Community Voices

Workshop to address “Treating Pain Responsibly,” May 30

Submitted by BG MANOR “Treating Pain Responsibly,”  free event will be held on Wednesday, May 30, 4:30-7:15 at the Wood County Senior Center, at 305 N. Main Street, Bowling Green. The free event will feature dinner at 5:30 p.m and presentations beginning at 4:30 p.m. from Dr. Nancy Orel, Emeritus Professor at BGSU, Dr. Jeff Swartz, physician at Falcon Health Center, Dr. Mickey Frame, Chiropractor at Whole Health at Falcon Health Center, Lon Muir, pharmacist at Falcon Health Center and Stephanie Wise from Zepf Center. Dr. Nancy Orel will be presenting from 4:30-5:30 p.m. on “The Impact of the Opioid Crisis on Older Adults” Her presentation will start with an overview of how the opioid crisis impacts older adults.  She will discuss more than just the increasing rate of opioid overdose deaths amongst older adults. Instead, she will include discussion on how opioids for chronic pain may be more difficult to obtain (due to recent policy), the problems with misusing opioids, how to safely disposal of unused opioids, and how grandparents are being asked to raise their grandchildren because of the opioid crisis. She will also discuss the economic and emotional toll of the opioid crisis. Dr. Swartz, Dr. Frame and Lon Muir will be presenting from 6-7 p.m. on the “Whole Health Approach.” Stephanie Wise from the Zepf Center will be doing a Narcan training/distribution from 7-7:15 p.m. The event is sponsored by Bowling Green Care Center and Bowling Green Manor, for more information, contact Jeff Miller at 419-351-6514.


Safe belts help protect drivers, passengers in the event of a crash

From WOOD COUNTY SAFE COMMUNITIES Wood County Safe Communities announced today that there have been six fatal crashes in Wood County for calendar year 2018, the same number as this time last year. During a crash, being buckled up helps keep you safe and secure inside your vehicle, whereas being completely thrown out of your vehicle almost always leads to injury. Seat belts are the best defense against impaired, aggressive, and distracted drivers. In 2015, the use of seat belts in passenger vehicles saved an estimated 13,941 lives of occupants ages 5 and older. The Click It or Ticket campaign focuses on safety education, strong laws, and law enforcement officers saving lives. Though some believe airbags can replace seat belts in the event of an accident, the force of being thrown into a rapidly opening airbag could injure or even kill. Airbags were designed to work in conjunction with seat belts to maximize safety efforts. Your pelvis and rib cage are more able to withstand crash force than other parts of your body, which is why it’s important to secure your seat belt over these areas. If impact should occur, these areas will be able to take more of the pressure from seat belts and airbags to protect the rest of the body. There are several steps you can take to get the best seat belt fit for your safety. When buying a car, test the belts provided to see if they are a good fit for you. You can talk to your car dealer about options for seat belt adjusters and extenders if necessary. For those with older vehicles, your seat belt may be outdated for current standards. Check with the vehicle manufacturer to determine the best option for you.


BGSU faculty granted tenure and promotion

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University celebrated the scholarly and creative achievements of 43 faculty members on May 4 when the board of trustees awarded promotion and tenure. The trustees also approved the hiring as associate professor with tenure of Dr. Neil Baird, for the English department. Baird joins BGSU from Western Illinois University, where he is an associate professor and director of the University Writing Center. Faculty promoted to full professor: • Dr. Neil Englehart, political science • Dr. Gabriel Matney, School of Teaching and Learning • Dr. Wei Ning, mathematics and statistics • Dr. Jeanne Novak, School of Intervention Services • Dr. Kurt Panter, School of Earth, Environment and Society • Linda Rich, library teaching and learning • Dr. Nancy Spencer, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies • Dr. Mikhail Zamkov, physics and astronomy Receiving tenure: • Dr. Mohamad Mayyas, engineering technologies Tenure and promotion to associate professor: • Dr. Kelly Balistreri, sociology • Thomas Castillo, theatre and film • Dr. Douglas Ewing, marketing • Dr. Nicole Jackson, history • Dr. Andrew Kear, School of Earth, Environment and Society • Dr. Rebecca Kinney, School of Cultural and Critical Studies • Dr. Sidra Lawrence, musicology, composition and theory • Dr. Christina Lunceford, higher education and student affairs • Dr. Alexis Ostrowski, chemistry • Leigh-Ann Pahapill, School of Art • Dr. Shannon Pelini, biological sciences • Dr. Kimberly Rogers, mathematics and statistics • Dr. Jerry Schnepp, visual communication and technology education • Chris Willis, School of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Policy • Dr. Alexey Zayak, physics and astronomy Promotion to senior lecturer: • Cynthia Bailey, applied sciences • Elizabeth Burns, mathematics and statistics • Abigail Cloud, English • Ann Darke, mathematics and statistics • Dr. Daria Filippova, mathematics and statistics • Dr. Eric Mandell, physics and astronomy • Dr. Christina Miller, mathematics and statistics • Dr. James Pfundstein, world languages and cultures • Amanda Rzicznek, English • Dr. Allen Rogel, physics and astronomy • Kimberly…


