Campus

BGSU names new dean of Health & Human Services

Dr. James Ciesla, associate dean for research and resources in the College of Health and Human Sciences at Northern Illinois University, has been selected as the new dean of Bowling Green State University’s College of Health and Human Services. In announcing the appointment, Interim Provost John Fischer stated: “He will bring to Bowling Green State University a wealth of experience in the many aspects of administration, from budgeting to personnel to facilities use to faculty and student research. … His academic background demonstrates a broad and comprehensive intellect and a commitment to public service.” Ciesla also served as interim chair of the School of Health Studies, an administrative unit he helped establish. In 2012, he was named a Distinguished Presidential Engagement Professor  at Northern Illinois. Ciesla holds a Ph.D. in health economics from the University of South Carolina, along with two master’s degrees, one in health systems management from Tulane University and another in humanities from the University of Chicago. His bachelor’s degree, from Wofford College, is in biology. Dr. Sue Houston has been serving as interim dean.


Genius Garage revs up college students’ careers

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Speed is part of Casey Putsch’s life. He drives race cars. He designs race cars. Putsch wants to speed up students’ progress on their career paths by working on vintage race cars. So now he’s devoting his time to Genius Garage, an educational non-profit that supercharges the resumes of college students from Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo by giving them hands-on experience working on automotive and aerospace engineering projects. Speaking Saturday afternoon at an open house to honor volunteers who support the program as teachers and mentors, Putsch said the project is a way to help students in a variety of disciplines to put the theoretical knowledge they learn in class to use on a real world project. Those projects, vintage race cars, prove their worth on the race track, including at the Indianapolis Speedway, with Putsch at the wheel. The project’s newest venture will even take flight. Putsch started Genius Garage five years ago. This year he moved the project to a Quonset hut at 400 Bishop Road in Bowling Green. Saturday the project’s three vintage Indy-style race cars were on display for a crowd of supporters, local business owners, university representatives, politicians, family members, and local residents. Also on view was a World War I Sopwith Camel airplane in the early stages of construction, and a high-efficiency prototype car with a recyclable chassis that Putsch is designing. Putsch said the idea for Genius Garage came after he’d launched his career following his engineering and design studies at Ohio State University. His first educational endeavor involved working with the OSU electric motorcycle project. He also would organize large-scale charity functions. Putsch looked around and realized students didn’t have the opportunities to gain the kind of experience that would set them apart in the job market. Five years ago, he said, he put much of his life on hold to develop the Genius Garage. He had the opportunity to move the project to southern California. Instead he decided to stick with his native Northwest Ohio. The move to Bowling Green was prompted by the need for more space in a central location, convenient for UT and BGSU students as well as possible involvement by Owens and Terra community college students. The project now employs eight on the automotive team, six on the aerospace team, and one student working with Putsch on designing the prototype car. And the project, he said, is “completely repeatable” in other areas. He believes the project will help attract students to affiliated schools. Students, Putsch said, do not have to pay to be involved. Everything is paid for by the foundations and individuals who support Genius Garage. While most are studying engineering, others come from other disciplines. The team coordinator Madolyn Burke studies special education at…


