumental and theatrical performances, plus exhibitions and demonstrations by student and faculty artists in glass, ceramics, metals and digital arts. Enjoy a festive atmosphere and an array of appetizers and tasty treats. The celebration will begin at 7 p.m. in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. To purchase tickets to the event, contact Lisa Mattiace in the President’s Office at 419-372-6780 or by email at lmattia@bgsu.edu April 1 – Students from BGSU’s College of Musical Arts will be featured in an afternoon chamber music concert at 1 p.m. at the Way Public Library, 101 E. Indiana Ave., Perrysburg. Hosted by Pro Musica, friends of music at the college, the program will feature students who have received travel grants from the organization. The concert is free and open to the public. April 2 – The Gish Sunday Matinee series kicks off with the 1945 film “And Then There Were None,” directed by René Clair. Agatha Christie’s celebrated who-done-it “Ten Little Indians,” under the deft guidance of French director…



BGSU students look for help launching business ideas at The Hatch

From BGSU MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University student entrepreneurs will present their business ideas to alumni investors during The Hatch on Thursday, April 6, vying for funds to launch their businesses in a format similar to the television show “Shark Tank.” The Hatch will take place from 6-8 p.m. in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Registration is required at bgsu.edu/thehatch. This is the fifth year for the event in which alumni investors make equity investments providing real money for students to launch real businesses. To date, more than $500,000 has been committed to student startups. New this year is HatchTonight, like ESPN’s “College GameDay,” except featuring business ideas. High school students, the BGSU community and alumni will watch as a panel of experts analyzes and discusses each Hatchling’s business idea, determines who it thinks will be funded and predicts who will receive the Eggy (fan favorite) award. Hatch Tonight will be presented 5-5:30 p.m. in The Falcon’s Nest on the first floor of the union. The student entrepreneurs, Hatchlings, come to this night after being paired with mentors, mostly BGSU alumni, who have helped coach business ideas, plans and presentations. This event is streamed to Hatch Watch parties across the country and to several countries. The 2017 Hatchlings are: Fatima Camara 10,000 Threads Camara created 10,000 Threads, a clothing line that merges rich traditional African textiles and forecasted fashion styles of Western society. Growing up on different continents made her realize that although African immigrants constitute a large population in Europe and America, there is no substantial effort to market to them in particular….


Musical serpent to be celebrated at BGSU

There’s a serpent in the College of Musical Arts at Bowling Green State University. Not of the reptilian variety, but rather the musical type. The college will host a residency on the snakelike historical horn featuring Douglas Yeo, the leading scholar on the instrument. The event takes place April 4-6 at Moore Musical Arts Center and includes a free public concert, a seminar and a lesson on playing the serpent, plus master classes with college students and faculty members on the serpent and the trombone. The serpent master class, led by faculty member David Saltzman, will take place from 9:30-10:20 a.m. April 5 in 2002 Moore Musical Arts Center and is open to the public. The seminar will be held from 2-3:15 p.m. April 6 in 2117 Moore. “The Ruth P. Varney Serpent: A Conversation and Concert Led by Douglas Yeo” will begin at 8 p.m. that evening in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Center, with a reception following in the Kennedy Green Room. The program includes marches written by Christopher Eley, Samuel Wesley and Josef Haydn for the Duke of York, the Prince of Wales and the Derbyshire Cavalry Regiment, plus a divertimento in four movements attributed to Haydn. Yeo’s performance will be accompanied by students and faculty from the College of Musical Arts. The idea for the BGSU serpent conference came about when the college received the donation of a serpent from Dr. Glenn Varney, professor emeritus of marketing. The instrument had belonged to his late wife, Ruth, whose grandparents had purchased it for her mother. “It is an English military serpent with four keys by an anonymous maker, likely constructed in the mid to late 1830s…


Activists describe the heartbreak, terror of undocumented immigrants today

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News   The immigration debate is about more than walls. It’s about families trapped by laws and borders that separate them. Eugenio Mollo, Jr., managing attorney with ABLE has those difficult conversations. A father of three, here without documents, telling him his mother is dying in Mexico. If he goes to see her, he’s at risk of not be able to return to his wife and American-born children. What can he do? Mollo can explain the law, but he has no good answer to give him. The client loves his family in America and yet the law poses the choice of being separated from them or comforting his mother in her dying days. He asks: What kind of heartless system is this? This is the system we have, and it is a system that has become more unforgiving since Donald Trump has moved into the White House, Mollo said. Mollo and Beatrix Maya, director general of La Conexion de Wood County, took part on a panel Developing Strategies to Mobilize Our Communities as part of STRELLA: 7th Annual Conference of Student Research on Latino/A/X and Latin American Studies. “The current climate has created an environment of fear and alarm in the community,” Maya said. “The greatest challenge we are facing in organizing the community is the fact that the community is absolutely terrified.” The Trump Administration plans to add 10,000 new border agents, and to double to 80,000 the number of people it incarcerates for immigration problems. Work place raids have increased, she said. None have occurred in Wood County, though a raid in Montpelier…


