Bowling Green Police Division

Underwear thief charged with repeat offenses in BG

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Hundreds of bras and women’s underwear were found during a search of a Bowling Green man’s home after he was caught reportedly trying to break into an apartment. This is not the first time Bradley Feasel, 33, of 236 S. Grove St., was arrested with stolen underwear and bras in his home. He was sentenced to six months in 2004 after being caught stealing items from an apartment on the East Side of the city. In addition to stolen undergarments, in 2004 police also found a telescope in the trunk of Feasel’s car and a journal detailing how to watch attractive people and how to set up a hidden video camera. “This isn’t his first time,” Bowling Green Police Major Justin White said Friday. The Bowling Green Police Division is asking that any women who have had undergarments stolen to contact Sgt. Hartman at 419-352-1131. This past September, college students living in a house on East Merry Avenue reportedly found a man in their residence when they returned home around 1:30 in the morning. The man fled, leaving a pile of the women’s underwear and clothes under a window as he escaped. The women reported that they believed this to be the third or fourth time the man had entered their home. Later that same month, Feasel was arrested for trespassing in the 200 block of North Enterprise. In that case, the residents reportedly heard Feasel trying to enter by the front door. They called police, who apprehended Feasel outside the house….


Here’s the scoop – cops meet with kids over ice cream

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   For more than a year now, Bowling Green Police Division has been meeting citizens over cups of hot coffee. On Friday, they tried something different – meeting them over bowls of ice cream, with chocolate sauce and sprinkles on top. “This is bigger than the Coffee with the Cops,” said Bowling Green Police Chief Tony Hetrick as he looked out over the room at the Wood County District Public Library, full of children eating ice cream and wearing police badge stickers. “We’re making you all honorary policemen today,” the chief told them. Police officers posed for photos with kids holding their bowls of ice cream. They answered questions about their jobs. Deputy Chief Justin White said he did not get the usual, “Have you shot somebody” question today. In fact, most of the questions were not about the two-legged officers, but about their four-legged canine officer named Arci. “He’s going to make an appearance,” assured Hetrick. The goal was to make the kids more comfortable around police officers in their community. “We’re here to help,” said Lt. Brad Biller. “The police officers in the community are here to serve them, not to be feared by them.” The officers have visited the library in the past to read to kids, but this visit was a little different. “We’ve invited the police officers before, but we’ve never thought of combining it with ice cream,” children’s librarian Maria Simon said. “What a great idea.” The ice cream, combined with the location, drew in a different…


BG police offer training for those selling alcohol

The Bowling Green Police Division will be providing Liquor Establish Employee Training (LEET) on Tuesday, Aug. 8. The training will be from 5 to 7 p.m. and will focus on civil liability, Ohio and Bowling Green liquor laws and fake ID recognition. Employees and management staff of local businesses (bars and retail outlets) that sell alcoholic beverages are invited to attend.


BG police investigating thefts from vehicles

The Bowling Green Police Division is investigating a series of thefts from vehicles over the past two weeks.  The stolen property includes but is not limited to electronics, money, and personal items. A majority of these thefts in our community occur as crimes of opportunity. Therefore, citizens are reminded to remove articles of value from their unoccupied vehicles and to keep their vehicles secured (windows up, sunroofs secured, convertible tops closed, and door locks locked). Anyone having any information related to these incidents is encouraged to contact the Police Division at (419) 352-2571 or Wood Co. CrimeStoppers at (419) 352-0077 or (800) 54-CRIME.  Persons contacting Wood Co. CrimeStoppers have the opportunity to remain anonymous and are eligible for a reward of up to $1000 if the information that they provide proves to be pertinent to the case.  


BG Police Division sees drop in use of force

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green Police Division has seen a steady increase in community relations efforts, and a decrease in force being used by officers, according to Chief Tony Hetrick. Hetrick presented an annual report during a strategic planning meeting with City Council on Saturday. “We don’t police the community. We police for the community,” Hetrick said. Poor police-community relations nationwide peaked the last few years, causing several police departments to examine their relationships with those they serve. “Community engagement is a hot button topic all over the nation,” Hetrick said. That’s something Bowling Green Police Division has done for years, but they are also making an increased effort. “We can always do better.” Last year the “Coffee with a Cop” program started, efforts are being made to engage with BGSU students more, and police participated in a panel discussion on minority relations. Police also met with students in a class teaching English as a second language. “It really helped us build trust with them,” Hetrick said. In August, when new international students arrive at BGSU, the police will meet with the group again. “I think we enjoy tremendous trust in the community,” Hetrick said. The chief also presented his annual report on police force being used. In 2016, there were 21 responses to resistance or aggression reports filed by office. That is a decrease from the 40 reports in 2015. The officers’ reports showed that in 19 cases, no weapons were used. In two cases, Tasers were used. According to the reports, there were…


