Campus

BG celebrates community’s ‘Best Hometown’ status

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   It was a year ago that Bowling Green was named one of Ohio’s Best Hometowns by Ohio Magazine. Next week, the Bowling Green Convention and Visitors Bureau will remind local residents why their community won that honor. A “Best of BG” event is planned for July 19, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., in the Simpson Garden Park Building, and the surrounding gardens. It’s fitting that the event be held at the park, since the gardens were one of the factors that won Bowling Green its “Best Hometown” status. The event will feature at least 35 businesses in the hospitality, restaurant, retail and lodging sectors, plus non-profit organizations. “We’re pretty excited about it,” said Wendy Chambers, executive director of the Convention and Visitors Bureau. “We’re having the opportunity to celebrate again our hometown honor.” Next week is a busy one for local officials. The city and university are hosting the Ohio Town & Gown Summit, with an estimated 150 attending. The Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce is hosting its annual luncheon on Friday, followed by the second Firefly Nights downtown in the evening. “It’s a big week,” Chambers said. “Our town’s always got something going on.” That buzz of activity helped the city secure its “Best Hometown” status. As editor of Ohio Magazine, Jim Vickers is accustomed to visiting communities throughout the state. But during his stop in Bowling Green, Vickers was struck by three features of the city – the energy from the university even though most students were gone for the summer, the healthy historic downtown, and the beautiful Simpson Garden Park. The 12th annual Ohio’s Best Hometowns issue of the magazine recognizes four communities in addition to Bowling Green: Marietta, Milford, Mount Vernon and Wooster. Bowling Green beat out other communities because of its vibrant college town atmosphere, strong sense of community and shared vision for the future. “I was in Bowling Green for the site visit,” Vickers said, so he had first-hand knowledge of why the city ranked so high. “Every year we look…


Turning the game on its head will give American soccer a leg up in the World Cup

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As the sporting world turns its gaze toward Russia and the final games of the World Cup, the United States is on the outside looking in. The U.S. Men’s National Team failed to qualify for the tournament at all after a 2-1 loss to Trinidad and Tobago last year. That’s the first time the team missed out on soccer’s biggest showcase since 1990. Yet even then only once did the U.S. advance as far as the quarterfinals. The failure of the men’s team (the women’s team, a dominant force in the world’s game. is another story) has cause plenty of head scratching and advice on how to improve. Most focus on training at the elite levels. Two local men Nathan Richardson and Carlo Celli, both on faculty at Bowling Green State University as well as youth soccer coaches, administrators and parents, have other ideas. Those ideas sprang from their experience here in Bowling Green as well as around the world. Celli is a native of Italy, where he continues to summer, and Richardson’s scholarship has meant stays in Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries. The result of their passion for the game and frustrations with its state in the U.S. have resulted in a broad prescription in book form, “Shoeless Soccer: Fixing the System and Winning the World Cup.” The book has garnered attention on Fox News and the authors wrote an opinion piece in USA Today. The epiphany came in Bowling Green. Richardson was leading winter training sessions for Bowling Green Soccer Club players at the Community Center. During one practice, one of the young players’ shoe “exploded.” There was no way to fix it, so rather than exclude the boy, Richardson suggested they all play barefoot. Setting fear of stubbed bruised, even broken, toes aside, the kids played on and Richardson realized being shoeless forced the youngsters to play with more care, and with more technique. No toeing the ball with a bare foot, rather they were forced to have the soft touch every soccer player wants to…


Bruce Meyer to lead BGSU capital planning & campus operations

Bruce Meyer has been named Bowling Green State University’s associate vice president for capital planning and campus operations, a role he has filled as interim since 2017. In announcing the appointment, President Rodney Rogers praised Meyer for making sure “our capital projects have been kept steadily moving forward.” Rogers added: “He is a longtime member of the executive team charged with implementing the Campus Master Plan and brings to the position thorough knowledge of the University and strong management skills.” In his new position, Meyer will be a member of the president’s cabinet. He will report to Sheri Stoll, vice president for finance and administration and chief financial officer.


BGSU president adds two new members to his cabinet

Bowling Green State University President Rodney Rogers has added two new positions to his cabinet. In an announcement to the campus community, he announced that Jennifer McCary, assistant vice president for student affairs/Title IX officer, will be added to the inner circle of presidential advisors. He cited the “critical issues facing BGSU and other universities and the significance of Title IX to our efforts to promote a campus culture of civility and freedom from harassment and sexual violence” as the rationale for the move. Dr. Christina Lunceford will continue to serve on the body as assistant to the president for diversity and inclusion. Because of “the importance of information technology to nearly everything we do at the University today and in the future,” Rogers has named John Ellinger, the university’s chief information officer, to the group.


