Community Voices

BGSU art exhibit celebrates legacy of Bernie Casey & other African-American artists

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATION Bernie Casey’s death in September 2017 was the impetus for creating an art exhibition in his honor at his alma mater. The Bowling Green State University School of Art is hosting “So Much More … Ohio’s African-American Artists” now through Oct. 21 in the Fine Arts Center’s Willard Wankelman Gallery. Though Casey was best known to the world as an actor and professional football player, he also was remarkably talented as an artist. He attended BGSU on a football scholarship and earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in fine arts in 1961 and 1966, respectively. According to Charlie Kanwischer, director of the School of Art, the exhibition evolved from a tribute to the legacy of athlete, actor and visual artist Bernie Casey and other African-American alumni to a broader, intergenerational conversation among alumni, current students and invited African-American artists from Ohio and beyond, addressing the intersection of racial identity and personal experience. “This conversation recognizes that the experience of African-American students in the School of Art has sometimes been fraught, that it has been and continues to be marked by the same fitful and incomplete progress toward equity and inclusiveness too long symptomatic of race relations in our country,” Kanwischer said. “Yet, approaching the exhibition only through the lens of race risks essentializing the participating artists and their work. “‘So Much More’ is fundamentally a celebration of the deeply personal and particular vision of the artists who gently but forcefully remind us that we’re all ‘so much more’ than our racial and ethnic identities, that the sense of agency arising out of a committed studio practice is a powerful means to push back against the injustice of stereotypical assumptions.” Work by 15 alumni and current students is included in the exhibition. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Thursday, 6-9 p.m., and Sunday, 1-4 p.m. “The exhibition features (Casey’s) work and that of African-American artists with ties to him, to BGSU and to the state of Ohio,” said Jacqueline Nathan, gallery director. Casey’s art was loaned from the collections of the Thelma Harris Art Gallery in Oakland, California; Barbara DuMetz; Vicken J. Festekjian CPA Inc., and Vicki McMillan. Nathan acknowledged three BGSU alumni who helped shape the exhibition’s direction: Col. John Moore Jr., Class of 1966; Edward…


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 3

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATION Through Oct. 21 – Bowling Green State University’s School of Art announces the opening of “So Much More: Ohio’s African-American Artists.” Over the course of its planning, the exhibition has evolved from a tribute to the legacy of athlete, actor, visual artist and BGSU alumnus Bernie Casey, and other African-American alumni to a broader intergenerational conversation among alumni, current students and invited African-American artists from Ohio addressing the intersection of racial identity and personal expression.  The exhibition, in the Willard Wankelman Gallery in the Fine Arts Center, runs through Oct. 21. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Sept. 29 – BGSU is part of the collaborative “ScupltureX – Igniting Change: Teaching Artists and Social Practice” with the University of Toledo, Owens Community College, Toledo Museum of Art, and Contemporary Art Toledo. The BGSU exhibition, sponsored by David and Myrna Bryan and curated by Saul Ostrow, features the work of regional sculpture faculty. BGSU also will host a series of presentations, including talks by Ostrow and Mel Chin, on campus Sept. 29.  Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Sept. 17 – The Grammy-winning choral ensemble Conspirare presents “Considering Matthew Shepard” as part of the McMaster Residency in the College of Musical Arts. Under the direction of Craig Hella Johnson, the group will perform the three-part oratorio, an evocative and compassionate musical response to the murder of Matthew Shepard. Shepard was a young, gay college student at the University of Wyoming who in October 1998 was kidnapped, severely beaten, tied to a fence and left to die in a lonely field under a blanket of stars. The performance begins at 7 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center. A talkback with BGSU panelists and Johnson will follow the performance at 9 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall. Admission is free for all BGSU faculty, staff and students with ID at the door. Advance tickets for community members are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. Call the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or purchase online at www.bgsu.edu/arts. Sept. 18 – Tuesdays at the…