BG police get community relations certification

  Submitted by BOWLING GREEN POLICE DIVISION The Bowling Green Police Department (Wood County) has adopted and implemented state standards established by the Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board as part of the state’s efforts to strengthen community and police relations. The agency joins nearly 120 other agencies who have become certified by meeting standards for the use of force, including deadly force, and agency recruitment and hiring. The standards are the first of their kind in Ohio and were developed by the Collaborative in August 2015. The state has partnered with the Buckeye State Sheriffs’ Association and the Ohio Association of Chiefs of Police to help certify Ohio’s nearly 1,000 law enforcement agencies on a process to ensure that they are in compliance with Ohio’s new standards. Certifications will continue throughout 2016. The first list of all Ohio compliant agencies will be published in March 2017. For more information on the Ohio Collaborative, the certification process for law enforcement and the complete list of agencies who have been certified, please visit: http://www.ocjs.ohio.gov/ohiocollaborative/


Police officials address issues of force, race & more during “Real Cops” panel

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The police in Bowling Green, either city or campus, don’t have to resort to using physical force very often. Bowling Green Police Chief Tony Hetrick said that in 90,000 interactions, officers on the BG force have used force 52 times, and BGSU Police Chief Monica Moll said her department’s experience was similar. Rodney Fleming, the managing attorney at Student Legal Services, said that if citizens looked at the statistics, they’d see how little physical force is used. Capt. Mike Campbell, who will be interim chief when Moll leaves BGSU at the end of the month, said that in looking at police conflicts that have been in the news, he sees faulty tactics in how the incidents were approached. More emphasis should be put on de-escalating a situation, and better communication, he said. They were part of the “It’s Just Us: Real Talk with Real Cops,” held Friday at Bowling Green State University, and sponsored by Not In Our Town. No matter how little force is used, all incidents are reported and looked at. “Even if it was a legal use of force,” Moll said, “maybe we could have used less.” Hetrick said each instance is looked at by more than one supervisor, including himself. “Nothing is going to be swept under the rug.” And, if citizens feel they have been unfairly treated, each department has a formal complaint process. If someone doesn’t trust the police to follow through, they can complain to other entities, Fleming said – city officials, his office, or Not In Our Town….


Review of BGPD shows very low use of force, few citizen complaints

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News There were enough chairs set up in the Simpson building Tuesday to seat every citizen who had filed a complaint against the Bowling Green Police Dvision in the past three years. And there would be room for more. None of them showed up when a visiting accreditation team from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc.  set up shop to receive citizens’ comments. City Councilman Bruce Jeffers was there. He said the police force is “positively engaged with the community.” In a time when there are so many reports of clashes between police and citizens with violence “going in both directions,” he is “amazed” how the BG officers “deal with large number of partying students … without losing control or using excessive force.” Planning Director Heather Sayler was there as a resident to praise the department, especially the D.A.R.E. program. Fire Chief Tom Sanderson was there to lend his support to Chief Tony Hetrick and the officers. He and his crews see first-hand BG police officers’ ability to de-escalate tense situations, which allows EMS crews and firefighters to feel safe doing their jobs. That camaraderie between the fire and police divisions is not always the case, said Robert Johnson, a retired Illinois State Patrol lieutenant colonel. Also on the CALEA team was Capt. Brad Fraser, from Shelby, North Carolina. Lt. Daniel Mancuso serves as the BGPD’s accreditation manager. That wasn’t the only surprising thing they found in reviewing the BG police’s performance from 2013 through 2015. Over that period, Johnson said, Bowling Green…


BG police seek comments as part of accreditation process

Submittted by BOWLING GREEN POLICE DIVISION The Bowling Green Police Division is scheduled for an on-site assessment as part of a program to maintain accreditation by verifying the agency meets professional standards. Administered by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA), the accreditation program requires agencies to comply with internationally accepted best practices and standards in four basic areas: policy and procedures, administration, operations, and support services. As part of the on-site assessment, agency employees and members of the community are invited to offer comments at the public information session on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. The session will be conducted at the Simpson Garden Park Building, 1291 Conneaut Avenue. The session will conclude when everyone that has signed in has had an opportunity to speak. Agency employees and the public are invited to offer comments by calling (419) 353-7459 on Tuesday July 26, 2016 between the hours of 1:00 pm and 3:00 pm. Comments will be taken by the Assessment Team. Telephone comments as well as appearances at the public information session are limited to ten (10) minutes and must address the agency’s ability to comply with CALEA’s standards. A copy of the standards is available at the Bowling Green Police Division , 175 W. Wooster Bowling Green, Ohio 43402. Local contact is Accreditation Manager Lt. Daniel Mancuso at (419) 352-1131. Anyone wishing to submit written comments about the Bowling Green Police Division’s ability to comply with the standards for accreditation may send them to the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc….