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Michigan author Patricia Polacco Literacy in the Park guest

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University’s annual Literacy in the Park event will feature popular children’s author Patricia Polacco. The Lansing native has written and illustrated more than 115 books for children in addition to being a playwright and penning for adults. She is a much-sought-after lecturer and keynote speaker. Some of her most popular books include “The Keeping Quilt,” “Thunder Cake” and “Thank you, Mr. Falker.” Presented by BGSU’s College of Education and Human Development, Literacy in the Park will take place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 29, at Perry Field House. The event is free and open to the public. Last year, more than 2,000 people attended the event. Literacy in the Park, which has taken place for more than a decade, promotes the importance of literacy in the lives of children and features more than 40 interactive exhibitor booths and displays. The focus of the event has been expanded to address all of the different ways literacy is important in our lives. In addition to reading and writing activities, families will have opportunities to engage in activities about digital literacy, science and environmental literacy, financial literacy, nutritional literacy, physical education literacy and many other forms of literacy that can be found in their lives and communities. In addition to these literacy-related activities going on throughout the day, there will also be entertainment on the main stage and two presentations from Polacco. Born in Michigan, Polacco’s family on her mother’s side were Jewish immigrants from Russia and the Ukraine, and her father’s people were from the County of Limerick in Ireland….


St. John Passion in its element as Good Friday offering

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Liturgy and drama are one in Bach’s St. John Passion. The theatrical elements – a narrator, dialogue, and the evocative underscoring for small orchestra—are undeniable. Yet the message and the story almost demand the setting of a church. Yes, it is presented in a concert hall, but that’s akin to a staged reading of a play as opposed to a fully staged production. The St. John Passion was fully in its element on Palm Sunday afternoon in Hope Lutheran Church in Toledo. The Passion, one of two that have come down to us from Bach, the other being the monumental St. Matthew, was presented by musicians from Bowling Green State University. The performance brought together the Early Music Ensemble, directed by Arne Spohr, the University Choral Society directed by Mark Munson, who also conducted the work, organist Michael Gartz, and voice faculty taking on the principal roles and solos. Munson said he’s been waiting for Easter to fall late enough in the semester to be able to prepare the Passion for presentation during Holy Week. So on Good Friday, April 14, the St. John Passion will be presented at 7 p.m. in First United Methodist Church in Bowling Green as the community commemoration of the day. The Passion was first performed in 1724, revised over time, though the final version reverted to much the same as it was originally performed. As presented in Bach’s time, a sermon would be preached between parts one and two. Those in attendance Sunday were advised not to applaud between the two movements. Spohr read several verses of the…


Schmeltz inducted into Hamilton Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership Hall of Fame

  From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Peggy Schmeltz of Bowling Green was inducted into the 2017 Hamilton Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership Hall of Fame during Entrepreneurship Week at Bowling Green State University. Schmeltz, a 1950 and 1970 alumna, was one of three BGSU alumni inducted into the Hall of Fame this year. She is a longtime investment educator and independent investor. Her investment career started while she was still an undergraduate business student at BGSU; later, she turned a $75,000 inheritance into a portfolio worth more than 30 times that amount. Schmeltz went on to share her investment knowledge with many others, lecturing throughout the United States with her “learn to earn” strategies. Alumni are invited back to campus each year to share their entrepreneurial journeys with students during the College of Business Administration’s celebration of entrepreneurship, dubbed E-Week. This year’s event featured alumnus Rick Kappel ’69, a 2015 Hall of Fame honoree, as the entrepreneur-in-residence. Kappel owned and served as president and CEO of ACS, Inc., a software company located in Dayton, Ohio, that specializes in the development and sale of software products for use by the commercial bank industry. Maribeth S. Rahe, a 1970 alumna and honorary 2016 alumna, and David Stickler, a 1983 alumnus, were inducted alongside Schmeltz. Rahe is president and CEO of Fort Washington Investment Advisors Inc. Under her leadership, the company has become one of Ohio’s largest investment advisers. Rahe is a past president and former board member of the United States Trust Co. of New York, and has served as vice chair of the board of The Harris Bank in Chicago,…