Poetry in motion – Sandra Faulkner explores link between women & running

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Sandra Faulkner wanted to study women runners, she used poetry as well as footnotes. Earlier this year, Faulkner, a professor in the School of Media and Communication, published “Real Women Run: Running as Feminist Embodiment.” The book is deeply personal scholarship. Early on Faulkner traces her own history as a runner, starting when she was 11 years old, growing up in the suburbs of Atlanta. She ran so hard her nose started bleeding. She didn’t notice until she finished the race, and won third place. But she missed the awards ceremony because her mother couldn’t staunch the bleeding. Her life as a runner has been full of small triumphs, injuries, and frustrations – sometimes at the same time. Though Faulkner says she doesn’t race to place, she’s still competitive. After one race she saw that she was fourth in her age group, but she thought there were only four runners in that class. Only later didn’t she learn there were more than that. Her life as a runner is told in brief journal-like entries, and each is paired with a haiku. One reads: “Don’t call us a girl / don’t call us a girl jogger / fierce women running.” The personal stories are “in service critiquing, discovering, uncovering larger social patterns,” she said. They take us up to Sept. 3, 2016, when Faulkner is 44 and has a daughter of her own, who cheers on her mother and herself has started running. “She’s more of a sprinter,” Faulkner said. This was the right time for Faulkner, an ethnographer, to research women and running. She would never have done this as a dissertation. When she used interviews for her dissertation on Sex and Sexuality at Penn State, where she studied interpersonal communication, it was considered unconventional. But when “Real Women Run” was starting, Faulkner had tenure and was taking the next step of applying for promotion to full professor. She had already completed a much cited book on poetic inquiry, “Poetry as Method: Reporting Research through Verse.” “I’m convinced…


Community exhibit, Now OH 11, to celebrate local artistic talent

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Artists are invited to submit to Now OH 11, a community art exhibit hosted by Bowling Green State University Art Galleries, opening July 13. For the 11th consecutive year, BGSU Art Galleries will provide a professional setting to celebrate the talented artists of all skill levels from 12 counties in northwest Ohio. Artists who display their work at the exhibition are eligible to win up to $1,500 in cash prizes and gift certificates, including the Best of Show award, the Kiwanis Young Artist Award, Toledo Federation of Arts Society Award and a People’s Choice Award. This year’s show will be juried by Michelle Carlson, who will also deliver a gallery talk at 7 p.m. July 13. Carlson is the artist and youth services coordinator for the Toledo Arts Commission. She has taught at BGSU, the University of Toledo and Owens Community College, as well as private workshops for youth and adults throughout Toledo. Artists are eligible to submit if they are 16 years of age or older and are from the following counties: Defiance, Erie, Fulton, Hancock, Henry, Lucas, Ottawa, Paulding, Sandusky, Seneca, Williams and Wood. There is an entry fee of $15 for artists ages 16-18 and $30 for artists ages 19 and older. All entrants are able to submit up to three entries. Online registration is open until June 15. For further information, please visit www.NowOHArtShow.org. Volunteers are also needed, and artists who volunteer will receive a registration discount. Volunteers will assist with the setup and takedown of the event, as well as be gallery hosts during the exhibition. Contact Jacqueline Nathan at galleries@bgsu.edu for more information about volunteering. The Now OH Exhibition is located at the BGSU Fine Arts Center and is free and open to the public. It runs July 13-28, and is open Thursday evenings from 7 to 9 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Sponsors for this event include Bowling Green Kiwanis, Ben Franklin, the Village Idiot, and Drs. Phipps, Levin, and Hebeka.


