Campus

BGSU hosting young African leaders

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University is hosting 25 emerging African leaders for a six-week academic and leadership institute sponsored by the U.S. Department of State. The Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, the flagship program of the Young African Leaders Initiative, empowers young African leaders through academic coursework, leadership training and networking opportunities. Fellows are from every country in Sub-Saharan Africa and have established records of accomplishment in promoting innovation and positive change in their organizations and communities. This cohort is part of a larger group of 1,000 fellows studying at institutions across the United States this summer. The institute will draw on the experience of the fellows, BGSU faculty and students, and local and regional partners to explore four topics of mutual concern: migration/refugee/human trafficking, youth poverty, civic leadership and engagement, and women’s rights/minority rights/disability. “We hope that peer-to-peer interactions around critical community issues will help both the fellows and regional professionals and their organizations to gain new insights and strategies for civic leadership and action,” said Dr. V Jane Rosser, co-director of the institute and director of the Center for Community and Civic Engagement. The institute will combine engaging seminars, interactive discussions and site visits to relevant organizations, businesses and agencies. Fellows will also engage in weekly community service projects with a variety of community partners. Professional development sessions will focus on social media use, constructing a persuasive argument, funding challenges, grant-seeking, activism and social organizing. “The goal of the BGSU Civic Leadership Institute is to create lasting partnerships between Mandela Washington Fellows and Americans, to facilitate enduring networks, mutual learning…


BGSU’s Pathways of Promise program gets state funding

By OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The Ohio Department of Higher Education recently approved $5 million in funding for projects that will enhance the quality of higher education throughout the state while making it more affordable for students by stabilizing or reducing tuition rates. Bowling Green State University received $750,000 for its PK-16 Pathways of Promise (P³) project. P³ proposes to develop and field-test a scalable model for identifying key performance indicators of college-readiness in university data systems. The data is then shared with PK-12 partners, building a system for continuous program improvement for institutions of higher education and local education agencies. Dawn Shinew, dean of the College of Education and Human Development, was excited to learn the project had been funded. “This project makes a lot of sense and has the potential to have a significant impact, not only for BGSU’s students, but for P-20 education in the state of Ohio.” Shinew serves as a co-principal investigator on the project along with Dr. Brian Campbell, associate dean for Operations, Analytics and Assessment, and Dr. Matthew Lavery, assistant professor, School of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Policy. The original pilot of the program began in summer 2016 after Shinew noticed a theme in conversations she had had with local superintendents – they didn’t have good data about how their students do in college. Shinew discovered that the data was available, it was just a matter of what could be pulled that was meaningful and respecting the students’ privacy. In June, data was shared with six local school districts: Bowling Green, Springfield, Fostoria, Otsego and Maumee and Toledo School for the Arts,…


BGSU student dies in triple homicide (updated)

A 18-year-old Bowling Green State University student was one of the victims in a triple homicide. Kylie Pifer, a biology major, was found murdered Sunday at 8 p.m. in a North Royalton home along with her mother, Suzanne Taylor, 45, and her sister, Taylor Pifer, 21, a student at Kent State. The three women were found shot in a bedroom in the homem according to cleveland.com. The mother had also been stabbed. Police have apprehended a 45-year-old man who is a suspect in the killings, and may be connected to another recent double murder. (http://www.cleveland.com/north-royalton/index.ssf/2017/06/north_royalton_triple_homicide.html ) In a state to the BGSU community, Thomas J. Gibson, vice president for student affairs and vice provost wrote: “Kylie had completed her freshman year at the University and lived in Offenhauer Residence Hall. ” He also noted that those wishing to can send condolences to sympathy@bgsu.edu. “Counselors are available to help the campus community cope with this loss,” he wrote. The BGSU Counseling Center is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.Monday–Friday, or can be reached by phone at 419-372-2081.


BGSU grads, dean’s list available

Bowling Green State University has announced the undergraduate students who have been named to the spring semester dean’s list for achieving grade point averages of 3.5 or better on a 4.0 scale. To be chosen for the dean’s list, undergraduate students must carry no fewer than 12 letter-graded credit hours per semester. Candidates for spring commencement are also available. The names of graduation candidates and dean’s list honorees can be found online at https://webapp.bgsu.edu/forms/gradlist/ Names are listed by county. Counties must be downloaded individually.


