Music

Kantorski-Pope Duo to help church dedicate new grand piano

On Sunday, Nov. 6 at 3 p.m., the community is invited to a rare concert event in which the congregation of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church will dedicate their new Steinway grand piano. Featuring the renowned Kantorski-Pope Piano Duo, the concert will be held in the sanctuary of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, 871 East Boundary Street, Perrysburg.   Formed in 1988 by pianists Valrie Kantorski and Ann Almond Pope, the Duo is a Steinway Artist Ensemble and has been three-time winner of First Prize in the Graves Duo-Piano Competition. The two-piano ensemble was awarded the Virginia E. Schrader Residency in the performing arts from the Toledo Museum of Art in conjunction with the national touring exhibition entitled Impressionism.  In addition, the duo was selected for membership in the Touring Artists Program of the Ohio Arts Council.   Prior to 1998, Pope was an adjunct instructor of piano and piano pedagogy in the College of Musical Arts at Bowling Green State University (Ohio) and instructor of piano in the Creative Arts Program.  Kantorski is the principal keyboardist of the Toledo Symphony, performing as orchestral, chamber, and solo pianist. The recital will feature familiar music from a variety of sources, including classical, ballet and film scores.  Included are works by Bernstein, Brahms, Debussy and a work based upon the themes from The Wizard of Oz. This is the second of the 2016-17 St. Tim’s Discovers season.. Tim’s Discovers is dedicated to bringing classical music to communities throughout Northwest Ohio. Doors open at 2:30 p.m.  St. Timothy’s is fully accessible with plenty of convenient parking. Information on all upcoming events in the series is available at www.saint-timothy.net.


Pat Martino swings through musical matrix as guest artist at BGSU festival

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jazz guitarist Pat Martino has his own perspective on music. Within a couple minutes of his telephone interview with BG Independent, he’s talking about the ancient Chinese text the I Ching, the Book of Changes. Martino’s mind has a mathematical turn. He sees the guitar, he said, “as a matrix.” “I teach it accordingly and hope through that I can open up other windows,” he said. “The guitar strings are six in number, and it’s horizontal and vertical in terms of its properties.” There’s the strings across and the fret bar down. “You literally have a matrix,” he said. The I Ching, he explained, is made up of hexagrams of six broken or unbroken lines, each with 64 variations. “The I Ching is a psychologically study, a spiritual study,” he said. “The guitar is a musical study, but it’s the same matrix.” And the performer is “a witness” in the middle of this complex of dualities – minor-major, loud-soft, fast-slow — looking back to the beginning and forward the end. Martino will share his views on music and all the areas of life it opens up as the featured artist at this year’s Orchard Jazz Festival at Bowling Green State University. He’ll perform Saturday, Oct. 15, at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre on campus and give a master class earlier that day at 2:30 p.m. in the Conrad Room in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. The fusion group Marbin will perform and teach on Friday. See the full festival schedule at: http://www.bgsu.edu/musical-arts/events/orchard-guitar-festival.html. The son of a singer and guitarist, Martino entered that musical matrix as a youngster growing up in in the fertile Philadelphia music scene. There he rubbed shoulders with jazz legend John Coltrane and worked with pop stars Bobby Darin and Frankie Avalon.  He first went on the road with former schoolmate organist Charles Earland, planting the guitarist firmly in soul jazz. He moved to Harlem to immerse himself more in that scene. His reputation was such that he signed with Prestige as a 20-year-old where he was a pioneer…


