Theater

Genevieve Simon’s Bowling Green roots inform work headed to Cincy Fringe Festival

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Genevieve Simon was a junior at Bowling Green High School she didn’t get the part she wanted in the school musical “West Side Story.” Instead of a role with a lot of singing and dancing, the director Jo Beth Gonzalez cast Simon as Anybodys, a tom boy who hangs out with the Jets, who ignore her. But she persists. “She was this strange girl who wanted to be a boy.” Simon ended up loving the role even though it has few lines. That didn’t mean it she wasn’t acting. “I started to learn how to be on stage when it’s not about you.” Simon learned to listen intently to the story. She fashioned a deep inner life for Anybodys, contemplating her role in the social structure, and projecting that even if she was in the shadows. “I was able to explore and learn how to be on stage and listen, how to be part of a group – who do I feel most loyal to, most scared of, and who do I hate?” “I look back at that and am so grateful she gave me that challenge,” Simon said in a recent telephone interview from her home in New York City. That experience not only has played into her development as a professional actor now working in New York, but it has inspired a new play, “Romeo + Juliet + Anybodys,” that will be performed at the Cincinnati Fringe Festival June 6, 8, and 10. For details visit: http://www.cincyfringe.com. The play brings Anybodys out of the shadows and into the spotlight. Simon said the idea for the play came to her about a year ago while riding the subway. She was reading a book in which a female character was simply called No Name. This frustrated Simon. Why would the author not give her a name? Then the train stopped, and it made a familiar metallic noise, which happens to mimic the first three notes of the song “Somewhere” from “West Side Story.” That got Simon thinking about this other female character with no name whom she’d played. For fun, she started writing in Anybodys’ voice, exploring her view of the tragedy. Simon discovered that “she had a lot to say.” Anybodys is there at pivotal moments. “But nobody listens.” Simon also looked at Shakespeare’s “Rome and Juliet.” There’s no character like Anybodys in Shakespeare’s tragedy, Balthasar, Romeo’s servant seems closest to fit the role. But Anybodys’ outcast status also got Simon thinking about others that people chose to ignore. While she has found New York a friendly place with people always willing to help, New Yorkers also have a way of shutting down emotionally, ignoring those around them who are speaking too loudly or strangely or are too dirty. Simon wondered: “How…


Perrysburg Musical Theatre to stage “The King and I”

From PERRYSBURG MUSICAL THEATRE Perrysburg Musical Theatre, in its last show of its seventh season, will present Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “The King and I” to the Perrysburg community this June 22 – 25.   “The King and I” is a timeless and ever-important reminder about overcoming cultural differences with understanding, respect, and love, while maintaining unique and personal traditions and values.  The story takes place in the early 1860’s in Bangkok, Siam (now Thailand), where the newly-widowed Anna Leonowens and her son, Louis, arrive from England, where Anna has taken a position as the schoolteacher for the children of the King of Siam. The King is determined to usher Siam into the modern world, and he thinks Western education can be a part of that – yet, Anna is horrified by many of the traditions that he holds dear.  They discover that they have a lot to learn from each other.  Music from the score includes “I Whistle a Happy Tune,” “Getting to Know You,””Hello Young Lovers,” and “Shall We Dance?” The cast is comprised of community members throughout northwest Ohio, featuring Jennifer Braun (Anna) and Matt Boggs (King of Siam), and supported by a cast of more than 70 members.  The show is a family affair for many of the cast members:  mothers-and-daughters sharing the stage are Angela Paprocki and Paige Paprocki (Royal Wives), Carrie Sanderson (Lady Thiang) and Lindsay Sanderson (Royal Child/dancer), Tania Schneider (Royal Wife) and Caity Schneider (Royal Child/Buddha), and Amanda Hubaker (Royal Wife) and Alex Hubaker (Royal Child); husband-and-wife cast members include Chuck Kiskaddon (Captain Orton) and Wendie Kiskaddon (Nurse); and a number of siblings will hit the stage as well, including Clara, Grace, and Isaac Burkin and Jacob and Jordan Nahhas (Royal Children). “The King and I” will be performed June 22-24 at 7 p.m. and June 25 at 2 p.m. at Perrysburg High School.  Tickets can be purchased online at www.perrysburgmusicaltheatre.org.  PMT will select the best available seats and hold them at “will call” for those ordering online.  In-person ticket sales and seat selection will be available at Perrysburg High School on June 19-21st from 6:30-8:00 p.m. and one hour before show time.   For more information, please visit www.perrsyburgmuscialtheatre.org.  


