Politics

Jean Geist: “Mike Galbraith wants to represent all people in the 5th Congressional District”

Mike Galbraith wants to represent all people in the 5th Congressional District. He has criss-crossed the 19 counties of our district numerous times over the past year+ meeting with farmers, small business owners, millennials & retirees. When we attended his “Old-Fashioned Rally” in Bowling Green, Mike addressed topics as varied as the price of soybeans to the health of Lake Erie. In the coming month before the midterm election he will be holding Town Halls and other public events in the following Northwest Ohio locations: Celina Delta Bryan Perrysburg Toledo Defiance Upper Sandusky Oak Harbor Grand Rapids Sylvania Wayne Napoleon Waterville Paulding Millbury Findlay If you live in these areas, I urge you to take the time to meet and listen to Michael Galbraith. And, ask yourself when was the last time you had the opportunity to talk to Bob Latta without paying $1000 a plate for a fundraiser? Jean Geist Bowling Green


GOP state auditor candidate Keith Faber wants government to work better for Bob & Betty Buckeye

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A few phrases roll quickly off the tongue of State Rep. Keith Faber, a candidate for state auditor. The Celina resident sees one of the state auditor’s duties as catching those “lying, stealing, and cheating.” And when talking about how government should run the operative phrases are “better faster cheaper” and “efficient, effective, and transparent.” “The auditor’s office is not a partisan office,” he said. “You wear the uniform of the umpire. My background shows I don’t show favor. … You elect an auditor to represent Bob and Betty Buckeye and to make sure government works for them, not itself.” That background includes 17 years in the State Legislature, first in the House, then Senate where he served as president from 2013 to 2016, and now is back in the House representing the 84th district. Faber is running against Democrat Zack Space. He includes ECOT, the private charter school now being sued by the state, in the category of those who have misused state money. He defends how his Republican predecessor Dave Yost, now a candidate for attorney general and the Republican controlled legislature, handled the controversy. Some have charged they let the problem fester too long. Faber said he has also supported effort to draw both state legislative and later congressional districts in a non-partisan way. The auditor will sit on the commissions that draw those districts. He backs the goal of keeping political subdivisions together with “a heavy emphasis keeping things compact.” He said “that should allow people to be represented by people who share their values.” Having a hand in shaping these new districts, though, is not why he’s seeking the state auditor’s office, he said. The auditor’s office, he said, is about on one hand providing “service and support to Ohio’s local governments.” One issue he’s focused on is the cost of audits. Sometimes for small commissions or townships, what’s charged by the state for audits is a disproportionately large share of their budgets, sometimes as much as half. “I’d like to empower the office to make them less expensive and ask the legislature to help subsidize them.” Then there’s the compliance side. If someone is caught “lying, stealing, and cheating, there’s a place for…


Investigation into Dawn Glanz’s murder continues

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The unsolved murder of Dawn Glanz may be closer to being cracked after the true crime TV show “Cold Justice” investigated the Bowling Green case. The episode aired last Saturday evening. The Bowling Green Police Division and Wood County Prosecutor’s Office picked up again where “Cold Justice” left off and spent the summer investigating unresolved questions. Though progress has been made, the prosecutor’s office is still not ready to press charges, according to Wood County Prosecuting Attorney Paul Dobson. But the investigation continues. “At this point, we haven’t made any decisions,” Dobson said Monday. Glanz, 66, was found dead in her home on Kensington Boulevard, on May 9, 2013. She had been a professor of art history at Bowling Green State University. Initially, it was believed her death was the result of natural causes, possibly a stroke. She was found on the bathroom floor. There were no signs of forced entry and nothing was stolen from her home. However, on the day Glanz’s body was to be cremated, police chief at the time Brad Conner received an anonymous phone call from a woman suggesting that Glanz’s death was not an accident. The cremation was halted. An autopsy found that Glanz had been stabbed in the scalp by an assailant using a weapon such as an ice pick or screw driver.  It was determined that the stabbing caused her to have a fatal heart attack. However, by this time much of the physical evidence of the crime scene had been cleaned up. Possible suspects were questioned, but there was not enough evidence to press charges. So five years later, Glanz’s nephew suggested a rather unorthodox attempt be made to find his aunt’s killer. Dehan Glanz said some new evidence might turn up if the show “Cold Justice” were to get involved. “The family approached us when the case stalled out,” Bowling Green Police Chief Tony Hetrick said. Kelly Siegler, a former Houston prosecutor, who leads the investigations on “Cold Justice,” was contacted. She worked with Tonya Rider, a Bowling Green State University professor and retired Toledo detective. The TV crew spent several days in Bowling Green in October, filming for the show. The primary Bowling Green police officers…


