Philanthropy

Michael Hoskins thinks the world of BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In talking about growing up in Bowling Green, Michael Hoskins described a lost world. He moved around campus just before Anderson Arena was built and with the football field was located where the College of Business now stands. He spent days at the natatorium and the “old” men’s gym – he was confused why it was called that because he never saw any old men there. “It a very perfect kind of college town life” that included pals such as Mike Marsh. Marsh was there to greet him Thursday when Hoskins returned to campus. The middle child of three, Hoskins moved here at 11 when his father William Hoskins took a position at the College of Business in 1965. His father had been recruited by then President William T. Jerome and Dean William Schmeltz, who were interested in bringing top scholars, especially in international business, to campus, President Rodney Rogers said. Hoskins said his father was “desperately recruited,” and could have made more money elsewhere, but stayed in Bowling Green. His work extended from founding the International Business program at BGSU to co-founding the Academy of International Business, the leading organization in the field, Rogers said. Hoskins attended BGSU, first in computer science, before changing his major to finance, graduating in 1977, before heading off to work at IBM. But then he moved to his passion, as, in Rogers’ words, a “serial entrepreneur.” Taking his father’s lead, he traveled the world. He lost touch with his alma mater for some time. That happens, Hoskins said. Then 12 years ago through Marsh, he reconnected with campus. And as he started to follow what was going on at BGSU, he became more impressed. He made donations. He founded the Hoskins Global Scholars program He said he’d reached that stage in his life where he started wanting to give permanency to his contributions. After talking with Interim Provost John Fischer, Hoskins decided not only to permanently endow…

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BGSU students fan out through the region on MLK Jr. Day of Service

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Steady snow showers throughout the region Monday couldn’t keep more than 800 university students from answering the call to service. The snow just gave a few of them another way to help. A group of Bowling Green State University students participating in the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service came to the office of Downtown Bowling Green. While some of them worked inside creating chalk signs for an upcoming United Way fundraiser, a handful headed outside with shovels and ice melt to clear sidewalks. They just wanted to help, said Jamie Hawkins and Jenna Battaglia. This is the 10th Annual Martin Luther King Jr, Day of Service coordinated by BGSU. With the students involved this year, the event will have sent about 5,800 volunteers into the field to serve the community. Angel Alls-Hall, one of the student organizers of the event, told the volunteers before they went out that this was a way of honoring King’s own service. “Today we carry on that legacy of activism and service that Dr. King embodied. So let us go out to the community to serve today and in days to come.” Jauntez Bates, a senior political science major and vice president of undergraduate student government, said service has been an essential part of his education at BGSU. He’s participated all four years, including last year as a site coordinator. He is a member of the Presidential Leadership Academy and a fraternity both of which emphasize service. And he’s already founded a clothing company, BossUpClothing, that combines commerce and philanthropy. “You should be a helping hand to others,” he said. The MLK Day of Service, he said, helps expands how students view volunteering because they are assigned places and jobs that they know little or nothing about. “This just shows your dedication to service.” On Monday he was one of the crew helping to building 15 mini-libraries, a project sponsored by Habitat for Humanity and the Rotary…


Volunteers stepping up to serve on MLK holiday

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Martin Luther King Jr, Day is a holiday for people to step up and serve their community. Though the city’s King tribute scheduled Friday had to be canceled because of the winter storm, volunteers were out Saturday morning going door to door for the 10th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service “Can” vass Food Drive. Now coordinated by the Brown Bag Food Project, the drive helps stock the shelves for a number of area food pantries. (See related story  http://bgindependentmedia.org/volunteers-needed-to-help-mlk-day-of-service-food-drive-extend-its-reach/) Amy Jeffers, a Brown Bag board member, said as of the noon shift, 75 people had signed in. Groups of volunteers headed out into the northwest quadrant of the city to collect food stuffs. “We’ll move on from there,” Jeffers said. The table in the middle of Grounds for Thought, headquarters for the food drive, was filling up with spaghetti sauce, canned vegetables and more. “It’s been nice and steady,” she said. “It’s really starting to grow. … They’re really filling the bags.” The drive will extend throughout the city through Sunday. The cold weather is slowing progress some, but Jeffers said the amount collected is the same or more than last year. Jeffers has worked every drive since it started in response to President Obama’s call for to service. Anyone interested in donating can drop of food, hygiene products or monetary gifts at the shop at 174 S. Main St. in downtown Bowling Green. Volunteers will be out from noon to 5 pm. Sunday, but the tables will be set up in the morning for anyone who wants to drop something off. The volunteers are both community members and students. “We get a lot of BGSU students” including a contingent from the women’s swim team Molly Wells, a journalism major was on hand, helping to sort food as it came in. She heard about the drive through her sorority, Sigma Kappa. She also knew about the food drive through a fellow…