BGSU has long to-do list of summer construction projects

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Orange construction fencing is back in style at Bowling Green State University. Once students leave the fences go up for projects, large and small. Some are unglamorous, though essential, like the upgrading of the tunnel under Thurstin Street that brings services from the university steam plant  to campus. Others are signature projects. With the Kuhlin Center completed a few years ago, and the renovated University and Moseley halls opened for business last fall, now the university turns its attention to the Robert W. and Patricia A Maurer Center. The Maurer Center will cost $44.5 million, with other projects coming in at $18.66 The Maurer project will transform Hanna Hall into the new home for the College of Business. That includes a 40,000-square-foot addition twice the size of the original building. Bruce Meyer, interim vice president for capital planning and campus operations, said the remediation of the inside of the building is complete, now interior demolition will begin. Workers will remove windows and knock down walls. Programming to determine the interior layout is being completed. The project is scheduled to be completed by the start of the fall, 2020, semester. The concept is to open up the inside space while maintaining a vintage look on the exterior of the existing building. Hanna’s east wall will be preserved with the new addition built over it. The building will incorporate the traditional with the contemporary, Meyer said. The open space will be conducive to collaboration among faculty and students. The style will be like a modern corporate space allowing for a smoother transition for students going from campus to careers. Work in the new movie theater spaces in Olscamp and the student union has commenced. That’s where the Gish Film Theater programming will move. The seats from the Gish have been put in storage, Meyer said. The summer started with one of the most notable projects – the demolition of Harshman Quad. Meyer said the removal of the residence hall complex opens up the view into campus. He said he’s surprised by…


BGSU faculty union leader decries Supreme Court’s Janus ruling

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News David Jackson, president of the BGSU Faculty Association, said the union is still trying to figure out the ramifications of the Supreme Court’s decision Wednesday forbidding public sector unions from charging non-members fees to cover services. The court rules 5-4 in Janus v. AFSCME Council 31 that non-members cannot be forced to pay “fair share “ or “agency” fees to cover the costs of a public sector union negotiating contracts and representing individual employees in disputes with the employer. The decision, which Jackson characterized as “rotted, reprehensible, illogical,” was “not a surprise.” Jackson, who teaches political science, was speaking in his role as faculty association president, not as an unbiased analyst. “We knew five corporate justices on the court were inclined to accept this completely bogus argument and side with wealthy special interests. That’s what they’re there for. That’s why the seat was stolen in the first place.” Jackson was referring to Republican senators’ refusal to act on President Barack Obama’s nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to fill the vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. Instead the GOP left it up President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy with Neil Gorsuch, who sided with the majority in the Janus case. The lead plaintiff, Illinois state employee Mark Janus, said that the fee was a violation of his First Amendment rights because it forced him to support speech he didn’t agree with. While the decision is complicated, it’s clear the faculty association cannot collect fees from non-members. Still, Jackson said, “the good work we do problem solving and representing faculty will continue.” He said the association’s attorneys are still trying “to digest the decision and figure out all the different meanings of it.” The decision written by Justice Samuel Alito possibly left open the option of charging non-members if the union represents them in personnel disputes, Jackson said. State law, Jackson said, requires the union represent all members of the bargaining unit, not just union members. They in turn could charge a fair share fee “to account…


BGSU’s supply chain management program ranks in top 25

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The Bowling Green State University College of Business supply chain management program has been ranked among the nation’s top 25 supply chain management programs by Gartner, a leading IT and supply chain management research and advisory company. The Gartner 2018 Supply Chain University Top 25 ranked BGSU’s supply chain management program No. 21 in the nation, making it the second-highest ranking supply chain management program in Ohio. This is the BGSU program’s first appearance on the list. BGSU’s supply chain management program features an integrated approach to the movement of goods from the supplier to the final customer. BGSU supply chain graduates work in a variety of industries, including technology, manufacturing, retail, logistics, health care and consulting. The Gartner Supply Chain University Top 25 is a biennial program that assesses and ranks undergraduate and advanced supply chain degree programs in North America.


BGSU camp leads young women down the path of business

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Sitting in the classroom in the college of business, 35 high school seniors seemed poised to develop the next big idea. For now they are trying to turn trash into musical instruments. The students are at Bowling Green State University for the Young Women in Business Leadership Camp being held this week. Kirk Kern, the director of the entrepreneurship program on campus, is cheerleading their efforts and aspirations. Entrepreneurs aren’t just men like Steve Jobs and Henry Ford, he tells them. Their ranks also include Isabella Weems. When Weems was 14, younger than the campers, she decided she wanted to save to buy a car. Her parents told her she’d have to earn the money. She had a choice: She could get a job or start her own business. With her parents backing, Weems started Origami Owl, making personalized pendants. The product took off. She earned more than enough to buy a car. By 2016 the company had sales of $25 million. Susan Kosakowski, the recruiting manager for the College of Business, said the residential camp has two goals. The first is “to help young ladies develop their leadership skills so they can take those back to their high schools and then continue them through their college years.” The other is to make them aware of the opportunities in business for women, she said. Even though about 55 percent of the undergraduate students at BGSU are female, in the College of Business two-thirds are. The college, Kosakowski said, would like to see more diversity, not only in gender but ethnicity and culture as well. “We have so many opportunities we want the women to start taking advantage of them,” she said. “People get very closed minded about what’s involved in business. Every time you walk in a store you’re engaged in business.” The camp aims to show young women how business impacts their lives. The entrepreneurship program is one draw for women, she said. Students from any major can minor in entrepreneurship. The program’s signature event The Hatch, where…