Daniel Gordon attends national convention of young elected officials

SUBMITTED BY DANIEL GORDON This past weekend, Bowling Green City Council Member Daniel Gordon met with fellow elected officials and national leaders in Seattle at the 13th annual National Convening of People For the American Way Foundation’s Young Elected Officials Network. At the convening, which is the largest gathering of young elected leaders in the country, Gordon participated in issue-based training sessions with nearly 100 fellow progressive elected officials from across the nation to learn best practices for community protection and improvement at the state and local level, and create proactive strategies to bring back to all 50 states. Gordon, 28, was elected to City Council in 2011, re-elected in 2013, 2015, and 2017, and has been a member of the Young Elected Officials Network since April 2015. Gordon brought his own unique perspective to the convening, sharing his experience working for social and economic justice in Bowling Green, including his advocacy for neighborhood revitalization and housing equity; enhancing transportation infrastructure, including bicycle lanes; creating more living-wage jobs, restoring local government funding, and ensuring a diversified local economy; investing in more clean and renewable energy sources; and defending local marginalized communities. “It’s remarkable how so many of our challenges in Bowling Green are shared by folks in local governments all across the country,” Gordon said. “I came back to Bowling Green re-energized to work with Mayor Edwards and my colleagues on Council to implement cutting-edge solutions to the policy problems we face here at home.” The Young Elected Officials (YEO) Network, a project of People For the American Way Foundation, is the first and only national initiative to provide a network of support to the newest generation of progressive leaders at every level of elected office. Over the last decade, the YEO Network has grown to more than 1,200 members in every state and at every level of office. The YEO Network is a cutting-edge program investing in the pipeline of progressive leadership and building sustained relationships with its members. It provides the resources young elected officials need to effectively impact policy, foster their own development and professional growth, and elevate their voices and their leadership in the broader progressive movement. At the convening, young elected officials discussed policy solutions and were immersed in solutions-based…


New justice likely to swing U.S. Supreme Court further to right

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Abortion rights and gay marriage are two issues that could hang in the balance with the retirement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy. The 82-year-old justice announced his retirement on Wednesday. That shouldn’t come as a surprise, said two political scientists who teach at Bowling Green State University. Melissa Miller said that Supreme Court Justices have lifetime appointments, and they most often decide to retire when a president of the same party that appointed them is in office, she said. Niki Kalaf-Hughes said some have opined that the timing of Kennedy’s retirement, giving President Donald Trump a second chance to nominate someone for the high court, sullies his reputation. That all depends, she said, on who eventually assumes the bench and how they rule. Kennedy, appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1987, is considered the court’s swing vote. He wrote the majority decision in Obergefeld v. Hodges that found that same sex couples had right to marry. He also wrote the opinion for the conservative majority to Citizens United that said political spending was protected speech under the First Amendment. If he is replaced by a more conservative justice then some rights that had been assumed to be settled matters, including the right of a woman to terminate a pregnancy and the right of same sex couples to marry, could now be in jeopardy. Some in the women’s movement have been warning, Miller said, that “we shouldn’t one shouldn’t take Roe v Wade for granted.” State legislators in conservative states continue to push bills that cut into those rights. “I don’t think that will stop in very conservative states,” she said, “because politicians are rewarded by their conservative voters for passing such laws.” Trump promised when he campaigned that he would appoint more conservative justices. And by some measures, his first appointee Neil Gorsuch is more conservative than the justice he replaced, the late Antonin Scalia, though not as conservative as Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito. Because of actions by Senate Republicans, who said they were reacting to changes instituted earlier by Democrats for lower court appointments,  it now takes only a simple majority to ratify the president’s nominee to the high court, not a 60-vote super majority….


