Campus

William Easterly touts the power of poor people, not experts, to address poverty

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News William Easterly believes that poor people are the key to ending poverty. He doesn’t have to look far to find a prime example in his father, Nathan William  Easterly, retired Bowling Green State University professor of biology. His father, Easterly said, came from southern West Virginia. He was 3 years old when his father died. It was the middle of the Great Depression. “It was really a heroic effort by him, his mother and his family for him to be able to climb out of that and become a professor at BGSU,” Easterly said “It was much easier for me as a professor’s kid to become a professor. That was the easy part. The hardest part was done by my father. And I’m enormously grateful to BGSU for making that possible for my father.” Easterly followed his father’s academic path, though, in economics, not biology. He chose the field because it brought together his passion for mathematics and social justice. “He got a PhD; I got a PhD,” the younger Easterly said. “He became a professor; I became a professor. He’s my role model. I really admire enormously what my father accomplished in his career. He had much further to go then I did.” His father was present Sunday, when BGSU bestowed an honorary doctorate on his son in recognition of accomplishments as one of the world’s most read, most cited and most recognized economists. Part of him still remains in Bowling Green. He stayed in town as long as he could until opportunities elsewhere forced him to leave. That included doctoral studies at…


Faculty celebrate milestones as BGSU trustees act on promotion & tenure (updated)

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University celebrated milestones in faculty academic careers with the granting of promotion and, for some, tenure, approved by the Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees at its May 5 meeting. Promotion to Full Professor Timothy Brackenbury, communication sciences and disorders; Ellen Broido, higher education and student affairs; Larissa Szporluk Celli, English; Lynne Hewitt, communication sciences and disorders; Bob Lee, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; Mingsheng Li, finance; John Liederbach, human services; Shannon Orr, political science; Andrew Pelletier, music performance studies; Valeria Grinberg Pla, romance and classical studies; Maria Rizzo, mathematics and statistics; Charles Saenz, music performance studies; Ray Schneider, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; and Junfeng Shang, mathematics and statistics Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor Leonel Carrillo, humanities, BGSU Firelands; Hyungsuk Choo, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; Gregory Decker, musicology, composition and theory; Christopher Dietz, musicology, composition and theory; Stefan Fritsch, political science; Benjamin Greene, history; Adam Fullenkamp, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; David Hampton, School Intervention Services; Lisa Hanasono, School of Media and Communication; Daniel Kelley, natural and social sciences, Firelands; Starr Keyes, School Intervention Services; Hee Soon Lee, human services; Mary-Jon Ludy, public and allied health; Vera Lux, library teaching and learning; Kate Magsamen-Conrad, School of Media and Communication; Mariana Mereoiu, School Intervention Services; Marco Nardone, physics and astronomy; Susan Nelson, music performance studies; Sarah Rainey, School of Cultural and Critical Studies; William Sawaya, management; Robert Snyder, library teaching and learning; Mihai Staic, mathematics and statistics; Jennifer Stucker, School of Art; Liangfeng Sun, physics and astronomy;…


Union contract bears fruit for BGSU lecturers

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees had a full house for its afternoon business session Friday. Being the last meeting of the academic year, the board had approvals for tenure and promotion on its agenda. The room was packed with those faculty, their colleagues, and family. One even came via Skype from across the Atlantic. Others, however, couldn’t attend because they had final exams to give. Friday’s list was larger than usual with 81 names. That full house represents the fruit of new provisions in the university’s contract with the BGSU-Faculty Association, which sets guidelines for non-tenured track faculty to be promoted. Of the 81 on the promotion and tenure list, 23 lecturers were promoted to senior lecturer and 17 instructors were promoted to lecturer. Also, 14 associate professors were promoted to full and 27 assistant professors received tenure and promotion to associate professor. (Complete list: http://bgindependentmedia.org/faculty-celebrate-milestones-as-bgsu-trustees-act-on-promotion-tenure/) Arts and Sciences Dean Ray Craig said later that the contract has meant procedures are more uniform across the colleges. As dean he had the most names to read – 48, with 33 of those were for promotions within the NTTF ranks. General Studies Writing had the most. Over the next few years the numbers of NTTF promotions will decline, he said,  as those eligible now will have already been promoted. NTTF faculty – instructors, lecturers, senior lecturers – make up 33 percent of BGSU’s full-time faculty on the main campus. In other action from the trustees’ Academic Affairs Committee, the full board approved the merger of the departments of German, Russian, East Asian Languages and…


