Police

Murder of Dawn Glanz to be featured on ‘Cold Justice’

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green’s only unsolved murder will be focused on in an episode of “Cold Justice,” a true crime series on Oxygen cable channel on Saturday. The murder of Dawn Glanz, who was found dead in her home on Kensington Boulevard on May 9, 2013, will be examined in the show that attempts to solve cold cases. The autopsy found that Glanz, 66, a professor of art history at Bowling Green State University, suffered a sharp force injury of the scalp and was stabbed by an assailant. “The family approached us when the case stalled out,” Bowling Green Police Chief Tony Hetrick said. They suggested finding a TV show to profile the cold case. Hetrick said he consulted Wood County Prosecuting Attorney Paul Dobson, and contacted Tonya Rider, a Bowling Green State University professor and retired Toledo detective. They contacted Kelly Siegler, a former Houston prosecutor, who leads the investigations on “Cold Justice.” The TV crew spent several days in Bowling Green in October, filming for the show. The primary Bowling Green police officers featured on the show are Det. Brian Houser and Sgt Scott Kleiber. During their 10 days in Bowling Green, the “Cold Justice” crew re-interviewed witnesses and brought in their own technical experts. Hetrick has viewed the episode and was pleased with its adherence to the truth. “I’ve seen it. It’s very accurate,” he said. “Sometimes these crime shows take licenses – this does not.” Hetrick and the Glanz family are hoping the “Cold Justice” episode jogs some memories. “Hopefully somebody has some information we do not,” Hetrick said. “We’re hoping this will bring some closure for the family and some justice for Dawn.” The family has offered a $10,000 reward for information leading for the resolution of the case. If the case is solved, it would clear up Bowling Green’s sole unsolved murder. “This is the only one we have,” Hetrick said.

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BG police & fire train on new strategy for school shootings

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Last week while Bowling Green schools were closed for spring break, teams of police officers clad in protective vests and carrying AR-15 air soft training rifles trained in their hallways. By this week, all of the city’s police officers will have gone through rescue task force training. The point of the practice is to prepare police and EMS to work together to get medical help to victims of mass shootings as quickly as possible. “Time is so critical,” Bowling Green Police Chief Tony Hetrick said. On Friday afternoon, another team of police officers wrapped up their active shooter drill at Crim Elementary School. While they train annually for active shooters, this was the first time that police and firefighters/paramedics trained together. Police trained to go into the “hot zone,” to confront the shooters, and create an area in the nearby “warm zone” for EMS to take care of those injured. “Our entire role in all of this is to train the police officers to make a safe area,” so medical treatment doesn’t have to wait until the entire scene is cleared of risks, Bowling Green Fire Chief Bill Moorman said. “Our paramedics are escorted in to treat in the building, and not wait for patients to be brought out to us,” Moorman said. “It’s getting our people into the building faster than normal.” The rescue task force responses to mass shootings do not require EMS personnel to carry firearms. “We are the firefighters’ protection for tactical emergency medical services,” explained Bowling Green Police Deputy Chief Justin White as he stood outside Crim Elementary. The rescue task force training included every police officer and firefighter. “All our officers are getting trained this week,” Hetrick said. “Every single one will go through it,” Moorman said. Each of the training sessions was held in Crim Elementary, though Hetrick said his officers are familiar with every school building in the city. The rescue task force training had been months in the making – long before the shooting in Parkland, Florida. But…


BG gathers to discuss how to keep schools safe

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Teachers pleaded to be armed with adequate resources – not guns. Parents asked about mental health care for children. And others debated the value of arming a school for violence, or preventing it before it occurs. Though the last school shooting was far away in Parkland, Florida, the ripple effect is being felt at schools across the nation. Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci has held eight expulsion hearings in the past week for students who have made threats of violence at school. Some threats were posted on social media, some blurted out in the school hallways, one uttered in anger while playing an Xbox game. “We have to take these seriously,” Scruci said. “I’ve got 3,100 kids I’m responsible for, and close to 400 staff I’m responsible for.” The school safety public forum Thursday evening was held as an open conversation with the community in the atrium of the Wood County District Public Library. The room was packed. The topic was touchy. But the forum was peaceful. “This type of event could happen anywhere,” Scruci said, talking about how schools and churches used to be safe places in the community. To make sure Bowling Green schools are as safe as possible, Scruci said he has been working closely with Police Chief Tony Hetrick and Fire Chief Bill Moorman, both who attended the forum. The district has taken steps such as limiting the times the schools are unlocked, reducing the number of open entrances at the beginning and end of the school day, changing the procedures for evacuating for a non-scheduled fire alarm, reviewing of lockdown plans with staff, talking with evening users of the schools buildings about not blocking open doors, promoting the anonymous tip line, and adopting a zero tolerance policy to threats. Scruci said he has walked the school buildings with emergency responders and State Senator Randy Gardner. “It’s not possible to make schools 100 percent safe,” Scruci said. “They were built at times we didn’t have to worry about these events.” “We all share…