Facts are what ignites author & illustrator Don Tate’s imagination

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Perry Field House at Bowling Green State University Saturday hosted scores of future Don Tates. Tate, a prolific illustrator of children’s books who has turned his talents to writing as well, was the guest author for Literacy in the Park. The Austin, Texas-based author and illustrator started out just like all the kids who raised their hands when he asked: Who likes to draw? He’s been drawing since before he could remember, and showed a picture he made when he was 3 of his mother, and baby sister, and some poop falling out of the infant’s diaper. Even then, he liked to include realistic details. When he was a kid growing up in Des Moines, Iowa, Tate said he particularly liked non-fiction, including the “Family Medical Guide,” which had pictures of bloody ulcers and pus-filled toe sores. And when he turned to writing his own books, as well as illustrating them, he turned to non-fiction, writing about strongman Eugen Sandow and early African-American poet George Moses Horton. Those themes were among those reflected in the dozens of activities available to children throughout the field house. Nothing, though, about pus or bloody sores. Still the activities showed how literacy is intertwined with construction, natural science, art, drama, and nutrition. Tate encouraged his young listeners to follow what they loved whether it was dancing, theater, or soccer. Tate said as a child he wasn’t as good at basketball as his father would have liked. He instead wanted to make puppets. He realized he could make a simple puppet with patterns and cloth. He wasn’t satisfied. Using an old wig his mother gave him, he made a more elaborate puppet modeled on the Muppets made by his idol Jim Henson. His mother loved it, but Tate’s father wasn’t impressed. “Your son is making dolls,” he told Tate’s mother. Young Tate persisted drawing, painting, doing macramé. His work progressed along the way and led to a career in illustration. He’s illustrated more than 50 books, including work by such notable writers as Jack Prelutsky and Louis Sachar. When he decided to write a book, he did about 30 drafts of “It Jes’ Happened: When Bill Traylor Started to Draw.” It’s a true story of a man, born into slavery, who became a renowned folk artist. Then he showed it to a published author, who loved it, and told him it needed to be rewritten. That happened twice more. But every time he rewrote it, the book got better, Tate said. A published book doesn’t just happen. When it was published, it was a success and won awards. His book on the strongman Sandow, considered the father of modern body building, was also based on fact as well as the author’s personal experience. As an adult, Tate decided to…


Student entrepreneurs put their ideas at center stage during Hatch 2018

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Hatchling Sara Clark was on the brink of closing the deal. Clark, of Bowling Green, was the last student entrepreneur to present her idea to a panel of alumni investors at The Hatch 2018 at Bowling Green State University Thursday night. Her invention was the Magnahalter, a halter using Velcro and magnets. The new halter would be easier for para-equestrians, and others to put a halter on a horse. The investors though were more interested in the magnetic fastening than the halter itself, and they were putting the money behind that interest. While Clark was looking for $7,600 to produce 100 prototype halters for a beta test, the investors were offering $20,000. But they’d claim 25-percent equity in the fastening technology.   Clark paused. Could she consult with her mentor, Bob Venzel? She turned to where he was standing on the stage before 1,500 packed into the Perry Field House. Then a voice rose from the crowd. There was a bit of commotion. Someone was offering her $10,000 with no stake. That someone turned out was retired banker Ed Reiter. That was the deal she accepted. Investor Earle Malm mused at how the panel of investors lost out to “door number two.” Kirk Kern, who was master of ceremonies, opined Clark might still want to talk to the investors to get input. As Brian Sokol, who has participated in the Hatch since its inception, said at the beginning that though the program was modeled after the TV show “Shark Tank,” this was live, and that opened up the possibilities. Like most of the other seven products presented, Clark, a major in intervention services in the College of Education and Human Development, drew on her personal experience and field of study to come up with her idea. She is a member of the BGSU equestrian team as well as an educator of people with special needs. The Magnahalter would also be of use to anyone with limited dexterity, even if that’s because of fingers numb from the cold. The Magnahalter has already been used by a gold medalist on the USA para-equestrian team, and others on the team have expressed interest. Clark has a patent pending on the halter. This year featured eight proposals presented by 10 students. They were seeking both money and guidance to help their ideas get off the ground from a panel of six angel investors, all BGSU graduates. Malm said The Hatch offered the students experience in presenting their ideas and raising the money to bring them to market. What the investors could offer, beyond money, were the connections and advice, and the opportunity to have their projects go through incubation to further develop it before investment. Investor Brian Sokol noted that while only 2 percent of start-ups funded by “angel…