Workshop offers strategies for communicating with the those with dementia

From THE OPTIMAL AGING INSTITUTE On April 20, at 5:30 p.m. at the Simpson Garden Community Center, “Communicating with Loved Ones Who Have Dementia: Practical Pointers” will offer simple strategies to help make communication easier and to provide stimulation and mental exercise for people with dementia. In partnership with the Optimal Aging Institute, this event is co-sponsored by Bowling Green Manor and Bowling Green Care Center, Brookdale Bowling Green, and Sincera Supportive Care and Symptom Relief. Brent Archer, Ph.D., assistant professor of communication sciences and disorders at BGSU, and his wife, Ramona Olvera, Ph.D., head of the Behavioral and Social Sciences Department at Owens Community College, will be presenting their professional expertise as well as their personal experiences with a family member with dementia. With a Ph.D. in Applied Languages and Speech Sciences, Dr. Archer specializes in aphasia, an inability to comprehend and formulate language because of damage to specific brain regions. He has worked in a professional capacity with people with degenerative brain diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. He also has personal experience interacting with his mother in-law, who had dementia and lived with his family for two years. Throughout the program, Dr. Archer and Dr. Olvera will have an interactive discussion and give communication pointers, as Dr. Olvera was the primary caregiver for her mother. “Having dementia has a big impact on people’s [sense of] identity and who they are,” Dr. Archer said. “Some people don’t realize that, in the end, all [brain] functions can be affected.” Communicating with someone who has dementia can be difficult, and it gradually gets worse. According to Dr. Archer,…


Beautiful singing takes precedence over competition in BGSU’s Conrad Art Song event

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Yes, the final round of the Conrad Art Song Competition at Bowling Green State University was, as the name makes clear, a competition. More than that it was a night of beautiful singing. That was the assessment of Kevin Bylsma, the coordinator of opera activities at the College of Musical Arts. The 18th annual competition featured 11 duos of vocalists and pianists in the undergraduate division and 12 duos in the graduate division. (The division is determined by the singer.) Honors go equally to the singer and the pianist. They must prepare a program of a half a dozen songs from different periods, including at least one selection from a living composer, with one song each in English, German, Italian and French. Regardless of the language, the 10 duos, five in each division, selected for the finals delivered emotion-packed performances, sometimes touching, sometimes coquettish, sometimes even funny. The power of drama was demonstrated in the first set by soprano Hannah Stroh with pianist Xiaohui Ma singing “He is Dead and Gone” in Russian. Even Russian wasn’t up to the task of expressing anguish, as Stroh leaned back against the piano, and began humming. The sound of her voice disembodied, as if emanating from the air itself. Then the song’s emotion swerved, ending with a demonic laugh. You didn’t need to speak Russian to be taken aback. A few hesitant claps were heard, then full blown applause. The decorum of the night – applause are usually reserved for the end of a duo’s performance – was disrupted, not to be regained. And Stroth had set…