“The Fantasticks” gets fresh & lively staging at Valentine Theatre

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A play so constructed of theatrical artifice should not be this moving. Yet when the wise rogue Gallo reprises the ballad “Try to Remember” at the end of “The Fantasticks,” it tugs at the heart. In the preceding two hours, the bandit-for-hire Gallo (Ryan Zarecki) has taken the audience into his confidence. “The Fantasticks” is being staged by the Valentine Theatre in Studio A, on the Adams side of the complex, directed by James M. Norman, for six shows starting Friday, May 12, at 8 p.m. continuing Saturday, May 13, Friday, May 19, and Saturday, May 20, all at 8 p.m. with Sunday matinees, May 14 and 21, at 2 p.m. Tickets are $20. Visit: http://www.valentinetheatre.com/events.html. “The Fantasticks” has a classic fairy tale set up with a girl, Luisa (Madison Zavitz), and a boy, Matt (Griffen Palmer), and they are in love in the most besotted way, made all the more acute by the fact that their fathers have built a wall to keep them apart. The fathers, Hucklebee and Bellomy, are feuding, or that’s what they like their children to suppose. It’s all a ruse to keep the lovebirds focused on each other and to bring about their marriage. They are also gardeners, which gives them more satisfaction than raising children, because as they sing “if you plant a turnip, you get a turnip.” Who knows what children will turn into? All this plays out as planned, more or less, in the first act with the assistance of Gallo and two, down-at-the-heels actors, Henry (Ed Burnham) and Mortimer (Jeremy Allen). But it is a very short lived happily-ever-after. A mute, played by Elizabeth Cottle, observes it all with bemusement and dispenses needed stage properties and costumes, and even those actors who emerge from her box. She’s a reminder that this is a mere fantasy with a lesson should anyone care to heed it. For Bowling Green theatergoers there’s some familiar faces. Palmer is a BGSU student who most recently appeared in “Twelfth Night” and “The Drowsy Chaperone.” Zavitz is a marvelous comic actor who played the female lead in “The Drowsy Chaperone” and graced a number of other productions on campus. This part of the head in the clouds teenager suits her well. She makes us care about a ridiculous character and shows how those romantic notions fare when exposed to the light of reality. This is a good chance to see her once more on stage before she continues her studies at Hogwarts. Well, sort of, she’ll work this summer as a member of the Hogwarts choir at Universal Studios’ The Wizarding World of Harry Potter. A decade ago a theatergoer in Bowling Green could not miss Zarecki. He bounded across stages at BGSU, at City Park as one of the Beautiful…


Theater lovers should add “Every Brilliant Thing” to their to-do list

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Kendra Beitzel is alone on stage as “Every Brilliant Thing” starts. Her character is in many ways alone in her troubled life as the daughter of a chronically depressed mother. Beitzel relates the tale in an engaging tone that’s at once self-knowing and wryly objective. But Beitzel needs help telling  her story. It is a monologue that sometimes needs other bodies to fill out the story, so she will draw random audience members to stand in for her psychologist, her boyfriend, her father, even herself. Her character as well discovers over the course of her life that she needs help to cope with what life has handed her. Broken Spectacle Productions will present “Every Brilliant Thing” Wednesday, May 3 through Friday, May 5, at 7:30 each night at Grumpy Dave’s, 104 S. Main St., Bowling Green. Tickets are $12 from http://www.brokenspectacle.com/. There’s also a one drink minimum. The audience participation is part of what attracted director Sara Chambers to the script.  “Because the audience itself becomes a character,” Chambers said, “the implication is we’re part of a human community, and that’s part of what makes life good.” The play deals with “hard-wired depression,” yet “it is so hopeful.” “The show is not saying in any way you can choose not to be depressed,” Chambers said. Still there are choices. “I can still get help,” Chambers said. “I can continue to make choices about how I view the world. Things can get better, not always brilliant, but they can get better. “I think it’s important to talk about things that are really hopeful about the sadness and the joy of moving through life.” “Every Brilliant Thing” shows how difficult that can be through the lens of the one character. The playwright Duncan MacMillan, who with Jonny Donahue adapted it from his own short story, doesn’t designate an age or gender for the character. The role has been assumed by a variety of actors because depression afflicts a variety of people. Chambers said she approached Beitzel because she wanted to work with her one more time before the actress delivers her baby – she’s eight months pregnant – and moves to Cincinnati. She felt a woman near to giving birth added resonance to the role. Beitzel worked in three other shows staged by Broken Spectacle, the theater company founded by Chambers and her husband Jonathan Chambers, to present new work in unusual venues. And she was excited to do one more show. “They understand the script so completely, it makes me as a performer want to match that,” she said of the Sara and Jonathan Chambers. Her character, she said, “is someone whose mother has dealt with depression her entire life and she’s dealing with this while simultaneously trying to find her own happiness.” At age…


