Downtown BG

Classics on Main on hiatus for this summer

From DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN The Classics on Main Car Show is on hiatus for 2019, due to the lack of resources required to organize the event.   The Sentinel Tribune had organized the show the past three years but requested another organization to take over in 2019. The Downtown BG S.I.D. explored the possibility of putting on the show in BG. After reviewing it with the car show committee, board members and some local merchants, the decision was made to put the Classics on Main Car Show on hiatus for 2019. Downtown BG S.I.D. is adding a non-juried car show on July 19, 2019 to add to the excitement of Firefly Nights. This exciting opportunity will keep the comradery alive amongst our car enthusiasts and add additional entertainment for the community. The Car Rally will be held in the Huntington Center parking lot on the corner of Clough and Main St. in Bowling Green, OH. The event will be free. Times, registration and additional information will be listed on our website beginning in June 2019 at www.donwtownbgohio.org. Downtown BG S.I.D. would like to thank the Sentinel Tribune, volunteers and car enthusiasts that have helped with Classics on Main over the years.  Please call our office at 419-354-4332 if your organization or car club would like to organize this event for 2020. We would be more than willing to help promote.. 


Food trucks added to the mix at BG Farmers Market

From DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN It’s hard to believe Market season is almost here! Your favorite Downtown Market can’t wait for the 2019 Season to start! After a record breaking year of vendors, customers, and community support- the market is ready to bring a fun new element to the table. Last year, new food vendors were a huge hit amongst all attendees. Market guests were given a chance to refuel so they could hang out just a little longer to enjoy the festivities. Our Market Staff wants to keep that momentum going into the 2019 year by bringing an even bigger food element to the market- Food Trucks. As fate would have it, Phil Barone, President of the Food Truck Association has big hopes to bring his many trucks to the Bowling Green Community. His association provides diverse, professional and delicious options for many festivals and events in the Northwest Ohio area. It seems like a perfect timing to join our Farmers’ Market, so we can “pull our great ideas together”, said Phil. “I’m looking forward to working with Sam, Tony, and the entire Downtown BG Special Improvement District to bring a new exciting element to the market”. Director of Downtown Bowling Green S.I.D., Tony Vetter agreed with the partnership. “It just makes sense for the community, for these great organizations to come together for a successful weekly event.”  “Our market attendees and vendors spoke up last year, and we’re ready for this combo to happen,” said Market Manager, Samantha Beane. “Our market is going into its fourteenth season, and I want to work with great groups like the Food Truck Association, to keep our market exciting, fun, and the place to be on Wednesday nights!  The 2019 Market season begins May 8th and runs through October 16th, 2019. The Wednesday evening market runs from 4-7pm in the Huntington Bank Parking lot at 201 S. Main Street (on the corner of Clough & Main Street). Part of Clough Street will be blocked off for the Food trucks and the safety of those attending. Food trucks will be present at each market alongside both seasoned and new vendors. Our market will offer live music from the Stones Throw Stage, special events throughout the season and much more!!  For more information, follow the Downtown Bowling Green Farmers’ Market on Facebook or Instagram (@bgfarmersmarketoh)  Please check out our new website; downtownbgohio.org – click on the events tab,…


Gnome decorating contest & raffle added to Art Walk (updated)

From DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN The 27th Annual Art Walk will take place throughout historic Downtown Bowling Green on Saturday, April 27 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., followed by a reception at the Wood County District Public Library starting at 3:30 p.m. This free event welcomes everyone to come experience the work of many local artists and participate in this year’s gnome raffle. As of Tuesday the gnomes are sold out. Anyone can stop by our Downtown Bowling Green’s Special Improvement Office at 130 S. Main St. located in the Four Corners Center to pick up their very own gnome for $15 (cash or checks can be written out to The Downtown Foundation, Inc.). After you pick up your gnome, you can decorate it and return it to our office before 5 p.m. on April 19 so we can have them ready to be showcased at The Wood County District Public Library during Art Walk. When you bring the gnome back, you will be entered in a drawing to win $50 in Downtown Dollars! The number of gnomes available is limited so please do not miss your chance to participate. All proceeds of the raffle will go toward the Downtown Foundation’s Flower Fund that is used to purchase and maintain the beautiful blooms that fill our historic downtown. For a chance to win a gnome you must purchase raffle tickets during Art Walk at The Wood County District Public Library. Raffle tickets cost $1 each or 6 tickets for $5! The Gnome Show will take place at The Wood County District Public Library (251 N. Main Street). The gnome raffle will be held after 3:30 during the Art Walk Reception. We look forward to having a great turn out! We recommend that you call our office before you stop in to make sure we aren’t in a meeting (419-354-4332). Please continue to check our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/DowntownBGohio/) or our webpage (downtownbgohio.org/art-walk) to keep up with the latest news and updates.