Poet Cheryl Lachowski’ “Ditches” cuts to the heart of the Black Swamp

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The ditches of the Black Swamp collect a lot of material – water, cattails, the occasional vehicle. Poet Cheryl Lachowski’s expansive project “Ditches” takes in even more. Lachowski, who teaches General Studies Writing at Bowling Green State University, gave a presentation earlier this week on the work in progress. She’s nearing the end of a semester-long leave, a welcomed respite from grading student compositions. The time to focus on poetry was made possible through a grant from the university’s Institute for the Study of Culture and Society. She said it was “unbelievable” that she, as a non-tenure track faculty, could avail herself of such a leave. One requirement is to give a presentation on the work accomplished during the leave. Ditches are a defining feature of the Great Black Swamp. They transformed the swamp from wildlands into farmlands, and they form the divide between the two sections of Lachowski’s books. The first section, which she is finishing up thanks to the leave, is “Watershed.” The second will be “Homestead.” The devoted to the time before ditches transformed the region, and the other afterward. The first before white settlers took hold, and the second when the native populations were evicted from the swamp. The Battle of Fallen Timbers will serve as a dividing line. The divide between the sections is not so neat. The Black Swamp is not so neat. Lachowski’s sprawling work seeks to encompass all its aspects. She described “Ditches” as a literary montage with ditches serving as an overriding symbol. Lachowski, who has frequently worked with musicians including a collaboration with composer…


BGSU environmental group protests Nexus pipeline

(Submitted by BGSU Environmental Action Group) Bowling Green State University students with the Environmental Action Group marched through campus Friday, ending at the I-75 overpass, with their banners calling attention to the Nexus Pipeline. The pipeline is scheduled to cross the Maumee River in close proximity to the Bowling Green water treatment plant. If constructed, the pipeline would endanger the drinking water of Bowling Green residents, including the 17,000 students who attend the University, along with the roughly 40,000 people in 12 neighboring communities who also rely on the treatment plant for drinking water. The BGSU students who planned the march are part of the Environmental Action Group, a student organization that has been active on campus since 1977. EAG has been fighting the Nexus pipeline since November of 2016. “The Nexus pipeline will affect everyone in our community. It is our responsibility as students to leave the town in better shape than we found it,” said sophomore EAG member Gabby Ysassi. EAG first got involved in the fight against Nexus when they heard about the City Council vote to accept or reject the $151,000 easement, which would have allowed Spectra Energy, the company seeking to build the pipeline, to start construction. On the day of the final vote, they helped to turn out enough citizens in opposition to the easement to fill the council room and the overflow room, in addition to forming a large crowd outside the building. Senior Alexis Kuch added, “Change can only happen when recognition happens. That’s why we are organizing to inform and involve the community, and that’s why we marched today.” Following the…


BG ranks high among towns to stay after graduation

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   There’s no reason for brain drain here, according to a survey looking at college towns in the U.S. Bowling Green has been ranked as one of the 20 best college towns to live in after graduation, according to a study done by rentcollegepad.com. To determine the best towns, the survey looked at the following data: The unemployment rate for those between ages 25-29, measuring how likely new college grads were to get a job by looking at unemployment rates among the newest set of college grads. The benefit of having a bachelor’s degree compared to those without in the town, looking at the median income for those with a bachelor’s degree and subtracting the median income of those without to figure how valuable a bachelor’s degree is in each town. Percentage of 25-34-year-olds also with a bachelor degree. Towns that are full of young, recent college grads are considered great towns for college grads to be in. To qualify as a “college town” in the study, the town’s population must be less than five times the enrollment of the given colleges. “We really measured up very well,” Mayor Dick Edwards said at last week’s City Council meeting. Bowling Green came in second place, with the following statistics: Unemployment rate for ages 25-29: 1.5 percent. Median salary with a bachelor’s degree: $36,869. Percentage of 25-34 year-olds with a bachelor’s degree: 4.94 percent. The report describes Bowling Green like this: “Bowling Green has a population of 30,028 and is located in the middle of beautiful Wood County. Home to a few popular festivals, like the Black…


BGSU arts events through April 18

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 7 – The Collegiate Chorale and University Women’s Chorus will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. April 7 – The elsewhere theater season concludes with “Dying City,” written by Christopher Shin and directed by Tanner Lias. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. on April 8 and 9. Free April 8 – The Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition will take place in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Preliminaries will begin at noon, with finals following at 8 p.m. Free April 8 – An opening reception for the MFA I Thesis Exhibition will begin at 7 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Free Through April 18 – The MFA I Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free April 9 – The Sunday Matinee Series continues with the 1925 film “The Lost World,” directed by Harry G. Hoyt. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was not only the creator of Sherlock…