Players’ “Dixie Swim Club” offers comic, touching look at friendship over the years

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even if you didn’t go to Pemberton College, you’ll probably know with the women from its championship swim squad. They are a familiar line up of southern female types – overachiever, perfectionist alpha woman, sex-obsessed diva, screwball redneck, and cheerful naif. These archetypes mean the writer, Jones Hope Wooten, doesn’t have to spend time establishing characters. You know, sometimes before the character enters, where they fit in this theatrical ecosystem. The fun is seeing what twists the script and the particular cast can put on them, so we see them a little fresh. The Black Swamp Players’ production of “The Dixie Swim Club” opens Friday, April 28, at 8 p.m. in the First United Methodist Church, 1526 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green. The play continues Saturday (April 28), Friday, May 5, and Saturday, May 6, all at 8 p.m. with Sunday matinees April 30 and May 7 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $12 and $10 for students and seniors at Grounds for Thought or at: https://www.blackswampplayers.org/. Directed by Aggie Alt, in her first effort for the Players, “The Dixie Swim Club” is set on a vacation house on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Members of the swim club have reunited here for more than 20 years when we first encounter them. Now 44 they are facing the various discontents and joys of middle age, and realizing those are sometimes hard to distinguish. One of the characters even shows up pregnant. That birth gives the play its circle-of-life feel. When the play ends 33 years after this first scene, one of the five team members is no longer with them. The characters are the focus here with no real overarching plot, just the repartee, most often comic, about love, lusts, marriage, diseases, aging, and parenthood. The characters don’t develop as much as they reveal themselves slowly over time. The cast is a mix of the Players’ usual suspects and newcomers to the troupe. Players regular Deb Weiser plays Sheree Hollinger, who is still the team captain even after more than 20 years. She organizes the whole thing, and brings health food for her friends, who are quite unappreciative. Sheree married the coach’s son, and is still in touch with him. Her children, it seems, are perfect. Deb Shaffer plays the high-powered attorney, who has let her personal life slide. Credit Shaffer for bringing real warmth to the character and making her neither shrill nor pathetic, just sharp tongued and realistic. Nicole Tuttle is new to the Players, but not to local stages. She’s performed in shows at the university as well as with Lionface Productions. She plays the sex-obsessed, serial cosmetic surgery patient, Lexie. As we skip forward in five year intervals she’s always going through another divorce. Her former teammates suffer empathy exhaustion. This is…


BG High’s musical “Shrek” delivers a message about acceptance on way to a fairy tale ending