Chocolate Crawl brings out competitive nature in choco-holics

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News My husband, a runner, does not understand the skill and stamina required to complete a “Chocolate Crawl.” He cannot comprehend how an event called a “crawl” is athletic. But this year’s Chocolate Crawl went from 16 business participants last year to 42 this year. As far as I’m concerned, that is like going from a 5K to a marathon. My husband also has no respect for the training regimen it takes leading up to the annual event held in downtown Bowling Green as a fundraiser for United Way during the city’s Winterfest. And he refuses to acknowledge that there is a technique: Gloves slow you down. No matter how cold it is, repeated removal and replacement of gloves cuts into your finish time. The harsh reality is, some places will run out of chocolates before feeding all 500 participants.Hydrate. Take advantage of the stores offering the chocolate smoothies, the chocolate “buzz” rum shots, the hot chocolate and the chocolate shooters which threw in a shot of espresso so “crawlers” could maintain their pace.Use the buddy system. When you are eating chocolate on the crawl, you need a true friend who will tell you if your face is covered in hastily eaten chocolate. (Thank you, Julie.)Accessorize with a bag, since consuming all the chocolate on site is not advisable.Consult the downtown map occasionally to make sure you stay on course and don’t miss chocolate stops. Robin Cross, of Bowling Green, was going strong as she started the Chocolate Crawl Friday evening. She had just stopped in at SamB’s for one of the true delicacies on the crawl route – a Belgian chocolate truffle dipped in Columbian white chocolate with an Amareno cherry on top. “It’s my favorite so far,” Cross said. Of course, she hadn’t turned down the more common chocolate treats of the Hershey variety. The lure of chocolate was enough to get her out in the cold. “It’s for a good cause … and you gotta love chocolate,” she said. Charlotte Perlaky, 10, of Sylvania, dips into the chocolate fountain at Waddington Jewelers. At Waddington Jewelers, crawlers were given the choice of strawberries, pretzels or rice krispie treats to drench in a chocolate fountain. “I could just do this all day. It’s so satisfying,” Aimee Burns said as she held a treat under the running milk chocolate. This was Burns’ second year…


Downtown BG seeks ice sculpture sponsors

From DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN Winterfest BG Chillabration is back for 2019 on Feb. 8 and 9 even bigger and better than last year. The Saturday evening of live bands in a heated tent, incredible ice bar and amazing ice garden met with rave reviews.  This year a larger Frozen Swamp Tent will not only provide shelter for live music from 4 – 11 p.m., it will also present the Winter Market from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. All this happens in the Huntington parking lot on the corner of Clough and S. Main Streets. This is also the location for our beautiful ice garden and live ice carving demonstrations.  This year’s sculptures will show a variety of our town’s finest establishments logos and images from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. These amazing works of ice art are sure to be a hit with every age group. This event offers something for everyone.  Families can come out for the day and enjoy the festivities and at night people can enjoy the hours of entertainment, craft beer and wine served from behind the incredible ice bar.   The Downtown Foundation will be overseeing the ice sculpture sales as a fundraiser. The foundation sponsors to commission a custom ice sculpture displayed for the thousands of people expected to attend.  \They will also be seen via our website, social media and WTOL coverage. The funds raised will help us continue to complete beautification projects in our historic downtown.   Contact our office at 419-354-4332 or download an order form from our website at DowntownBGOhio.org.