Toledo Symphony welcomes Trudel as music director, kicks off 75th anniversary season

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Toledo Symphony Orchestra welcomes new Music Director Alain Trudel to Toledo for its first ProMedica Masterworks series concert for a community celebration featuring local composer Christopher Dietz from Bowling Green State University and dancers from Toledo Ballet. Two performances of Trudel’s Debut will take place Friday, September 21 and Saturday, September 22, 2018 at 8 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art’s Peristyle Theater. “This weekend kicks off our 75th Birthday celebration. It was September 1943 when what is now the Toledo Symphony gave its inaugural performance,” said Zak Vassar, President and CEO of the Toledo Symphony. “We will spend a lot of this season looking back over the past 75 years and where the orchestra has been in our community. With Alain’s arrival, this season represents a great moment of artistic change for our organization, but it also represents a great opportunity to raise a glass to where we’ve been and how far we’ve come.” “I am so excited for our season opener and my official debut as Toledo Symphony Music Director. I’m looking forward to bringing some of my new ideas to the table in the 2018-2019 season. Each concert will feature music you know and love and something new for audiences to discover. We hope you can join us to experience the power of live music,” said Alain Trudel, Music Director of the Toledo Symphony. The programs on Friday and Saturday evening open with one of the most recognizable themes in all of music from Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. The opening four-note motif has been featured in movies, television commercials, and popular culture for decades, such as The Breakfast Club (1985), Austin Powers in Goldmember (2002), and The PeanutsThe Toledo Symphony Orchestra welcomes new Music Director Alain Trudel to Toledo for its first ProMedica Masterworks series concert for a community celebration featuring local composer Christopher Dietz from Bowling Green State University and dancers from Toledo Ballet. Two performances of Trudel’s Debut will take place Friday, September 21 and Saturday, September 22, 2018 at 8 PM at the Toledo Museum of Art’s Peristyle Theater. “This weekend kicks off our 75th Birthday celebration. It was September 1943 when what is now the Toledo Symphony gave its inaugural performance,” said Zak Vassar, President & CEO of the Toledo Symphony. “We will…


Public asked to help set priorities in health plan

(Submitted by Wood County Health Department) Wood County Health Partners is looking for community leaders and other people interested in helping create the county’s next Community Health Improvement Plan. This plan will help inform agencies’ priorities and identify ways to collaborate and improve the health of people in Wood County. Wood County Health Partners recently completed the 2018 Community Health Assessment, which gathered health data from adults, students and children to help determine the area’s strengths and needs. A draft is available at http://woodcountyhealth.org/Reports/reportsandpubs.html The health assessment and the improvement plan are jointly funded by Wood County Health Department and Wood County Hospital. Wood County Health Partners will conduct four meetings to create the Community Health Improvement Plan. Meetings will take place at Wood County Health Department and be facilitated by the Hospital Council of Northwest Ohio. The four meetings are scheduled for 12:30-4:30 p.m. Sept. 20; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Oct. 11; 12:30-4:30 p.m. Nov. 1; and 12:30-4:30 p.m. Nov. 29. After these meetings, there will be a public event to release the results of both the Community Health Assessment and the Community Health Improvement Plan. Anyone participating in the CHIP process is asked to complete a “Key Issues” worksheet in advance of the first meeting. If you are interested in obtaining the worksheet or more details, contact Alex Aspacher, community outreach coordinator for the health department, at aaspacher@co.wood.oh.us or 419-354-9212.


