Campus

BGSU to host Alumni Summer College, May 10-12

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Come back to Bowling Green May 10-12, 2017.  Bowling Green State University continues Alumni Summer College. Designed to offer special programming for alumni and friends of BGSU and for members of the University community, Alumni Summer College provides a series of educational (and fun) classes, lively discussions and excursions. Bowling Green is an ideal location for a special summer get-away. Expect the lectures and classes to stretch your mind and be thought-provoking. Attendees will enjoy time with fellow Falcons, parents and friends on campus. Courses will be taught by BGSU’s nationally recognized faculty and will include topics such as health and wellness, the arts, science, as well as topics relating to current events. Transportation will be available between residence hall and class sessions. All meals will be held at the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. All sessions are accessible and a certificate of attendance will be sent to participants following the program. The Golden Falcons 2017 Reunion will take place on May 9 to coordinate with Alumni Summer College. Registration for on-campus lodging closes on April 30. For more information: https://www.bgsu.edu/alumni/summer-college.html


Film production experience gives students a taste of Hollywood

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The students in Bowling Green State University’s film production class are getting ready to deliver their newest movie. The short film “Well Born” will premiere Friday, April 28, in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts on campus. The film is the culmination of a three-semester Studio Experience. Through that time students worked with Lucas Ostrowski, who taught the course, refining his concept and script, then actually filming it, and finally editing and promoting it. The production is run like a professional union operation. Each member of the class has an assigned position. “You have your specific job and that’s what you’re going to do,” Ostrowski said. Students must apply to be in the course. That involves a written statement, and then an interview with Ostrowski. Their experiences are important and, as in workplace, their attitude. “Arrive on time, have a good attitude and ask a question only once.” “Well Born” is a science fiction story set in a dystopian future where reproduction is carefully controlled. Cynthia Stroud, an adjunct instructor in the department with a doctorate from BGSU, plays a reproduction specialist who has a say in who gets to bear “the presidential seed.” And she’s one of those selected. The president is played by David Engel, a Toledo chiropractor and actor. Theater students Sarah Drummer and MacKenzie Baumhower also have roles. All are donating their services to the film. This is a society with no crime and violence, but cracks appear in its façade. While there are certain echoes of “Handmaid’s Tale,” this focuses more on the “science,” and…


Microaggressions – small cuts leaving big wounds

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Microaggressions are like mosquito bites. One is an annoyance. But a constant swarm leaves a person feeling angry or helpless. Microaggressions are the subtle verbal and nonverbal slights, insults, indignities and denigrating messages that are inflicted on people of any marginalized group. It’s when a person of Asian heritage who was born in the U.S. is praised for speaking English so well. It’s when men at a workplace meeting ignore the women trying to offer input. It’s when a white woman clutches her purse when a black man approaches. It’s the flying of a Confederate flag. Many times the comments or actions come from well-intentioned people who are unaware of their hidden messages. Social injustice and oppression have occurred since the beginning of time, explained Dr. Krishna Han, assistant director of the BGSU Office of Multicultural Affairs, during a program on microaggressions Thursday evening organized by Not In Our Town Bowling Green. But through most of history, smaller acts of social justice were not addressed. However, now that society is aware of the impact of microaggressions, the question is “Now what?” Han asked. There is now a sense of responsibility on people to recognize their hurtful words or acts, and to not just stand by when others are wronged. Many of those attending the program last week had experienced microaggressions themselves. Sheila Brown relayed the story of being told, “Oh my gosh, you’re so articulate,” as if that was shocking for a woman of color. Rev. Mary Jane Saunders recalled when a parishioner at a previous church praised her sermon, then turned…