No such thing as free parking … somebody’s got to pay

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   One by one, the business owners and city officials took turns trying a different type of parking kiosk that promised to be easy to use, faster for patrons, and less likely to cause frustration for shoppers. The sample kiosk, presented recently by International Parking Solutions, was promoted as taking less than 10 seconds to use. But as with most technology, human error and uncertainty sometimes stretched out the time. Bowling Green Police Chief Tony Hetrick, whose staff patrols the city parking lots, said the kiosks used in the lot behind Panera were “not well received.” The city and a parking task force is considering several downtown parking options – including the replacement of the current kiosks with new easier models. “You want to make it as convenient as you can,” said Michael Wilson of IPS. The new sample kiosk proved to be easier – since it allows users to pay in a variety of ways with a variety of paths to get there. Unlike the existing kiosks, this one does not send the motorist back to square one if a step is missed. “If this takes you longer than 10 seconds, it’s too long,” Wilson said. But there are some problems with the IPS kiosk. It will accept credit cards or coins – but programming it to accept dollar bills costs an extra $1,500 per kiosk. Motorists who frequent the lots can go online and register their credit card to streamline the process more. Like the current kiosks in use, the IPS model also notifies motorists on their phones of their parking time nearing expiration. The motorists can then ask for more time. “The revenue side of parking is critical to cities,” Wilson said. It’s often that money that is used to maintain city parking lots and sidewalks, he said. The average minimum parking cost in cities is $1 an hour. Anything less than $1 is not work the credit card processing, Wilson said. Costs in larger communities are much higher, like $2.75 an hour in Madison, Wisconsin, and $6.50 an hour in San Francisco, he added. Kim Thomas, owner of the H&R Block building on South Main Street, said the parking issue is more complicated than it appears. “Of course, free parking sounds wonderful,” she said. But the fact that several downtown apartment renters use city parking lots for their vehicles…


BG residents urged to shop locally at small businesses for holidays

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green officials suggested local resident go big and shop small. With holiday shopping season officially starting on Friday, Bowling Green officials urged local residents to spend some money with local small businesses. Bowling Green Mayor Dick Edwards and new Downtown BG Director Tony Vetter took to the podium at the City Council meeting Monday evening to promote “Small Business Saturday” which follows this week’s “Black Friday.” The “Small Business Saturday” moniker is an annual reminder of the need to support small businesses, Edwards said. The annual shopping promotion started in 2010 in response to the recession. It was intended to help small businesses recover, Vetter said. In the U.S., 28.8 million small businesses account for 99 percent of businesses, employing more than 48 percent of American workers, the mayor said. The Saturday after Thanksgiving has become a very important day in the life of many small retailers. “It is a break even day for a lot of small businesses,” Edwards said. Downtown Bowling Green retailers are counting on local residents spending some of their holiday shopping money here. “Downtown Bowling Green is so important to our economy,” the mayor said. And Vetter noted that “Small Business Saturday” is not just about downtown and not just about this weekend. “Shop small is not just this weekend. It’s all year round,” Vetter said. Also at Monday’s meeting, City Council approved a solar project easement and lease agreement with the Wood County Commissioners and Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The city is researching the viability of building a community solar field on property owned by those two entities on the north side of East Gypsy Lane Road, just east of Interstate 75. Council also heard from a Bowling Green State University graduate student in public administration, who has been researching the financial history of the city in the 1970s when the city budget was very stretched. He mentioned that he has been unable to access some records, and urged council to preserve such records for safekeeping. Council President Mike Aspacher assured the student that the city complies with all record retention rules, but said council will take the request under advisement. Council members Bruce Jeffers asked the student to send council a copy of his research, and Bill Herald asked him to report back to council on his research. In other business at…


