Campus

BGSU reports higher enrollment

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University’s overall enrollment for the spring 2019 semester is up 1.7 percent over spring 2018, meeting the University’s enrollment goals.  Total student enrollment for spring 2019 is 18,776, up from 18,459 in 2018. BGSU’s fall-to-spring retention rate improved to over 91 percent for spring 2019. These numbers are released every semester on the 15th day of classes, which marks official enrollment counts that are reported to the State of Ohio. BGSU introduced a new winter session this year, changing the academic calendar to accommodate the new three-week session. Enrollment for the first winter session was more than 1,000 students and included those participating in courses online, courses on campus and experiences both abroad and throughout the United States.  “Our students are engaged in a learning community at BGSU that prepares them to live meaningful and productive lives,” said BGSU President Rodney K. Rogers. “We continue to make tremendous progress in our levels of student success, including retention and recently achieving the highest four-year graduation rates in University history.” Undergraduate enrollment on the main campus for spring 2019 is up nearly 2 percent over last year with a headcount of 14,196 compared to 13,929 in spring 2018. Graduate headcount on the main campus is slightly down at 2,603 compared to 2,624 in spring 2018. BGSU Firelands saw a 3.7 percent enrollment increase, from 1,906 in spring 2018 to 1,977 in spring 2019.


BGSU hosts speakers in ‘Beyond the Dream’ series

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University has planned a powerful series of speakers and events that take the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous words “Beyond the Dream.” Throughout the spring semester, students and community members will hear from national leaders of some of today’s most important social movements, aimed at bringing equity and justice to all members of society. Speakers include Opal Tometi, co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement; Shaun King, journalist, activist and writer in residence for Harvard Law School’s Fair Punishment Project; Ariana Brown, award-winning poet and activist; and Tarana Burke, founder of the ‘me too.’ Movement. “We’ve worked collaboratively to bring the most dynamic line-up we’ve had to date,” said Jennifer McCary, assistant vice president for student affairs and Title IX coordinator. “We hope these speakers will help spark much-needed conversations on our campus about equity, diversity and inclusivity driving us to action.” “Beyond the Dream” events provide “an opportunity for the University to create a sense of belonging for our minoritized students and build a culture of inclusion on campus,” said Ana Brown, interim director of the Office of Multicultural Affairs. They are also an avenue for all students to “learn, grow in their empathy, and develop a more inclusive mindset as a result,” Brown said. “By continuing to support the Black Issues Conference, ‘Beyond the Dream’ offerings, and other programming like this, BGSU is saying, ‘This is what we value and who we strive to be.’” On Feb. 20, Opal Tometi will deliver the keynote address for the University’s “Beyond the Dream” series from 7-8 p.m. in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom at the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Tometi is the daughter of Nigerian immigrants. She co-founded Black Lives Matters with two other women, and today is the executive director of Black-Alliance for Just Immigration. Her talk is sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and the Office of the Provost. Register to attend her keynote address at bgsu.edu/opaltometi. The 19th annual Black Issues Conference, held Feb. 20-22, features Shaun King. He will speak on “Civil Rights Today: The New…


Students pack in the knowledge about seeking post-college employment

By ABBY SHIFLEY BG Independent Correspondent Avery Lane had two questions for BGSU students: First, what are your plans after graduation? Second, how are you going to get there? During the second week of Winter Session, students attended the Backpack to Briefcase boot camp. The event aimed to provide students with resources they might need for their careers, as well as to challenge students to think about their post-graduation plans. Fifty-three students registered for the boot camp, which consisted of individual consultations, mock interviews, eight presentations, an etiquette lunch and professional headshots for each student. Some students at the boot camp had plenty of experience in the workforce, but still attended the camp for extra practice. “Any practice is good practice,” said Brian Armstrong, a senior majoring in geography who had a summer internship at the Iowa County Highway Department in Wisconsin. He ended up giving a presentation to the highway commissioner, which resulted in a $2 million increase in the department’s highway budget. “I feel like everyone should have the opportunity and take advantage of the opportunities that we have here to better yourself and prepare yourself for the future, for your career,” Armstrong said. “So that’s why when I saw this opportunity to come and get a mock interview done and come to this session I signed up.” The first presentation on Tuesday was on making a “one-minute commercial,” for students to use to inform potential employers on their skills and qualifications. Armstrong said he hopes that after the boot camp, “when I get to interview for a job, I’m not going to be nervous, I’m going to be prepared, I’m going to kill any interview that I go for.” “Dressing for Success” was the topic of the second presentation on Tuesday, given by Assistant Director of the Career Center Andrea Gutierrez and an employer partner and BGSU student, Bobby Bergstrom. The presentation covered what is appropriate to wear to a job interview and what isn’t, but also how the expectations can change depending on the nature of a company. Nicole Edelbrock, a junior majoring in graphic design,…


