Dallas-Hamilton Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership

Showtime for ideas for a better world at BGSU’s The Hatch

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Surrounded by music, lights, a wise-cracking master of ceremony, video projections of tweets, 11 university students got down to the serious business of pitching ways to make people’s lives better. During Hatch 2016 Thursday night, those students presented eight projects to a five-member panel of Bowling Green State University alumni, who were ready to invest thousands of dollars to help these budding entrepreneurs launch their businesses. Just about all those projects ended up walking away with an initial offer of money in exchange for a stake in the company, and a step closer to solving problems large and small, for people from preschoolers to elders, and everyone who uses water. For Kiersten Castner and Collin Newton, their Trace Case would help people prone to losing their credit cards keep track of them. For Alyssa Batch, her Comfort Covers would employ key words and symbols to foster conversations between people suffering from dementia and their families, friends and caregivers. For Jarrod Cain, his StuPro Match would help college students find the professor who best matches their learning styles. For Baqer Aljabr and Ryan Murphy, their Park Shark would lower costs for airports, universities and others managing massive parking lots with a robot that gives tickets and provides video surveillance. For Meredith Moore and Khory Katz, their Easy-Loft Beds would help college students expand the living space in their dorm rooms. For Sophia Schmitz, her Play-to-Play interactive board game will help music students as young as preschoolers learn their note names and other basics. For Austin Farrington, his Trac Band would allow elders more freedom of movement in care centers while helping staff monitor their safety. For Giuseppe Giammanco, his Microgreens would provide an alternative to plastic microbeads used in a large range of cosmetic products. Those microbeads have now been banned by the federal government because they pollute waterways. Giammanco created a green alternative that has all the capabilities of the existing product. Giammanco got the $10,000 investment in exchange for a 10- percent share of the business. This will go for legal expenses and…