BG council member questions Columbia Gas protocols

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   At least one Bowling Green City Council member is not ready to give Columbia Gas a pat on the back for agreeing to notify the city more promptly in case of an emergency. On Monday evening, Council member Greg Robinette complimented the local response by firefighters to a serious gas leak last month. But he referred to Columbia Gas’ response protocol as “negligent and reckless.” Gas company officials met with city officials and agreed to not wait so long to call the fire division in the case of another leak. But that gave Robinette little comfort. “I’m still quite concerned about Columbia Gas and their internal policies,” Robinette said. “Despite their assurances to do better, I don’t think we should give them a pass.” He referred to comments made by a Columbia Gas official after a leak that allowed natural gas levels to reach explosive levels in downtown Bowling Green. After the leak, Columbia Gas defended its response. Cheri Pastula, communications and community relations manager for Columbia Gas, said the gas crews followed proper procedures. The fire division was notified when the gas company knew the electricity needed to be shut off, she said. The fire division removed the electric meter from the buildings involved. “We have gas professionals that are experienced in emergency response and will notify first responders when necessary,” Pastula said. “All of our policies and procedures were followed appropriately and most importantly, safely.” Robinette called that statement an “outrageous admission” by Columbia Gas. He cited what he called a “disregard to the safety of residents.” City Council member John Zanfardino asked about the seriousness of the gas leak. “We were like a cigarette lighting away from blowing up a building,” he asked. Bowling Green Fire Chief Bill Moorman said the gas is “highly explosive” and had reached explosive levels. Moorman reported to City Council the results of a meeting that he and Public Works Director Brian Craft had with Columbia Gas officials days after the downtown leak. Moorman said he and Craft had a very frank conversation with them. “It was made very clear that would never happen again here in Bowling Green,” Moorman said. Columbia Gas officials agreed go beyond their policies and immediately notify Bowling Green Fire Division if gas leaks in the downtown construction area get close to dangerous levels again. On Sept. 13, a…


Tricked-out Firefly Nights will offer plenty of treats for kids & grownups

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Firefly Nights is adding some new tricks to the downtown festival to provide more treats for kids and adults alike.  The Firefly Nights Fall Festival will be held Friday, Oct. 19 from 6 to 10 p.m. in downtown Bowling Green. The festival continues the series of events offered throughout the summer. Now it’ll change colors just a bit to fit the season. For kids that means a costume contest, trunk and treat, pumpkin decorating, and a kiddie tractor pull. For adults that means a farmers market, more music, free yoga classes, and beer gardens on both ends of Main Street. Adults are invited to come in costume as well. The fall festival took shape through parallel discussions by the Firefly organizers and the downtown merchants. Mary Hinkelman, former Downtown Bowling Green director and now Chamber of Commerce executive director, said the concerns about downtown trick or treat were raised by merchants. Downtown trick or treating had outgrown the streets. She estimated about 2,000 children trick-or-treated downtown last year. That many youngsters accompanied by adults jammed the sidewalks, causing safety concerns. The merchants wondered: What if they could block off the street as they do for Firefly Nights? Hinkelman took the idea to the board of directors and they approved. So did the Firefly Nights organizers who were already considering doing one more festival in fall. “I think it was the zeitgeist of the time,” said Laura Wicks of Grounds for Thought. “You know how small towns work — good ideas just grow.” A new partnership was born. Laura Wicks said the idea was: “Why not make it more of a family friendly activity instead of just filling up a bag of candy?” So the Fall Firefly Nights will be held instead of downtown trick or treat, which had typically been on the Thursday before Halloween. In place of children going to door to door to businesses, Thayer Family dealerships is bringing cars downtown, and treats will be doled out from the trunks. Trinity United Methodist, a couple blocks off Main Street, will also hold its trunk or treat event that night from 6 to 8 p.m. In the Firefly costume contest, judges roaming the crowd will select 40 kids — 20 from earlier in the night, 20 from later — based on the creativity and effort put into their outfi. Firefly Nights will also…


Gas leak downtown reached dangerously high levels

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Several businesses and apartments in downtown Bowling Green were evacuated Thursday evening after dangerously high levels of natural gas were detected in the area. Laura Wicks, of Grounds for Thought, said that she noticed the gas smell shortly before 6 p.m. The coffee shop and Coyote Beads, both on the west side of the 100 block of South Main Street, were shut to the public after that because of the gas smell. Owners of those two businesses and Lahey Appliance & TV said Columbia Gas teams were in their stores working on gas lines earlier in the day on Thursday. The natural gas company has been working in the downtown area all summer replacing old gas lines. Wicks said a Columbia Gas employee was on the scene, and told her and Gayle Walterbach of Coyote Beads that he needed to call in more help to handle the problem. However, the Bowling Green Fire Division was not notified of the gas leak until nearly two hours after the smells were noticed, when Columbia Gas called 911. “We were never notified until 8,” Fire Chief Bill Moorman said on Friday. When the fire division arrived downtown, the smell of natural gas was obvious. Atmospheric tests done by firefighters showed high levels of gas. “The gas levels were at a dangerous level,” Moorman said. The fire chief classified the gas levels as being in the “lower explosive limits.” “It was getting to the point that a spark, anything can really set it off,” Moorman said. “Pretty much anything ignites natural gas.” The Bowling Green Police Division joined the fire division in evacuating the businesses and residents in the general area of the leak in the 100 block of South Main Street. The street was also closed to traffic to limit the risks. “Fortunately, after 8 p.m. most of the businesses are closed anyway,” Moorman said. The Columbia Gas spokesperson for the Bowling Green project was not available Friday afternoon, but Moorman said the crew members on the scene Thursday evening said they were having difficulty shutting the leak, and were initially unsure if the leak was from an old or new line. The fire division ventilated the affected buildings and stayed on the scene until about 11:20 p.m. “It was a dangerous situation. It was handled well by police and fire,” Moorman said. However, city…