Indigo Girls to perform with Toledo Symphony, June 1

From TOLEDO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Grammy award-winning Indigo Girls—iconic duo Amy Ray and Emily Saliers—will come to Toledo on June 1, 2018 at 8 p.m. for a one-night-only Spotlight Event at the Stranahan Theater to perform some of their greatest hits including “Closer to Fine,” “Power of Two,” and “Galile” —all with full orchestra in a new sonic experience. Sara Jobin will lead the Toledo Symphony Orchestra for her final performance as Resident Conductor in this program of folk and symphonic music. Three decades after releasing their first album and countless U.S. and international tours later, the Indigo Girls continue to make waves on the music scene. They remain the only duo with top 40 titles on the Billboard 200 each decade since the 1980s. In 2012, Emily Saliers and Amy Ray began collaborating with orchestrators to create larger-than-life arrangements that combine the original instrumentation with a full orchestra of musicians, fusing together folk, rock, pop, and symphonic music into one. They have performed with more than 50 symphonies across America to date and will perform with the Toledo Symphony for the very first time in June. “The Indigo Girls have achieved a new and raw experience all over again without sacrificing any of the emotional qualities that defined their music over the years,” said Felecia Kanney, Director of Marketing for the Toledo Symphony. “It’s incredible. Together, they totally unleash the full power of symphony orchestra, performing with our musicians as opposed to in front them, and you will definitely hear that in their arrangements that are more akin to the music of John Williams’ film scores as opposed to music of Bach or Haydn.” “When I hear the symphony come in, it’s a convergence of a lot of feelings,” says Emily Saliers, according to the Indigo Girls website biography (indigogirls.com). “First, you can’t believe your good fortune that it’s really happening, and then you’re hit with the power of this enormous, full orchestra coming from behind you. Even when…


Health district to present 2018 Clean Plate Awards

(Submitted by Wood County Health Department) Wood County Health District will present the 2018 Clean Plate Award to 30 licensed food facilities that have demonstrated commitment to excellent sanitation and food safety practices. Presentation of the awards will take place at the health department, 1840 E. Gypsy Lane Road, at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, prior to a meeting of the Wood County Board of Health. The Clean Plate Award will be given this year to less than 4 percent of the more than 800 licensed food facilities in Wood County. Those who receive it have shown dedication to upholding excellent sanitation and food safety knowledge. “To receive this award, these food services have consistently practiced safe food handling,” said Lana Glore, director of Environmental Health. This is the eighth year the health department has presented the Clean Plate Award. Each winner will receive a certificate in recognition of excellent performance in food safety, and a decal to display at their facility. This year’s recipients include: Marco’s Pizza-Rossford, Wood County Committee on Aging-Bowling Green, Wood County Committee on Aging-Perrysburg, Wood County Committee on Aging-Northeast Center, Wood County Committee on Aging-Wayne, Wood County Committee on Aging-Pemberville, Wood Lane School, Rita’s Dairy Bar, Wood County Justice Center, WSOS Perrysburg/Rossford Early Childhood, BG’s Frosty Fare, Hospice of Northwest Ohio, Carolyn’s Personalized Catering, Northwood High School, Eastwood Middle School, Eastwood High School, Poppin George Kettle Corn of Wood County 2, Poppin George Kettle Corn of BG, American Table, Northwest Community Correction Center, Bowling Green Manor, Bowling Green Care Center, Kingston Care Center of Perrysburg, Frobose Meat Locker, Flatlands Coffee, Heritage Corner Health Care Campus, Heritage Corner Nursing Home, Meijer Gas Station #116, Bass Pro Shop, and Care & Rehabilitation-Perrysburg. The mission of Wood County Health District is to prevent disease, promote healthy lifestyles and protect the health of everyone in Wood County. Our Community Health and Wellness Center provides comprehensive medical services for men, women and children. We welcome all patients, including uninsured or underinsured clients,…