David Bixler’s Hughes Project started as a gift from his mother

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News David Bixler can thank his mother for inspiring his Hughes Project. His mother, a retired English teacher, sent him a copy of Langston Hughes’ poem “Mother to Son.” “Well, son, I’ll tell you,” the poem begins. “Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.” That poem inspired Bixler. He responded as a jazz saxophonist and composer would: by writing a song. From that first piece has grown into The Hughes Project, seven pieces with more to come for a nine-piece ensemble. All based on poems written by the man of letters considered a leading figures of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and 1930s. Last week Bixler gave a lecture about the project, accompanying his remarks with performances of two pieces from the project. Later that night he presented a recital featuring the seven movements he’s completed so far. He’d long been interested in writing music inspired by Hughes that blended a jazz quintet and a string quartet. He finally carved out the time to write the piece last year. He was on leave from his position as director of jazz studies at Bowling Green State University, and his family had relocated back to New York City. They were living, he quipped, in “the squalor” of renovating their new home. He started writing in June, 2015 and first heard what he’d written this May. Bixler, who received a grant from the Institute for the Study of Culture and Society at BGSU, brought in musicians from New York City for the performance. They included trumpeter Russell Johnson, who grew up in the same Wisconsin town as Bixler and has his mother as a teacher. The jazz contingent also featured Jon Cowherd, piano, Gregg August, bass, and Fabio Rojas, drums. The quintet was joined by the Semiosis Quartet – Natalie Calma and Nicole Parks, violin, Oliver Chang, viola, and Kett Lee, cello. In composing the pieces, Bixler made some key decisions up front. As with the initial “Mother and Son,” he did not set the poem to music to be sung nor did he have a…


Grammy nominee Hunter Hayes to perform at Stroh, Oct. 15

Hailed as a “country-rock-blues guitar hero in the making” by the Los Angeles Times, five-time Grammy nominee Hunter Hayes is a singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who roared onto the music scene with his Platinum-selling, No. 1 self-titled debut album and chart-topping sophomore album “Storyline,” on Atlantic/Warner Music Nashville. He will perform at the Bowling Green State University Stroh Center Saturday, Oct. 15. Doors at 7 p.m. With three No. 1 singles already under his belt (including the multi-Platinum smash “Wanted,” “Somebody’s Heartbreak,” and “I Want Crazy”), Hayes delved into unprecedented territory with the innovative rollout of new music via streaming and digital platforms in 2015, culminating in the release of a special, three-disc collection (seven acoustic, seven studio and seven live songs) dubbed The 21 Project. Ticket prices are: $43 for Floor Seats (General Admission); $35 for Lower Bowl; and $29 for Upper Bowl Purchase tickets online, by calling 1-800-745-3000, or by visiting the Stroh Center Ticket Office.


GRUBS highlight originals, crowd favorites on new CD “If You Think That Way”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even watching the Grande Royale Ukulelists of the Black Swamp set up for a show can be entertaining. The four members banter among themselves, the convivial jibes are a preview for what’s to come. They tune up with quirky bits of music. And after playing their first set, Geoff Howes, Sheri Wells-Jensen, Jason Wells-Jensen and Anne Kidder are unable to turn it off. In the back of Grounds for Thought amidst their fans, the band becomes a tangle of hands, bodies contorted so they can all play one ukulele. It’s a regular routine that says much about the teamwork and humor of the band. GRUBS, as the band is more familiarly known, was at Grounds Tuesday night is unveil their second recording, “If You Think That Way.” The quartet brings together four avocational musicians with varied musical backgrounds including classical voice training, old-time jams, musical theater and church bands. These disparate backgrounds are leavened by the band’s adoption of the ukulele, a fairly recent musical adaptation by all four members. Not that the ukulele is in anyway a limitation. On stage they display 11 different types of ukes, from the bass that Jason Wells-Jensen uses to lay down the foundation to Kidder’s “baby,” the sopranissimo. There’s a resonator ukulele and several tenors in different shapes as well. That does not include the four instruments that get pulled out for the audience participation segment of the program. These provide a full, uke-chestral backing for the GRUBS solo and harmony vocals. The dozen-song set captured on “If You Think That Way” distills all the musical qualities of the band minus the between-song repartee. Not that the recording stints on the humor. Even without Jason Wells-Jensen spoken introduction of an Eastern European wedding ballad, the balalaika-like take on the standard “Yes Sir, That’s My Baby” is still a hoot. And Howes’ rhyming “auto loans” and “traffic cones” with “kidney stones,” always brings a smile, no matter how often you hear it. “If You Think That Way” comes less than a year after “Uke Tide,” the GRUBS’ debut…