Mary Hinkelman named new director of BG Chamber

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Mary Hinkelman – who has made Bowling Green her business – will soon take on a broader workload. She is going from being a cheerleader and advocate for downtown businesses to meeting the needs of 450 businesses in the entire Bowling Green community. Hinkelman has been named the new executive director of the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce, a position held by Earlene Kilpatrick for the last decade. She relishes the challenge. “You never tell me that I can’t do something,” Hinkelman said with a smile. The common denominator with her old job and new position is the focus on local businesses. “Doing things with the businesses is the favorite part of my job,” she said. Hinkelman admits she won’t miss the 6 a.m. phone calls from the downtown groundskeepers, or cleaning the streets on some Saturday mornings. But she is looking forward to continuing working side-by-side with businesses. As Downtown BG director, she represented about 175 businesses in the downtown area – everything from retail and restaurants, to law offices, medical services, and non-profits. As chamber director, Hinkelman will be spreading her skills to the entire business community. She knows the job will be a challenge. “I know that the way people do business is very different than 10 or 15 years ago,” she said. “Are we still meeting the needs of the chamber?” Hinkelman would like to focus on the creation of a business incubator space in the city to help entrepreneurs get started. “This is still in its infancy,” she said. “It would be a place for someone to launch a product and see what the interest would be.” The chamber of commerce announced Hinkelman’s hiring Friday morning. She was one of 65 applicants for the position. “It was very humbling,” she said. Hinkelman is proud of her two-plus years as downtown director. “I saw there was a difference being made,” she said. During her tenure, the downtown initiated a Chocolate Crawl. “That was wonderful,” she said. The Downtown Farmers Market has expanded and is expected to have more than 100 vendors next year. A winter market is being started, which is “super exciting.” The Art Walk was revived with the addition of the “one-bite competition.” “The numbers were dwindling, but people love food,” she said. And the summer Firefly Nights were so successful the event is continuing into…



Food truck discussion takes sweet and sour twist

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The discussion over food truck rules in Bowling Green erupted into a verbal food fight Wednesday evening. But when it was over, rules allowing food trucks to operate in the city were ready to move on to City Council. On one side of the dispute was council member Bill Herald, who had spent countless hours covering every possible angle of the mobile food truck issue in a 180-page slide presentation. On the other side were council members Sandy Rowland and John Zanfardino, who wanted to move along the process, stop reviewing the slide presentation, and instead discuss a one-page food truck permit proposed by Rowland. “We talked about the size of this report,” Rowland said to Herald, referring to council members asking the committee to move along the process. “It’s taken far too long at this point.” While the committee has held eight meetings, they took place over a condensed space of less than two months, Herald said. He stressed that the one-page permit proposal “isn’t as rich with detail,” as his 180-page report. Herald asked his fellow council members to give him a half hour to get through his executive summary of 21 pages. “I think we’ve been thorough. We’ve been comprehensive,” Zanfardino said. “I don’t mean to be argumentative up here,” Zanfardino said, but added that he wanted Wednesday’s meeting to end with a plan that council as a whole could review. Rowland agreed, and pushed for a product that could go before City Council soon. But both agreed to let Herald start through his executive summary. As they studied the slides, Rowland and Zanfardino pointed out unnecessary specifics or redundancies. For example, there was no need to stipulate that the food sold has to be legal, or to identify the type of vehicles allowed. The locations where food trucks would be permitted was narrowed down to not allow the vehicles on Main Street, Wooster Street or any of the sides streets one block off of those. Those restrictions are due to safety on the state routes, which don’t have much spare room. “It’s just not made for it,” Herald said of the downtown streets. Rowland and Zanfardino agreed. “I’m personally trying to strike a balance” between local concerns and mobile food vendors, Zanfardino said. Food trucks will also not be allowed in city parking lots unless for special events….


