Campus

BGSU Arts Events through Sept. 26

Sept. 6 – The Faculty Artist Series features violinist Penny Thompson Kruse at 8 p.m.in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 7 – Spotlight on the Arts focuses on creative writing with a talk by Dr. Lawrence Coates, chair of the Department of English and award-winning author of novels “The Master of Monterey,” “The Blossom Festival,” “The Garden of the World” and “Camp Olvido.” Coates will discuss “Temporary Landscapes: The Fiction of Place,” at 7:30 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. A reception will follow. Free Sept. 8 – Family Weekend kicks off with a family-friendly showcase featuring the College of Musical Arts, Department of Theatre and Film and the School of Art. The showcase begins at 7 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Sept. 11 – The ARTalk series begins with “Strings, Folds and Rabbit Holes” by 1981 alumna Kristy Deetz, arts and visual design professor at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Her talk will begin at 6 p.m. in 204 Fine Arts Center. Free Sept. 12 – In conjunction with the exhibit “FABRICation,” Kristy Deetz, arts and visual design professor at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, will give a gallery talk on “The Curator’s Process.” The talk will begin at 5:30 p.m. in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Free Sept. 12 – Tuesdays at the Gish presents “The Virgin Suicides” (1999, U.S., 97 minutes, directed by Sofia Coppola). This coming-of-age film, starring Kirsten Dunst and Josh Hartnett, features five sisters and the group of boys who become fascinated by their troubled lives. The film…


Former student rep, entrepreneur Drew Forhan, returns to BGSU Board of Trustees

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Ohio Gov. John Kasich has appointed Drew Forhan of Hudson, Ohio, to the Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees. His nine-year term will run through 2026. Forhan is the founder, president and CEO of ForTec Medical, Inc. Founded in 1988, ForTec Medical was created on the premise that hospitals, surgical centers, medical offices and patients would benefit from mobile access to technology and highly trained technicians on an as-needed basis. The ForTec Laser Rental Program provides medical lasers to hospitals, surgical centers and physicians delivering the latest in therapies and treatments. Forhan is also a former executive with American Hospital Supply/V Mueller and with Richard Allen Medical. A past student representative to the BGSU Board of Trustees, he earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration/selling and sales management from the University in 1981. He is a board member, chairman and president of the Hudson Community Foundation. In 2015, he was inducted into BGSU’s Hamilton Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership Hall of Fame. “I am delighted to be joining BGSU’s Board of Trustees,” Forhan said. “The years I spent at Bowling Green helped to shape who I am today. It is an honor to be appointed, and look forward to my years as a member of the board.” “Mr. Forhan has substantial business experience and a keen interest in student success,” said BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey. “He is a wonderful addition to a very dedicated board.” At its meeting in June, the BGSU Board of Trustees elected Trustee Megan Newlove of Bowling Green the chair of the board and Trustee Daniel Keller of Huron, Ohio, vice…



Locals urge Congress to act to protect Dreamers

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Trump Administration’s announcement Tuesday that it would end protection for immigrants covered by the Deferred Action for Child Arrivals, or DACA, has prompted local calls for legislators to step in to protect the so-called Dreamers. Once the announcement was made , Beatriz Maya, the executive director of La Conexion, pulled together a small contingent to deliver a letter to the Bowling Green field office of U.S. Rep. Bob Latta (R-Bowling Green) calling for him to support the Dream Act that is now before Congress. That act would provide protection for these immigrants who were brought here as children by their parents who lacked proper documentation. The act would also provide them and other young immigrants with a path to become citizens. The letter read in part: “We demand that you and all members of Congress take immediate action to protect DACA recipients contributing to communities across the country. We urge you to co-sponsor the bipartisan Dream Act sponsored by Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Sem. Dick Durbin (D-Ill) that would provide a path to citizenship to 1.8 million immigrant youth who grew up calling this country home.” The letter noted it makes no sense in areas reporting labor shortages to deport people who have been educated and trained here. Maya said six people visited the office and spoke with David Wirt, Latta’s district manager, for about 20 minutes. She said they were told that given the announcement was just made, he had not had time to contact Latta to get his position on the matter. Maya noted in an interview later Tuesday that…


Gibson engineers changes within BGSU Division of Student Affairs

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Campus Fest last Thursday offered Bowling Green State University students a wide variety of ways to engage with campus and their community. Maybe they want to join the Japanese Club or volunteer at the Black Swamp Arts Festival.  Greek life was well represented, as were religious and cultural groups. Students were offered opportunities to play sports and to lift their voices in song. Thomas Gibson, vice president for student affairs and vice provost, likes this kind of event. “What I enjoy most is seeing the students make this campus their own and occupying every part of it.” Gibson, just starting his second year at BGSU, oversees a broad swath of offices involved in aspects of students’ BGSU experience. The vice presidential part of his title, he said, “means … I am responsible for matters impacting student life outside of the classroom that involves a large portfolio of student services.” The vice provost part “provides greater interaction with academic affairs that allows me to have a voice at the table to make sure that matters that are important to students are shared in academic affairs  spaces. … I have responsibility and partnership with colleagues in academic affairs to work for student retention and student success.” Learning communities, for example, are “a wonderful partnership,” he said. They bring together residential life and students’ academic majors “to develop an academic community of learners. That’s a good partnership.” After taking a year to observe and talk with faculty, administrators, staff, and students, Gibson spearheaded, a restructuring of his division’s staff. The reorganization involved “assessing the talent we have…


Collab Lab aims to make its mark by sparking innovation at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Collab Lab in Bowling Green State University’s Jerome Library has plenty of top notch technology—virtual reality headsets, video for 3D modeling, 3D scanner and printers, laser etchers, a suite of graphic programs, and markers. “You never want to be out of reach of a marker and a dry erase board,” said Jerry Schnepp, the lab director. All the high-tech equipment is ready at hand and in its place – at the periphery of the lab. The center of the space are comfortable chairs, arranged in semi-circles, partitioned off with white boards. Other prototyping materials are ready at hand, sheets of butcher paper, pipe cleaners, and magnets. These humble tools are “things that will help you get your ideas out of your head and tangible,” Schnepp said. The Collab Lab opened last week. It was funded with money from the state’s Next Frontier fund. The university received about $350,000 in state money, which it then matched. (http://bgindependentmedia.org/bgsu-taps-state-grant-to-get-ideas-flowing-at-collab-lab/) The lab is opened to students, staff and faculty from all disciplines, Schnepp said. The idea is to foster cross-disciplinary collaborations. The lab is also open to community members, as a way of spurring entrepreneurial ideas. The mission of the lab is not to bring innovations to fruition, but rather to germinate the ideas. On a recent morning Emily Aquilar, of the Department of Theatre and Film faculty, was on hand with a number of her students. She directs the Treehouse Troupe. The troupe will present Dennis Foon’s “New Kid” at area elementary and middle schools this fall. She brought her students to the Collab Lab to…


Aging in place will be focus of Optimal Aging Institute Fair

From BGSU OPTIMAL AGING INSTITUTE Optimally aging at home and in the community is the topic of the second annual Optimal Aging Fair, hosted by the Bowling Green State University Optimal Aging Institute. Older adults and their families, aging-services providers, community members, elected and government officials and others are invited to explore how to age in place, as well as how to make area communities age-friendly, during this Sept. 19 event. The 9 a.m. keynote presentation features Esther Greenhouse, an environmental gerontologist: a specialist in the impact of the built environment on older adults. She will speak about “Designing the Built Environment to Enable Optimal Aging.” Greenhouse advises manufacturers, has consulted on regional PBS series and developed the program for the visual environment of the nation’s first elder-focused emergency department. She is recognized as a national expert in both universal design and aging in place.  “Esther will speak both about how the design of our homes, as well as that of the overall community, affects how well we can age in place,” said Paula Davis, director of BGSU’s Optimal Aging Institute. “She’s been a key player with AARP’s Livable Communities national initiative. “We also have a great slate of other speakers lined up who will talk about home modifications, home care options, reverse mortgages, aging-in-place ‘villages,’ livable communities in Cleveland and Columbus, and how we can help advance Wood County communities to become age-friendly.” Attendees will be able to visit 40 exhibitors and will be eligible to win one of four Kindle Paperwhite E-Readers, or a wide selection of other prizes. Registration is required for the Optimal Aging Fair, which will be held from 8 a.m. to…


Sexual assaults reported at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University is again grappling with more accusations of sexual assault on campus. President Mary Ellen Mazey in a statement to the campus community said that the suspected assaults happened on Aug. 20 and Aug. 26 in Centennial Hall and the Greek Village. University Spokesman Dave Kielmeyer said that the Aug. 20 incident was reported on that day, and the Aug. 26 incident was reported on Aug. 28. Mazey wrote: “The initial investigations have revealed that the alleged assailant in both reported incidents was the same individual. To help ensure the safety of the campus community, the alleged assailant, a student, has been suspended from the University and barred from campus pending the outcome of the investigations. Because of privacy laws and the ongoing investigations, we are unable to share any additional details at this time.” The incidents involved two different victims. Kielmeyer said that “when the connection between the two incidents became apparent we took immediate action” against the alleged assailant. The incidents are being investigated by the BGSU campus police and the dean of students office. The university was rocked last spring by demonstrations over the way it handled sexual assault. Over the summer a task force to study the issue was convened and its recommendations were accepted by the administration at the beginning of the semester. “We are implementing the recommendations of the Task Force on Sexual Assault to improve our reporting, investigation and adjudication processes to ensure we are empathetic, thorough, fair and respectful.” The new procedures for handling reports of sexual assault are being implemented in these…


BGSU Arts Events through Sept. 12

Through Sept. 14 – “FABRICation” displays the work of seven artists — Erin Castellan, Kristy Deetz, Virginia Derryberry, Reni Gower, Rachel Hayes, Susan Iverson and Natalie Smith — who incorporate elements of fabric and fabrication. Inspired by a rich array of historical textiles (drapery to quilt), these complex, multi-part constructions are encoded by traditional handicraft to contrast our culture’s rampant media consumption with the redemptive nuance of slow work wrought by hand. Whether painting, tapestry or construct, these works interweave sensory pleasure with repetitive process to invoke introspection and reflection. The exhibit is in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdaythrough Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Sept. 16 – Focus Northwest Ohio/Southeast Michigan presents the juried High School Art Show in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m.Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Aug. 30 – The Faculty Artist Series presents Andrew Pelletier on the horn at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Aug. 31 – Visiting Writer Series will feature American poet Timothy Liu, whose poetry collections include “Bending the Mind Around the Dream’s Blown Fuse” (2009), “For Dust Thou Art” (2005), Publishers Weekly Book of the Year “Of Thee I Sing” (2004), and Poetry Society of America’s Norma Farber First Book Award winner “Vox Angelica” (1992). His reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 5 – Tuesdays at the Gish opens with “Lion”(2016),…


North Korean troupe lifts curtain on harsh life under Kim Il-sung’s regime

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The scene acted out by eight defectors from North Korea left some, including the director, wiping tears from their eyes. A younger brother knelt by his dead sister pleading for her not to leave him alone. Over and over, he cried out, until another character came and led him off. Maybe they would cross the Tumen River into China, and maybe from China finally reach South Korea. As emotionally wrenching as the 20-minute drama was, the reality is worse, said Taejoon Choi, one of the actors. The audience saw “just a glimpse” of a situation “more serious and severe.” The cast members are not professional actors. They are victims of the North Korean regime who have made that journey to refugee camps in China, where further hardship and abuse awaits them, and finally to South Korea. This was not fiction. This was their lives, and continues to be the reality for those who remain in North Korea. The mission of the troupe from NAUH International is to expose the harsh realities under which people live in North Korea. As part of that mission the troupe visited Bowling Green State University Wednesday night to present “Kotjebi: We Are Happy.” The play takes place in the market, Jangmadang, where the casual brutality of life under despot Kim Il-sung plays out. A mother played by Gunjn Ju, sells homemade tofu to feed her two children. She is joined by a schoolboy played by Taejoon Choi. His father has died because of the famine, now his mother is dying because of typhoid. He is selling his father’s clothes…


BGSU’s Albert Dzur to receive medal for promoting democracy

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Dr. Albert Dzur, professor of political science and philosophy at Bowling Green State University, is the winner of the 2017 Laurence and Lynne Brown Democracy Medal from the McCourtney Institute for Democracy at Penn State University. The McCourtney Institute promotes rigorous scholarship and practical innovations to advance the democratic process in the United States and abroad. The institute awards the Brown Democracy Medal annually to honor the best work being done to advance democracy in the United States and internationally. “Albert Dzur’s work represents an important new frontier in democratic theory,” noted Dr. Michael Berkman, professor of political science and director of the McCourtney Institute, in announcing the 2017 Brown Democracy Medal recipient. “When partisan rancor is at an all-time high and confidence in democratic processes is at an all-time low, Dzur shows that democracy is still an effective and empowering way for citizens to address their common problems.” Dzur argues that some of the most innovative and important work in democracy is taking place face-to-face and is encouraged by power-sharing professionals who bring citizens into their decision-making processes. These “democratic professionals” co-create institutional cultures that lead to better decisions, increased trust and less “civic lethargy.” His most recent work focuses on how democratic professionalism can better manifest itself in the operation of our criminal justice system — from juries to prisons. He rejects the conventional wisdom that more expertise and less democracy are needed in criminal justice because of the links between a fearful public, demagogic politicians and mass incarceration. Instead, Dzur focuses on the more foundational problem of “repellent” criminal justice institutions that…


BGSU teams with Wood County to monitor mosquitoes

By BOB CUNNINGHAM BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications Notice an uptick in mosquitoes in northwest Ohio? You can thank climate change. Warmer summers mean longer mosquito seasons, and milder winters signify a higher survival rate for mosquitoes. Those conditions, which have allowed for the emergence of diseases such as that caused by Zika virus, are cause for concern — especially as mosquitoes that vector, or carry, such viruses migrate farther north. “What’s happened the last two to three years has led to a lot of concern about mosquito-borne pathogens and viruses,” said Dr. Dan Pavuk, an insect biologist and lecturer in Biological Sciences at Bowling Green State University. “South Florida last summer in mosquito season had more than 200 cases of the Zika virus in humans that were actually documented to be transmitted by mosquitoes. That has spurred the interest in revitalizing a lot of the mosquito surveillance.” The Wood County Health District recently received a $17,696 grant from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency to study mosquitoes in Wood County. The health district contracted with BGSU to assist in its mosquito surveillance project. Pavuk and two undergraduate biology students, Erica Eskins of Bellevue, Ohio, and Hannah Alanis of Oregon, Ohio, have been working on the project all summer. They’ll set the traps throughout Wood County, including three sites in Bowling Green and one each in Pemberville, Grand Rapids, Perrysburg, Rossford, North Baltimore and Walbridge. “We go out at least once a week and set the traps and then go back the next day to pick them up,” Pavuk said. “Most people don’t want to work with mosquitoes, but Erica and Hannah…


Mazey addresses sexual assault concerns in State of the University

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In her State of the University address Friday, President Mary Ellen Mazey spoke about the changes in how Bowling Green State University handles sexual assaults. Last spring a student went public with her story of being raped and her futile efforts to have the perpetrator stop harassing her. That prompted a protest and a call for a change in the way BGSU’s approaches the problem. A number of faculty members in Women’s and Gender Studies sent the administration a letter spelling out what they believed should be done. (Story here.) Mazey convened a task force that met over the summer. That task force has issued its recommendations, and the administration has accepted them all. (Story here.) In an interview after the State of the University address, Mazey said that she was impressed with the work the task force accomplished. It was headed by Alex Solis, a former undergraduate student body president who now works in the president’s office, Meg Burrell, the undergraduate student representative to the Board of Trustees, and Dr. Maureen Wilson, of the College of Education. In her address, Mazey promised to work to implement the task force’s recommendations. “As a community, we must all come together to prevent sexual assaults from occurring, make sure survivors are properly supported, and continue to ensure that our investigative processes are thorough, fair, equitable and respectful.” Sarah Anne Rainey, an associate professor in the School of Cultural and Critical Studies, was one of the professors who helped draft the letter last spring to Mazey and served on the task force. “We did a lot of…


President Mazey sings praises of state of BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News President Mary Ellen Mazey delivered an upbeat State of the University address Friday at Bowling Green State University. As she spelled out in her talk, the university has scored a number of successes, and its goal is to continue to building on those. Asked afterward what she thought the biggest challenge facing BGSU in the coming academic year was, she prefaced her answer by saying: “Well, sometimes I would say you don’t know the biggest challenge until it’s upon you.” Then she added, “right now I don’t see any major challenges that we can’t take care of.  We recruited a great class, and the challenge is to retain them.” Attracting, retaining, and graduating students remains the focal point for the university. This fall, almost 77.6 percent of last year’s freshmen returned for their sophomore year. That’s 10 percent more than five years ago. That’s still, Mazey said, short of where the university wants to be. “Our goal is to be at 80 percent.” Mazey opened her speech with a long list of national recognitions the university has received. That includes achievement in environmental awareness, safety, entrepreneurial spirit, affordability, and even having the most patriotic football helmets. At first mention the latter drew a laugh, until Mazey continued and noted: “Our helmets list the names of our 111 former students who gave their lives in service to our country.” Sports was also recognized for the academic achievements of student athletes. And Eric Nichols, the men’s soccer coach, was recognized for recruiting two players from Ghana, and helping to make sure they were able to come…


BGSU talks about how to prevent Charlottesville here

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green State University students and staff met Tuesday to prevent their campus from becoming another Charlottesville. Many of those present had fresh memories of the white supremacy leaflets posted around campus this past spring. And they had even fresher memories of the images of the violence at a white supremacists rally in Charlottesville earlier this month. Tuesday’s scene at BGSU was set as Angelica Euseary and Zarina Cornelius, of the Black Student Union, played video of President Donald Trump’s three statements about Charlottesville. They reminded the audience of the Maumee man who drove his car into a crowd, killing one and injuring many more. Euseary said Tuesday’s “community conference” was a safe space, where no bashing was allowed. “Attack the argument, not the person,” she said. Those present were reminded that last spring BGSU was targeted by alt right white supremacists, who stuck materials around campus. Those items were quickly removed, but left a bad feeling among many on campus. Students wanted to know how BGSU police would handle a demonstration like the recent one in Charlottesville – if neo Nazis and other white supremacists came here to rally. BGSU Police Chief Mike Campbell said the campus department’s 24 sworn officers have trained for handling demonstrations – both passive protesters and active aggressors. But he admitted his office has limitations. “We’re a small agency,” he said. BGSU police department has mutual aid agreements with Bowling Green, Wood County and state law enforcement – who would be called in to assist. Campbell stressed that students could also help by sharing information with…