Students at BGSU robotics camp engineer summer fun

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Games of cornhole are on the summer fun agenda of many young people. Earlier this month, a dozen teenagers from Northwest were looking at ways to make the game more exciting using robotics. The students, one from as far away as Antwerp, attended robotics camp for commuters at Bowling Green State University. It’s the second year BGSU has provided a robotics camp. Last year, one session was held at the Toledo Museum of Art targeting students from the Toledo Public Schools. That program continues, but teacher Mohammad Mayyas, an associate professor of engineering technologies, said he wanted to offer one on campus for other students. They decided to have the camp for students on campus “to help our program to grow,” he said. “We want to expose future students, prospective students, to what we can offer,” Mayyas said. “The university is paying attention to robotics and advanced manufacturing.” Northwest Ohio needs a workforce trained in robotics and automaton, and the state recognizes this. That’s helped BGSU land grants to develop its program. “We have very good equipment,” he said. “It excites them to see the actual equipment used in industry.” Employing open source software, the students learned to integrate hardware with software to make sensors so cornhole is more interactive. That can mean keeping score, or having lights or sounds go off in response to scoring tosses or misses. Maybe it’ll play a song or show a hand waving. Ekumjyot Kaur, from Perrysburg, said she was enjoying the camp. “It’s really in-depth. You wouldn’t think you’d go to robotics camp and learn so much,” she said. “Here they focus on the on software as opposed to the moving parts.” This was her first real exposure to BGSU, she said, and for other interested in engineering she’d recommend the camp. Sisters Chloe and Mia Wegener, from the Anthony Wayne district, were working with Kaur. The work consisting of tossing bean bag toward a cornhole board trying to activate a light. The light should be going on when the beanbag goes…


Farewell to “The Chief” – BGSU community celebrates life of long-time band director Mark Kelly

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News If a stranger happened into the memorial for Mark Kelly Saturday morning in Kobacker Hall not knowing anything about the person’s whose life was being celebrated, that person would have been enlightened about the late Bowling Green State University band director, and why he was called the Chief. It would be clear why more than 100 musicians were assembled on stage to play some of Kelly’s favorite music, and why several hundred more gathered in the hall, where The Chief had directed so many concerts, to hear the music and words honoring him. That stranger would come away with a clear picture of a man who valued tradition, integrity and excellence. Kelly thought of himself as “just a band director from Iowa” yet left a legacy that has touched untold thousands, both directly and through the ripple effect of the students of his students. A Celebration of Mark S. Kelly was held Saturday morning on campus. Kelly, band director at BGSU from 1966-1994, died at age 91 on Nov. 20. Those gathered for the celebration of life included a Pulitzer Prize winning composer and just as important people whose lives have taken them away from music yet still remember lessons learned from The Chief. Mark Zimmerman, a 1979 BGSU graduate, was drum major for the Falcon Marching Band under Kelly. He said that Kelly’s voice resonates with them as they stand at the kitchen sink, or walk down Wall Street or through a slum in Kenya. It doesn’t matter if they had careers in music or not. “I’ve heard that voice in my mind for 43 years and it’s never going to leave me,” he said. That voice resounded in the words of the speakers. It was heard in the pet sayings – “plan your work then work your plan,” recalled John Deal, his assistant from1975-1979. And in the stories told. Jay Jackson, as a newly hired assistant director in 1986, recalled questioning whether he needed to wear a uniform. Maybe a sport coat, he suggested, during an increasingly…