BGSU faculty union leader decries Supreme Court’s Janus ruling

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News David Jackson, president of the BGSU Faculty Association, said the union is still trying to figure out the ramifications of the Supreme Court’s decision Wednesday forbidding public sector unions from charging non-members fees to cover services. The court rules 5-4 in Janus v. AFSCME Council 31 that non-members cannot be forced to pay “fair share “ or “agency” fees to cover the costs of a public sector union negotiating contracts and representing individual employees in disputes with the employer. The decision, which Jackson characterized as “rotted, reprehensible, illogical,” was “not a surprise.” Jackson, who teaches political science, was speaking in his role as faculty association president, not as an unbiased analyst. “We knew five corporate justices on the court were inclined to accept this completely bogus argument and side with wealthy special interests. That’s what they’re there for. That’s why the seat was stolen in the first place.” Jackson was referring to Republican senators’ refusal to act on President Barack Obama’s nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to fill the vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. Instead the GOP left it up President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy with Neil Gorsuch, who sided with the majority in the Janus case. The lead plaintiff, Illinois state employee Mark Janus, said that the fee was a violation of his First Amendment rights because it forced him to support speech he didn’t agree with. While the decision is complicated, it’s clear the faculty association cannot collect fees from non-members. Still, Jackson said, “the good work we do problem solving and representing faculty will continue.” He said the association’s attorneys are still trying “to digest the decision and figure out all the different meanings of it.” The decision written by Justice Samuel Alito possibly left open the option of charging non-members if the union represents them in personnel disputes, Jackson said. State law, Jackson said, requires the union represent all members of the bargaining unit, not just union members. They in turn could charge a fair share fee “to account for the cost of negotiating, interpreting and enforcing the terms of the contract” as well as representing them in disciplinary procedures. Jackson declined to give specific numbers, but said an…


Democrat Zack Space says as auditor he’d look to limit the role of money in politics

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Donald Trump got one thing right, Democrat Zack Space believes. Space, who is running for state auditor, said the president’s assertion during the campaign that the political system “was rigged” resonated with many voters. Space doesn’t agree with Trump on much but he agrees with him on that. Space is running against Republican Keith Faber. “The system has been rigged by money and political greed,” Space said during a recent campaign stop in Bowling Green. “The money manifests itself by political contributions, all of which are legal, and improper influence on policy. And political greed manifests itself through gerrymandering. Politicians drawing their own lines.” That allows politicians to select their voters, instead of voters selecting their candidates. As auditor he’ll have a say in addressing that. The auditor will have a place on the panel that will redraw state legislative districts, and possibly on the one that redraws congressional districts. Space, though, has mixed feelings about Issue 1, the constitutional amendment calling for the redrawing of congressional districts, which passed in May. While it is a step in the right direction, he said, it still will allow for gerrymandering by the Republican state legislature. All they have to do is lure a third of Democrats with “extremely safe” seats, and the status quo is maintained. “So the potential for gerrymandering still exists.” This kind of political chicanery “causes people to lose in politics and the institution of government and in democracy itself,” Space said. “When they lose faith in democracy they naturally turn to authoritarianism.” The influence of money in politics is seen in the two controversies roiling state government – for-profit charter schools and pay-day lending. The current a state auditor Republican Dave Yost, who is running for attorney general, could have brought the ECOT scandal to a head by declaring the books unauditable. Then it would be up to a judge to decide whether that was a proper use of public funds. Instead the Democrat said, the charter school company continued to received state money, costing local school district millions of dollars. Earlier this month Space, who served two terms in Congress before losing a bid for re-election, announced schools on his first day as auditor he…


Two Democrats vying to take the Fifth for their party

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News If either James Neu Jr. or J. Michael Galbraith would succeed in their bids represent the Fifth Congressional District in the U.S. Congress, the winner would be the first Democrat to do that in 80 years. And for 40 of those years, a congressman named Latta has held the seat, Del Latta for 30 years from 1959-1989, and his son, Robert Latta, for the past 10. But both candidates, as well as the incumbent’s two Republican challengers, feel Latta is vulnerable, and all for the same reason – Latta has largely been unresponsive to constituents’ calls to meet with him on a range of issues. (A story on the Republican primary race with challengers Robert Kreienkamp of Wayne and Todd Wolfrum of Middle Point, is forthcoming.)  Voters will decide on May 8. Galbraith said in a recent interview that “hardly a day goes by when I don’t run into a Republican who tells me something has to be done about our current representative.” And, yes, those are Republicans. Latta “does not listen to us,” Galbraith said. “That’s why I’m running.” Neu said that Latta has four challengers is a sign of the dissatisfaction. “He does not listen to them. That’s the main thing we hear from them. He doesn’t listen to constituents.” James Neu Jr. This is the second time Neu, of Perrysburg, has challenged Latta. He ran in 2016 and garnered 100,000 votes, 29 percent of the vote. Neu said the only way to unseat an incumbent with high name recognition is for a candidate to build their own name recognition over several races. He’s said he has people who recognize him as the candidate who challenged Latta in 2016. Such recognition, he said, is “surreal.” Neu sees himself as a representative of the middle working people. He works on the floor at the Chrysler plant, and serves as a union steward. He said he’s knows the dilemma of having to decide whether to pay bills or buy food for his kids. “I can relate to the average worker in the Fifth District.” He sees the tax bill that was passed late last year with Latta’s vote as “the worst.” People may be seeing a little extra in…