Falcons hatch in courthouse clock tower

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green welcomed its newest falcons to town Saturday and Sunday (April 22-23). Two of four peregrine falcon eggs hatched Saturday in the clock tower of the Wood County Courthouse. The first view of a hatched egg was around 8 p.m. on the Falcon Cam, www.bgsu.edu/falconcam, which is provided by a partnership between the Wood County Commissioners and Bowling Green State University. The third egg hatched early Sunday morning with the fourth hatching sometime before Monday. “This year mom falcon chose to lay her eggs in a better viewing location for people watching the Falcon Cam,” said Andrew Kalmar, Wood County administrator. “From year to year it has been fascinating to watch the young falcons hatch and grow, as well as watch the parents fly, hunt and teach their young. We are truly fortunate they chose the Courthouse as home base.” It’s well known that the peregrine falcon is BGSU’s official mascot. Seven years ago, a pair of the raptors took refuge in the clock tower located just two blocks west of campus. “We’re happy the peregrine falcons have made it a tradition of calling Bowling Green home,” said Dave Kielmeyer, chief marketing and communications officer of BGSU. “It’s fitting that the falcons have formed a unique bond with the town and University.” The first egg was laid March 14, and there’s typically a 33-day gestation period. For more information about the peregrine falcons in the courthouse clock tower, go to www.bgsu.edu/falconcam.


BGSU’s Greek Village earns LEED gold certification

By BOB CUNNINGHAM BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The color green is usually associated with Earth Week, but sometimes green is gold. Bowling Green State University learned during Earth Week that the Greek Village, a $32.7 million Greek housing project which opened at the beginning of Fall 2016, received the LEED for Homes Gold certification from the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is a rating system devised by the council to evaluate the environmental performance of a building and encourage market transformation toward sustainable design. The Greek Village is the sixth LEED-certified structure at the University. Each of the 33 residences was constructed using sustainable construction practices and materials, with the intention of operating efficiently. We are so proud of this significant designation for our new Greek Village and are so pleased that our students have access to facilities that are state-of-the-art and environmentally friendly,” BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey said. The efficiency credits that helped the Greek Village earn LEED Gold include: The use of low-volatile-organic-compound (VOC) emission paints, adhesives and coatings. Construction Waste Management records indicating that the project diverted more than 75 percent of construction waste from a landfill to a recycling or reuse center. The Greek Housing projects diverted approximately 605 cubic yards of material. The installation and use of high-efficiency toilets and showerheads, along with very high-efficient lavatory faucets. The complete air infiltration sealing with a continuous air barrier: Each Greek Chapter is sealed separately from the other adjacent chapters. All the wall assemblies and trusses were delivered to the site as prefabricated…


BG block party brings community and campus together

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green’s block party on Saturday met all the qualifications – live music, food, dogs and people of all ages. Spectators sat on straw bales as they watched musicians perform from the makeshift stage, complete with cardboard curtains, in front of the county courthouse. Children played games of giant checkers and got their faces painted. The hungry filled up on Chicago dogs and onion rings. And young and old pedaled along the temporary bike lane along East Court Street. “It’s close to perfect,” said Heather Sayler, city planning director who was in charge of organizing the Court Street Connects event. “We’ve had a constant stream of people since 10 o’clock,” she said. “I don’t think we could ask for anything better.” The block party was the brainchild of the city’s Community Action Plan process. At a series of public meetings, Bowling Green residents were asked what project they wanted to try out first in an effort to improve neighborhoods on the East Side. The block party was top on the list. “This is great,” said Adam Rosa, a principle with Camiros, the consulting firm helping with the Community Action Plan. “It’s amazing how much energy has gone into this. It’s great seeing all the energy.” The goal of Court Street Connects goes far beyond the one-day block party. “When people see changes in their neighborhood, it brings other positive changes,” Rosa said. “It will help with decision making about what we want to do.” Sayler agreed. “This makes people recognize this area could be more,” she said. The event created new and…