Student retention & recruitment initiatives paying off for BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University’s efforts to recruit student better prepared for college and then to make sure those students stay around to graduate in a timely manner is paying off. In presenting BGSU’s budget to trustees Thursday, Chief Financial Officer Sheri Stoll said that while the amount appropriate to support higher education is stagnant, BGSU is getting more. State funding, which makes up about a quarter of the university’s revenue, is based on how many students graduate and how many successfully complete courses. University officials have made these a priority. The result, Stoll reported, is that BGSU’s state share of funding is increasing 1.7 percent, to just under $77.9 million, in the operating budget that will go into effect July 1. That budget is tight, Stoll told the university’s Board of Trustees Thursday. It calls for $422.2 million in spending with $423.8 million in revenue, almost half of which comes from tuition and fees. Tuition rates have been flat both because the university opted not to raise tuition and some years, and the state has nixed hikes in recent years. The state has now allowed universities to implement tuition guarantee programs. Through these, tuition for first year students can be increased, but that tuition is guaranteed to stay the same for four years. Tuition for the incoming class will be 5.9 percent higher. The university also raised the out-of-state surcharge and graduate student fees. These changes plus a modest increase in enrollment is bringing in more money. Stoll said her assumptions were “very conservative.” Last year more students were expected but then there was “a melt,” largely because international graduate and undergraduate students decided not to come. That decline in international enrollment was felt at colleges and universities across the country. She also said it was too early to figure in the impact of online courses and new professional master’s degrees. The largest increased expenditure comes from salaries and benefits, which make up over half the expenses. Based on the faculty union contract, the amount spent on faculty will…


BGSU & OSU heads: Higher education a wise investment

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Several decades ago, college was affordable for a few, and a dream for all the others. A few decades later, college was the place kids were expected to go to start their futures. Now, the pendulum has swung back again, with college costs and job prospects leading to a push in the trades. But BGSU President Rodney Rogers and OSU President Michael Drake held a public conversation Wednesday evening about the lasting value of higher education. “Higher education is a value to young people, a value to our communities, a value to our state,” said State Senator Randy Gardner, R-Bowling Green, who moderated the conversation. A college degree makes a person more employable, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate for someone with a master’s degree is 2.2 percent; a bachelor’s degree is 2.5 percent; an associate’s degree is 3.4 percent; and a high school education, 6.8 percent. And more than 80 percent of the country’s top 100 jobs require a bachelor’s degree. “There’s real value there,” said Gardner, who both Rogers and Drake called a strong advocate for higher education. A college degree also results in bigger paychecks. It offers a better annual return for investment (average 13.7 percent) than the stock market (average 10 percent), Drake said. “It’s really about the best investment a person can make in their future,” the OSU president said. Over a lifetime, that investment averages more than $1 million more in earnings, he added. The perks go beyond the paychecks, Drake said. People with college educations are more likely to rank themselves as happy, are healthier, live longer, and are more engaged in their communities, Drake said. Drake asked those in the audience to envision a map of the U.S. – then put their fingers on a couple areas of great innovation, like Silicon Valley, Boston, or the Research Triangle. “Under your fingers are great universities,” he said. Rogers noted the BGSU alumni who are doing great things in their communities. “That is a part of…


Former students to gather to honor legacy of late BGSU band director Mark Kelly

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATION They called him “The Chief,” and at 10:30 a.m. June 23, 101 of his former students will play at Bowling Green State University’s Kobacker Hall in his memory. Mark Kelly, who directed the BGSU bands from 1966 to 1994, died in November 2017 at the age of 91. The BGSU College of Musical Arts will host the memorial service Saturday. His daughter, Karen Kelly, brought together dozens of alumni and former students of her father to perform together as a band at the service. Capt. Ryan Nowlin, assistant director of the “The President’s Own” U.S. Marine Band, will conduct the band during its performance. Karen Kelly ’75, ’82 is touched that so many alumni are coming back to the University to pay their respects to her father. “It speaks to the interest Dad maintained in the life and careers of the students, whether they continued in music, or completely different careers, away from music,” said Kelly, who was the band director at Van Wert (Ohio) High School for 34 years. “Outside of music, the careers included Air Force pilots, business entrepreneurs and scientists. His leadership was not music education specific.” Before Mark Kelly came to BGSU, he taught high school band at his alma mater in Centerville, Iowa, for several years. Three of his students from that time period will play in the memorial concert. Others are traveling from Washington D.C., Minnesota, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Illinois, Maryland, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Florida, Virginia, Tennessee, Connecticut, New York, New Hampshire and Texas. Alumni performing Saturday include Lisa Welling Baker ’84, flute, a retired Shelby (Ohio) High School band director whose daughter is a twirler with the Falcon Marching Band; George Edge ’79, oboe, retired Grove City (Ohio) band director; Roger Kantner ’88, bassoon retired member of “The President’s Own” U.S. Marine Band; Patty Ruckman ’90, clarinet, New Bremen (Ohio) choirs; Stan George ’80, alto sax, Perrysburg (Ohio) Schools; Ray Novak ’83, trumpet, retired (Toledo) Whitmer High School band director; Amy Horn ’89, French horn, retired member of “The President’s Own” U.S. Marine Band; Dale Laukhuf ’67, trombone,…