Volunteers needed to help MLK Day of Service food drive extend its reach

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Martin Luther King Day of Service “Can”vas Food Drive hopes to extend its reach. Now in its 10th year, organizer Amy Jo Holland, of the Brown Bag Food Project, said she’d like to reach the homes throughout town. That means putting out a call for volunteers, about 300 is what she thinks will be needed. The food drive will be held Saturday, Jan. 13, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 14, noon to 4 p.m. Last year, Holland said, the canvassers covered the north side of the city and some of the south. “We hope this year we can cover it all.” Volunteer sign up is just getting underway. The organizers have started reaching out to groups at Bowling Green State University as well as community groups. Holland is well aware of people’s reluctance to commit, but is confident as the date nears community members will enlist. Some volunteers will hang back at the collection site, Grounds for Thought, and help sort the food that comes. That means setting aside items beyond their sell-by dates. As long as they are not too old, some pantries can still use those. Most of the volunteers will join small teams of canvassers going door-to-door through Bowling Green neighborhoods collecting non-perishable food and others necessities. Especially needed are peanut and jelly, tuna, and canned meats. They are also collecting hygiene items, baby formula, wipes, and diapers, and pet food. This year seven food shelters will share in the bounty. Those benefiting are: Brown Bag Food Project, the Christian Food Pantry, and pantries operated by St. Aloysius, St. Thomas More, St. Mark’s Lutheran, Broken Chains, and First United Methodist Church. Each received about 30 boxes of food last year. “For us it’ll maintain us through May,” Holland said of Brown Bag. It certainly will not meet all the food needs of the 300 people a month Brown Bag helps, but it’ll provide an essential core of…


Salvation Army in need of grocery gift cards

From THE SALVATION ARMY BOWLING GREEN CENTER The Salvation Army will be distributing holiday food baskets and toys to over 250 families on Wednesday, December 20. The food baskets consist of a basic holiday meal, however we rely on gift card donations for our families to purchase the meat for their holiday baskets. Over 600 families have preregistered for Christmas assistance throughout Wood County; many have been sponsored by individuals, businesses, organizations and churches. Families who have not been sponsored will pick up their items on the 20th. We are grateful we are continuing to receive toy donations; however, we are also in immediate need of gift cards from any local grocery store in $10-$20 increments. These gift cards will allow our families to purchase the meat to complete their holiday food baskets. Please drop off gift card donations at The Salvation Army office located at 1045 N. Main St. in the Marco’s Pizza plaza. Our office hours are Monday thru Friday 9:00 am to Noon and 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm. Thank you for your continued support of The Salvation Army’s holiday programs. For any questions or to learn more about The Salvation Army, please contact our office at (419) 352-5918.


Perrysburg teen to receive philanthropy award

From Association of Fundraising Professionals – Northwest Ohio Chapter As a young woman herself, 22-year-old Afreen Alvi is working to help other young women find their leadership gifts through the Women of Toledo organization. In early 2017, Alvi participated in a strategy planning and development program to establish the Young Women of Toledo program, which provides coaching and mentoring for women ages 15-26 who have personal and professional development goals. After establishing an operational budget, Alvi leveraged her peer network to create a special fundraising event, selling tickets and securing vendor support that generated $4,250 in support of YWoT programs. One of the first programs Alvi helped develop was a Chat & Chew group for millennial women, a safe place for them to discuss and debate constructively, build social awareness and self-esteem, and inspire each other to take leadership action in their own communities. Thanks to Alvi’s efforts, there are now more than 30 youth and young women participating. Nina Corder, Executive Director of Women of Toledo, nominated Alvi for the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award (Ages 18-23) saying, “Afreen has transformed into a great role model for other youth, and her continued involvement in the Young Women of Toledo program is a tremendous asset to our organization.” Alvi will be recognized at the 30th Annual National Philanthropy Day luncheon on November 9, from 11 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. at Premier Banquet Hall in Toledo. The annual event is a community celebration of the philanthropic spirit and practice that results when we work together to “Change the World with a Giving Heart.” Space is limited, so those who would like to attend are encouraged to reserve their tickets now. Reservations can be made online at AFPNWO.org or by calling 330-329-2472. Toledo Community Foundation is the Presenting Sponsor for the 2017 National Philanthropy Day. Other sponsors include Ambassador Sponsor – Toledo Lucas County Public Library; Signature Sponsors – Bowling Green State University, ProMedica Foundations and The University of Toledo; and Supporting Sponsors – The Andersons, Inc., Mercy Health…


Under Friday night lights, homecoming crowd cheers on kickoff of BGSU fundraising campaign

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Under the lights Friday night, President Mary Ellen Mazey summoned up her former cheerleader self to whip up support for Bowling Green State University’s comprehensive campaign, “Changing Lives for the World.” Always a booster of the university she leads, Mazey turned her enthusiasm up a notch addressing a Homecoming Weekend crowd gathered to mark the kickoff of the public portion of the $200 million campaign. Mazey said given the good start she envisions the campaign topping the official goal, maybe raising as much as $250 million. Since the campaign was announced in spring, 2014, the university has raised $110 million in “leadership giving.” Now the university is ready to get the public engaged in the effort. The money will be used for facilities, scholarships as well as named professorships and academic programs. Mazey noted that BGSU is one of the very few colleges in Ohio that doesn’t have a named college. She’d like to see two by the time the campaign wraps up in 2020. Mazey said she and many others in attendance benefited from scholarships when they were students, and now it is time to return the favor. Two students who have benefited from those scholarships testified to their importance. Meg Burrell, former student representative on the Board of Trustees, talked about how she fell in love with BGSU. She arrived for her tour during “the worst weather,” but the tour went great.  It was her first one, and she felt this augured well for the rest. Yet 14 tours later, “I had not found another BGSU.” Receiving Presidential Leadership Scholar made her decision to become a Falcon easy. When Burrell arrived, she missed early activities on campus because she was working. “I realized this was not the kind of experience I wanted. I knew I was going to take advantage of any opportunity I could.” Though Burrell still worked two part-time jobs, she knew she could take time off for mock trial…