New Music Festival showcases contemporary music at BGSU, Oct. 19-22

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The 37th Annual Bowling Green New Music Festival will showcase the work of more than 30 guest composers and performers Oct. 19-22. The four-day international festival includes concerts, lectures and an art exhibition. This year’s featured guests include composer Dai Fujikura and the Spektral Quartet (See related stories at: http://bgindependentmedia.org/musical-specters-come-to-life-in-string-quartet-concert-on-campus/ and http://bgindependentmedia.org/music-of-now-intersects-with-classics-in-spektral-quartet-concert/) Organized by the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music (MACCM), the College of Musical Arts and the Fine Arts Center Galleries at BGSU, the festival supports the creation of new work and engages both the University and city communities in the process of music appreciation and awareness. Most festival events are free and open to the public. FESTIVAL SCHEDULE Wednesday, Oct. 19 7 p.m., Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery, School of Art Exhibition opening: “The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramner,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group. Thursday, Oct. 20 1 p.m., Bryan Recital Hall Composer Talk: Dai Fujikura 3pm, Bryan Recital Hall Concert 1: chamber works by Dai Fujikura, Peter Eötvös, Marissa DiPronio, and Chin-Ting Chan. 7:30 p.m., Kobacker Hall Concert 2: Ensemble works by Roger Zare, Takuma Itoh, Dai Fujikura, Christopher Dietz and Jason Eckardt. 9:30 p.m., Clazel Theatre (127 N. Main St., downtown Bowling Green) Concert 3: Works by Dai Fujikura, Anthony Donofrio, Dan VanHassel, Alex Temple, Mario Diaz de Leon, and Matt Marks. Friday, Oct. 21 10:30 a.m., Bryan Recital Hall Concert 4: Chamber works by Steven Stucky, Dai Fujikura, Mary Kouyoumdjian, Girard Kratz, Eliza Brown and Joe Dangerfield. 2:30 p.m., Kobacker Hall Concert 5: Works by James Romig, Chun-Wai Wong, Robert Morris, Marilyn Shrude and Dai Fujikura. 8 p.m., Kobacker Hall Concert 6: Spektral Quartet. Music by Samuel Adams, George Lewis, Mikel Kuehn, and Dai Fujikura. Saturday, Oct. 22 10:30 a.m., Conrad Choral Room, Wolfe Center for the Arts Panel Discussion to be announced 2:30 p.m., Bryan Recital Hall Concert 7: Electroacoustic works by Ravi Kittappa, Daniel Pappas, C.R. Kasprzyk, Mara Gibson, Dan VanHassel, and Mario Diaz de Leon. 8pm, Kobacker Hall Concert 8: Orchestral and wind ensemble works by Dai Fujikura, Jonathan Newman, John Mackey, Emily Custer, and Leonard Slatkin….


Piano concert, job coaching all on tap at public library

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY The library’s popular “Job Coach,” HR expert Frank Day, will be available Wednesday, October 5 starting at 9:30 am to provide advice on polishing your resume, exploring online job sites, or filling out an online application. Please call ahead, 419-352-5050,  to make an appointment for your half-hour session with Mr. Day. “Tablet and Smartphone Classes,” presented in partnership with the Wood County Committee on Aging and the BGSU School of Media and Communications, will be held Tuesday, October 4 and 11 at 6:15 pm in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room. These classes are structured to suit your needs and to help you to get the most from your phone or mobile device. Registration is required. For details and to register call the Senior Center at 419-353-5661. A popular concert series which showcases graduate students in piano studies at BGSU’s College of Musical Arts returns to the WCDPL Atrium on Monday October 3 at 7 pm. The program features three centuries of keyboard classics from composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, Liszt, and Chopin. WCDPL’s full programming calendar, including youth programs and scheduling and selections for its popular book discussion groups during the month of October may be seen on line at wcdpl.org/calendar. These events are free and open to all. For more details about these and other programs for adults at WCDPL, call the library at 419-352-5050.


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, Sept. 28 – Oct. 12

From BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications  At the Galleries –“Face It: Reimagining Contemporary Portraits” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. “Face It” explores an expanded definition of photographic portraiture. Curated by BGSU art faculty Lynn Whitney and Andrew Hershberger and BGSU Galleries Director Jacqueline Nathan, the exhibit features photos by 27 renowned artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free. Sept. 29 – Award-winning author and book critic John Freeman will read from his works as a part of the Visiting Writer Series. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 29 – TheInternational Film Series continues with “Abrazos (Embraces),” directed by Luis Argueta. A group of children travel from Minnesota to Guatemala to meet their grandparents for the first time. The film documents their pilgrimage, exploring family, heritage and immigration. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 29 – BGSU composition students will present their works at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 30 – TheBGSU Wind Symphony will be in concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. On the program are “Skating on the Sheyenne,” by Ross Lee Finney; “Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum,” by Olivier Messiaen, and “First Symphony for Band” by William Bolcom. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu/arts. Sept. 30, Oct. 1 &2 – Elsewhere performances continue with “boom,” written by Peter Sinn Nachtrieb and directed by Katelyn Carle. All performances will begin at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Oct. 2 – The University and Concert Bands will perform a joint concert, featuring works by Ticheli, Bernstein, Grainger, Sousa and more. The performance begins at 3…


