green energy

BG Council peddles bicycles and green energy efforts

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Bowling Green City Council heard some good news and some bad news last week about efforts to go more green in the community. Council was introduced to the city’s new Bicycle Spokesperson of the Year, and learned about state legislation introduced that would hurt future solar and wind power efforts of the city. On the bicycling issue, Mayor Dick Edwards declared May as National Bicycle Month in Bowling Green, and shared upcoming efforts to promote bicycling with a “slow roll” for families and beginners, a Ride of Silence to recognize those bicyclists killed by motorists, and the annual Bike to Work Day planned for May 17. Steve Langendorfer, president of the City Bicycle Safety Commission, then introduced Alan Frishman as the city’s Bicycle Spokesperson of the Year. In the last 2½  years, Frishman has logged 25,000 miles on his bike. He makes frequent rides with Toledo Area Bicyclists. And Langendorfer pointed out that Frishman is very safety conscious – always wearing his helmet when bike riding. “This is quite an honor,” Frishman said as he accepted the recognition during the City Council meeting. When the city posted signs along streets last year explaining that bikes are allowed to use the full lane, one of those signs was erected right across the street from Frishman’s home. “My daughter said, ‘Look Dad, they put it up just for you,’” Frishman said with a grin. Also at the meeting, the mayor notified council that he would be sending a letter to State Rep. Haraz Ghanbari, R-Perrysburg, voicing the city’s strong opposition to House Bill 6, which Edwards referred to as the “nuclear subsidy bill.” The proposed legislation would subsidize nuclear power plants, but shut the door on future credits for renewable energy projects, the mayor said. Bowling Green has a “long, rich history in sustainability,” investing in solar and wind power sites. “We’ve been hoping an amendment would be introduced,” that would preserve the credits for renewable energy, he said. But the bill appears to be “on a fast track.” The nuclear subsidy bill is “very disturbing. We hope that we will be joining with lots of the communities committed to green energy,” Edwards said. In other business at the meeting, Municipal Administrator Lori Tretter reported that the police division is partnering with the chamber of commerce and possibly BGSU to offer employee training in an…