Remember BGSU & what it stands for, Coast Guard rear admiral tells graduates

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For Rear Admiral June Ryan the path that led her to the Coast Guard was illuminated by the light of a television screen. She saw an advertisement for the Coast Guard at 3 in the morning – “the only time the Coast Guard can afford to advertise.” It featured the Midgett family from North Carolina’s Outer Banks who had members who served in the Coast Guard since before the Revolution. She decided she wanted to start her own tradition. As a sophomore at Bowling Green State University, she enlisted in the Coast Guard Reserve as a junior boatswain’s mate. Once a month she would report to the lighthouse at Marblehead, a lighthouse rich with history. It is the oldest continually operating lighthouse on the United States side of the Great Lakes. It had the first female lighthouse keeper and is near the site of one of the first rescues honored by the Gold Lifesaving Medal. Her career ended up taking her around the world, serving presidents as a military aide, and meeting world leaders, before returning to the Midwest in 2015 as the commander for the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway. In introducing the 1984 biology graduate at Saturday morning’s BGSU commencement ceremonies, Provost Rodney Rogers noted she was the first woman to rise from the junior enlisted ranks to become a flag officer. Ryan offered the graduates of the College of Arts and Sciences “four observations that led to my success and could lead to yours.” “Remember BGSU,” she said. The “B” stands for beacon, she said. “Be a beacon for others,”…


BGSU trustees okay money & authority for university to buy adjacent properties

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees Friday again gave approval and money to the administration to purchase adjacent properties as they come on the market. That can be done if the university needs the land for development or to improve the aesthetics around the campus. Sheri Stoll, vice president for finance, said during the morning informational meeting that the limited authority to purchase real estate dates back to 2003. The authority is renewed every two years. The authorization is for up to $1 million. The most recent purchases were two houses on the corner of East Wooster and College and two houses on Troupe Street. The houses on Troupe Street have been turned into places where forensic science students can student crime scene procedures. Stoll said sometimes when a house “is deemed not in horrible condition,” it can renovated and used as temporary housing for faculty or staff. Only one house is now being so used. Otherwise as is the case of the two houses on East Wooster they are torn down. She said will plant grass and leave the lots as green space “until such time we have some use for that.” In the past two years the university has spent $631,000 using the limited authority, she said. Board Chair David Levey, in his last meeting as a trustee, encouraged Stoll to buy up whatever became available. While the university’s side of East Wooster has really been cleaned up, nothing has been done across the street. That makes a poor first impression. Levey, a housing developer, said he was struck by…


BGSU to test warning sirens, May 9

BGSU will perform outdoor warning siren testing from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. Tuesday, May 9. Periodic testing will consist of warning tones and voice commands at four to six locations across campus. Each test will last for 10 to 15 minutes. These sirens typically activate if Wood County goes under a Tornado Warning, for the regular monthly test or for the statewide tornado drill normally held every March. The May 9 test will be rescheduled if there is a chance of severe weather.


BGSU to award 2,328 degrees in graduation ceremonies

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Degree candidates at Bowling Green State University’s commencement ceremonies Friday (May 5) and Saturday (May 6) will hear from alumni who have gone on to distinguished careers in academia, the Coast Guard and the financial services industry. Of the total 2,328 degrees to be awarded this weekend, 664 are with honors. The Graduate College will award 436 degrees, including 404 candidates for master’s degrees and 32 for doctorates. Those graduating include 102 international students from 30 countries. The Bowling Green campus will hold three ceremonies, all in the Stroh Center. The 7 p.m. Friday event will comprise the Graduate College and the colleges of Health and Human Services, Musical Arts and Technology, Architecture and Applied Engineering. Giving the commencement address will be Anthony Rucci, who received a bachelor’s degree in psychology and master’s and doctoral degrees in industrial/organizational psychology from BGSU. Rucci is now a clinical professor of management in the Fisher School of Business at the Ohio State University and a Distinguished Teaching Professor. The 9 a.m. Saturday commencement for the College of Arts and Sciences will feature an address by Rear Admiral June Ryan, who earned a Bachelor of Science in biology in 1985. Ryan serves as the Ninth Coast Guard district commander, a position she assumed in June 2015. She is the senior Coast Guard commander for the Great Lakes and Saint Lawrence Seaway. The colleges of Business Administration and Education and Human Development will hold commencement at 2 p.m. Saturday. Susan Mucciarone, who earned a Bachelor of Science in business administration in 1979, will give the commencement address. She…