GRÜBS ready to unveil new recording

From GRÜBS The Grande Royale Ükulelists of the Black Swamp, a.k.a. the GRÜBS, will celebrate the release of their new CD if you think that way on Tuesday, October 4, at Grounds for Thought coffeehouse, 174 S. Main St. in Bowling Green, from 7:30 to 9:00 pm. The band will play some of their tunes and CDs will be available for purchase and autographs. The quartet of ükulele players and vocalists are Sheri Wells-Jensen, Jason Wells-Jensen, Anne Kidder, and Geoff Howes. “If you think that way”includes five original songs and seven cover versions ranging from folk (John Prine’s “Paradise”) to 1920s musical (Brecht and Weill’s “Mack the Knife,” sung in German) to classical (Pachelbel’s Canon in D, but done in C) to rock (Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4”). Recording and releasing “if you think that way”  has involved the talents of many collaborators, most of them local: The CD was recorded at Stone Soup Recording Studios in Maumee by Eric Sills, who also assisted the group with production and arrangements. A guest artist, Dave Fogle of Perrysburg, who runs Dave’s Drum Depot in Toledo, sat in on drums for the original song “Sweet Rebecca.” The cover photograph and album design are by Ashley Donaldson of Findlay. Kate Kamphuis of Bowling Green contributed additional photography. Phil Klum of Phillip Klum Mastering in New York City mastered the recording. For the past three and a half years, the GRÜBS have been entertaining in Northwest Ohio, performing at the Black Swamp Arts Festival, the Downtown BG Art Walk, the BG Farmer’s Market, the Stones Throw Tavern, the Hump Day Revue, Coffee Amici in Findlay, the Sunset Bistro, Leisure Time Winery in Napoleon, National Train Day in Toledo, the Relay for Life, Rhythm on the River in Grand Rapids, the Ohio Chautauqua in Rossford, the Wood County District Public Library, the Wood County Historical Museum, Fremont’s Got Talent, on WTOL Channel 11 and Fox Toledo’s “Daybreak,” on WBGU televsion and WBGU-FM radio, and at many benefits, fairs, and private parties. In 2015, the quartet released Uke Tide, an album of Christmas music, which will…


Carl Allen spreads the love of jazz in Bowling Green

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jazz drummer and producer Carl Allen told some of those war stories young jazz payers love to hear during his visit to Bowling Green State University. Anecdotes about being in the studio with their musical heroes. About being back stage with a legend like Art Blakey – and getting a life lesson. And the students came ready to play for him, so he could share some of the knowledge he’s accumulated over the years. On Thursday night those in the two big bands, even got the chance to perform with his inimitable beat getting them in the groove. But the stories, the notes, even the groove, was not the main lesson Allen had to share “It’s about love,” he told the students. That’s what he and all the other visiting artists who come to campus are about, the musician said. They love the music, and they want to share that love with students. Whatever criticism he had of their playing, he told those in a master class for jazz combos, was delivered in that spirit. The same spirit in which Blakey brought him up short when Allen was 23 and complained about a drum set provided on a gig. “Do you play the drums or do the drums play you?” Blakey, who’d used the same set, asked him. The way the young musicians can reciprocate is by asking questions. That’s what Allen did when he first arrived on the scene in New York while still a student at William Patterson College in New Jersey. An older drummer told him they let him into the fraternity of jazz drummers because he clearly loved the music. He showed it by being a pest. He constantly asked questions of drumming greats like Philly Joe Jones and Max Roach. He urged students to have that same kind of curiosity. Allen has been on campus since Thursday. In addition to his work in campus, he stopped by the high school to work with the jazz students there Friday morning. He’ll play with the jazz faculty band Friday and Saturday…