BGSU plans events around performance of ‘Considering Matthew Shepard’

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The image of young Matthew Shepard, attacked and left to die alone in a Wyoming field because of his sexual orientation, is a horrific reminder of what intolerance, fear and hatred can wreak. But from his 1998 death have come important national conversations and now, a choral work that explores not only Shepard’s death but also his life and legacy. The award-winning choir Conspirare will perform conductor and composer Craig Hella Johnson’s evocative and compassionate “Considering Matthew Shepard” at Bowling Green State University Sept. 17. Guest choirs from the University of Toledo and area high schools will join BGSU choirs as part of the performance. The concert will be the centerpiece of a series of engaging campus and community events in the choir’s two-day residency at the University, which is supported by the Helen McMaster Endowed Professorship in Vocal and Choral Studies. The 7 p.m. Sept. 17 concert takes place in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. It will be followed by a talk-back session from 9-9:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall with Johnson and other panelists. Admission is free for all BGSU faculty, staff and students with ID at the door. Advance tickets for community members are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. Call the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or purchase online at www.bgsu.edu/arts. Conspirare is considered today’s leading choir; they and their conductor, Johnson, have each won Grammy awards. “Considering Matthew Shepard” debuted at number four on Billboard’s Traditional Classical Chart and has also been nominated for a Grammy. “Considering Matthew Shepard” transports listeners through a tapestry of musical textures and idioms in a poignant concert experience inspiring hope, compassion and empowerment. The Washington Post called the three-part oratorio “powerfully cathartic,” and wrote, “Like Bach’s large-scale choral works, this spellbinding piece draws on many styles masterfully juxtaposed, though Johnson’s sources are the American vernacular. A Prologue, Passion and Epilogue … combine spoken text, cowboy song, American hymnody and popular song, spirituals, jazz and dazzling polyphony, all woven into a seamless tapestry. The impact is immediate, profound and, at times, overwhelming.” “Aside from the important topic of the piece and the inspirational message that it will bring, students and members of the community will hear in…


Beth Genson exhibits nature paintings at Marathon Center

From MARATHON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS The Fisher/Wall Art Gallery, located in Marathon Center for the Performing Arts, welcomes encaustic artist, Beth Genson, whose exhibition, “Exploring Nature in Paint and Wax,” is now on display through Thursday, September 27, 2018. Trained in fine art and education at Bowling Green State University, Genson has spent the majority of her career as an art instructor for middle school through college-age students. She has also studied at France’s Grenoble University. Genson refers to herself as an artistic explorer which has led her to creating works in the ancient art of encaustic. This method of art uses a hot paint mixture of beeswax, damar resin and oil pigments. She finds encaustic is a medium particularly suited to her exploration of water as a subject matter thus rivers and ponds are the focal point of many her paintings. An advocate for access to potable drinking water, a portion of her sales is donated to Charity: Water, an organization that utilizes 100 percent of its donations to fund water projects. The Fisher/Wall Art Gallery is open Monday through Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 pm. and there is no admission fee to view the exhibit. An artist’s reception will be held on Wednesday, September 19 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. This event is free and open to the public.  


BGSU police compete against students in Together We Ball

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Kickball will be the game when the BGSU Police join with communities of color in the September edition of Together We Ball. The game will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21 in the Perry Field House. Spectators are invited to attend and cheer on the teams, enjoy the music provided by D.J. Silk and win BGSU swag. Together We Ball was launched by the BGSU Office of Multicultural Affairs in partnership with the Campus Police Division in 2016 as a friendly basketball tournament designed to build a bridge between communities of color and local law enforcement. The success of those events prompted the expansion of the program this year to include kickball, which will provide more interaction between the groups and extend an opportunity to include those who don’t play basketball, said Sheila Brown, interim director of the Office of Multicultural Affairs. Additional partners for the event include BGSU Recreation and Wellness, Bowling Green city police, Coke and student organizations. Guests with disabilities are requested to indicate if they need special services, assistance or appropriate modifications to fully participate in this event by contacting Accessibility Services at access@bgsu.edu or 419-372-8495 before the event.