BGSU kicks off 44th year of State Fire School on campus

(Submitted by State Fire School) More than 350 firefighters will arrive at Bowling Green State University to sharpen their skills in technical rescue, practice ventilation and search in vacant buildings, recognize and preserve arson scenarios, perfect their fire officer skills and learn life-saving techniques to save themselves or fellow firefighters – all part of the weeklong State Fire School scheduled May 7 – 11. “As always, State Fire School week is an exciting time for this community and we (BGSU) pride ourselves on providing the most up to date training in this fast-paced and dangerous environment,” said Kerry Gonzalez, Program Director of State Fire School in the College of Arts and Sciences. State Fire School has been under the direction of BGSU since 1974. “Our unique training environment gives students the opportunity to network with first responders from all over Ohio and learn from the best instructors in the country,” stated Gonzalez. “The hands-on training at BGSU exposes students to firefighting and technical rescue scenarios that may save a life in their community. After an intense week of training, we encourage them to take their knowledge and expertise back to their communities and train other firefighters.” Fire School is made possible by, not only eager students from all over the state, but also local fire departments who donate equipment, time and supplies for hands-on classes. This year, we are receiving support from Bowling Green, Toledo, Maumee, Sylvania, Perrysburg, Waterville, and Central Joint fire departments. BGSU State Fire School employs an elite group of instructors from 8 states including Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Florida, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois and New York and one instructor from Canada to instruct a variety of cutting edge classes. At a time when many fire department training budgets have been cut or eliminated, some firefighters are attending classes courtesy of grants from the Nationwide and State Farm Foundation and other funding sources. Major sponsors of State Fire School include Paratech, Ohio CAT and Sutphen Corporation. Our opening ceremony…


Donations sought for humane society garage sale

(Submitted by Wood County Humane Society) Donations of clothing, household items, electronics, furniture, toys, collectibles and other good and useful items for the Wood County Humane Society Garage Sale will be accepted from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on May 21, 22 and 23  under the grandstands at the Wood County Fairgrounds.  Early bird donations will also be received at the same location from 5 to 9 p.m. on Sunday, May 20. All donations to the sale are tax deductible. Regretfully, the sale is unable to accept analog televisions, VHS tapes or encyclopedias. The garage sale will be held at the same location May 24 and 25 from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. and May 26 from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. The sale features a wide variety of merchandise under the grandstand building at the Wood County Fairgrounds on West Poe Road in Bowling Green. Additionally, the sale will feature 10 cent clothing on May 25 and a $2 “Fill-a-Bag” sale on May 26. The garage sale, now in its 25th year,  is one of the Wood County Humane Society’s larger fundraisers, raising a record $17,000 in 2017 for the care of animals housed in the Minnebelle Conley Shelter, a no-kill humane shelter owned and operated by the Humane Society on Van Camp Road in Bowling Green. For more information about the sale or to volunteer to help, please call  419-669-0701.