Young entrepreneurs tackle serious problems in Hatch pitches

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The young entrepreneurs competing in The Hatch Thursday at Bowling Green State University were intent on solving social issues as well as launching companies. For all the show business trappings — Kirk Kern’s game show demeanor as master of ceremonies and a live band – this was serious business. Autism, Alzheimer’s disease, lack of clean drinking water in Guinea, opioid addiction, and career planning were all issues that Hatchlings wanted to address. “You’ve all targeted some heady issues,” said Earl Malm, one of the alumni investors the Hatchlings were pitching their ideas to. No matter how sincere they were in their approach or how serious the problem, it fell to the nine Hatchlings to make their cases. This year’s Hatchlings and their products were:  Fatima Camara, 10,000 Threads clothing line; Shannon Ebert, Workforce Academy; Andrew Hood and Sarah Walter, medication dispenser; Jacob Kielmeyer, Nostalgia Therapies—Alzheimer’s assistance; Joe Lisa, wearable charging device; Thomas Moody, virtual reality sales trainer; Marharita Tavpash, Ice Sleeve; and Cory Thompson, autism app. “This is where education meets the street,” Malm said before the presentations began. “This is where Hatchlings graduate to become fledglings in business.” And he said: “Not everyone will get a deal.” Some got advice and a meeting instead. Regardless, Malm said, it was just another step in their entrepreneurial journeys. That journey has already been a long one for Fatima Camara. Born in New York City, she was raised in Guinea. As child visiting the market she was enthralled by the multi-colored hand woven and dyed fabric. Now she wants to create 10,000 Threads, a fashion company…


More changes in store for BGSU campus

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News After spending the last few summers bringing new life to the two original buildings on the Bowling Green State University campus, next summer will see two 1950s vintage structures bite the dust. Steve Krakoff, the vice president for capital planning and campus operations, told Faculty Senate Tuesday that the work tearing down West Hall and the neighboring Family and Consumer Sciences building will begin as soon as classes are over. That work will be completed by the time students return to campus. The demolition will require some work on Founders Hall which is connected to the two doomed structures. Both buildings were rendered redundant by upgrades that have been Krakoff’s focus in the past years. West Hall was no longer needed once the former South Hall was renovated and expanded into the Kuhlin Center, which houses the School for Media and Communication Renovations to the Health and Human Services Building after the Falcon Health Center opened, and to Eppler, meant there was no longer a need for Family and Consumer Sciences. But the campus isn’t just on the eve of destruction this summer. Work on the renovation of University and Moseley halls will be completed, so those 100-year-old structures will open in the fall semester. Krakoff said those who taught in those buildings in the past will find the new space “unrecognizable.” He expects “a lot of positive shock.” While upgrading the buildings, the university has maintained distinctive architectural features. And less dramatic, but essential, projects will take place across campus. Krakoff said that the conversion of all BGSU’s 145 classrooms into active learning…


BGSU library acquires trove of Great Lakes research materials

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University Libraries at Bowling Green State University has greatly expanded its collection of Great Lakes research materials thanks to a significant donation from the National Museum of the Great Lakes, which is owned and operated by the Great Lakes Historical Society. More than 160 cubic feet of photos, pamphlets, slides, bound materials, postcards and archival materials have found a new home in the Libraries’ Historical Collections of the Great Lakes (HCGL), housed within the Center for Archival Collection. “We are grateful to the National Museum of the Great Lakes for entrusting us with their extensive collection, and we are excited that the consolidation of their materials with our existing Great Lakes archives has now created the largest collection of its kind on the U.S. side of the Great Lakes,” said Mary Ellen Mazey, Ph.D., president of Bowling Green State University. “Thank you to the Museum, its board of directors, the Great Lakes Historical Society and the University Libraries staff who helped to facilitate this exciting and symbiotic new alliance in the name of historic preservation.” These additional materials bolster the already robust offering of Great Lakes-related research and artifacts curated by the University Libraries at BGSU. “The Great Lakes materials recently donated to HCGL is a wonderful addition to our holdings and provides many opportunities for collaboration between BGSU, the National Museum of the Great Lakes and the Great Lakes Historical Society,” said University Libraries Dean Sara A. Bushong. The addition of these materials to BGSU also will make University Libraries a major research destination in the U.S. for Great Lakes history….