Earth Week speaker: People favor protections, but not if labeled ‘job-killing regulations’

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Lana Pollack got her first taste of government regulation, or protection as she prefers to call it, when she was a girl watching beef being butchered. As the Lamb Peace lecturer, Pollack, who chairs the U.S. section, International Joint Commission, kicked off Earth Week at Bowling Green State University posing the question: “If protections are good, why are regulations bad?” Certainly her father who ran a grocery store and butcher shop in rural western Michigan didn’t appreciate the state inspector who stood by while he and his help processed a beef carcass. Her father, Pollack said, was the kind of person who fed a lot of people whether they could pay their bills or not. Once a week he’d go to the cattle auction and buy a couple steers, which he’d bring back. Pollack said she went along, and watched the processing. “I know where my meat comes from.” She could see her father was “aggravated” by the inspector and his seemingly petty demands. In his later years, his daughter asked him if the state regulations made his ground beef or hot dogs any better. No, he said. “But it kept the guy down the road from adding sawdust to his hot dogs.” The consumer wasn’t protected from an ethical business like the one her father ran, but from the unethical ‘guy down the road.” That holds true for the environment as well, including the Great Lakes. That’s why the EPA is the Environmental Protection Agency, not the Environmental Regulatory Agency. People like “protection,” she said. They think far less of regulations, especially when they are so constantly referred to as “job-killing regulations.” That phrase is tossed around so much that it almost becomes one word. It’s a favorite of conservative lobbying efforts like the American Legislative Exchange Council. “Words matter,” Pollack said. It’s not like businesses, including agribusiness, are opposed to government action, she said. They’re fine with it as long as it benefits them. While agribusiness may fight rules aimed at controlling the run-off of phosphorus from fields that causes toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie, farm interests back federal government support for ethanol production, Pollack said. Now 40 percent of corn on 7 million acres of…


Speaker encourages conservatives to extol the virtues of the free market

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In a building tucked away in the Wood County Fairgrounds, area conservatives gathered to hear a message they feel has too long been hidden. The topic of the evening’s talk, hosted by the Wood County Young Republicans, was the moral case for capitalism. Set aside talk about greed is good, they’d rather talk about self- free markets have resulted in lifting the economic fortunes of people around the world. That was the message of Jeb Morris, a senior trainer with the Grassroots Leadership Academy, an affiliate of Americans for Prosperity. He had a willing audience of about 15 people. In the ice-breaker before his talk he asked them to name someone, living or dead, whom they would like to dine with. Several attendees said their spouses, and Jesus had been put off limits. The others mentioned Lincoln and Washington, economist Milton Friedman, writers J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, basketball coach Bobby Knight, conservative commentator Dinesh D’Souza and radio host Rush Limbaugh. Despite the blandishments of the left, which for Morris includes Hillary Clinton, Elizabeth Warren, and most of all Bernie Sanders, the way to lift people out of poverty is free enterprise. With charts and graphs and quotations flashing on the screen, he maintained that as economic freedom has expanded world poverty has plummeted. “Economic freedom has lifted more people out of poverty” than any other system, he said. This means improvements in quality of life for people around the globe. Morris traced this process starting with women’s underwear. Sam Walton founded his business on finding products, such as women’s underwear, that he could purchase wholesale for the cheapest price, allowing him to pass that onto his customers. He didn’t do this, Morris said, “to be altruistic.” Walton did it because it was in his self-interest, just as it is in the self-interest of his customers to purchase his low cost goods. At the root of this, Morris said, is the notion that the value of goods is not intrinsic but subjective. He then showed a slide with a quotation from Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises: “Value is not intrinsic, it is not in things. It is within us; it is the way in which man reacts to the…