Bawdy “Threepenny Opera” takes the low & highly entertaining road

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Shakespeare for Dummies teaches that certain comic and bawdy bits in the Bard’s plays were written to appeal to the groundlings crowded at edge of the stage. “The Threepenny Opera,” though bearing an elite pedigree as the brainchild of theatrical provocateur Bertolt Brecht and composer Kurt Weill, is written through and through for the groundlings. This is bawdy, often crude by design, in-your-face entertainment meant to please those in the cheap seats. All of Bowling Green State University’s Donnell Theatre becomes the cheap sections when the Department of Theatre and Film presents “Threepenny Opera” opening tonight (April 19) and continuing through Sunday, April 22.  Shows are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 8p.m., with matinees Saturday & Sunday at 2 p.m. Visit for details  bgsu.edu/arts. Jonathan Chambers, directing Michael Feingold’s translation of Elisabeth Hauptmann’s script, doesn’t stint on the raw humor of the piece. Yes, “Threepenny” has complex political and aesthetic underpinnings, but the flashing of women’s underwear and even one actor’s bare butt take precedence. “Threepenny Opera” was conceived a satirical criticism of capitalism and the middle class. The milieu of the show is the underworld, but it’s all the underworld in the opera’s view.  After the ensemble led by Jenny Driver (Erica Harmon) introduces us to the opera’s antihero, Macheath (Kris Krotzer)  with the tune, “Mack the Knife,”, we meet  J.J. Peachum (Noah Froelich) who runs the beggars’  racket around London. If you want to beg you have to pay him a fee and share your earnings. One down-on-his-luck sucker finds this out when he is beaten by Peachum’s operatives. Peachum tells him he should be glad he could still walk. In “Peachum’s Morning Hymn,” Peachum laments that begging requires constant innovation. Human pity has a short shelve life. Even the four or five useful verses from the New Testament lose their appeal. He and his wife the grasping, conniving Mrs. Peachum (Kelly Dunn) have other concerns – their daughter Polly (Anna Parchem) has been cavorting with the thug Macheath, a Victorian Tony Soprano. To them their daughter is yet another commodity. But as Polly explains in “Barbara’s Song” she’s likely to go only so far with a respectable suitor, but will drop her panties for a poor, disreputable man. Her father, though, is intent on having Macheath arrested. The problem is the chief of police Tiger Brown (Jabri Johnson) is an old Army buddy of Macheath’s. They celebrate in “Soldier’s Song,” a caustic look at the military. Here as elsewhere the production plays up a homoerotic undertone. Johnson’s Brown watches out for Macheath, not just out of Army buddy loyalty. As much as Macheath pledges to be faithful to Polly, he’s a wandering dog and that leads to his downfall. He leaves a trail of jealousy in his wake especially between Jenny…


Not In Our Town celebrates five years of fighting hatred

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   A series of hate-filled acts five years ago led to the birth of Not In Our Town Bowling Green. On Tuesday, the five-year anniversary of the organization was celebrated with cake, balloons and pledges of renewed commitment. Vicky Kulicke, a founder of NIOT BG, recalled the dark events that led to the organization’s formation. First, there were swastikas drawn on the driveway of a BGSU basketball coach. Then there was the arson at the Islamic Center in Perrysburg Township. And finally, there were a series of racist tweets that were made by BGSU students at a local bar about fellow African American students in the establishment. The community was looking for a solution when Kulicke suggested the formation of Not In Our Town. The organization had been created in 1995 in Billings, Montana, after someone threw a brick through a storefront window where a Menorah was on display. In that community, the newspaper printed pictures of a Menorah for citizens to post in their own windows to show support. Kulicke believed something like that could work here in Bowling Green. She was challenged by the president of the BGSU Black Student Union to make it happen. So Kulicke started knocking on doors and found overwhelming support – from the mayor, BGSU president, city police and campus police. But Kulicke still wasn’t sure how the overall campus and community would respond. A panel discussion was planned to launch the Not In Our Town concept – but no one knew if students and citizens would attend. “We wondered if people were even going to care about what we cared about,” she said. “There was a great fear of failure.” It turned out they did care – so much so that people packed a BGSU lecture hall to hear about the program. The efforts to “beat the drum for justice” were successful, Kulicke said. “When we launched it was rapid fire,” she said of that drum beat. Since then, Not In Our Town has stood up to hatred and intolerance of many kinds in Bowling Green. The group stands for a safe and inclusive community, and against acts of discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexuality, ability, religion and class. The organization’s pledge calls for people to “lead and live through example by stopping bigotry before it starts.” Holly Cipriani, NIOT programming chairperson, asked those attending the five-year celebration to renew their commitment. “How do we embody the pledge and live it day to day,” she said. Though the drum beat has slowed and been quiet at times, Kulicke assured those present that Not In Our Town is still committed to fighting hatred in any form. Lately that has included working on issues of gun violence and food insecurity. “There are always individuals…