BGSU faculty honored for excellence

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University recognized a group of its highest-achieving faculty April 13 during the annual Faculty Excellence Awards. Faculty were honored for research, teaching, creative arts, service, leadership, advising, mentoring and more during the celebratory event in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom at the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Joining President Mary Ellen Mazey on the stage were alumnus David Levey, chair of the BGSU Board of Trustees, who gave credit to his undergraduate faculty for launching him into a successful life; Dr. Rodney Rogers, provost and senior vice president; and Dr. William Balzer, vice president for faculty affairs and strategic initiatives, who led the event. “All of BGSU takes great pride in the work and accomplishments of our faculty,” Rogers said. “Time and time again, we hear stories about a particular faculty member who changed a life, challenged a student, opened a door to new possibilities. That’s what makes BGSU such a great place.” Three faculty received the Professorship of Excellence title. The Professorships of Excellence are presented to faculty holding the rank of full professor who have achieved outstanding success in teaching, research, creative arts or service and whose work merits special recognition. The title is held for three years, and brings additional support for its duration. Dr. Cynthia Baron, theatre and film, was named Professor of Research Excellence. Dr. Mikel Kuehn, musicology, composition and theory, was named Professor of Creative Arts Excellence. Dr. Kefa Otiso, geography, was named Professor of Service Excellence. The Master Teacher Award, selected and presented by the Student Alumni Connection, was given to Dr. Andrew Gregory, School of Earth, Environment…


Pelletier to revisit old friend, Mozart’s fourth horn concerto, with BG Philharmonia

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For French horn players, there’s no escaping the four Mozart concertos. Andrew Pelletier, professor of horn at the College of Musical Arts, has played the fourth Horn Concerto as many as nine times with full orchestra, and he doesn’t know how many times with just piano. And it is a staple of the repertoire for his students. They know whenever they go out for auditions, whether for scholarships, competitions, graduate school admission or orchestral work, movements from the second and fourth will be required. Their soaring melodies, flourishes and ebullient calls serve as the foundation of the instrument’s literature. Pelletier will perform Mozart’s Horn Concerto in E-Flat Major with the Bowling Green Philharmonia Sunday, April23, at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. The orchestra also will perform Brahms’ Symphony No. 2 and Stravinsky’s “Firebird” Suite. The fourth of Mozart’s horn concertos is “the most involved” of the set, Pelletier said, with two cadenzas. In Mozart’s time, Pelletier said, horn was the most featured wind instrument. The instrument had not long before come in from the field. The hunting horn made its first orchestral appearance in opera, whenever a hunting scene was involved. Horn players of the time developed techniques to allow them to play more notes than the natural bugle-like overtone series. This enabled the horn to play virtuosic passages “and “beautiful singing melodies,” Pelletier said. “It’s the sound of the horn that captures so many different emotions that caught me.” Mozart made full use of the instruments resources and associations. “Whenever I play Mozart I feel I’m…


BGSU’s “Twelfth Night” has Shakespeare doing Jazz Age shimmy

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As the matches are made in “The Twelfth Night” the characters gather on stage for a Charleston inspired dance number to that 1920s hit “Masculine Women! Feminine Men!” I could well imagine that peppy song with its refrain “which is the rooster which is the hen” inspiring the BGSU Department of Theatre and Film’s production of the Shakespeare comedy. The confusion of gender lies at the heart of the comedy. Director Jonathan Chambers has set the play in the days of the flappers, 1929 in particular. He injects period touches such as mentions of accordions, Jack Dempsey and the shimmy, as well as having people playing golf, into the script. The sound design is packed with period hits that reflect on the action. In his notes he explains that just as in 1929 the world was poised on the brink of a new era, when Shakespeare wrote the play England was pondering what would come after the reign of Queen Elizabeth. In both cases there was much frivolity with an undertow of apprehension. This “Twelfth Night,” though, does not linger on the darker shades. It just wants to have fun and keep the audience laughing, and succeeds in grand fashion. The play opens Thursday (April 20) at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts on the Bowling Green State University campus. It continues with shows Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. with matinees Saturday and Sunday. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for students and children. Available at the Wolfe Center box office or by calling 419-372-8171, or…


Earth Week speaker to explain how a grizzly killing changed the face of national parks