Market holds the key to a sustainable future, Lamb Peace speaker contends

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Speaking on the day that Donald Trump started reversing the country’s commitments to combat global warming, author and entrepreneur Hunter Lovins had some news for him. “The era of fossil fuel is over,” she said. “I don’t care what Mr. Trump does.” Lovins, the founder of Natural Capital Solutions and author of 1 books with another in the works, is a proponent of using capitalist solutions to combat global warning. Tuesday night she took the stage at Bowling Green State University as the Edward Lamb Peace lecturer to promote her views. In his introduction, political scientist professor Mark Simon noted that the lecture series originally started dealing with military threats to world peace. When the Cold War ended, it was determined that environmental issues now posed the greatest threat to world peace. Lovins was the latest in a long line of noted environmentalists to speak. Climate change has already sparked or contributed to conflicts in Darfur and Syria, and driven 65 million people from their homes, Lovins said. That will only get worse as the global temperatures rise. The Middle East is projected to become too hot to live in by the year by 2040. A study funded by NASA found that “total system collapse will be difficult to avoid” if current patterns of resource depletion and economic inequality continue. That means no water, no food, and no money. Lovins cited a survey that found that the eight richest individuals on the planet control more wealth that the bottom 50 percent. As bleak as that picture is, she took a different tack, inspired in…


BGSU administrator suspended after erotic material, some with children, found on work computer

A Bowling Green State University professor and assistant dean has been immediately suspended after erotic material, some involving children, was found on his university computer. In a statement issued this afternoon, BGSU said it has suspended Alan Atalah “effective immediately” for misuse of state property and violation of university policy. According to the report from the Ohio Office of the  Inspector General, Atalah, of the College of Technology, came to its attention in March, 2015, after erotic stories, including some involving children, was discovered on a USB drive sent to the Ohio Department of Transportation. The flash drive contained information on culvert boring process research that Atalah was conducting. ODOT was not satisfied with the work and asked to have all material related to it returned. Personnel at the ODOT State Office of Planning and Research discovered the document when reviewing the material on the disk. ODOT referred the matter to the Inspector General’s office. The inspector general interviewed Atalah, who admitted to sometime looking at and copying erotic stories. He said he did not know how the file got onto the flash drive sent to ODOT and denied being the author of the document. Evidence of such material was found both on his laptop and on his work computer, in violation of BGSU’s internet use policy. In a follow up letter to the investigators, Atalah said  when he finally read the document he was “sick to his stomach” because of the nature of the material, and concluded by stating that he would do whatever he could “to assure you that I am not the kind of person who would…


The arts are ready for their close up at Bravo! BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News With Bravo! BGSU entering its third year it has not settled into a pattern, and that’s by design. The arts gala was created by President Mary Ellen Mazey to raise money for scholarships for Bowling Green State University students in the arts. The night showcases the creativity from all the arts on campus, with a selection of sweet and savory munchies. The celebration will begin at 7 p.m.in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. To purchase tickets, call 419-372-6780 or email lmattia@bgsu.edu. For more information, visit bgsu.edu/bravo. Because of sponsorships, including by presenting sponsor PNC, all the ticket money will go toward scholarships. Last year, more than $70,000 was raised. Both sponsorships and ticket sales are up, said newly named Dean of the College of Musical Arts William Mathis. In a statement, Mazey said: “Bravo! BGSU is a wonderful evening that allows us to showcase the talents of our students, faculty and alumni in the arts.” With the interim dropped from his title, Mathis and Dean of Arts and Sciences Raymond Craig has been serving as “artistic directors” of Bravo, Mathis said. “We’ve been telling our patrons we wanted to do something a little different every year, and bring on new elements” Mathis said. The biggest change will be a short, culminating concert at the end of the evening. The feeling was the gala needed a finale. A new nine-foot Steinway grand piano will be dedicated, and a scene from last semester’s musical “The Drowsy Chaperone” will be presented. Also showcased will be recent BGSU graduate Jenny Cresswell who will perform in a vocal…


Holocaust survivor to share her story of strength

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   As a child in Belarus, Miriam Brysk and her family were rounded up by Nazis and sent to die with other Jews from their city. Now, as an 82-year-old in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Brysk said she refuses to sit around drinking tea and playing cards with other women her age. After spending her adult life teaching biochemistry and raising two daughters, Brysk now spends her time reminding people of the horrors of the Holocaust. “I am doing it in memory of all those who perished,” she said. “I’m preserving their memories. As a survivor, I continue to cry for them. It gives me meaning in my life.” On Tuesday, Brysk will share her story of survival during a talk at Bowling Green State University, at 7 p.m., in Room 101 of Olscamp Hall. “I made a pact with God that I would spend the rest of my life making sure the Holocaust would not be forgotten.” Brysk’s Holocaust story is not the typical experience told by survivors. Her story is not about death camps, but about escaping the Germans to live in resistance camps in the Lipiczanska Forest. “Most people know about the Holocaust,” she said during a phone interview from her home. “This was a different cup of tea from the regular German holocaust.” Starting in 1941, Jews rounded up in Russia by the Germans were not sent to camps. “Not only are they Jews, they are communists,” Brysk said the Germans believed of the Russian Jews. “We can treat them like absolute dogs.” Many were lined up along ditches and…