Earth Week speaker: People favor protections, but not if labeled ‘job-killing regulations’

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Lana Pollack got her first taste of government regulation, or protection as she prefers to call it, when she was a girl watching beef being butchered. As the Lamb Peace lecturer, Pollack, who chairs the U.S. section, International Joint Commission, kicked off Earth Week at Bowling Green State University posing the question: “If protections are good, why are regulations bad?” Certainly her father who ran a grocery store and butcher shop in rural western Michigan didn’t appreciate the state inspector who stood by while he and his help processed a beef carcass. Her father, Pollack said, was the kind of person who fed a lot of people whether they could pay their bills or not. Once a week he’d go to the cattle auction and buy a couple steers, which he’d bring back. Pollack said she went along, and watched the processing. “I know where my meat comes from.” She could see her father was “aggravated” by the inspector and his seemingly petty demands. In his later years, his daughter asked him if the state regulations made his ground beef or hot dogs any better. No, he said. “But it kept the guy down the road from adding sawdust to his hot dogs.” The consumer wasn’t protected from an ethical business like the one her father ran, but from the unethical ‘guy down the road.” That holds true for the environment as well, including the Great Lakes. That’s why the EPA is the Environmental Protection Agency, not the Environmental Regulatory Agency. People like “protection,” she said. They think far less of regulations, especially when they are so constantly referred to as “job-killing regulations.” That phrase is tossed around so much that it almost becomes one word. It’s a favorite of conservative lobbying efforts like the American Legislative Exchange Council. “Words matter,” Pollack said. It’s not like businesses, including agribusiness, are opposed to government action, she said. They’re fine with it as long as it benefits them. While agribusiness may fight rules aimed at controlling the run-off of phosphorus from fields that causes toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie, farm interests back federal government support for ethanol production, Pollack said. Now 40 percent of corn on 7 million acres of heavily fertilized cropland is grown for fuel. Taking action to combat pollution of the Great Lakes is a complex issue that involves understanding the science, as well as the cultural and political context. Pollack, who served in the Michigan State Senate from 1984 to 1993, describes herself as “a recovering politician.” At her lecture she showed two photos of the Cuyahoga River on fire, one from 1952 and the other from 1969. No action was taken in 1952 in the years of complacency after World War II. But the 1960s was a “time of social…


BGSU film students celebrate their movies, the Gish, & Ralph Wolfe

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For Bowling Green State University film students, the Film and Media Festival is their Oscars. Walking into Gish Theater, the trophies for best drama, comedy, documentary, experimental, and horror, and for the various crafts that go into making these – special effects, musical score, costumes, makeup, and cinematography – are lined up. The festival is a decidedly more low key affair – and it should be noted, a tighter show, lasting less than an hour from the end of the mixer to start of the after-awards socializing. At the Oscars, you wouldn’t have Adam Panter, who would pick up best actor award on Sunday night, hawking t-shirts at the theater on Saturday morning. But then that’s all part of being in a creative community. That sense of camaraderie, even among ostensible competitors, was evident. They appeared in each other projects, and cheered wildly when a classmate won. This community, though, will be losing its ‘home,” or at least the venue where so many of the films produced on campus were first screened, said Keisha Martin, president of the University Film Organization, which presented the festival with BG Reel. Martin said that the experience of screening films in the Gish connected current students with those who came before them. To show their appreciation the student groups honored Ralph Haven Wolfe, the professor emeritus of English, who founded the theater in 1976. Wolfe said that growing up on a farm, he always wanted to go to town because that’s where the two places he loved, the library and the movie theater, were. Those ignited the intellectual passion that led him into academia, and BGSU, first as a student and then as a professor. Wolfe spoke about how he got Lillian Gish to come for the dedication at a time when film studies at BGSU was in its infancy. Though he has been outspoken in his displeasure about the removal of the Gish from Hanna Hall – the theater will be relocated to the Student Union (see story http://bgindependentmedia.org/university-promises-gish-name-will-live-on-bgsu/) – he struck a philosophical note on Sunday night. The theater and what it represents will survive in a new form, he said. Then befitting an English professor he recited poetry, a long section from William Wordsworth’s “Intimations of Immortality,” with the lines: “We will grieve not, rather find / Strength in what remains behind.” And like the poet, he is was now of a “philosophic mind. “ The Gish was one of the features that attracted Diana Hoffman to BGSU. Hoffman’s “No One’s Little Girl” won best of festival honors. She was initially interested in BGSU because of the reputation of its film program, and then when she visited she was impressed by the facilities, both the new Wolfe Center for the Arts, and the vintage Gish Film…