Redistricting makes May ballot – thanks to compromise

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   It looked as if Ohio’s redistricting reform might be doomed to failure – with opposing sides of the issue not budging. But on Monday, a compromise was reached that satisfied both political parties plus the League of Women Voters and other citizen groups which had been pushing hard for reform. Ohio Senate Majority Leader Randy Gardner, R-Bowling Green, called the unanimous Senate passage of Ohio Congressional Redistricting Reform “pretty remarkable.” The compromise, he said, should help restore public confidence that state legislators can tackle controversial issues in a bipartisan way. “This historic, bipartisan vote is yet another example how state legislators in Columbus find ways to work together,” Gardner said. This afternoon, the Ohio House voted to support the bill. The compromise was reached just in time, since the deadline to get an issue on the primary election ballot is this Wednesday at 4 p.m. The proposed plan keeps the legislature in charge of drawing congressional district maps, but adds additional steps requiring minority party support to put a map in place for 10 years. Ohio’s current process allows the majority party to dissect counties and cities to create districts that favor the party in power. Under the current map, drawn by Republicans in 2011, the GOP holds 12 of Ohio’s 16 seats while only winning 56 percent of the votes. The plan establishes, for the first time, criteria for limiting the number of times counties, cities, villages and townships can be divided into multiple districts. Monday night the Senate voted 31-0 for a Senate resolution that would place the proposed constitutional amendment on the May primary ballot.  Gardner referred to the effort as a “major breakthrough.” Joan Callecod, a member of the Bowling Green League of Women Voters, was excited to hear about the compromise in the Senate. “It looks promising,” she said. “It’s a positive thing, anytime there is compromise.” The Bowling Green League of Women Voters has been advocating redistricting reform. Local members have been collecting petition signatures for a project called “Fair Districts = Fair Elections,” a non-partisan effort to place a redistricting amendment on the November 2018 ballot across the state. The ultimate goal was to get congressional district lines drawn so…


Daniel Gordon announces run for state representative

Submitted by DANIEL GORDON Bowling Green City Councilman Daniel Gordon has announced he is filing petitions this week to run for State Representative in Ohio House District 3, comprising Wood County. “Serving on City Council for the better part of a decade has given me a front row seat to see that decisions made by the state legislature have made our lives worse here in Wood County, and I refuse to sit by and watch that continue,” Gordon said. “We deserve better, and I’m going to offer all of us a real choice and a new path.” Gordon singled out the state legislature’s decision to cut millions of dollars from the Local Government Fund — which is vital to ensuring Ohio cities, towns, and villages have the money needed to maintain services — to close a state budget shortfall. Cuts to the fund have forced local communities in turn to cut needed services and raise fees or taxes to protect schools, fire, police, and social and mental health services. Despite state politicians’ promises that these cuts would make the state healthier, Ohio has consistently lagged behind other states in job creation and economic security, and risks another recession. And Gordon says he knows why. “The legislature has been fiscally irresponsible,” Gordon asserted. They can’t fix the roof by knocking out the foundation. They couldn’t pay off the money they lost spending on pet projects and rewarding their corporate friends, so they took our taxpayers’ money instead. And they have nothing to show for it. We got ripped off, and the worst part is they keep doing it. Not on my watch.” “I’m going to get our money back,” Gordon promised. Gordon sees the state government’s funding cuts as a pattern of assault on local communities. “These folks go to Columbus and preach about “small government,” but then go and pass bills to give themselves more power and restrict ours at the local level,” he said, referring to so-called “preemption bills” which demand new restrictions on what mayors and city councils can do in Ohio. “I believe in local control. If I’m elected, we’re going to take back our municipal authority. That power belongs to us, at the local level, where we know best how to…