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Nature has a way of asserting itself. Jordan Fisher Smith noted a small example of that as he walked into Hanna Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. During his talk to the 40 students in Amilcar Challu’s American Environmental History class, he showed them a shard of limestone. The building represents human ideas of architecture set in stone. Now nature, through freezing, thawing and the movement of water, is having its way with human design. Or maybe it’s the dandelion, an invasive species, rising up through the concrete sidewalk. “That’s wildness,” he said. “That’s the unexpected that happens without human intervention and design.” Or maybe, that assertion comes during the 1972 celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of Yellowstone Natural Park. In the midst of all the activities, a hiker Harry Eugene Walker is pulled off the trail, killed and eaten by a grizzly. That’s the subject of Smith’s book “”Engineering Eden: The True Story of a Violent Death, a Trial, and the Fight Over Controlling Nature,” a finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. He’ll speak about the book and the National Park system tonight (April 18) at 7 p.m. in the Student Union theater. Though Yellowstone was created in 1872, people knew nothing about how to run them. They served as “nature management kindergarten,” Smith told the class. Officials were guided by a few “crude rules.” Plant-eating animals were good, and the predators who ate them were bad. Fire was bad. So after human market hunters killed off the elk and bison, park officials decided they…


BG News alumni award scholarships honoring Terry Goodman

From BG NEWS ALUMNI SOCIETY A current Bowling Green State  University student and an incoming BGSU freshman are the first winners of the Terry Goodman Memorial Journalism Scholarship at the university. The awards are intended for students who work at the campus newspaper, The BG News, and are sponsored by the BG News Alumni Society and presented by the Department of Journalism and Public Relations. Winner of a $500 scholarship is Courtney Brown, a BGSU junior multiplatform journalism major from Huron, Ohio. A graduate of Norwalk High School and a transfer student from Firelands College, Brown is a reporter at The BG News and is expected to become an editor in the next academic year. Winner of a $250 scholarship is Brionna Scebbi of Cleveland. Scebbi will enroll at BGSU next fall and plans to work at The BG News and storytelling with online platforms at the university. She is a senior at Saint Joseph Academy and is editor of the high school newspaper, The Jaguar Beat. She has been active with that newspaper all four years of high school. The scholarship is named for Terry Goodman, a 1978 BGSU journalism graduate who was sports editor of The BG News. He went on to win 39 state and national journalism awards during a reporting career with The Chronicle Telegram in Elyria, the Sandusky Register and the Lorain Journal (later The Morning Journal) in Lorain. At the Journal, he was sports editor and then associate managing editor in charge of the daily layout and design from 1980 until his death from cancer in 1996. The BG News Alumni Society was established…


BGSU taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University is in it for the long haul when it comes to sustainability. Under the terms of the American University and College Presidents’ Climate Commitment, which BGSU president Mary Ellen Mazey signed with almost 700 of her peers, the university will work to reduce its carbon footprint by an average of 4 percent a year, leading to being carbon neutral by 2040. Monday marked the kickoff for Earth Week activities on campus. A short ceremony to mark the occasion was held outside McFall Center with those gathered moving to place green pinwheels outside the student union. The theme is “Action Today, Better Tomorrow.” Nick Hennessey, BGSU’s sustainability manager, said Monday that the university is close to reducing its carbon footprint by 4 percent annually, but hasn’t done so yet. “We’re working on it. We’re taking a big chunk of it. We’re right where we want to be.” He’s looking forward to finalizing the university’s greenhouse gas analysis. “The most change has occurred in the last year,” he said. Renovation of buildings helps, Mazey said. She’s proud of the number that have earned LEED – Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – Certification. When the Harshman Quad, the Family and Consumer Science building, and West Hall come down this summer that will have “a major impact on our energy consumption,” Mazey said. Hennessey said the effort to reduce the carbon footprint also got a boost from the city. Now 40 percent of the electricity supplied to BGSU comes from renewable sources. Mazey praised the Friday Nights Lights Out program through which student…