BGSU marks Sexual Assault Awareness Month with multiple events

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University will host several events during Sexual Assault Awareness Month in April. Highlights of the month include “What Were You Wearing,” an exhibit by sexual assault survivors to challenge victim-blaming statements; the Sexual Assault Awareness Month 5K and Dog Walk; and the Clothesline Project. Additional events include free and confidential HIV testing, peer education presentations and a Step Up Step In basketball tournament. Guests can visit “What Were You Wearing” between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. April 11 in 208 Bowen-Thompson Student Union. This event is a collaboration between BGSU and the community, co-hosted by It’s on Us and The Cocoon, with support from the BGSU Women’s Center and Apparel Merchandising and Product Development Program. The Sexual Assault Awareness Month 5K and Dog Walk begins at 10 a.m. April 14 at the BGSU Student Recreation Center. Participants can register at bgsu.edu/5KDogWalk. Participants can also register for the We Are One Team (WA1T) Walk/Run, which aims to promote social justice, diversity, inclusion and teamwork through the power of sport. This year’s event will begin at 11 a.m. April 15 at Doyt Perry Stadium. For more information, contact Amanda Washko at awashko@bgsu.edu. The Clothesline Project, a visual display that bears witness to violence against women, will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 18 on the Education Lawn. In the event of rain, it will be held in 208 Union. The shirts in this display have been designed by survivors or those who care about them. The Wood County Clothesline Project began in 1995 and is protected and maintained by The Cocoon. On April 25, everyone is encouraged to wear jeans as a visible means of protest against the misconceptions that surround sexual assault. To view a complete list of calendar events and learn more about BGSU’s sexual violence prevention efforts, visit bgsu.edu/bgsucares.


Student entrepreneurs pitch their ideas at The Hatch

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS In the spirit of “Shark Tank,” 10 student entrepreneurs will pitch their business ideas to alumni investors during The Hatch on April 19 at Bowling Green State University. The event will begin at 6 p.m. in the Perry Field House on the BGSU campus. In 2017, The Hatch attracted more than 3,500 attendees and was streamed to watch parties across the United States. “Hatchlings” are paired with alumni mentors throughout the spring semester to develop their business ideas. The field includes two Bowling Green natives: Sara Clark and Isaac Rogers. Participating students and their ideas include: Hannah Barth and Elyse Blau, both juniors, are creating Pop-Up Palace, a play structure that is easily assembled, disassembled and modified to reflect a child’s changing developmental needs. Barth is majoring in inclusive early childhood education; Blau is majoring in early childhood education. Nick Bundy and Jacob Hauter, both juniors, are developing Saflee, a hybrid of a traditional safe and a disaster kit. Bundy is double-specializing in finance and sales and services marketing; Hauter is double-specializing in marketing and business analytics. Sara Clark, a senior, is creating Magnahalter, a horse halter that eliminates buckles and clasps by replacing them with Velcro and magnets. Clark is majoring in intervention along with dual education licensure for K-12 students with mild-to-moderate and moderate-to-severe disabilities. Olivier Ernst, a graduate student, is developing Suppleo, a supplement dispenser designed for athletic and workout environments. Ernst is pursuing his MBA. Kristen Grom, a senior, is creating Power Play, an app-controlled dog toy that allows owners to control the toy from smart devices. Grom is majoring in visual communication technology. Marikay Mester, a junior, is developing Bloomzoa, an app that makes childhood nutrition fun and interactive while providing educational tools to successfully manage dietary restrictions. Mester is majoring in dietetics. Rachael Poling, a senior, is creating a wearable device that is an early detector of geriatric diseases. Poling is majoring in applied health science. Isaac Rogers, sophomore, is developing Mchezo, a web-based, interactive game for children with chronic diseases. Rogers is majoring in business administration.