The Stacked Deck offers gaming fans a new place to gather in downtown BG

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Joe Busch was in high school, playing Dungeons and Dragons had a “Cheetos in the basement” stigma attached to it, so he and his friends used the school chess as a cover. Now role playing games and the card game Magic are more popular and accepted. Busch is out in the open with his love for the games as the new owner of The Stacked Deck, a gaming shop in downtown Bowling Green. Busch said he first got into gaming in junior high. Like many others in his generation Pokémon served as the gateway game. He and his friends heard about Magic the Gathering, which was more complex with deeper back story, so they started playing that. Busch said he loved writing and telling stories, so in high school, he started his own Dungeon and Dragons campaign, conducted under the cover of the chess club, and continued through his college years. The New Jersey native, Busch attended Rowan University where he studied journalism. Summers he’d come home and muster his friends and resume the campaign. That’s the appeal of role playing games in the world of fast paced video play. Video games may have good stories, he said, but those tales are created by someone else. “Dungeons and Dragons moves with you,” he said. “It’s writing a story but with a group of five people all contributing. You can do whatever you want. You’re just having fun telling the story together.” Whether engaged in role playing, another board game, or a Magic, the social aspect of people gathering for fun and camaraderie is part of the attraction. From the beginning Busch knew he wanted to do more than sell games and cards, but wanted to have a place where people could play uninhibited without the questioning looks of people wondering what they were doing rolling those strange dice and talking about fireballs. “It’s not like you’re an outsider doing something like that here,” he said. The appeal is broad. “You can have anybody play with anybody.” Fathers bring in their kids to get their first starter deck of Magic cards. He had a man in his 70s stop by. He’d seen YouTube videos about Magic, and was thinking about taking the game up. When Busch went to the bank to set up his business account, the banker was excited because he played Magic….


Food trucks stir up worry for brick and mortar restaurants

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   It was the battle between hot dogs and Philly cheese steaks Monday during the first meeting tackling the food truck issue in Bowling Green. Brick and mortar restaurants and mobile food trucks manage to co-exist in other communities – so Bowling Green is looking for the secret recipe to allow both to operate in this city. But the common ground for rooted and wheeled restaurants may take awhile to find. “We’re all in the same boat,” said Aaron Evanoff as he talked about his plan for a hot dog food truck. “We’re not in the same boat,” Jim Gavarone, owner of Mr. Spots, disagreed from the audience. The current city ordinance permits food trucks, but requires them on private property with large setbacks in some areas, and only during limited hours. The rules have been found to be too cumbersome, so a City Council committee has been charged with finding a middle ground that can work for citizens, existing brick and mortar restaurants and mobile vendors. Monday was the first meeting of the Public Lands and Buildings Committee, made up of council members Bill Herald, Sandy Rowland and John Zanfardino. The committee will meet again on Saturday for a “really good roll up your sleeves working session” from 8 to 11 a.m., in the council chambers. Zanfardino said many more meetings will have to be held before recommendations can be made to council. “I’m hoping we can have it done sooner rather than later,” Herald said. “But not so quick that we stifle public input.” “It’s very important that we get public input. You don’t want to leave it up to us,” Herald said. The committee will study actions that would allow food trucks to operate, while benefiting the public , promoting entrepreneurship, adding to a strong downtown, and enhancing citizens’ experiences. The group will look for a balance that will not hurt existing restaurants and maintain a vibrant downtown. Rowland talked about the success that cities like Perrysburg and Toledo have experienced with food trucks. She added that Bowling Green Planning Director Heather Sayler has visited other college towns, like Kent and Oxford, to explore their food truck regulations. The primary locations in Bowling Green for mobile food vendors are likely the downtown, areas close to the BGSU campus, and the city parks. But the committee first needs to hear from…