DeWine serves up campaign for governor at Campus Pollyeyes

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   As Mike DeWine worked the tables at Campus Pollyeyes, he had one question. “What’s the best thing to eat here?” He got one response from his fellow Republicans waiting to greet the gubernatorial candidate. “The breadsticks.” DeWine, Ohio’s attorney general, is shifting into high gear for the governor’s race to be decided next fall. Tuesday morning he started with breakfast in Mayfield Heights, followed by pie in Amherst, then showed up for pizza in Bowling Green. Early campaigning can probably be forgiven, since there are already three other Republicans in the governor’s race, including Secretary of State Jon Husted, Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor, and Rep. Jim Renacci. Even before DeWine’s arrival at Pollyeyes, some of those present had already picked him as their top choice. “I like the fact that he has a plan on the opioid epidemic, and he’s ready to go,” David Jenkins said as he dug into a calzone. Jenkins, who is treasurer of the BGSU College Republicans, is part of the voting population that needs to get excited about the next election, said George Nicholson, whose son runs Campus Pollyeyes. “I think it’s wonderful he’s coming here,” Nicholson said about DeWine. “It’s a good thing for us and a good thing for the College Republicans.” David Kuebeck, co-chair of DeWine’s campaign in Wood County, is already sold on the attorney general. “He’s the most experienced candidate by far,” Kuebeck said, listing off DeWine’s past roles as U.S. senator, U.S. representative, lieutenant governor, state representative and now state attorney general. “Nobody’s got a resume like that.” Unlike the other GOP candidates, DeWine has 90 percent name recognition. As for the age difference between DeWine and his younger competitors, Kuebeck shrugged that off. “I don’t buy into that argument too much.” And unlike his competition, DeWine has taken on the opioid crisis – and has put money behind the fight, including a grant recently awarded to Wood County. “He is tackling the most difficult public issue of our time,” Kuebeck said. DeWine is also credited with helping to keep the BCII crime lab in Bowling Green. When the lab outgrew its building in Bowling Green, several other locations in the state were considered. But a…


Battle of the sexes – do men really know more than women about politics?

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The battle of the sexes has many combat zones – with political knowledge being one of the battlefields. For decades women have scored lower than their male counterparts on political knowledge surveys. That trend irked Bowling Green State University political science professor Dr. Melissa Miller enough that she decided to study that “pesky gender gap.” Miller shared her thoughts on the political battle of the sexes recently during at talk at BGSU. Since 1960, national surveys ranking political knowledge asked basically the same questions: Which party controls the U.S. House of Representatives? Who is the vice president? Which branch rules on the Constitutionality of an issue? What majority is required to override a presidential veto? Which is the more conservative political party? “Men on average are more likely to get the answer right,” Miller said. “This is troubling.” For years, the gender gap was blamed on women spending more time at home, being less likely to discuss the topic at work, and being less interested in politics than men. However, those trends just no longer hold true, Miller said. Women in the U.S. are currently more educated, spend less time at home on housekeeping, are more likely to share child-rearing chores, and are much more likely to have jobs outside the home. “So why hasn’t the gender gap disappeared?” she asked. Miller has some ideas. “Maybe it’s the way we measure political knowledge,” she said. Upon looking closer at the way the surveys were conducted, Miller noticed that the political surveys included multiple choice answers – with one of those answers being “I don’t know.” And whether conducted by phone or in person, those taking the surveys were always advised that many people don’t know the correct answer, so they can pick “I don’t know.” Seems insignificant? Not so, Miller said. Women are far more likely to take the bait and say “I don’t know.” Men are more likely to risk a wrong answer, and less likely to say they don’t know. Miller used BGSU mascots Freddie and Frieda Falcon to explain. “Frieda is more likely to say ‘I don’t know.’ Freddie has a higher propensity to guess,” she said. “A lot of men have a higher…


Mike Zickar: Something’s rotten in the City of Perrysburg

There is a group of Perrysburg politicos who have a penchant for secrecy. They like to make negative attacks on candidates and issues but they do not have the guts to identify themselves. In 2013, there was a Facebook page set up to attack a judicial candidate with no names to identify the page’s creator. In that same campaign, fake Letters to the Editor were sent attacking the same candidate, letters attributed to individuals who simply didn’t exist. A few years ago, there was a Political Action Committee set up to oppose a School Bond issue that used a PO Box at the UPS Store with somebody from the Chicago area listed as a Treasurer, all so that nobody local could be identified with a negative mailing. And now in this election, there is a Facebook page, Concerned Citizens for Perrysburg, designed to attack a particular candidate. There are no names attached to the page or their posts. Negative campaigning may be distasteful in local campaigns, but it is fair game.  What is not fair game is for people to hide behind anonymous pages or shadow organizations.  If you don’t have the guts to put your name to the message, don’t say it. I hope people find out who created this page and hold them accountable.   Mike Zickar Wood County Democratic Party Chair Perrysburg