Drunk man shot after entering wrong home is indicted

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   It was a case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Bowling Green Police Division gets multiple calls a year about drunk college students wandering into the wrong homes after a night of drinking. Some are found sleeping on couches by the homeowners the next morning. But in this case, the homeowner was frightened in the middle of the night, was armed with a handgun, and shot the intoxicated intruder three times. Last year, at 1:05 in the morning on Dec. 22, police received a call from a resident in the 100 block of Liberty Street, Bowling Green, who reported two men had broken into his home and he shot to defend himself. Last week, a Wood County Grand Jury indicted Ty Krill, 21, of 610 N. Main St., Bowling Green, for trespassing in a habitation. The other man accompanying Krill on that night, Wade Sutton, 22, of Waterville, was not indicted. According to the police reports, the Liberty Street resident heard a noise at his front door, then at a side window. He grabbed a flashlight and his 9mm semi-automatic handgun, and headed downstairs.  He was headed for his phone in the den, since he only has two land-lines in his home. There, in the living room, he encountered Krill. There are conflicting stories in the police reports about the words exchanged, but the homeowner said the intruder came running at him. The homeowner shot Krill twice in the arm, then once in the lower back when Krill turned. He said he did not shoot at Sutton, who was standing with his arms raised. Both intruders ran from the home. When police arrived, they found blood on the steps by the back door, on the sidewalk and on the lawn. Officers followed the blood trail toward the rear of the property, over a fence and on toward West Evers Street. Police found Krill walking eastbound in the 100 block of West Evers Street near North Main Street. According to the police reports, Krill…


BG board hears push for arming teachers in schools

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Thoughts are prayers aren’t keeping schools safe – so some citizens suggested Bowling Green City Schools look at arming teachers and posting more police. During Tuesday’s school board meeting, Paul Tyson looked out into the audience at teachers who would die for their students. “Why wouldn’t you be ready to fight for them,” he asked. Earlier in the meeting, Superintendent Francis Scruci asked those present to take a moment of silence for the victims at Parkland, Florida. “Last week, we were reminded of our vulnerability in the face of evil,” he said. Scruci talked about the need for more mental health resources and stricter gun laws. He mentioned the need for a tip line allowing anonymous reporting of suspected threats. He talked about the “Boot” system which allows every Bowling Green classroom to be locked to intruders. While some schools would have pile up items in front of doors, the “Boot” can secure doors in a matter of seconds, he said. “The reality is every school is vulnerable,” Scruci said. “Like everyone else, I get up in the morning and pray that it doesn’t happen here.” Tyson, an off-duty Bowling Green police officer, suggested that the district needs an “armed presence” through part-time police or military, and training of teachers so they could carry firearms in school. Then, the district should put a big sign out front of the schools stating that the building is defended by firearms – discouraging any potential shooters, he said. “We will take your comments under advisement,” School Board President Jill Carr said. “I do believe you have plenty of people in town who will help you with this,” Tyson said. Jaime Baranski agreed with Tyson, saying shooters won’t attempt violence at a school that is well defended. “They’re there to shoot fish in a barrel,” Baranski said. “If there’s a patrol car outside, they’re not going to come to this building.” If the district can’t afford armed protection, Baranski suggested that parents could donate to help secure police assistance or someone…


Firefighter and wife save man from jumping off overpass

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   An off-duty Bowling Green firefighter and his wife stopped a man from jumping off the East Wooster overpass at Interstate 75 late Saturday night. Steve and Dawn Tyda were on their way home from Columbus on Saturday, when they pulled off I-75 around 11 p.m. They saw a man standing on the overpass, facing the highway. Bowling Green Fire Chief Bill Moorman said Steve Tyda turned around and went back to the overpass and pulled up next to the man. Dawn Tyda asked the man if he was OK. “He said, ‘I’ll be OK in about four seconds when I jump,’” Moorman said. Dawn Tyda offered to talk or pray with the man, who turned back to the highway and leaned over the side. Meanwhile Steve Tyda came up behind the man and tackled him to keep him from going over onto I-75 below. Tyda held him down until police arrived. The man, a 49 year old Bowling Green resident, was taken to Wood County Hospital where he was checked out by Behavioral Connections. He was transported to Flower Hospital in Sylvania for evaluation. The man told police he had recently been suicidal. In the previous few days, he said he had attempted to hang himself, tried to sleep with a bag on his head, drank rust remover and stabbed himself in the stomach with a small paring knife. “If he went through with it and jumped, it would affect so many people,” Police Chief Tony Hetrick said. Last year a man did jump off the I-75 overpass, resulting in several vehicles hitting him on the roadway. “It was an absolutely horrific sight,” said Moorman, who helped distraught drivers who couldn’t avoid hitting the man who jumped. Moorman praised Tyda for helping the suicidal man on Saturday night. “It was somewhat heroic, with complete disregard for his own safety,” Moorman said.


BG district scrutinizes safety after Parkland shooting

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   In response to growing violence at schools across the nation, Bowling Green City Schools had each classroom equipped with a “Boot” last year. The “Boot” was created by Rob Couturier, of Michigan, after his daughter was the victim of a violent attack. The “Boot,” is a rectangular-shaped plate of quarter-inch thick industrial steel. Secured by two steel pegs, the plate can withstand 16,000 pounds of pressure and keep doors closed to intruders. The safety mechanism has been installed in more than 100 public schools and 18 private schools in the region. Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci rests a little easier knowing every classroom in the district has a mechanism to keep an intruder out and keep the students safe inside. However, Scruci also realizes nothing is completely safe. “Anytime we’re talking about student safety, there is always more you can do,” Scruci said Thursday, the day after the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that killed at 17. “We want to make sure kids are safe. But we can’t with 100 percent certainty,” he said. “We don’t have the resources to make them as safe as possible.” But in the case of the Parkland shooter, who reportedly went door to door to classrooms, the “Boot” would keep him from entering rooms. “That’s the beauty of the ‘Boot.’ He’s not getting in there,” Scruci said. In addition to the “Boot” on classroom doors, the Bowling Green school district also relies on students and staff to point out troubled students, hold training drills at the school, and work with local police on responding to threats. By law, every school must hold a lockdown drill at least once a year. “We just had a meeting and discussed that we need to do it more often,” Scruci said. “We don’t ever want to think this is a new normal, but we want people to be prepared.” Of course, the school district can’t prepare for every possibility, he said. The accused shooter in the Florida school pulled a fire alarm first, reportedly to…