BG cracks down on ‘deplorable’ house on Wooster

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The house is the problem child on the East Side – 1014 E. Wooster St. Neighbors have reported trash, a recliner and a mattress piled in the front yard. This past weekend, the college students living there had a TV “blaring” in the front yard. The inside of the house has also had its share of problems, according to records kept by the city. “It is unfortunate that conditions like this exist and there is so little regard for community values and people who reside in the neighborhood,” Mayor Dick Edwards said during Monday evening’s city council meeting. The owners of the house, Ronald F. and Mary Jo Trzcinski, live in Holland, Ohio. The city has recorded two pages of complaints and official responses to the “deplorable conditions and appearance” of the house that sits to the east of Crim Street across from Bowling Green State University. “It’s enough to make your head spin,” Edwards said. The mayor made several trips to the property over the weekend, and East Side advocate Rose Hess continued to monitor the site. “I think it’s time to take the gloves off with this property,” Edwards said. Over the last few years, the city’s police division, fire division, code enforcement officials, and Wood County Health District have intervened. Each time they have asked the owner to cleanup or repair items, the Trzcinskis have done just enough to comply. This past weekend, Hess recorded more problems at the property. “Last night we drove past there and a 36-inch flat screen TV was blaring in the front yard.  (Interior…


BGSU students paint murals to animate Toledo neighborhoods

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Art students from Bowling Green State University have left their mark on the streets of Toledo’s Old South End and East Toledo. Each summer since 2010, groups of students, under the direction of instructor Gordon Ricketts, have made their way to these neighborhoods to paint murals that bring a burst of color and inspiration to the residents. This year, they’re at it again working on both sides of the river. In East Toledo, on East Broadway they contributing to a corridor of color started by previous students, visiting artists, and community members. Ricketts estimates the project has completed about two dozen murals in the southern end of the city. Driving down Broadway, headed west, you first encounter Martin Luther King Jr. on a wall, then nearby Cesar Chavez. Further down there’s the comic book character Green Lantern on the Green Lantern restaurant. Closer to the intersection of South Street, the murals multiply. On a recent morning 15 students had gathered on East Broadway in East Toledo. Ladders up, and transforming a drab viaduct into a vivid celebration of the neighborhood. Trains rumble over the nearby overpass. Traffic whizzes by. Sometimes drivers honk approval and give a thumbs up. Passers-by will express their appreciation and offer to pick up a brush. Ricketts points to a short wall where neighborhood children emulated the BGSU artwork. “This is something that’s visual evidence that positive things are going on in their community,” Ricketts said. “These images are respected,” he said noting those done in previous years have not been tagged with graffiti. “They don’t mess with us.” The…


East Siders tired of landlords not maintaining rentals

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   East Side resident Rose Hess is always armed with a roll of Scotch tape. “That’s just in case she needs to post something on an East Side home as she goes by,” explained John Zanfardino. Hess has taken it on as her duty to notify student renters in her neighborhood of such information as garbage rules, nuisance party issues, or just tips on how to be a good neighbor. “Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t,” she said. University student behavior is often a topic at the East Side neighborhood meetings. But on Thursday evening, much of the discussion was on the landlords who rent to students. Neocles Leontis, a BGSU faculty member and East Side resident, noted the large number of students living off campus and the growing number of rentals in the community – an estimated 60 percent of the housing units in Bowling Green, he said. “We’re also concerned when landlords violate safety and health standards,” Leontis said. He asked for help from the group’s guest speaker, Dr. Tom Gibson, vice president of student affairs and vice provost at BGSU. Leontis sought Gibson’s support working with the city, “so all housing units meet minimal standards. We are woefully behind.” Gibson offered to help. “You have my support,” he said. The issues range from rental homes in disrepair, absentee landlords and poor energy efficiency. Gibson said while he was working at Ball State, he chaired a campus and community coalition for landlords and homeowners. Students got involved by developing a list of landlords to avoid. It functioned similar to “Yelp,”…


BGSU adds academies to its summer offerings

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Patrick Nelson and Bowling Green State University’s Conference and Events Services staff didn’t get the usual break after graduation this year. No sooner had the caps and gowns been packed away, then the university hosted three major events – Fire School, Alumni College, and the New Music Gathering. As Memorial Day approached, they did get something of a respite, but not for long – the BGSU campus will be a busy place this summer. Nelson, who serves both as director if the Bowen Thompson Student Union and Conference and Events Services, said despite the loss of Buckeye Boys State, he expects the university will host as many visitors this year as last. Nelson estimates campus will welcome about 5,000 guests. That, he noted, does not include those who come for weddings. This summer eight weddings are scheduled for campus, twice as many as last year. This year the university is launching a Summer Academy program. These academies will bring high school age students to campus to experience some of the new programs the university offers. Two will be offered in June – Forensic Science and Health Career Exploration – with two robotics camps – BGSU Robotics and Art and Robotics, a collaboration with the Toledo Museum of Art – offered in July. (See http://bgindependentmedia.org/bgsu-offers-range-of-summer-camps-in-science-the-arts/) Assistant Vice Provost Andy Alt said: “These are exciting new programs we want to introduce to potential students locally and across the state.” “The university has facilities and great faculty and experts around in the summer,” he said. This allows the university to extend its offerings beyond the usual degree-oriented…