PRIZM brings art collection, including Haitian crafts, to Sam Bs

From PRIZM CREATIVE COMMUNITY PRIZM Creative Community is pleased to announce its  “Sun, Sand, Summer Exhibition” as the newest exhibit in Wood County.  On display thru July the 30th at the Sam B’s Restaurant in Bowling Green the exhibit pays homage to the pleasures of nature, outdoor life, and nostalgia enjoyed with warmer days. On display is a collection of over 150 new pieces, by 24 artists in all medias including jewelry, ceramics, glass, acrylics, oils, fiber, alcohol inks, wood, floral, and paper.  Many featured items would make great Mother’s Day, Graduation or Wedding Gifts this season while supporting local artisans. An informal Opening Reception with free drinks and appetizers and a chance to meet many of the artists will be held on Thursday evening May 10 from 7:30- 9:30 p.m. in the back bar area of the restaurant at 163 S. Main Street in Bowling Green.     New to the exhibit space is a special collection from The Circle of Life project sponsored by Missions International of America located in Perrysburg.   The Circle of Life project is a system in which local artisans and business people have mentored the Haitian people to develop their artistic skills, to make and market products that have given them a never before opportunity to make an annual income to feed their families.    Most of the products are made with recycled paper, but a generous donation to the non-profit has enabled the group to begin to develop leather products as well. These reasonably priced products include innovative jewelry, coasters, key rings, change bowls, pots, and decorative items. Also exhibiting for the first time is several new and innovative artists.   Just graduating BGSU student Regina Hilton is showcasing her beautiful hand crafted ceramics.  Each ceramic mug, and drinking glass or porcelain bowl is uniquely formed and glazed. Regina encourages customers to pick up each item, and select the one that fits their hand the best.  Also new this exhibit is the hot blown glass of retired…


Mental health month focuses on ‘#And I Am’ campaign

(Submitted by National Alliance on Mental Illness) May is mental health month. In honor of the one in five Americans who lives with a mental illness, NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Wood County is bringing its “#And I Am” display to public libraries all over Wood County, as well as to the Wood County Courthouse. The national “#And I Am” campaign reminds us that people with mental illness are more than their diagnoses. By encouraging us not to let labels limit individuals, it seeks to fight the stigma that still haunts these biological brain disorders. Libraries hosting the displays include Way Public Library in Perrysburg, Pemberville Public Library, Rossford Public Library, Stony Ridge Public Library, and Luckey Public Library. NAMI WC staff have also installed the display in the atrium of the Wood County Courthouse. The “#And I Am” displays feature a flyer, table tents, and brochures sharing facts about the prevalence of mental illness in the United States. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, one in five Americans suffers from a mental illness. Half of all lifetime cases of mental illness begin by age fourteen, and only forty-one percent of adults in the U.S. with a mental health condition received mental health services in the past year (National Alliance on Mental Illness.) But, with the proper treatment and supports, our friends, family, and neighbors living with these illnesses can lead productive, happy lives. They are not limited by a diagnosis. That’s why at each “#And I Am” display visitors can fill in a slip with information about themselves to complete the “#And I Am” statement. Some slips filled out at other events read “I have schizophrenia# And I Am a college graduate;” “My father struggles with substance abuse #And I Am his advocate;” “My daughter has bipolar disorder# And I Am a proud father;” and “I live with depression # And I Am a father and ER doctor.” Anyone interested in participating in this campaign can…


Wood County Recorder’s Office reports transactions

(Submitted by Wood County Recorder’s Office) The Wood County Recorder, Julie Baumgardner, has released a report covering the transactions of the recorder’s office for the first quarter, Jan. 1 thru March 31, 2018. 1,344 deeds were recorded for this quarter, compared to 1,346 deeds being recorded for the same quarter last year. 885 mortgages, with a valuation of $878,844,635.79, were recorded for this quarter, compared to  967 mortgages, with a valuation of  $4,216,562,441.16 being recorded for the same quarter last year. Numerous other documents were recorded, in addition to the above, for a total of 4,231 documents being recorded for this quarter, compared to 4,142 documents being recorded for the same quarter last year. Julie Baumgardner, Wood County Recorder, paid a total of $249,521.15 into the county for this quarter, compared to $239,290.11 for the same quarter last year. $109,794.35 of the total for this quarter was paid directly into the county general fund, compared with $104,833.81 for the same quarter last year. $123,362.80 of the total for this quarter was paid into the housing trust fund, less one percent back to the county general fund by the state for the timely distribution of the money to the fund, compared with $118,288.30 for the same quarter last year, less one percent paid back to the county general fund. The remaining balance of $16,364.00 was paid into the recorder’s equipment fund for this quarter, compared with $16,168.00 for the same quarter last year.