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A musical based on an animated film shouldn’t feel this timely. But you can’t escape the echoes of the news when a host of refugees flood onto the stage of the Bowling Green Performing Arts Center. Yes, the refugees are a motley assortment of your favorite fairy tale characters. Still one feels the very real pang of people displaced. These refugees end up in a swamp, the home of the misanthropic ogre, Shrek, who wants no part of them. “Shrek: The Musical” like its predecessors “Shrek” the movie and the original picture book by William Steig turns fairy tales on their heads. The show, directed by JoBeth Gonzalez, still delivers a happily-ever-after ending. Along the way there’s plenty of comic patter, tuneful melodies, dances, and a few heart-tugging moments. “Shrek, the Musical,” Bowling Green High’s all-school musical, opens tonight (April 20) at 7 p.m. continuing Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. in the PAC. The animated film really sets the bar for the cast and crew. Technical director Ryan Albrecht and his team capture the atmosphere and settings, and manage to make these shifts without interrupting the action. The dragon is a particularly nice piece of stage puppetry. Justin McKenzie does a good job as the gruff Shrek. He shows that a lot of that grouchy exterior is an affectation. He lets the ogre gradually open up emotionally. That process begins with his relationship with Donkey played with a sure sense of comic timing by Josh Coleman, who is able to capture the antic spontaneity of Eddie Murphy from the movie without doing an imitation. It’s when Shrek meets the Princess Fiona (Elaine Hudson) that he really opens up, until – this being a romantic comedy – there’s a misunderstanding that sends him back into his shell. Hudson’s Fiona is spunky, very devoted to the myth of the princess, and quite demanding when things don’t go according to the fairy tale code. She also has her own secret curse to deal with. Micah McKanna plays the primping despot Lord Farquaad as a fatuous fool. He wants to marry Fiona, not for love, but so he can become king. He even gets to lead the dance number “What’s Up Duloc?” That piece evokes Mel Brooks’ “Springtime for Hitler and Germany” from “The Producers.” And he does this all on his knees because Farquaad is very short of stature. (Spoiler alert: the curtain call has him at his full height towering over most of the rest of the cast.) The songs, a hummable pastiche of contemporary show music, expand on the characters’ hopes and fears. The immediacy of the singing with a live orchestra is where live theater can top even an Oscar winning movie. In “I Think I Got You…


BGSU’s “Twelfth Night” has Shakespeare doing Jazz Age shimmy

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As the matches are made in “The Twelfth Night” the characters gather on stage for a Charleston inspired dance number to that 1920s hit “Masculine Women! Feminine Men!” I could well imagine that peppy song with its refrain “which is the rooster which is the hen” inspiring the BGSU Department of Theatre and Film’s production of the Shakespeare comedy. The confusion of gender lies at the heart of the comedy. Director Jonathan Chambers has set the play in the days of the flappers, 1929 in particular. He injects period touches such as mentions of accordions, Jack Dempsey and the shimmy, as well as having people playing golf, into the script. The sound design is packed with period hits that reflect on the action. In his notes he explains that just as in 1929 the world was poised on the brink of a new era, when Shakespeare wrote the play England was pondering what would come after the reign of Queen Elizabeth. In both cases there was much frivolity with an undertow of apprehension. This “Twelfth Night,” though, does not linger on the darker shades. It just wants to have fun and keep the audience laughing, and succeeds in grand fashion. The play opens Thursday (April 20) at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts on the Bowling Green State University campus. It continues with shows Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. with matinees Saturday and Sunday. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for students and children. Available at the Wolfe Center box office or by calling 419-372-8171, or visiting www.bgsu.edu/the-arts. All tickets are $20 the day of the performance. The play opens with a shipwreck. Viola (Nicole Bogdanovic) is distraught because she believes her twin brother Sebastian (Jarod Mariani) has drowned. She’s left on the shore of Illyria, which for the purposes of this production, is in the USA. With the help of the sea captain (Harmon R. Andrews), she disguises herself as a man and enters the service of Duke Orsino (Baxter Chambers). The duke is in love with Olivia (Mackenzie Baumhower), but she has foresworn any courting for seven years as she mourns the death of her father and brother. Her household is hardly a somber place though given the presence of her carousing uncle Sir Toby (Devin Bader) and his drinking buddy Sir Andrew (Justin M. Roth). This draws the ire of Olivia’s smug, officious steward Malvolio (Simon Morgan Russell). When the duke sends “Cesario” (Viola in disguise) to woo Olivia for him, all the parts begin to click. Baumhower plays Olivia as something of a ditz, who is easily captivated by this Cesario fellow. She pursues him as relentlessly as several males, the duke, Sir Andrew, and in a marvelous comic twist Malvolio, pursue…