Visiting musician Doug Yeo brings ancient sound of the serpent alive at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News After two hours of discussing the fine points of trombone playing – articulation, dynamics and the like, Doug Yeo left the student trombonists at Bowling Green State University with message. “We live in a messed up world,” the visiting artist said. All they had to do was look out the door to see that. “What you do with trombones … matters.” When people come to a concert, whether a student recital or a performance by a major symphony orchestra, the performer doesn’t know what brings them to listen. They may have just lost their job or a loved one. They might have just gotten engaged. “You don’t know what their story is, but you’re playing for them and what you play can change their lives. They’re giving you something they’ll never have back, their time.” And it’s up to the musician to make that time they spend together worthwhile. “What you do,” Yeo said, “really, really, really matters.  … I’ve been to concerts, and my life has changed.” That’s not just hearing star soloists, sometimes it has been a recital by one of his own students. Yeo has been making a difference for listeners for decades. That included 27 years as the bass trombonist for the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Since 1994, though, he has also performed on the serpent, a musical instrument dating by to the 16th century, and prominent through the 19th in military bands. His visit to BGSU s to mark the donation and renovation of a serpent given to the College of Musical Arts by Glenn Varney, a professor emeritus of…


Winter session is coming for BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In moving to a new calendar with shorter sessions, Bowling Green State University is not entering uncharted waters. In his review of the progress on adopting the new calendar John Fischer, vice provost for academic affairs, said that BGSU was behind the curve as one of the last public institutions in the state to cling to the 16-week semester. The University of Toledo is switching this fall. BGSU is planning to implement the new calendar in fall, 2018. The Board of Trustees accepted the new calendar in concept at its last meeting. No other approvals are needed. Still that doesn’t mean the university can simply cut and paste what its sister institutions have done. Fischer said when they surveyed to see how other universities have handled particular issues, they got a variety of answers. And there are a lot of issues as demonstrated by the questions posed by members of the senate. The new calendar would have a 14-week semester in fall and spring, with one week of exams. That trims one teaching week. Fischer said that BGSU now exceeds the required number of “contact hours” required by the state. This will bring in line with state regulars. The current schedule has 2,370 contact minutes a semester, 2,250 of which are in class meetings and 120 minutes for an exam. The new schedule would be a total of 2,250 contact minutes with, 2,100 for class meetings and 150 in an exam period. Fischer said that the longer time devoted to exams will make that period even more important. He said Provost Rodney Rogers, who…


Free speech & hearing screenings offered at BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The Bowling Green State University Speech and Hearing Clinic is celebrating Better Hearing and Speech Month early this year, in April instead of May. The clinic will provide free hearing screenings and speech/language screenings for children and adults of all ages. Screenings are available by appointment April 10, 12 and 14 at the BGSU Speech and Hearing Clinic in 200 Health and Human Services Building on Ridge Street. Call 419-372-2515 for an appointment. Everyone is invited to take advantage of this offer — faculty, staff, family and friends and both the on- and off-campus communities. The BGSU Speech and Hearing Clinic offers state-of-the-art diagnostic and therapeutic speech, language, and hearing services while acting as a training facility for master’s- and doctoral-level speech-language pathologists. Professionally experienced faculty and clinical staff are state licensed and nationally certified speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Under the supervision of these professionals, enthusiastic graduate students receive valuable academic and clinical experiences.