Faculty members urge BGSU to be a leader in addressing sexual violence

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Sandra Faulkner wants Bowling Green State University to be the leader in combating sexual assault on campus. The director of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies hopes that the recent protests over the way BGSU handles sexual assault will lead to innovation, not duplication of other universities’ “best practices.” “No institution in higher education handles sexual violence well,” she said. Faulkner and her colleague Sarah Rainey, an associate professor in the School of Cultural and Critical Studies, met with Dean of Students Jodi Webb Friday in the wake of a protest that drew about 200 students. In their meeting with Webb, Faulkner and Rainey brought with them a list of actions, drafted by members of the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies faculty, that BGSU could take immediately to start addressing the problem. On Monday President Mary Ellen Mazey announced the formation of Task Force on Sexual Assault. Rainey is one of 17 members appointed to the task force. The task force includes faculty, staff, students, the student member of the Board of Trustees, and a representative from The Cocoon. (http://bgindependentmedia.org/mazey-to-launch-task-force-on-sexual-assault/) According to President Mary Ellen Mazey’s letter announcing its creation, the task force’s charge is: “to review our policies and procedures for Title IX and sexual assault, benchmark our efforts against best practices across the country, and provide recommendations to improve the campus culture and our policies. In addition, the task force will examine our services for supporting sexual assault victims and evaluate our awareness and prevention efforts.” Both Faulkner and Rainey were encouraged by the composition of the task force. Faulkner is concerned about…


Mazey to launch Task Force on Sexual Assault

Bowling Green State University President Mary Ellen Mazey has announced the university will form a Task Force on Sexual Assault. The task force will include “students, faculty, staff and a victim advocate to review our policies and procedures for Title IX and sexual assault, benchmark our efforts against best practices across the country, and provide recommendations to improve the campus culture and our policies. In addition, the task force will examine our services for supporting sexual assault victims and evaluate our awareness and prevention efforts.” In announcing the task force Mazey wrote: “I greatly appreciate the concerns you have shared over the past week regarding the issue of sexual assault on campus, support services for victims and the processes we have in place today to report and investigate assaults. I want you to know that I hear your concerns, and I, along with others, will address them. “I respect and understand that it takes tremendous courage to report a sexual assault. When a sexual assault occurs, it’s not only a crime perpetrated on the victim, but it’s an assault on our entire University family. As a community, we must all come together to prevent assaults from occurring, make sure victims are properly supported, and continue to ensure that our investigative processes are thorough, fair, equitable and respectful.” The task force will be co-chaired by: Meg Burrell, undergraduate student trustee on theBoard of Trustees; Alex Solis, a former student body president and current staff member in my office; and Dr. Maureen Wilson, chair of the Department of Higher Education and Student Affairs. The full statement follows. May 1, 2017 Dear Students, Faculty…


BGSU offers range of summer camps in science & the arts

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Summer is the perfect time for pre-college students to experience Bowling Green State University while expanding their knowledge, building life skills and exploring their interests. Deadlines are approaching for these exciting summer camps: Forensic Science Camp June 19 – 21 The combination of a world-class, on-campus Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation crime laboratory and criminal investigation facility with the resources of an internationally recognized academic institution have produced a unique interactive learning environment for high school students age 15 to 17 years old (as of January 1, 2017) who are interested in exploring the field of forensic science. Health Career Exploration Camp June 26 – 30 High school students interested in a career in the health field can gain insight into eight pre-professional areas during this camp. Attendees will participate in a lesson on personalized medicine, extract DNA, explore dentistry and optometry and more. Robotics July 10-12 The College of Technology, Architecture and Applied Engineering hosts this three-day robotics camp for students who will design and build their very own robot, use the robot in a game called “Hatch the Falcon Egg” and explore careers in engineering and robotics. Art and Robotics July 17 – 21 These weeklong camps held at the Toledo Museum of Art will give participants a crash course in the fundamentals of 2D and 3D media. The intensive workshops provide a great introduction and foundation for teen artists who wish to work in these exciting mediums. Courses include digital photography, mixed media painting and interactive art. Summer Music Institute June 11 – 30 BGSU’s Summer Music Institute features intensive…


BG teamwork touted in ‘State of the City’ address

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Though it may sound trite, it’s teamwork that makes Bowling Green work, and it’s those teammates who will get it through tough times in the future. That teamwork was seen in city government last year, with a solar field being built, a park levy being passed, streets being paved, sidewalks being replaced and trees being planted, Mayor Dick Edwards said Thursday during the annual State of the City address. Vital members of the team are Bowling Green City Schools and Bowling Green State University, which have the ability to bring new residents and businesses to the community. “There are hundreds of details,” to make a community work, Edwards said during the address hosted by the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce. Among the many teammates are the fire division which responded to more than 3,000 calls last year, and the police division that reached out to the community with a new “Coffee with Cops” program. Both divisions are nationally accredited – which only six cities in Ohio can boast. “This speaks directly to their extremely high level of service,” Edwards said. “It’s a very, very demanding process.” Last year, economic development in the city brought in investments of more than $47 million in machinery and equipment, and more than $24 million in business construction. “Bowling Green is on the right track for 2017,” the mayor said, noting that during his annual visits with industries, many have indicated they are likely to add more jobs. The city’s utilities also continue to be a point of pride – with a state-of-the-art water treatment plant, an…