Crim Elementary stages musical to make learning fun

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The backstage was buzzing with nervous actors. The frog and toad were preparing for their big scenes. The snail was brushing up on her slow motion moves. The squirrels were getting ready to make a mess. And the understudies were standing by. In front of the stage, on the gymnasium floor, the eager audience sat with their legs criss-cross applesauce style. When the curtains opened, an excited “ooooooooohhhhh” filled the gym. That’s just the reaction second grade teacher Stacey Higgins was hoping for with the debut of the first musical Thursday at Crim Elementary School. A dress rehearsal was performed in the morning for fellow students, with the big show to occur in the afternoon for parents and other fans. The musical, “A Year with Frog and Toad Jr.” featured all the second grade students – an ambitious endeavor with such young students. “It ties in with our curriculum on the seasons,” Higgins was quick to say. But she added that the performance was also something more. “They need these types of experiences,” she said. “Too much time is spent testing and preparing for tests. We need to get back to making school meaningful and enjoyable for kids.” The musical got the kids singing, dancing, acting, reading narration and designing the colorful set. That is all learning, Higgins stressed. “We want them to have experiences other than just taking tests.” As the audience filed into the gym, and the second graders fidgeted back stage, Higgins admitted to being a little nervous herself. “It’s a good nervous,” she said. “This if the first time they get to do it in front of an audience.” The story began as the best children’s stories do – with “Once upon a time…” It went on to tell the tale of two best friends, frog and toad. With the help of an animated chorus and able narrators, the friends navigated the seasons, playing in the summer, raking leaves in fall, sledding in winter, and waking up from hibernation in spring. The young audience members sat with their wide eyes glued to the stage. They applauded heartily went the cast took their bows at the end. “What great singing you did,” Crim Principal Melanie Garbig announced to the cast. “I am so proud of you.” “It’s wonderful,” Garbig said. “It brings out different personalities in the boys and girls. It allows them to shine in a different way.” The production allowed Darla Davis to shine as a narrator. Adorned with leaves in her hair and on her shirt, Darla read the portion on autumn. “It was fun talking in front of everyone,” though she admitted to being a tad bit nervous. In addition to learning about the seasons, Darla also learned another important lesson – “not to be…


BGSU arts events through April 28

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 13 – The International Film Series continues with the Swedish film “Force Majeure,” directed by Ruben Östlund. An award winner at the Cannes Film Festival, the Toronto Film Festival, and other internationally recognized venues, the film deftly explores the emotional dimensions of the legal term “force majeure,” an unexpected event (such as a hurricane) that releases both parties from the obligations of a contract. In this story, the ski vacation of a seemingly ideal family takes a sudden turn when an avalanche approaches them as they are having a pleasant lunch at the lodge. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 13 – Prout Readings conclude with B.F.A. student readings at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free April 13 – Bowling Green Opera Theater presents a variety of opera scenes. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 14 – The University Choral Society and Early Music Ensemble present Bach’s “St. John Passion.” The moving and sacred oratorio of Johann Sebastian Bach is a dramatic representation of the Passion as told in the Gospel of John for the Good Friday Vespers of 1724. Revel in the extravagant, expressive music of the season. The performance will begin at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, East Wooster St., Bowling Green. Free April 14 – The Toledo Museum of Art and BGSU’s College of Musical Arts present EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art. The performance and discussion series will feature BGSU doctoral candidates in music performing in response to the work in the Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic exhibit. It begins at 7 p.m. in the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St, Toledo. Free April 18 – Music at the Manor House features the Graduate String Quartet. The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Manor House in Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., in Toledo. Free   Through April 18–The M.F.A. I Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries located in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free April 19 – A chamber orchestra, conducted  by Maria Mercedes Diaz Garcia, will perform “Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth)” by Gustav Mahler in the  Schoenberg/Riehn version at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall.  The concert will open with a talk by Dr. Eftychia Papanikolaou. Vocalists Laura Reaper and Moises Salazar will be the soloists. Free. April 20–The International Film Series concludes with the Chinese film “The Grandmaster,” directed by Wong Kar Wai. Nominated for two Oscars and a prize winner at…


BGSU arts events through April 18

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 7 – The Collegiate Chorale and University Women’s Chorus will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. April 7 – The elsewhere theater season concludes with “Dying City,” written by Christopher Shin and directed by Tanner Lias. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. on April 8 and 9. Free April 8 – The Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition will take place in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Preliminaries will begin at noon, with finals following at 8 p.m. Free April 8 – An opening reception for the MFA I Thesis Exhibition will begin at 7 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Free Through April 18 – The MFA I Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free April 9 – The Sunday Matinee Series continues with the 1925 film “The Lost World,” directed by Harry G. Hoyt. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was not only the creator of Sherlock Holmes, he happened to write imaginative first-rate adventures, including this tale which involves one Professor Challenge who discovers a jungle plateau where prehistoric beasts thrive — all masterfully animated by Willis O’Brien, who would bring to thrilling life King Kong. The screening will begin at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 9 – The Douglas Wayland Student Chamber Competition winners will perform at 3 p.m. in the Great Gallery in the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Free April 11 – Music at the Manor House features the Douglas Wayland Student Chamber Competition winners. A performance will be given at 7:30 p.m. at the Manor House located at Wildwood Metropark. 5100 W. Central Ave., in Toledo. Free April 13 – The International Film Series continues with the Swedish film “Force Majeure,” directed by Ruben Östlund. An award winner at the Cannes Film Festival, the Toronto Film Festival, and other internationally recognized venues, the film deftly explores the emotional dimensions of the legal term “force majeure,” an unexpected event (such as a hurricane) that releases both parties from the obligations of a contract. In this story, the ski vacation of a seemingly…