Don Scherer’s “Cooperative Wisdom” wins Nautilus Award

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS A book co-authored by Dr. Donald Scherer, professor emeritus of philosophy, and BGSU alumna Carolyn Jabs, a journalist and author, is the recipient of a gold Nautilus Award. “Cooperative Wisdom: Bringing People Together When Things Fall Apart” won recognition for illuminating an innovative and highly effective approach to conflict resolution. “We started working on the book in 2008, long before the recent election,” Scherer said. “Today, we find that people are deeply tired of endless conflict. There’s a real hunger for the benefits that come only from cooperation.” Scherer, who specialized in environmental ethics during his teaching career, spent a lifetime studying social systems to understand what makes them sustainable. “Cooperative Wisdom” distills his research, describing five principles that promote the kind of cooperation that undergirds thriving human communities. “The book is rooted in rigorous ethical philosophy,” Scherer said, “but the principles are relevant for families, schools, workplaces, nonprofit organizations and even governments.” Scherer and Jabs wrote the book as a conversation, a time-honored way of presenting philosophical ideas. Using living examples from history, current events, family life and Scripture, the book guides readers through 15 practices that will help them master this new way of responding to conflict. Jabs writes the award-winning column “Growing Up Online” and has published hundreds of articles on families, ethics, environmental issues and the internet. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Newsweek, Working Mother and Family PC, among many others. She is also the author of “The Heirloom Gardener.” The Nautilus Book Awards recognize books that transcend barriers of culture, gender, race and class….


BGSU researchers find virus may have been accomplice in Toledo water crisis

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS In August 2014, toxins from algal blooms in Lake Erie shut down the city of Toledo, Ohio’s water supply, leaving half a million residents without potable water for more than two days. A new study co-authored by Bowling Green State University researchers shows that a virus may have been involved in the crisis and suggests methods for more stringent monitoring of water supplies. Michael McKay, Ryan Professor of Biology, and George Bullerjahn, Professor of Research Excellence, both at BGSU, worked with a team of 25 researchers to examine the physiological traits of Microcystis, the cyanobacterial organism responsible for scum-like algal blooms in Lake Erie. They found that it was consistent with algal blooms from 2012 and 2013 except for one thing – the Microcystis cells had a viral infection. Typically, toxins from algal blooms are trapped within the cell until the cell dies. But virus infections can cause cells to break open, leaking the toxin into the water and subsequently into water facility intake pipes and treatment centers. The viruses analyzed in this study infect only bacteria and do not infect humans. “The study changes the way we think about how the toxin moves around aquatic systems and gets into water supplies,” said Steven Wilhelm, Mossman Professor of Microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, who led the study. “It may help us understand how these organisms persist in nature.” The study was published recently in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. Co-authors included Wilhelm and his team from the University of Tennessee; Tim Davis of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Great…


‘Isms’ give power to prejudice by labeling people

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Racism. Sexism, Ageism. Classism. Those “isms” tacked onto the ends of words stand for prejudice combined with power. The words define systematic prejudice – made easier by lumping people under a label. Earlier this month, Not In Our Town Bowling Green held another workshop at the library – this one specifically on “isms.” Everyone at the workshop could identify as a victim of at least one “ism.” There were “foreigners” and “feminists.”  There were people who stood out due to their color or their politics. The workshop was led by Dr. Krishna Han, assistant director of the BGSU Office of Multicultural Affairs. Han, originally from Cambodia, speaks five languages. Sometimes he can’t immediately find the English word that he is searching for. So, his strength sometimes appears to be a weakness when people judge Han’s intelligence by his occasional halting English. That and the color of his skin mean that Han may forever be looked upon as a foreigner in the U.S. – no matter how many years he had been here or the fact that he is an American citizen. “Generalization is dangerous – period,” Han said. Han tires of hearing people say, “Worry about your own country … This is my country,” he said. Even stereotypes that paint favorable pictures of people – such as all Asians being smart and hardworking – are harmful. “Any stereotype is negative,” said Ana Brown, a member of NIOT and BGSU administration member. Han asked the group to identify the hurtful comments directed to them in the past. “What do you never again want…


Bethany Ash receives BGSU Rookie of the Year Award for work with COSMOS

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Beginning a new job is challenging enough, but Bethany Ash, research program manager for COSMOS (Northwest Ohio Center of Excellence in STEM Education), has not only mastered her own duties since joining Bowling Green State University in February 2016, she has already made improvements to the program to further benefit students. She has also taken on an additional role left vacant by a departing staff member. Ash was recognized for her many contributions with the 2017 Rookie of the Year Award at the Administrative Staff spring reception and awards. The Rookie of the Year is awarded annually by Administrative Staff Council in recognition of an administrative staff member who has played an integral part in implementing an idea, program or procedure designed to enhance or improve student recruitment, retention and/or engagement. To be eligible for the award, employees must have worked at BGSU a minimum of one year but no more than three years. As manager of the research program, Ash works on multiple projects and grant programs. She works very closely with students who conduct water quality research, providing them with an experiential learning opportunity and a chance to be a part of local, state and national discussions surrounding water quality and farm run-off. “In mid-2016 Beth learned that the grants covering the research did not have funding for students to work in the lab and that the students were volunteering their time,” said her nominator, Jessica Belcher, COSMOS associate director. “She took it upon herself to write a grant specifically to fund the students’ work. Because of her efforts these students now…