Art in Park offers artists a breath of fresh air, June 8

From BOWLING GREEN ARTS COUNCIL The Bowling Green Arts Council and Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Department will host Art in the Park on the grounds of Simpson Garden Park, 1291 Conneaut Avenue, on Friday, June 8, 5-7  p.m. Artists of all ages are invited to bring their easels and art supplies to the park to paint in the gardens for this event. Artists can register to participate by sending an email to blair@surrealogic.com. No sales can be made on Park premises; however, artists may bring a sample finished work and are encouraged to bring business cards to distribute. To encourage artist participation, The Art Supply Depō in Bowling Green has donated a $100 gift certificate for the artist voted “People’s Choice” by those in attendance. In addition to the artists at work, Art in the Park will feature hands-on arts activities for children. There will also be local musicians, music by students of the BGSU College of Musical Arts and performances by the Black Swamp Players and Horizon Youth Theatre. Some light refreshments will be provided.


Habitat asks women to get involved in National Women Build Week

(Submitted by Habitat for Humanity) For the 11th year, Habitat for Humanity and Lowe’s are engaging women nationwide to work together to build Habitat homes during this year’s National Women Build Week from May 5-13. In preparation for the build week, Habitat for Humanity of Wood County and Lowe’s are asking women to get involved by signing up to volunteer and build. “We’re excited to partner with Lowe’s to educate, inspire and empower women to advocate and help Habitat homeowners love where they live through building or improving an affordable place they can call home,” said Clara Maynard, Community Outreach Director of Habitat for Humanity of Wood County. “We want to engage women of all skill levels to join their friends, families and neighbors to build up their communities and volunteer where women will gain invaluable skills to bring back and use in their everyday life.” “Lowe’s is in the business of helping people improve and maintain their homes,” said Colleen Penhall, Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility. “Lowe’s Heroes have helped build hundreds of Habitat homes across the country and National Women Build Week is another chance for Lowe’s to reinforce our long-standing commitment to Habitat, Women Build and communities where our employees and customers live and work.” Locally, Women Build participants will be working on-site at 223 Guy Street in Walbridge to help build the next Habitat home. State Representative Theresa Gavarone, along with local women’s organizations, will be taking part in activities. National Women Build Week, a nationwide initiative created by Habitat for Humanity and Lowe’s in 2008, has brought together more than 117,000 all-women construction volunteers to build or repair homes with nearly 5,000 families over the past 10 years. This year, Lowe’s donated nearly $2 million to Habitat for Humanity to support the 2018 National Women Build Week, which is set to take place in 300 communities nationwide. Habitat and Lowe’s encourage all women to volunteer—no construction skills or experience in Habitat builds necessary. To…


Toledo Museum celebrates 200 years of Libbey Glass

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART To commemorate 200 years of excellence in glassmaking, the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) has organized Celebrating Libbey Glass, 1818-2018. The exhibition will present more than 175 outstanding examples of glass from TMA’s renowned collection as well as objects and materials from the Libbey Inc. archives, including pressed glass tableware, Amberina art glass, Libbey’s world-renowned “brilliant” cut glass (including TMA’s glorious Libbey Punch Bowl), mid-century modern barware and examples of more recent “premium give-away” glasses for companies. Celebrating Libbey Glass will be on view exclusively at TMA beginning May 4 and continuing through Nov. 25 in the Glass Pavilion. “As founders of the Toledo Museum of Art, the Libbey family was instrumental to the advancement of arts education and art appreciation in this region,” said Brian Kennedy, TMA’s Edward Drummond and Florence Scott Libbey director. “It is our honor to recognize the Libbey legacy of innovative glass design, practices and production and to celebrate the Museum’s longstanding commitment to the medium through collections development, exhibition, research and programming.” The story of the Libbey Glass Company began 200 years ago in East Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established as the New England Glass Works in 1818, the company rose to prominence in the 19th century, cementing its reputation as one of the most successful American producers of fine glass tableware. As the general manager of the company from 1872, William L. Libbey (1823-1883) saw the business through difficult economic times, eventually taking over the firm’s lease to become owner. His son, Edward Drummond Libbey (1854-1925), joined his father as partner in 1880. Promoted to superintendent in 1883 at the age of 29 when his father died, the young Edward faced serious challenges with rising fuel costs and growing labor unrest. In 1888 he made the decision to move the entire operation to Toledo, Ohio, because of the abundance of natural gas and high-silica content sand, as well as its proximity to shipping and rail lines. Continuing its production of both high-end and everyday…