NIOT offers series of programs on reducing prejudice

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   An educational series on reducing prejudice is planned in Bowling Green – with one requirement for those attending. “Just come with an open mind,” said Dr. Krishna Han, assistant director of the BGSU Office of Multicultural Affairs. “It takes a village to build a caring community,” said Han, who will be the facilitator in the three-part series looking at the power of words, “isms” and safe zones. The programs are being hosted by Not in Our Town Bowling Green and the BGSU Office of Multicultural Affairs on April 20, May 17, and June 1. All programs will be held at the Wood County District Public Library from 6 to 8 p.m. and are free and open to the public. “Raising awareness, building knowledge, and developing skills on multicultural interaction and communication is an important and on-going aspect of self-work that every individual should take it very seriously,” said Han, who provides leadership for the BGSU Office of Multicultural Affairs Diversity Education Program, and oversees the Ethnic Student Center and LGBTQ+ Resource Center Programs and Services. “We all have something to learn from each other. As we all come from different backgrounds, often times we don’t have the developed skills that allow us to engage each other with grace and productive ways,” Han said. “This workshop will help participants look at the topic of multicultural interaction and communication from a positive perspective, and empower each other on skill sets that enable them to carry-on and spread the caring spirit and knowledge in their community.” The first in the series is “The Power of…


Music Industry Club presenting multi-act show at Common Good April 21

From SAMANTHA JO SHARP BGSU Music Industry Club Members of the Music Industry Club at Bowling Green State University have been planning the Burlywood Music Festival since the beginning of January. The event will take place at The Common Good community center house, 113 Crim St., Bowling Green, with musicians performing from 2 to 10 p.m. on Friday, April 21. The event is free and open to the public, all ages are welcome. The Common Good House is a family friendly environment and alcohol is absolutely prohibited on the premises. More than five different musical acts will perform inside and outside the house at the festival. WBGU-FM’s Battle of The Bands competition winners, Indian Opinion will headline, other artist include: The Sugar Creek, Marbin, RadioBlack and Fire Sloths From Mars. Artists who have performed at MIC BGSU’s Open Mic nights throughout the year will be also be featured at the event. Music Industry minor and festival performer Zach Rzicznek is an active member of MIC and has performed at MIC’s other live events. “I am happy to be performing, I’ve been performing at BG open mics all year,” Rzicznek said. “I am really looking forward to performing at the festival.” Communications major/Music Industry Minor Alyssa Rosselot is a founding member of the MIC and plans to use the experience she has gained in an internship in NY this summer at The Syndicate in NYC. “Discussing the event and how we should market it has helped me learn more about social media and the marketing strategies that work best,” Rosselot said. BGSU’s Music Industry Director and Instructor Terry Tompkins advises the…


All of BG invited to giant community block party

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Citizens of Bowling Green are invited to a giant block party on Saturday, April 22. Actually, it’s a party covering multiple blocks and the entire city is welcome to attend from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The idea for “Court Street Connects” was born at a Community Action Plan meeting last year. The concept for a block party was top on the list for local residents wanting to bring about positive changes in city – especially the East Side. Court Street was identified as a great location since it is a natural corridor between Bowling Green State University and downtown. But the party is reaching far beyond that one street, said Heather Sayler, the city’s planning director who has been working on the Community Action Plan. “To improve neighborhoods, you’ve got to bring a lot of people together,” Sayler said. “It’s really exciting.” Those coming together to make the block party a big bash include the city, BGSU, Wood County, fire division, police division, parks and recreation department, bicycle safety commission, BG City Schools, Wood County Historical Society, local businesses, library, bookmobile, the Common Good, county solid waste agency, county park district, Wood County Hospital, East Side Neighborhood Group, Habitat for Humanity and more. “It’s all free,” Sayler said, including many children’s activities. Various types of entertainment will be provided from the Wood County Courthouse steps, including acoustic music, theater and poetry reading. There will also be “pop-up art” along the street. Q’dobe will have a food truck on site. The city will also be test driving  bike lanes, which will be…