BGSU Lively Arts through Oct. 5

Through Sept. 28 — The 33rd annual juried exhibition of Ohio designer craftsmen continues in the Willard Wankelman Gallery in BGSU’s Fine Arts Center. The exhibit showcases works in clay, glass, fiber, wood, metal and mixed media by many nationally recognized Ohio artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Oct. 6 — “Face It: Reimagining Contemporary Portraits” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the BGSU Fine Arts Center. “Face It” explores an expanded definition of photographic portraiture. Curated by BGSU art faculty Lynn Whitney and Andrew Hershberger and BGSU Galleries Director Jacqueline Nathan, the exhibit features photos by 27 renowned artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free Sept. 21 – The BGSU Faculty Artist Series features pianist Cole Burger in recital at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 22 – Creative writing students in BGSU’s Master of Fine Arts program read from their work beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 22 – BGSU The International Film Series features the 2010 Guatemalan film “AbUSed: The Postville Raid,” directed by Luis Argueta. The film conveys personal stories from a small Iowa town that witnessed the May 2008 mass arrest of 400 immigrants at a meatpacking plant. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 22 – The BGSU Guest Artist Series puts a spotlight on jazz with Carl Allen on percussion. In addition to his work as a drummer, sideman, bandleader, entrepreneur and educator, Allen has more than 200 recordings to his name. His performance begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 22 – Elsewhere productions begins the season with “Spineless: A Staged Reading” written by Elise Lockwood and directed by Rebekah Sinewe. The reading will begin at 8 p.m. in the Margit Bloch Heskett Classroom located in…


Poetry & art all have part in composer Elainie Lillios’ music

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Elainie Lillios’ music emerges from a web of relationships. The composer works closely with the musicians as she’s writing. She meets with the poet whose work inspires her. She reaches beyond music to poetry and art to construct her pieces that merge electronics and acoustic sounds. All those elements are in play as the Bowling Green State University professor of composition works on her newest piece. “Hazy Moonlight” is being funded by a prestigious Barlow Endowment Commission for Music. Lillios had already been discussing composing a piece for the duo of percussionist Stuart Gerber and saxophonist Jan Berry Baker before the Barlow Commission. In fact, it was the performers who suggested she apply. Lillios was one of 12 recipients out of 150 applicants. Lillios had visited them in Atlanta where they were playing on a streetcar during a festival. That’s part of what impressed the composer about the performers. “Just because music is difficult doesn’t mean it can’t be shared with the community,” she said. “They are very committed to this idea of getting music outside buildings, outside the academy, into places new music necessarily doesn’t happen. … They are really fearless performers. They want to engage with the community.” Lillios engages the performers from the very beginning of the composition process. “I like to be in a relationship with the people with whom I work. I’m not the kind of composer who goes into my room and spends six months there to write a piece and says ‘here it is’ without having any collaboration during the process.” Lillios wants them to feel “like they’ve been part of the piece from the very beginning.” Lillios wants to know who the performers’ favorite composers are, particular techniques they like or don’t like, how the piece will fit into their repertoire. The discussions include logistics as well. What instruments can the percussionist expect to have available while on tour? Lillios already has decided the piece will only use soprano and alto saxophones since that’s what saxophonist Berry Baker carries when she travels. The piece will use…