Michael McLaughlin, Robert Snyder win BGSU classified staff awards for caring for lab animals

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Like most classified staff members, Michael McLaughlin and Robert Snyder serve the needs of students and faculty. But their responsibilities also include nonhuman clients. As the Bowling Green State University Animal Facilities technicians, they care for research subjects such as pigeons and rats. In addition, they maintain the research facilities for faculty and students in the areas of biology, forensic science and psychology. Their dedication to their wards and to enabling research to be conducted in a clean, safe and compliant situation have earned them the 2017 Classified Staff Team Award. The award was presented May 17 at the annual Classified Staff Council reception and ceremony. The team will share a $1,500 award and their names will be displayed on a commemorative plaque in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Caring for animals is a seven-day-a week job, with no holidays and no two days the same. The University has two on-campus facilities plus a satellite location. McLaughlin and Snyder work diligently to ensure that not only are the needs of the animals met, but also the needs of the faculty, staff and students who utilize the facilities in their own important work, said Jenifer Baranski, director of BGSU animal research facilities. Each research project is different, with different requirements, but all must meet strict federal guidelines for safety and the well-being of the animals. McLaughlin and Snyder are thorough and careful in maintaining these standards while making sure that researchers have what they need to conduct their studies. Dr. Jon Sprague, Bureau of Criminal Investigation Eminent Scholar and director of the Center for the…


Marsha Bostelman presented with service award at BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Persistence, kindness, professionalism and skill are but some of the characteristics Marsha Bostelman brings to her job as administrative assistant in the Department of Marketing at Bowling Green State Universty. Her unflagging commitment to excellence and service was Marsha Bostelman recognized with the presentation of the 2017 Classified Staff Outstanding Service Award, given to Bostelman at the annual Classified Staff Council awards and reception on May 17. She received a $1,000 check and a plaque bearing her name, to be permanently displayed on the second floor of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Bostelman’s role in keeping the department running smoothly is appreciated by faculty, administrators and students alike, and they joined to nominate her for the award. “Marsha’s wealth of information, understanding of institutional policy and legacy knowledge of the University is inimitable,” wrote marketing faculty members Kirk Kern and Drs. Douglas Ewing and Jeffrey Meyer. “Her talents for efficient organization and effective communication with our faculty members and department chair keeps our diverse department operating. In short, she is invaluable.” “To say that Marsha exhibits exemplary job performance (one of the criteria for the award) is an understatement,” said former faculty member and chair Dr. Susan Kleine. “In fact, in an annual performance review, it is a challenge to identify something Marsha could improve; her work is nothing less than excellent in every way.” The marketing department is a challenging environment, her nominators agreed. Comprising a variety of disciplines from marketing to entrepreneurship to business communications to BIZX to hospitality management, it serves all business students plus others outside the College of Business…


Jeffery Jackson’s work directing Career Center earns Ferrari honors at BGSU

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The criteria for the Administrative Staff’s annual Dr. Michael R. Ferrari Award include innovation and initiative, high performance and building relationships with the University community. Jeffery Jackson, the 2017 winner of the top Jeffery Jackson administrative staff award, exhibits all those and more, according to his nominators. Jackson, assistant vice president for student career success and director of the Career Center, received the award, which comes with a $1,000 cash prize and a reserved parking spot for a year, at the spring reception hosted by Administrative Staff Council. “Jeff truly embodies all three attributes of this prestigious award,” wrote Danielle Dimoff, associate director of the Career Center. “He is known for his energetic and optimistic attitude when working through student concerns, while demonstrating a sense of compassion toward every individual. He is an innovative leader who goes above and beyond the responsibilities of his position. He is a relationship builder who strives to strengthen University partnerships with stakeholders. He is a strategic thinker who approaches each new challenge as a new opportunity. Above all, he is an educator who recognizes and cares about the success and future of Bowling Green State University.” Jackson has been involved with creative new approaches to ensure the career readiness of BGSU graduates, Dimoff said. These include partnering with the Office of Pre-Major Advising to support students through the Deciding Student Program with such activities as Major Match-Up, the Career and Life Planning course and numerous others. He also helped develop the Falcon Internship Guarantee Program, designed to prepare first-year students experiential learning opportunities. And along with that,…