Last dance majors take to the stage in winter showcase for program in transition

By DAVID DUPONT  BG Independent News This weekend will be the last dance for the last two dance majors at Bowling Green State University. Shannon Cleary and Emily Sindyla have prominent roles in the Winter Dance Concert. That’s fitting because once they are gone, the university will have no dance majors. The major has been eliminated as part of the transition of the dance program from the School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies to the Department of Theatre and Film. Students will still be able to minor in dance. The change, which has been in the works for about two years, will be official next fall. Shayna Smith (left) and Shannon Cleary dance out in front of the ensemble in the tap number “Valerie.” The Winter Dance Concert will be Friday, Feb. 8 and Saturday, Feb. 9 at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Click for tickets. For Sindyla and Cleary the performance is bittersweet. Both are passionate about dancing and BGSU’s dance program. Neither came to be dance major. Sindyla intended to major in business. Realizing she could study dance “was an added perk,” she said. She ended up majoring in dance with a business minor.    Cleary came to BGSU because “I liked the feel of the campus,” and without a clear idea of what she would study. She also ended up in dance. She’s a double major in dance and journalism and public relations. Shannon Cleary in “Valerie” That they would end up studying dance is not surprising; they both have danced since they were 2 years old. That’s 20 years of dancing. And both hope to remain involved after BGSU. Cleary, who comes from the Akron area, said when she was 8, she moved into a competitive program. From then on that’s what she did. She had dance five nights a week, four hours a night. “When I’m performing, I feel like it’s the authentic version of myself,” she said. Cleary hopes to put her public relations background to work promoting the arts, whether as a social…


Young pianists find keys to success at BGSU’s Dubois Piano Competition

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Natasha Wu’s trip is just beginning. The Taiwanese 18-year-old kicked off a two-month trip to the United States by winning the David D. Dubois Piano Competition Sunday. The rest of the trip, the young pianist said, will be devoted to visiting conservatories and colleges to see where the next step in her musical career will take her. Wu was one of eight finalists who performed for a panel of judges Sunday morning in Kobacker Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. Guest artist Marina Lomazov speaks with Elizabeth Liu, a competitor in the Dubois Piano Competition after the event. The finals capped a three-day competition and festival being hosted for the ninth year by the College of Musical Arts. Twenty-two semifinalists performed on Saturday. On Friday, a number of the contestants took lessons from BGSU faculty members, and guest artist Marina Lomazov gave a master class for university students. On Sunday morning Lomazov was sitting at the adjudicator’s table with Sun Min Kim, of Denison University, and Mary Siciliano, a Michigan-based teacher and performer, determining the winner from what was a field of winners. Every one of the competitors, whether they made the finals or not, could boast a list of state and regional victories. “Obviously it was a really difficult decision,” Lomazov said. “There was a lot of very beautiful playing. “ Still the judges were “cohesive” in selecting those who should receive the awards. Lomazov said of  Wu: “She played with maturity and depth that really belied her years. There was a tremendous nobility to her playing. She did not show off. She didn’t do anything that the music did not ask her to do. That’s what I really appreciated.” “I was very happy and glad,” Wu said of winning the top prize of $3,000.  Other winners were: Colin Choi, high school senior from Northbrook Illinois, second place, $2,000; Kasey Shao, 15, from the Cincinnati, third place, $1,000; and Stephanie Petinaux, 16, Cranberry Township in the Pittsburgh area, and Bryant Li, 14, Katy, Texas, both honorable mentions. Wu said she has…