University promises Gish name will live on BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The last day of classes this spring semester will mark the end of the 42-year history of the Lillian and Dorothy Gish Film Theater in Hanna Hall. Bowling Green State University officials hope this will mark a new chapter in film studies at the university, though the man behind the theater, Ralph Haven Wolfe remains disheartened at the changes to the theater he founded and led for 40 years. He said Friday afternoon that changing the theater in the Bowen Thompson Student Union into the Gish marks a step back to 1975 when the university did not have a theater dedicated to showing films. The space in the union will still be a multi-use space, he said. That’s necessary said, Dean Ray Craig, who led several members of the media on a tour Friday of where the Gish facilities will be moving next semester. Those include a large lecture hall, Olscamp 117, which will be named the Ralph Haven Wolfe Viewing Center. That will replace in name the viewing center now in Hanna. That viewing room houses a collection of hundreds of videocassettes, DVDs, and laserdiscs donated to BGSU by Wolfe. The relocation project will cost $500,000, said Bruce Meyer, interim vice president for capital planning/campus operations. The money will come from funds allocated to complete the university’s master plan. Craig explained that the Gish has served two communities. There are the students in film studies who screened their original work in the 168-seat venue, and there were film series that attracted the broader community. Those were the Sunday matinees, often silent films with live musical accompaniment, a Tuesday film series, and international films on Thursdays. Those series will all move to the student union theater. That auditorium will get a new digital high definition projection system and a screen large enough for those images. The sound system will be rearranged with some of the speakers now lining the walls being placed behind the screen. The system, said Bob Waddle, assistant vice president for capital planning, will be the same system used throughout campus, and that should avoid the glitches that sometimes have occurred during presentations in the venue. Now if there is a problem, any campus technician should be able to fix it. Craig said that though film programming will take priority, the auditorium will still need to be used for other events. There will be some interior improvements, including new carpeting. The seats from the Gish with name plates honoring donors will not be used. Waddle explained that seats in a theater must conform to the slope of the theater floor. The lobby will house rotating displays of Gish memorabilia. Craig said some of the enlarged movie stills that were given to BGSU after an exhibit honoring the Gishes at the Museum…


BGSU partners with Texas firm to promote online business degrees

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University is seeking help to promote its online business programs, even before one of them is launched. The university has signed an agreement with Academic Partnerships, a Texas-based company, to help with the marketing and recruiting of its existing online Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree (EBSBA), and to market an online Master of Business Administration, that is still in the process of being created. Acting Provost John Fischer said that collaboration was being sought to try to get more enrollment in the eCampus programs. The university is looking more and more to non-traditional, or post-traditional students, to maintain enrollments when there are fewer high school graduates. The EBSBA is under enrolled, he said, making it a good candidate for such a collaboration. The program is aimed at working adults who want to complete a bachelor’s degree, he said. The EBSBA provides the last two years of the bachelor’s degree. Academic Partnerships is expected to start recruiting for the EBSBA this fall. Academic Partnerships will reach out to build relationships with companies to recruit students, as well as providing some mentoring support for students. They will also help market the program. That will include fine tuning language on the program’s web page. Fischer said prospective students for the EBSBA “want to know as soon as possible how much is it going to cost in its entirety, and how much credit we’ll give them for other coursework they’re bringing in.” They also want to know if they can get credit for prior learning because of their work experience. In exchange for these services, Academic Partnerships will split the revenue 50-50 with the university. The proposed online MBA is meant to address the concern in the drop in enrollment in MBA programs. “Online MBAs seem to be supplanting face-to-face MBAs,” he said. At some institutions that drop has been significant. “Cross country the trend is that those are shrinking,” Fischer said. “But we haven’t seen that yet. We don’t want to be naïve. We don’t want to assume we’re the only institution that avoids that trend.” Fischer said it’s not an either or proposition. “How do we be proactive and preserve the reputation and operation of those face to face models at the same we’re building a strong online one?” This new online MBA will not replace the three MBA programs the university already has in place. BGSU offers a traditional classroom-based, face-to-face, program on campus. It also offers two hybrid programs. Those programs bring students to campus, which includes the Levis Commons facility, periodically. The rest of the time the do some work online. The Professional MBA is aimed at working adults. The Executive MBA is geared toward business people who already have executive experience. The new collaboration with Academic Partnerships…