Tickets on sale for BG High’s production of “Shrek”

From BGHS THEATRE The musical “Shrek”  is based on the beloved Dreamwork’s cartoon about an ogre, named Shrek, who along with several other fairy-tale creatures who are forced off their land by the evil Lord Farquaad.k the Musical” The show will be on stage at the Bowling Green Performing Arts Center, April 20-22  at 7 p.m. and April 23 at 3 p.m. Tickets are available at showtix4u.com until April 14. Then tickets can be purchased at the PAC box office April 17-19th from 3-6 pm. In an attempt to regain his land, Shrek decides to take Lord Farquaad’s challenge to rescue the “fair Princess Fiona” from a tower that happens to be guarded by a dragon. Shrek, with his “trusty steed” Donkey, and Fiona make the journey towards Lord Farquaad’s kingdom. Along the way, Shrek and Fiona discover that they are now friends who are also in love. The play teaches us to love our true natures which sometimes include “our warts and all.” Shrek is played by junior, Justin McKenzie. Fiona is played by junior Elaine Hudson. Donkey is played by senior Josh Coleman with the voice of “the dragon” sung by Olivia Strang. Lord Farquaad is performed by senior Micah McKanna. The cast includes  Rachel Amburgey, Stephanie Bell, Alex Bellavia, Sophia Bird, Hannah Bowlus, Abraham Brockway, Ethan Brown, Natalie Carty, Alyssa Clemens, Megan Clifford, Brian Condon, Nova Cullison, Kaitlyn Dorman, Fran Flores, Saralynn George, Sophi Hachtel, Devon Jackson, Moe Kellow, Sarah Kelly, Sarah Kerr, Darin Kirchner, Hailey Kirchner, Luke Kobylski, Dea Kukeli, Thomas Long, Jadyn Lundquest, Julie Maas, Michael Martin, Jessica Miller, Darryl Moorehead, Sophia Nelson, Naila Ortega, Hudson Pendleton, Mr. Tom Pendleton, Charlotte Perez, Austin Picar, Alexis Reinbolt, Naria Rieske Drew Thomas, Michaela Urban, Bob Walters, Rose Walters, Anne Weaver, Claire Wells-Jensen, Jeremiah Williams, and Meagan Worthy. The play is directed by JoBeth Gonzalez with vocal direction by Beth Vaughn, choreography by Bob Marzola, orchestral direction by Jeremy Sison, technical direction by Ryan Albrecht, and is produced by Sarah Caserta.


BGSU Arts Events through April 12

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 31 – Jazz Week continues with a trombone performance from Jazz Lab Band I with Grammy-nominated guest artist Alan Ferber. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. April 1 – Bravo! BGSU celebrates the very best of the arts. Experience a magical evening of vocal, instrumental and theatrical performances, plus exhibitions and demonstrations by student and faculty artists in glass, ceramics, metals and digital arts. Enjoy a festive atmosphere and an array of appetizers and tasty treats. The celebration will begin at 7 p.m. in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. To purchase tickets to the event, contact Lisa Mattiace in the President’s Office at 419-372-6780 or by email at lmattia@bgsu.edu April 1 – Students from BGSU’s College of Musical Arts will be featured in an afternoon chamber music concert at 1 p.m. at the Way Public Library, 101 E. Indiana Ave., Perrysburg. Hosted by Pro Musica, friends of music at the college, the program will feature students who have received travel grants from the organization. The concert is free and open to the public. April 2 – The Gish Sunday Matinee series kicks off with the 1945 film “And Then There Were None,” directed by René Clair. Agatha Christie’s celebrated who-done-it “Ten Little Indians,” under the deft guidance of French director Clair, becomes a delightful, sly, topnotch film noir. The skillful adaptation boasts a strong cast of Hollywood’s most memorable character actors, with a score by esteemed Italian composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco. The program will also include a Technicolor cartoon. The screening begins at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 2 – The A Cappella Choir and University Men’s Chorus will perform at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. April 3 – Pianist Phyllis Lehrer is the next performer in the Guest Artist Series. Known internationally as a performer, teacher, clinician, author and adjudicator, Lehrer has enjoyed an active concert career as a soloist and collaborative artist in the United States, Canada, Central America, Asia and Europe. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts center. Free April 4-6 — The College of Musical Arts at Bowling Green State University will…