BGSU fall dean’s list available

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University has announced the undergraduate students who have been named to the fall semester dean’s list for achieving grade point averages of 3.5 or better on a 4.0 scale. To be chosen for the dean’s list, undergraduate students must carry no fewer than 12 letter-graded credit hours per semester. Candidates for fall commencement are also available. The names of graduation candidates and dean’s list honorees can be found online at https://services.bgsu.edu/gradlist/ Names are listed by county. Counties must be downloaded individually.


BGSU sports management team headed to Super Bowl

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The New England Patriots aren’t the only team at the Super Bowl in Atlanta who will be there for the third time in five years. Students from Bowling Green State University’s Sports Management Alliance are on site in Atlanta for the week, working as volunteers at the event. The 24 students headed down Tuesday before the break of dawn, with their first 14-hour shift on Wednesday. While that sounds grueling, two sports management majors who made the trip last year agreed it was chance of a lifetime. “It was the best week of my life,” said Cory Radebaugh, a senior in sports management. “Eye opening,” said Kyle Edmond, also a senior sports management major. “I think that’s the easiest way to summarize it. … Every step of the way you saw something different, something you never anticipated. None of us could have dreamed the amount of manpower that’s behind it.” That includes security with military on every corner and rooftop and a tank parked outside the stadium. In the days leading up to the game, the students will be working with the fan experience at the stadium. These are a series of activities for families. The volunteers guide visitors through exhibits and help them get photographs with the Lombardi Trophy that the winning team will hoist after Sunday’s game. Kids also participate in a pass, punt, and kick skills competition. Radebaugh said last year, youngsters had the chance to don a helmet equipped with the same communications technology the pros use, and Radebaugh and other volunteers would call out instructions to them as they maneuvered. Those participating in the activity include local families who can’t afford the tickets, which are going for several thousands of dollars. Others have tickets, Radebaugh said, but come early to get the most out of the trip. On game day, BGSU students will assist the 1,700 fans who bought $20,000 Super Bowl packages — airfare, hotel, and game tickets. They primarily will help them find their way around Mercedes-Benz Stadium. This will be the sixth time in just over…


BGSU cancels classes for Thursday (update)

Due to dangerously low temperatures, all classes are canceled on Bowling Green State University’s Bowling Green and Firelands campuses, and its Levis Commons location, for Thursday, January 31.  Classes had been canceled for today. All University offices will continue operations. However, the university is encouraging everyone to remain inside whenever possible and to limit outside exposure.  The Jerome Library and Student Recreation Center will have reduced hours. BGSU Dining will continue operating, but locations and hours will be limited. Details on hours, events, and service availability can be found on the weather updates website .  Falcon Health Center and the Counseling Center will operate on their normal schedule. Campus shuttles will maintain full service.  Employees should report to work, if they can safely do so.  The university also issued the following “reminder” to faculty and staff: “The University has chosen to cancel classes and remain open because we have an obligation to continue to provide services to our students and the public to the best of our ability. Of particular concern during a weather emergency is supporting the 6,000 residential students on our BG campus.  “At the same time, please know that your safety is also paramount. As always, use your own judgment about whether you can safely travel to the University.  “If you’re unable to make it to work, you may utilize vacation, personal leave or compensatory time (if applicable), or leave without pay (with supervisor’s approval). If you won’t be reporting for work, please be sure to notify your supervisor.” 