Roger Schupp’s legacy celebrated in memorial concert, Sept. 25

Percussionists at Bowling Green State University will beat their drums in memory of Roger Schupp Sunday, Sept.25 at 3 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center on campus. Schupp, who taught percussion and jazz at BGSU for almost 25 years, died Dec. 15 at 55. He continued teaching up until a few days before his passing from cancer. The concert will feature performances by his students and colleagues, as well as internationally renowned jazz drummer Carl Allen. Allen will perform Thad Jones’ “Groove Merchant” with the Jazz Lab Band I. Speaking about Schupp and his legacy will be his widow, Tracy Schupp, long-time colleague Jeff Halsey and former student and owner of Black Swamp percussion Eric Sooy. Former student and colleague Olman Piedra will also participate as a special guest. The program will reflect the range of Schupp’s interests and influence. That includes a performance by the faculty jazz ensemble with Halsey, bass, David Bixler, alto saxophone, Isabelle Huang, marimba, Ariel Kasler, guitar, Daniel Piccolo, drums and cymbals, and Charles Saenz, trumpet. Schupp was the drummer for the group throughout his time at BGSU and organized its weekly sessions in downtown Bowling Green venues. Also performing will be a marimba quartet of his students from his last semester, the BGSU Percussion Ensemble, and the Afro-Caribbean Ensemble. A reception will follow the memorial concert. The Missouri native was a versatile performer in the areas of classical, jazz, and world music.  Schupp performed in a variety of ensembles including the Toledo and Austin symphonies, the Kansas City Civic Orchestra, and Austin Jazz Orchestra. He was a member of the Toledo Symphony Percussion Trio, Toledo Symphony Concert Band, and Toledo Jazz Orchestra. Schupp performed on recordings with the Hawk-Richard Jazz Orchestra, the Toledo Jazz Orchestra, the BGSU Jazz Faculty Ensemble and guitarist Chris Buzzelli as well as on recordings of works by composers Samuel Adler, Michael Daugherty, and Shane Hoose. He also performed and recorded with such diverse artists and ensembles as the Royal Ballet of London, New York Voices, Marvin Hamlisch, Tommy Tune, Bob James, Clark Terry, Terrance…


BGSU Lively Arts through Sept. 28

Sept. 14 – The Faculty Artist Series features Caroline Chin, assistant professor of violin. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 15 – BGSU’s creative writing MFA students present their work. Their reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept 16 – The first ARTalk of the season features Joshua Kosker, a visiting professor of art in jewelry and metals from Indiana University. Kosker’s work is rooted in contemporary craft and body adornment. His talk will begin at 5:30 p.m. in 204 Fine Arts Center. A reception will follow in the Willard Wankelman Gallery. Free Sept 16 – EAR l EYE: Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art features BGSU doctoral candidates from the College of Musical Arts responding to works of art. The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Free Sept. 18 – The Sunday Matinee Series continues at 3 p.m. with two 1919 films, “The Breath of a Nation,” directed by Gregory La Cava, followed by “The Greatest Question,” directed by D.W. Griffith, with Lillian Gish and Robert Harron. In 1919 Griffith was in top form, this being a year of the masterworks “Broken Blossoms” and “True Heart Susie.” However, no less inspired is the gorgeously photographed “The Greatest Question” (by Billy Bitzer, cameraman on all the Griffith features that incredibly busy year). Somehow it has been mysteriously overlooked, yet is no less fascinating and no less a worthy role for the extraordinary, resilient, ageless Lillian Gish. Free Sept. 18 – Celebrate the history and the future of the Bryan Recital Hall, which has undergone major renovations in the last year, including completely new seating, acoustics and lighting. A rededication concert will be held at 3 p.m. in the hall, located at the Moore Musical Arts Center. For details, see: http://bgindependentmedia.org/bryan-rededication-concert-to-raise-funds-for-scholarships/ Sept. 19 – ARTalk features Jess T. Dugan, whose work explores gender, sexuality, identity and community. Named a 2015 White House Champion of Change, Dugan will discuss a decade of visual activism. The talk…


Bryan rededication concert to raise funds for scholarships

The College of Musical Arts will present a rededication concert of the newly renovated Bryan Recital Hall Sunday, Sept. 18 at 3 p.m. in the venue.The concert will feature performances by 38 university faculty and graduate student musicians. Interim Dean of the College of Musical Arts William Mathis will host the concert which will raise money for music scholarships. Tickets are $50. Contact: https://commerce.cashnet.com/cashnetk/selfserve/BrowseCatalog.aspx. Further questions call 419-372-8654. The concert will be followed by a reception and tour of the hall. Brad Cresswell, of WGTE Radio will serve as master of ceremonies. The program will feature music for voice, piano, strings, brass and woodwinds, jazz, and opera and Broadway selections. In his notes for the performance, Mathis writes: “The impact and rich history of music performance, music instruction and community outreach in Bryan Hall is difficult to measure. Notable guests have performed and taught here including names such as David Brubeck, Yo Yo Ma, Ray Brown, Marilyn Horne, John Cage, and BGSU alumna and Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Higdon. The hall plays host to featured guest artists, faculty recitals, daily classes and rehearsals, and scores of student performances each year. “ The recital hall was originally supported by a gift from Ashel and Dorothy Bryan. The renovation was made possible by a gift from their son David Bryan and his wife, Myrna.