Park district springs into may with full slate of nature programs

From WOOD COUNTY PARK DISTRICT The Wood County Park District is offering a variety of nature programs in May. Spring Wildflower Walk                          Tuesday, May 1; 6:00 – 7:30 pm Sawyer Quarry Nature Preserve 26940 Lime City Road, Perrysburg Woodland wildflowers put on a brief, but beautiful show on the forest floor. Join us for a naturalist led stroll to see who is starring this month. Learn why these flowers are called ephemerals. Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Archery Skills: Rainbow and Arrow Thursday, May 3; 6:30 – 8:00 pm Otsego Park 20000 West River Road, Bowling Green Improve your archery skills through this short, beginner-friendly instructional program, focusing on the steps of shooting and consistency. Make progress you can see, as we create some artistic targets using our newfound skills. All archery equipment provided, personal gear welcome (inspected at program). Must be 7 yrs of age or older to attend. Minors must be accompanied by legal guardian. Bring a small canvas, shirt, poster, or anything you’d like splatter-painted! $5/$3 FWCP Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 EcoLit Book Group Meeting Thursday, May 3, 7:00 – 9:00 pm W.W. Knight Nature Preserve Friends’ Green Room 29530 White Road, Perrysburg For this meeting, please read The Sea Around Us, Special Edition (1989) by Rachel Carson. Group meets once a month. Register for any or all. Discussion leader: Cheryl Lachowski, Senior Lecturer, BGSU English Dept. and Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist (OCVN). Register atwww.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Homeschoolers: Bird Migration Friday, May 4; 10:00 – 11:30 am Bradner Preserve: Nature Interpretation Center Northwest Ohio is a great place to witness the spring migration! Learn about where these birds are going, how our parks play an important role, and what species you might see before heading out into the field. Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897   Heritage Farm Demo Saturday, May 5; 1:00 – 5:00 pm Carter Historic Farm 18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green  Stop by any time during the afternoon the first Saturday of each month to see farm…


BGSU alums to address grads at weekend ceremonies

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Degree candidates at Bowling Green State University’s commencement ceremonies Friday (May 4) and Saturday (May 5) will hear from alumni who have gone on to distinguished careers in business, writing and academia. The Bowling Green campus will host three ceremonies, all in the Stroh Center. The 7 p.m. Friday event will comprise the Graduate College and the colleges of Business and Health and Human Services. Giving the commencement address will be John Gawaluck, who received a bachelor’s degree in business administration from BGSU in 1973. He recently retired from EY, formerly Ernst & Young, after 41 years. He is now a consultant/instructor for EY’s manager-level technical accounting/auditing courses and is an adjunct graduate school accounting professor at Middle Tennessee State University. The 9 a.m. Saturday commencement for the colleges of Arts and Sciences and Musical Arts will feature an address by Beth Macy, who earned a Bachelor of Science in journalism in 1986. She is the author of the Lukas Prize-winning “Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local – and Helped Save an American Town.” In 2016, she published “Truevine: A Strange and Troubling Tale of Two Brothers in Jim Crow America.” The colleges of Education and Human Development and Technology, Architecture and Applied Engineering will hold commencement at 2 p.m. Saturday. Paula Whetsel-Ribeau, who earned a Bachelor of Science from BGSU in 1981 and a doctorate in education from BGSU in 2007, will give the commencement address. She is the associate provost for student engagement and success at Mount St. Mary’s University. BGSU Firelands’ commencement ceremony will begin at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Justin Harris, law director for the city of Sandusky, will address the candidates. He received his Associate of Applied Science in 2000 and his Bachelor of Applied Health Science in 2001, both from BGSU. Caylie Shover ’16, a candidate for a Bachelor of Applied Health Sciences, will serve as the student speaker. Of the total 2,341 degrees to be awarded this weekend, 666 are with honors. The Graduate College will award…