Apollo’s Fire to bring the spirit of Bach’s coffeehouse to BGSU’s Kobacker Hall

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Back when Bach’s music was new, the composer and other professional and student musicians would hang out at Cafe Zimmermann, a coffee house in Leipzig, Germany, to play the latest sounds. Apollo’s Fire, a Baroque music ensemble based in Cleveland, will take listeners back to that time in the mid-18th century when it presents “A Night at Bach’s Coffeehouse” Wednesday, Feb. 6, at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus. The free performance is part of Apollo Fire’s three-day residency presented by the Dorothy E. And Duwayne H. Hansen Musical Arts Series (https://www.bgsu.edu/musical-arts/events/residencies/hansen-musical-arts-series.html). During the residency the ensemble will hold open rehearsals and master classes for flutists and string players. The BGSU visit will feature an 11-member version of the ensemble, which was founded by Jeannette Sorrell 26 years ago. Kathie Stewart, the ensemble’s flutist, has been a collaborator and friend of Sorrell since before she started Apollo’s Fire. The two musicians met at Cincinnati Conservatory, where both were pursuing graduate work. Sorrell was studying harpsichord and conducting, and Stewart was working on a doctorate in flute performance. In Cincinnati, Stewart discovered her love of Baroque music. In the course of her studies, Stewart had played music from the history of flute from early music through contemporary. Her attention always seemed to return to the Baroque period. While later music tends to be “messy,” she said, “Baroque music is calm and clear. It gets messy enough, but then it all resolves.” By this time, Stewart said she was working hard on her instrumental studies. “But I wasn’t loving it.” The conservatory had a Baroque flute.  She took the instrument into a practice room to try to play music by Bach and Telemann. “It was horrifying,” she said. She found a book to guide her, and with that she applied herself to the period instrument.  “I tried things that were awkward and didn’t make sense on modern flute. They made perfect sense on the Baroque flute. I learned from the instrument what Baroque music was all about. Finally I was…


BGSU arts events through Feb. 20

Jan. 30 – The Faculty Artist Series welcomes Brittany Lasch on trombone. Lasch is an assistant professor in the College of Musical Arts. As the second-place winner of the 2017-18 American Prize, she has appeared as soloist with numerous ensembles including the U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own,” the Queens Symphony and the Rodney Marsalis Philadelphia Big Brass. She also was a winner of Astral Artist’s 2017 National Auditions and the 2015 national Collegiate Solo Competition hosted by the U.S. Army Band. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free. Jan. 31 – The Prout Reading Series presents poet Julie Webb and fiction writer Ali Miller during the first reading of the semester. Both women are MFA students in the BGSU Creative Writing program. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free. Feb. 1 – The Center for Women and Gender Equity presents “Women, Gender and Poetry Open Mic,” featuring 1997 BGSU alumna Kayla William as the keynote speaker. The event, which runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in 207 Bowen-Thompson Student Union, includes collaborative poetry activities, blackout poetry tables and open mic time. Free Feb. 1 – The BGSU Department of Theatre and Film’s Elsewhere Productions presents “I Didn’t Want a Mastodon” by Halley Feiffer and directed by Melissa Snyder. The production will begin at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. A second performance will begin at 8 p.m. on Feb. 2. Free  Feb. 2 – The College of Musical Arts will host the eighth annual David D. Dubois Piano Competition, which features accomplished high school pianists competing for prizes. Mariana Lomazov, a Ukrainian-American pianist, is this year’s guest artist for the piano competition. One of the most passionate and charismatic performers on the concert scene today, she is the Ira McKissick Koger Professor of Fine Arts at the University of South Carolina School of Music, where she is founder and artistic director of the Southeastern Piano Festival. She will present a solo piano recital at 8…