Annual Wine & Cheese Social and Auction to benefit Ridge Park

The 23rd Annual Wine and Cheese Social and Auction will be held Friday, Sept. 28, from 5 to 8 p.m., in the Simpson Garden Park Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. A live auction will be performed by Jerry Anderson. There will also be a silent auction, autumn mum sale, wine pull and raffle. There will be appetizers, desserts, wine, beer and soft drinks. Featured will be “Parks & Rec Red” from BG Beer Works and other craft beer. All proceeds will benefit the completion of Ridge Park. Admission is $50 per person through Sept. 21, and $60 per person after Sept. 21. No actual ticket is necessary. Once paid, your name will be on a guest list at the door. Checks can be sent to BG Parks & Recreation Foundation, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green, 43402, or tickets can be purchased via PayPal by going to www.bgohio.org/departments/parks-and-recreation, click on Parks & Recreation Foundation, then click on PayPal. Include a note about Wine and Cheese event ticket purchase. Overflow parking will be available at Wood County Hospital, with shuttle service to the Simpson building. For information or questions, contact Cheryl Witt at 419-354-6297 or clwitt@bgohio.org.


Sock monkey reunion planned at Beeker’s General Store

(Submitted by Beeker’s General Store) Beeker’s General Store in downtown Pemberville is eager to put together a Sock Monkey display as part of our Christmas festivities this year. Many adults have received or given a genuine Rockford Red Heel Sock Monkey in their lifetime. Beeker’s would like to collect any version of the sock monkey, along with written memories/photos that describe this childhood gift. The iconic sock monkeys made from red-heeled socks, known today as the Rockford Red Heel, emerged at the earliest in 1932. This red heel gave the monkeys their distinctive mouth. During the Great Depression, American crafters first made sock monkeys out of worn-out Rockford Red Heel Socks. The display “Christmas Sock Monkey Reunion” will be featured Dec. 1 to Jan. 5 as part of this year’s holiday season. If you are willing to share a sock monkey/collection/written memory/photo; please drop off, postal mail, or email such stories/memories to: Beeker’s General Store, 226 East Front Street, PO Box 273, Pemberville, 43450 or 419-287-3274 or info@beekersgeneralstore.com. All items will be properly cataloged for proper ownership and returned promptly in January of 2019. Help us celebrate a good luck tradition.


BGSU forensic science center part of study to field test drugs for opioids

From The ATTORNEY GENERAL’S CENTER FOR THE FUTURE OF FORENSIC SCIENCE AT BGSU Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine and Bowling Green State University President Rodney K. Rogers, Ph.D. announced today that the Attorney General’s Center for the Future of Forensic Science at Bowling Green State University is part of a team that will conduct a study that could help Ohio authorities safely, quickly, and reliably field test drugs for the presence of opioids. The Attorney General’s Center for the Future of Forensic Science (the Center) and Vuronyx Technologies are part of a partnership that today received a $200,000 grant as part of the Ohio Third Frontier’s Opioid Technology Challenge, an effort to find technology-based solutions to address or improve opioid abuse prevention, treatment, and overdose avoidance and response. The grant funds will be used to develop small, portable paper test cards that could be used by first responders, law enforcement agencies, medical professionals, and crime scene investigators in the field to quickly detect opioids and cutting agents in drug samples. The Center will conduct a study to validate the results of the test cards using control substance standards alone and in the presence of cutting agents at various concentrations. “Right now, we discourage local agencies from field testing drugs because opioids are just so dangerous, but we are excited about the prospect of helping to develop this new technology,” said Attorney General DeWine. “The goal is to help local authorities quickly determine what type of drugs they’ve encountered while limiting the chance for an accidental exposure.” “As a public University, we’re committed to helping address the critical societal issues facing the state,” said President Rogers. “This is a great example of the real-world, applicable research the center is doing to aid law enforcement.” “We welcome this opportunity to partner with Vuronyx to develop this rapid opioid detection technology,” added Dr. Jon Sprague, Director of the Center. More information on the Ohio Opioid Technology Challenge can be found here.


Grief support group to meet at county senior center

(Submitted by Wood County Committee on Aging) The Wood County Committee on Aging Inc. is currently partnering with Lutheran Social Services to hold an educational grief support group, “Understanding Your Grief.” The group is for those age 60 and over. It will run for 11 weeks and be held on Wednesdays from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Wood County Senior Center, 305 N. Main St., Bowling Green. This partnership will allow the offering of the group free of charge; however materials are needed to participate. The purchase of a book and workbook total $25. This group will begin on Wednesday, Sept. 26, and will be facilitated by Joan Staib, MSW, LISW. To register for the group, please call 1-800-367-4935 or 419-353-5661 and ask for the Social Services Department. Materials can be ordered through the senior center upon registration. Scholarships available.


BGSU Arts Events through Sept. 29

Sept. 5-29 – BGSU is part of the collaborative “ScupltureX – Igniting Change: Teaching Artists and Social Practice” with the University of Toledo, Owens Community College, Toledo Museum of Art, and Contemporary Art Toledo. The BGSU exhibition, sponsored by David and Myrna Bryan and curated by Saul Ostrow, features the work of regional sculpture faculty. BGSU also will host a series of presentations, including talks by Ostrow and Mel Chin, on campus Sept. 29.  Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Sept. 5 – The Faculty Artist Series presents Charles Saenz on trumpet. As a professor and coordinator of the College of Musical Arts’ brass area, Saenz has performed with numerous ensembles, released a solo recording, “Eloquentia,” in 2015 and is a member of the Tower Brass Quintet. His recital starts at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center. The performance will also be livestreamed at https://www.youtube.com/user/bgsumusic/live. Free Sept. 6 – The Prout Chapel Reading Series, hosted by the BGSU Creative Writing program, presents poet Tony Lograsso, a teaching associate in the Department of English, and fiction writer Anne Carney. The readings will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 11 – Tuesdays at the Gish presents “The Glass Castle” (2017, U.S., 127 minutes, directed by Destin Daniel Cretton), with an introduction by Mariia Spirina (cq), doctoral student in American culture studies. The film follows Jeannette (Brie Larson) and her wildly eccentric parents (Woody Harrelson and Naomi Watts). Based on journalist Jeannette Wall’s bestselling memoir, the film intertwines events from her unpredictable nomadic childhood with scenes of Wall as a young writer who comes to terms with her parents. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in 206 Bowen-Thompson Student Union (Theater). Free Sept. 11 – The Guest Artist Series presents pianist Heather Lanners. Lanners, a Canadian pianist, has performed extensively throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe as an active soloist and chamber musician. Her recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 12 – The Faculty Artist Series presents horn soloist Andrew Pelletier. Pelletier is a brass/percussion professor, a Grammy Award-winning chamber musician and president of the International Horn Society. His recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan…


Toledo Symphony celebrates Bernstein by playing ‘West Side Story’ soundtrack live with film

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA On Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 8 P.M. at the Stranahan Theater, the Toledo Symphony Orchestra (TSO) opens its 2018-2019 KeyBank Pops series with West Side Story: Film with Live Orchestra. The TSO joins the worldwide celebration of Leonard Bernstein’s 100th birthday to perform his electrifying score to West Side Story while the Oscar®-winning film is shown in high definition on the big screen above the stage. The film will be projected on a large screen above the orchestra, taking the audience through a captivating journey of musical storytelling. Music Director Alain Trudel will not only lead the orchestra, but he will follow a series of synchronized cues from a click track to stay in coordination with the film on stage. “It’s a classic movie with a fun and entertaining story,” said Alain Trudel, Music Director of the Toledo Symphony. “The score is challenging, and so is coordinating the music to the film, which only adds to the fun.” Toledo Symphony President & CEO, Zak Vassar, is a particular admirer of West Side Story and its creator, Leonard Bernstein. “West Side Story is about as iconic as Broadway gets,” said Vassar. “With music by Leonard Bernstein, lyrics from Stephen Sondheim, and choreography by Jerome Robbins, this show was bound to succeed. Its melodies are so catchy, its words so sincere, and the dancing so vivid. Now, as the music world celebrates Bernstein’s centennial, I’m excited for the TSO to bring this great music back to life and provide us a space to reconsider this fantastic film.” Orchestras around the world are joining together for the two year global celebration of the life and career of legendary composer and conductor, Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990). Bernstein transformed the way Americans and people everywhere hear and appreciate music. His successes as a composer ranged from the Broadway stage—West Side Story, On the Town, Wonderful Town, and Candide—to concert halls all over the world, where his orchestral and choral music continues to thrive.  


Prize-winning writers to visit Gathering Volumes

From GATHERING VOLUMES Three Award-Winning Authors will be visiting Gathering Volumes in Perrysburg on Friday, September 21 at 6 p.m. Brad Felver is a fiction writer, essayist, and teacher of writing. His honors include the O. Henry Award, a Pushcart Prize special mention, and the Zone 3 Fiction Prize. Currently he serves as Lecturer and Associate Chair of the English Department at Bowling Green State University. Felver’s short story collection, The Dogs of Detroit, which releases on Tuesday, September 4, was recently in the news for winning the 2018 Drue Heinz Literature Prize for short fiction. Each of the collection’s 14 stories focuses on grief and its many permutations. “This grief alternately devolves into violence, silence, solitude, and utter isolation. In some cases, grief drives the stories as a strong, reactionary force, and yet in other stories, that grief evolves quietly over long stretches of time,” Mr. Felver said in a statement. Michael A. Ferro has been awarded an Honorable Mention by Glimmer Train for their New Writers Award, received the Jim Cash Creative Writing Award for Fiction, and been nominated for The Pushcart Prize. Michael graduated with a degree in Creative Writing from Michigan State University. In addition to his fiction and humor publications, Michael is also a Sportswriter and a Features Writer for CBS Detroit. Ferro will be visiting with his debut novel, Title 13. A darkly comic, cautionary tale of mental illness and unconventional love, Title 13 deftly blends satirical comedy aimed at the hot-button issues of modern society with the gut-wrenching reality of an intensely personal descent into addiction. When asked what compels him to write, Mr. Ferro said, “I think what compels me to write stories is the simple act of getting them out of my head. In an effort to become better people, we’re always trying to make sense of our past or some trauma that we suffered through, and for many, we use art and creativity to do this. Musicians create songs, painters paint paintings, and writers write stories.” Lillian Li is the recipient of a Hopwood Award in Short Fiction, as well as Glimmer Train’s New Writer Award. Her debut novel, Number One Chinese Restaurant, was named a Summer Must-Read by TIME, Buzzfeed, The Wall Street Journal, Star Tribune, Fast Company, The Village Voice, Toronto Star, Fortune Magazine,…


Spaghetti dinner to benefit toddler with serious health issues

(Submitted by Modern Woodmen) Modern Woodmen will partner with Plain Congregational Church for a spaghetti dinner to benefit an 18-month-old who is facing many life-threatening surgeries. The spaghetti dinner will include salad and garlic bread. The cost is $10 per meal. The dinner will be held Sept. 22, from 4 to 7 p.m., in Plain Congregational Church, 16011 W. Poe Road, Bowling Green. A bake sale will run concurrently with the dinner. Rolando Hernandez has been in the Mott Children’s Hospital at the University of Michigan almost every month of his life. The church has a goal to sell 250 tickets for $10 in order to raise $2,500. The church will donate all proceeds to help with medical expenses. Modern Woodmen will match any funds they raise up to a maximum of $2,500. If we achieve this goal, then combined, this family will receive a $5,000 check to help with much needed medical expenses.  We’ve had some great donations from area businesses, which will help pay for the ingredients needed for the dinner. The more we can get donated, the more we can give to this family.