Yannick Kluch, founder of WA1T, wins Cooper Award for teaching

By BONNIE BLANKINSHIP BGSU Office of Marketing &  Communications For doctoral student Yannick Kluch, “learning is a journey, not a destination,” and he seamlessly brings that philosophy into the classroom as a teacher in the School of Media and Communication. In recognition of his teaching excellence, Kluch recently was named the winner of the Central States Communication Association’s 2018 Cooper Award for teaching by a Ph.D. student. He becomes the first Bowling Green State University student ever to receive the prestigious honor. The association is one of the top regional organizations in promoting all levels of scholarship, and sponsors outstanding teaching, research and service awards, including teaching at the two graduate levels. Kluch will be recognized at the CSCA annual conference, to be held April 6 in Milwaukee. Kluch takes a holistic approach to teaching, combining it with research and community-based learning and bringing a variety of elements into the curriculum and classroom activities to ensure every student is grasping the material and is able to apply it in a larger context. He is perhaps most familiar to the BGSU campus as the founder of the NCAA award-winning We Are One Team (WA1T), a campus-wide initiative he created to promote diversity and inclusion through sport at the University and in the Bowling Green community. He has spent the past year working closely with the NCAA’s Office of Inclusion and Diversity, traveling the country to give workshops for teachers, coaches and administrators and share the WA1T experience. His commitment to social justice also permeates his teaching. “Yannick presents very dense, complex material in a way that students can understand” “As a teacher with a passion for knowledge, education, diversity, and inclusive leadership, it is my goal to create classroom environments that foster meaningful learning experiences for all students enrolled in my classes, empower students to reflect on the worlds they are a part of, and encourage students to apply the course concepts and skills to address social problems,” Kluch said in his Cooper Award application. “I am a critical educator who views learning as a continuous process that transcends both the physical and temporal limits of the communication classroom. That is why I conceptualize learning as a journey, not a destination.” His emphasis on creating meaningful learning experiences has led him to, variously, invite local drag queens into a class session on gender norms to tell how they perform gender, and to have students create fictitious online dating profiles and use strategies of uncertainty reduction to get to know one another. A central emphasis is to get students to reflect on how concepts covered in class relate to their everyday lives, and he frequently uses humor, pop culture references and technology to achieve that. For example, in class sessions on critical approaches to sport he asks students to deconstruct and critique how “ESPN: The Body Issue”…