Horizon Youth Theatre presents 2017 Festival of Shorts

Submitted by Horizon Youth Theatre Horizon Youth Theatre is pleased to announce its 2017 Festival of Shorts. Three different shows will consist of one act plays written and acted by students; monologues by students from Cassie Greenlee’s Character Acting & Monologue workshop; and the emcee talents of Scarlet Frishman and Katie Partlow. Performances are at Otsego Elementary School, 18505 Tontogany Creek Road, on Friday March 31 and Saturday April 1 at 7:00 pm; and Sunday April 2 at 2:00 pm. Admission is by donation. The plays, with their performance days and cast lists, are as follows: Featherwary by The 2017 Devising Class, directed by Keith Guion Performing Friday and Sunday Cast: Firecloud, an elf-dragon thief – Alexandra Roberts-Zibbel Lainey, a mushroom fairy – Paige Suelzer Penny, a bewildered sudden visitor – Katie Partlow Tim Brown II, a squatter and housekeeper – Eli Marx Vanessa West, a spoiled, rich brat – Emma Kate Holbrook Dr. Cecilia Goldberg, a medical prodigy – Grace Holbrook Greenhouse by Bindi Hoskay, directed by Terra Sloane with mentor Brittany Albrecht Performing Friday and Saturday Cast: Gardener – Ethan Headley Daisy – Isobel Roberts-Zibbel Sunflower – Scarlett Strausbaugh Rose – Calista Wilkins Primrose – Alice Walters Shopper 1 – Noah Carpenter Shopper 2 – Lydia Korzeniewski Shopper 3 – Elise Allen Gwen – Izzy Douglass Home? by Alexandra Roberts-Zibbel & Rose Walters, directed by Alli Kulbago Performing Friday and Saturday Cast: Mom – Sasha Meade Karsyn – Lydia Mackiewicz Cassidy – Lauren Clifford Penny – Bindi Hoskay Peyton – Gray Frishman The Secret Alliance for Lonely Kids by Terra Sloane, directed by Kelly Frailly Performing Friday and Sunday Cast: Ezra – Luke Weaver Pearl – Amalia Cloeter Taylor – Lola Truman Tyler – Isaac Douglass Mom – Annie Oberlander Classmate 1 – Ayla Weinandy Classmate 2 – Ligaya Edge The Somewhat Unlucky Consequences of a Short Bus Ride by Libby Barnett, Amalia Cloeter & Paige Suelzer, directed by Cole Stiriz Performing Friday and Saturday Cast: Pebble – Emy Wilkins Luna – Ari Allen Eric – Maddox Brosius Sofia – Madison Kline Selsius – Bella Truman Fairinheight – Ella McNamara With Friends Like These (Who Needs Enemies?) by Sophi Hachtel, Narnia Rieske & Anne Weaver, directed by Cassie Greenlee Performing Saturday and Sunday Cast: Lady Foxglove / Addie – Megan Clifford Captain Man / Calvin – Gavin Miller Baroness Monolith / Georgie – Aria Weaver Viscount Voltage / Bob – Vance Weaver Nox / Daniel – Liam Rogel Sandy – Emily Pollock Stacy – Haley Premo Agatha – Gianna Hemming Emil – Amelia Mazzarella HYT would like to thank OTSEGO SCHOOLS for the generous access to its facilities we’ve enjoyed since 2014. We couldn’t do this without you. We’d also like to thank St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, First Presbyterian Church, Vineyard Church, and Grounds For Thought for providing…