WBGU-TV gets grant, seeks local funds for Neil Armstrong documentary

From WBGU-TV PUBLIC TELEVISION WBGU-TV has been selected as one of 15 PBS stations nationwide to receive a $10,000 grant from WGBH’s “American Experience” for special programming in commemoration of the upcoming 50th anniversary of the first successful manned moon landing. WBGU-TV is creating a documentary celebrating the early life of the first man on the moon and Wapakoneta, Ohio, native Neil Armstrong. The documentary will include interviews with those who knew Armstrong and how his accomplishment had such a lasting effect on Northwest Ohio. It will feature Wapakoneta and various locales that figured prominently in Armstrong’s formative years. Plans are to premiere the documentary during Wapakoneta’s “First on the Moon” celebration in July. It then will air on WBGU-TV and be available for viewing online. “American Experience” is planning a six-hour, three-part documentary about the politics and culture of the space age and the journey that led to the moon landing. It will air on PBS throughout the summer. “We are proud and excited to showcase Armstrong,” said WBGU-TV co-General Manager Anthony Short. “When you stop and think about it, it’s amazing that the first man on the moon grew up in our viewing area. It was such a monumental time in our history and he was such an interesting (and humble) person.” “We were thrilled to receive the grant and are hopeful that others will support this project,” said WBGU-TV co-General Manager Tina Simon. “It’s been 50 years now since the moon landing and it’s important that we’re able to talk with people who were in Wapakoneta when it happened and let them share their experiences, before time makes that impossible.” Along with the grant, WBGU-TV will be seeking additional sponsors and funding sources in support of the documentary. The station will be hosting a 5K fun run/walk April 6 with proceeds benefiting the project. The WBGU-TV “Great American Run: Ruby’s Race for Space” will begin at 9 a.m. at the Jerome Library on the Bowling Green State University campus and follow an easy course around the university. To register or for more details, visit davesrunning.com or wbgu.org….


BGSU business & accounting programs have accreditation extended

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) has extended the accreditation of the business and accounting programs at the College of Business at Bowling Green State University. Founded in 1916, AACSB is the longest-serving global accrediting body for business schools and the largest business education network advancing students, educators and business worldwide. AACSB accreditation is the hallmark of excellence in business education and has been earned by less than 5 percent of the world’s business schools, according to AACSB, placing the college among a very exclusive group. Further, only 187 institutions in the world hold additional AACSB accreditation for their accounting programs, a distinction held by the top 1 percent of business programs in the world. “AACSB accreditation is a significant achievement recognizing academic excellence and a commitment of continuous improvement,” said Dean Ray Braun. “A business degree from the BGSU College of Business is a sound investment and this accreditation reaffirms the value for our students and alumni.” To earn and sustain business accreditation, an institution’s business program is required to undergo a rigorous review and evaluation process. During the accreditation process, business school deans with substantial knowledge of business education and accreditation standards visit and evaluate the program. The BGSU college was reviewed based on 15 business accreditation standards including mission and strategic management; support for students, faculty and staff; learning and teaching; and academic and professional engagement of students and faculty.   Additionally, the college submits annual reports to AACSB on enrollments, retention, graduation, faculty and staff levels and hires, salaries and other benchmark data. “The College of Business has a vibrant student-oriented culture where faculty and students thrive in an inspiring and interactive learning environment,” said Dr. Mohammed Khayum AACSB peer review team chair and provost at the University of Southern Indiana. “With 720 internships completed in the last academic year prior to the report, student engagement is impressive. Similarly, advisory board members raved about the student interns they hosted.” The BGSU College of Business undergraduate program has been accredited since 1954. The BGSU MBA program has been accredited…


Winter Session means a ‘dead’ BGSU campus

Winter Session means a ‘dead’ BGSU campus By ABBY SHIFLEY BG Independent Correspondent For senior Kelly Schroeder, the BGSU campus is in an uncommonly lifeless state during Winter Session. “I don’t really like how it’s so dead … it’s just weird being in class when no one is around and walking on campus,” said Schroeder, who is majoring in graphic design. This winter, 300 BGSU students decided to take on-campus classes instead of having an extra three weeks of winter break. Since there are typically thousands of students enrolled during the Spring and Fall semesters, the campus has a considerably different atmosphere. Schroeder is in one of the 15 on-campus classes that are taking place during the 2019 Winter Session. Originally, 36 on-campus classes were offered but 21 were canceled according to information provided by Betsy Winters, data analytics coordinator of Online and Summer Academic Programs. Besides classes, there are other on-campus activities going on during Winter Session. Some of these activities are workshops, research opportunities, a Backpack to Briefcase Boot Camp, as well as volunteer opportunities offered by the Center for Community and Civic Engagement. Of the 1,062 students involved in Winter Session, only 300 are on campus. However, this lower number of on-campus students was anticipated by the university said Paul Cesarini, assistant vice provost of Online and Summer Academic Programs. “The majority of our Winter Session classes were online or experiential where students are not on campus, and that is by design,” Cesarini said. “Many of them were in study abroad classes or what we call ‘study afar,’ which is essentially experiential learning but within the United States.” Of the students taking classes on BGSU’s campus, many are like Schroeder and are living off campus. The number of students living in the residence halls varies week by week during winter break but is between 50 to 100 students. Stephanie Brinkman of the Office of Residence Life said these students can be on campus for multiple reasons, and not just during winter session. Besides taking on-campus classes, students could be on campus for sports, work or to use…