Automation & robotics focus of State of Region Conference

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS As online ordering giant Amazon adds automated fulfillment centers around the country and fast-food restaurants pilot automated ordering kiosks, questions arise about the impact on jobs and employment. Will more people or fewer be needed, and will robots take over roles usually held by humans in an increasingly automated workplace? The Center for Regional Development (CRD) at Bowling Green State University will address these concerns at the 16th annual State of the Region Conference Monday, April 16. This year’s theme is “The Implications of Automation for Economic Development” and features speakers from Amazon, APT Manufacturing Solutions, SpinGlass and the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. The conference runs from 8 a.m. to noon at the Hilton Garden Inn in Levis Commons, Perrysburg. Sen. Randy Gardner (R., Bowling Green) will give opening remarks at 9 a.m. following breakfast and networking. Attendance is free, but registration is required. Register at bgsu.edu/crd. The 2018 conference will provide an overview of economic conditions in the region as well as data and analytics on the current workforce in northwest Ohio. It will also provide insights to economic development and elected officials in northwest Ohio about the impact of automation on workforce development efforts. “Our goal with the State of the Region conference is to highlight the critical economic issues facing our region today and in the future,” said Will Burns, CRD interim director. “Increased automation in our lives and work environments has potentially paradigm-shifting consequences for the future of work in our nation and region,” said Dr. Russell Mills, CRD Research Fellow. Giving the State of the Region address will be Guhan Venkatu, group vice president in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He leads the department’s regional analysis and outreach group. Venkatu joined the bank in 1998 as a research analyst and has held positions of increasing responsibility, including economist and vice president and senior regional officer of the bank’s Pittsburgh branch. Dr. Eric Daimler, an artificial intelligence expert and CEO of SpinGlass, will deliver the keynote address. A leading authority in robotics and artificial intelligence with over 20 years of experience in the field as an entrepreneur, investor, academic and policymaker, he most recently became co-founder and CEO of SpinGlass, a multi-tiered investment platform for fueling the development and adoption of emerging robotics and AI technology. SpinGlass creates, acquires and applies modern digital technologies, including robotics and AI, to industries traditionally slow to adopt them. Daimler earlier co-founded six technology companies that have done pioneering work in fields ranging from storage software systems to statistical arbitrage. He is the author of the forthcoming book “Your Augmented Future,” a guidebook for entrepreneurs, engineers, policymakers and citizens on how to understand — and benefit from — the unfolding revolution in robotics and AI. A frequent speaker, lecturer and commentator, he works…


Ghanaian master drummer Bernard Woma has wake up call for BGSU students

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Master drummer Bernard Woma has greeted presidents and royalty to his native Ghana. On Tuesday morning he greeted students in Bowling Green State University’s School of Art with the throbbing sound of drums, and the swirl of dancers. Most of those in the audience in the lobby of the Bryan Gallery were students in Rebecca Skinner Green’s African art class, but the ranks of listeners swelled as the rhythm reverberated around the building. They didn’t stay observers for long. On the second dance, members of Woma’s Saakumu dance troupe summoned those in the audience to join the line, instructing them as they danced, on the steps and gestures. “We share the music together,” Woma said. “We share the experience together, so you better understand.” Ghanaian music is participatory. Woma has been coming to BGSU every few years since 2001. This week’s two-day stay with his dance troupe will culminate with a free performance Wednesday night at 7 in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre in Wolfe Center for the Arts. He said that when he first opened his Dagara Music Center in 1998, a BGSU group led by Skinner Green and Steven Cornelius was the first to come to study there. Woma said he was born to be a drummer. He came out of his mother’s womb with his fists clenched as if gripping a pair of mallets. That marked him as a gyil player. His grandfather played the instrument, a Ghanaian xylophone, as did his uncle. While his father didn’t play he loved to dance. So Woma grew up in a home full of music and dance. At 2 he was banging out the melodies he’d heard. His musical education began long before his formal “European” education. When he completed that, he headed to the capital city of Accra where he joined the National Dance Ensemble. The government brought together the best musicians from the country’s more than 60 ethnic regions. By the time President and Mrs. Clinton came to visit in 1998, he was the master drummer of the troupe. Clinton was intrigued by the enormous ceremonial drum, and quizzed Woma on what it was made from. Elephant hide, Woma replied. He also greeted the Obamas when they visited Ghana in 2009. He recalled that he was planning to come to the United States at that time, but the embassy said he needed to stay for the Obama visit. He even taught Sasha and Malia how to play the gyil. “It was privilege.” As master drummer he also welcomed South African President Nelson Mandela and Queen Elizabeth. With the founding of his school, Woma decided he needed to pursue graduate education. So he earned a master’s degree in African Studies from SUNY Fredonia and a master’s in ethnomusicology from the Indiana University. “It helped me understand the academic function of…