BGSU arts events through April 4

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS   Through March 31 – The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Bryan and Wankelman Galleries, located in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m.Sundays. Free March 24 – Bowling Green Opera Theater features Kurt Weill’s “Street Scene.” The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Advance tickets are $5 for students and children and $15 for adults. All tickets are $20 the day of the performance. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by calling 419-372-8171 or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. An additional performance will be at 3 p.m. on March 26. March 24 – EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art explores the relationship of contemporary music and art through music performances in response to specific works of art and discussion. It is a partnership between the doctoral program at BGSU’s College of Musical Arts and the Toledo Museum of Art. The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St. Free March 28 – Tuesdays at the Gish continues with the 1991 film “Thelma and Louise,” directed by Ridley Scott. Based on the award-winning screenplay by Callie Khouri, the film draws us into the remarkable but troubling adventures of Thelma (Geena Davis) and Louise (Susan Sarandon) that arise from their desire to take a few days off from their oppressive lives as women in domestic/economic relationships. Their misadventures lead to encounters with a duplicitous hitchhiker (Brad Pitt) and a sympathetic policeman (Harvey Keitel). The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free March 28 – Jazz Week begins with the Vocal Jazz Ensemble in performance at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 28 – Music at the Manor House features viola students of Matthew McBride- Daline. The recital will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Manor House, located at Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., Toledo. Free March 29 – In celebration of Jazz Week, the Faculty Artist Series will feature the Jazz Faculty Group, in performance at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 30 – The International Film Series kicks off with the Italian film “Le meraviglie (The Wonders),” directed by Alice Rohrwacher. Winner of the Grand Prize of the Jury at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, the coming-of-age tale merges a quirky premise with emotional storytelling. When a reality television show comes to rural Tuscany, Gelsomina (Maria Alexandra Lungu) sees an opportunity to win money for her poor beekeeping family. Family conflict and…


Broadway, blues & opera intersect in colorful “Street Scene” at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The brownstone at 346 on an anonymous street on New York’s Lower East Side is the home to seven families of motley ethnicity. “Street Scene,” the opera they inhabit, brings together music of the Old World and New to express their joys, hopes, passion, fears, and desperation. The 1946 collaboration of composer Kurt Weill, poet Langston Hughes, and playwright Elmer Rice opens Friday at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts on the Bowling Green State University campus. A matinee performance will be presented Sunday at 3 p.m. Advance tickets are $15; all tickets are $20 the day of the performance. Call 419-372-8171, go online at bgsu.edu/arts, or visit the box office in the Wolfe Center to purchase tickets. “Street Scene,” said Kevin Bylsma, coordinator of opera at BGSU, “is a great amalgamation of operetta, opera and musical theater that tells a poignant story that resonates as much today as it did in 1946.” The tale of immigrants tossed together in a strange, sometimes hostile place had such resonance that guest director Nicholas Wuehrmann considered setting this version in contemporary times. There’s the “universality of the themes of love, relationships, the struggle of the immigrant population, prejudice, just every day life and the struggle to get along, and dreaming and hoping,” the director said. “It reminds me of the people I know in New York.” He passed on the idea, trusting the audience will relate regardless of the time period. All the characters have their own struggles, and the show highlights them in song. In the opening we hear the janitor (Brett Pond) and Anna Maurrant (Alicia Yantosca) sing of their dreams. His are expressed in a grinding blues number “I Got a Marble and a Star,” sung as residents ask him about repairs that need to be made. Anna expresses her desires in a passionate aria in which she declares that “I will always believe there will be a brighter day.” For her that “brighter day” may include the milkman Sam Sankey (Jarrod Davis) with whom she’s carrying on a not-so-secret affair. The neighbor ladies – Emma Jones (Hillary LaBonte), Greta Fiorentino (Elizabeth Vogel), and Olga Olsen (Betsy Bellavia) – gossip about it in the bouncing “Get a Load of That.” All the play’s drama plays out in front of the brownstone. While the setting roots the production in 1946, many of ideas could come from today. That’s true when Anna’s husband Frank Maurrant (Otis Jeffries) and Eastern European Jew Abraham Kaplan (Aaron Meece) argue about politics, and the hopes and futility of class struggle. The joining of the personal and political come through when Frank sings the folk-song-inspired aria “Let Things Be Like They Used to Be.” Lippo Fiorentino (Nathan Wright) shows up to sweeten everyone’s…