Protest blasts BGSU’s handling of reports of sexual violence

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News One in five women on college campuses have been sexually assaulted. Those numbers got a voice Thursday when about 200 students gathered in front of the student union at Bowling Green State University to protest what they said was the lack of response to instances of rape. They chanted and carried homemade signs. One after another, people who had been assaulted stepped into the circle, picked up with megaphone and told their stories. Some happened before the speakers had come to BGSU. Some happened here. Others offered words of support, and expressions of anger. Felita Guyton said she was assaulted in October 2015. She dropped the case, she said, when it was clear it would not be pursued. She told those gathered that she felt like the university thinks the careers of those accused are more important than those they have victimized. No one, she said, should be made to feel their body is not their own, or “have an out-of-body experience as they are being attacked.” Speaking out was difficult, Guyton said later. She wasn’t sure she could do it. But in the end it was something that had to be said. “I needed to do it now.” The protest was sparked by a post on Facebook by first year student Chelsea Halm expressing dissatisfaction with the way her complaint was handled by the university. Her post prompted a number of comments, including from Allie Dyer who suggested the rally. Halm attended the rally, but did not speak. She said she was not involved in organizing it. Afterward, Halm said, that initially she…


Global network honors BGSU for entrepreneurial education

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Today (April 27) AACSB International, the world’s largest global education network, recognized Bowling Green State University’s College of Business Administration for its commitment to creating and incubating cutting-edge business innovations and fostering entrepreneurship in the next generation of business leaders. BGSU is the only entrepreneurship center in Ohio, and one of just 20 entrepreneurship centers around the globe, to earn this distinction. “Our faculty and staff in the College of Business Administration are dedicated to transforming lives and preparing the next generation of business leaders through education, research and service,” said Mary Ellen Mazey, Ph.D., president of BGSU. “We are extremely proud of this recognition for the work they are doing.” BGSU was recognized for its Hamilton Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership, which is one of the region’s premier entrepreneurial resources. The Center is best known for The Hatch, based on the show “Shark Tank.” This entrepreneurial immersion program is open to BGSU students and their business ideas. Finalists enroll in a 10-week curriculum, which takes students through the entrepreneurial experience, from customer discovery to venture launch. It all comes together on one night in April, when alumni mentors and investors join the finalists to decide whose business ideas earn funding. “We are honored that AACSB has recognized the incredible work that happens here every day with our faculty, staff and students,” Raymond Braun, dean of the College of Business Administration, said. “The Hamilton Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership’s programs have positively impacted this region and even reached overseas through live-streaming of The Hatch. The best part is that we are just getting started; this…


BGSU eyes some programs for collaboration with UT, others for elimination

By DAVID DUPONT                 BG Independent News The Faculty Senate wound up its activities for the academic year Tuesday with a report on the fate of several academic programs. Provost Rodney Rogers gave an update on the process for identifying programs that are offered both at the Bowling Green State University and University of Toledo, with an eye for eliminating some and collaborating on others. The review was mandated by the Governor’s Task Force on Affordability and Efficiency. The state identified 50 duplicated programs. The criteria to evaluate them was the number of students enrolled and the number of graduates from the program. Of the 50, 34 programs were identified as worth maintaining on both campuses because of “robust” enrollments. The last 16 fell into different categories. Four were already in the process of being eliminated. The bachelor’s degree in athletic training has been eliminated because it can no longer be accredited. A master’s degree has become the accepted credential in the field. Also, a teacher education program has been absorbed into Adolescent Young Adult (AYA) Integrated Sciences. Two business programs – Accounting Technology/Technician & Bookkeeping with four graduates and. Business/Commerce, General with 11 – are being considered for elimination. Three programs are being repositioned within their colleges and will continue. Film Studies, for example, has low enrollments because the university now offers a film production major. When considered together, the two programs have 163 students. Another program in Theatre and Film, a Bachelor of Arts degree in drama, provides a liberal arts option in theater as well as the option for double major. The university is awaiting the results of…


Handling of sexual assault allegation roils BGSU

A rally to demand action on an alleged sexual assault on campus is planned for noon Thursday (April 27) in front of the Bowling Green State University Student Union. What’s being billed as a “Protest Against BGSU’s Campus Rape Culture” was prompted by an incident last fall in which a female first year student said she was raped by an acquaintance. The protestors allege the university did not adequately respond to the incident and that the woman is continuing to be harassed by her alleged attacker and his friends. They want him removed from campus. On Wednesday (April 26) the university issued a statement in response to the allegations. The statement reads in part: “We can assure the University community that upon learning of this reported incident last fall the matter was thoroughly investigated by the Office of the Dean of Students. BGSU Police also spoke with the complainant. She asked the police not to pursue this as a criminal investigation. Based on its investigations, the University determined that there was not cause to pursue further action.”