BGSU celebrates joy of piano with Dubois festival & competition

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University will welcome 23 top teenage pianists from as close as Toledo and as far as Taiwan as well as guest performer and judge Marina Lomazov for the David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition, Feb 1 through 3. The festival was established in 2008, and since then more than 200 pianists have come to campus to compete for the top prize of $3,000. The young pianists already have impressive resumes, often having won other competitions. Several have performed on “From the Top” on National Public Radio. The semifinalists have been selected through a preliminary round in which video recordings of applicants are screened. Each contestant must prepare a program of 20-30 minutes in length that includes pieces from three of the four major periods — Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Contemporary. One of the pieces must be a movement from a Classical sonata. The semifinal round will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center with the finals taking place Sunday beginning at 8:30 a.m. The winners are announced shortly after the last pianist performs. Lomazov will be on campus throughout the festival. On Friday, Feb. 1 she will present a master class with students in the College of Musical Arts from 2:30-4:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall. On Saturday, Feb. 2 she will perform a free recital at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall. Tickets for the recital are $7 and $3 for children and non-BGSU students in advance from https://itkt.choicecrm.net/templates/BGSU/. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. Students with BGSU ID card, and the festival participants will get in free. On Sunday morning, she will join two BGSU faculty members to judge the finals. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. Lomazov is no stranger to competitions. She launched her career with prizes in several international events. Her performing has drawn praise from critics around the world. Talk Magazine Shanghai described her performances as “a dramatic blend of boldness and wit.” A native of Ukraine, Lomazov…


BGSU’s Christina Lunceford reflects on a legacy of fighting for equality during MLK tribute

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Christina Lunceford has been thinking about her legacy lately. In introducing Lunceford as the keynote speaker for the annual Martin Luther King Tribute Friday, university student Morgan Hollandsworth noted that this was Lunceford’s  last day as Assistant to the President for Diversity and Inclusion.  Lunceford, who had a split role at Bowing Green State University for the past couple years, will become interim chair of the Department of Higher Education and Student Affairs and part of the leadership team for the College of Education and Human Development.  Lunceford said in this period of transition she’s looked back at those who helped guide her to become who she is as an educator, scholar, and mother. Some are unknown outside her family, others more renowned. Yet each struggled for social justice “with integrity, resilience, and joy,” she said. “I am definitely part of each of these legacies. I do my best to make sure their investment in me was worthwhile, and I take that responsibility very seriously to do good with what they instilled. It’s important that the legacy continues.” Lunceford started with her grandmother Lyda Mae Saunders.  Lunceford said growing up in East St. Louis, Missouri, her father “started fighting, stealing and drinking at a young age.” Bowling Green High School Madrigals perform “Tshosholoza” with David Siegel, left, on percussion, and Kam Frankfort singing lead. Her grandmother moved with him to the outskirts of Dallas, where she taught, taking advantage of some of the opportunities just opening up for blacks. Yet she knew she needed more, so she went to graduate school in Denver, because what she needed was not available to her in the South at that time. Lunceford still wears her grandmother’s 1958 class ring. Her father, Ronald Lunceford, went on to become a sociologist and counseling psychologist. He met her mother in Kansas where he went to train teachers working in newly integrated schools. As a mixed race couple their lives were “adventurous,” Lunceford said. They relocated to southern California, where he taught and together they founded a clinic for black and…