Government

BG joins the nation in rallying for immigrant families

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Nearly 250 Bowling Green citizens sweltered in the sun Saturday to add their voices to the national cry for justice for families seeking refuge in America. They gathered on Wooster Green to be counted among the 800-plus rallies held across the nation today with their top message being – families belong together. They held signs saying “Resist Hate,” “Reunite Broken Hearts,” and “The Pilgrims were Undocumented.” They came to say their country doesn’t treat people with such cruelty. And their Christianity doesn’t turn away people in need. They listened as Dr. Bill Donnelly, a psychologist who specializes in the care of children, talked about the traumatic effects the forced separations will have on children taken from their parents as they cross the southern U.S. border. “There will be devastating consequences for children and their family members,” Donnelly said. Decades of research show that children forcibly taken from their families are likely to suffer long-term problems of anxiety, depression, panic and grief, he said. “There is nothing more important for the mental health and physical health of a child,” than being with family, Donnelly said. Children crossing the border with their parents had already undergone great stress making the dangerous trek into the U.S. “They’re not coming in a luxury train,” he said. “Children rely on their parents for support in difficult times.” Despite President Donald Trump’s executive order that children no longer be separated from their parents at the border, very few families have been reunited. More than 2,000 children are still being held in detention centers, and it appears that in many cases, the federal government does not know where some separated children are so they can be reunited with parents. “This policy is needless and cruel,” Donnelly said. “We know children are not reunited with their parents.” It’s that image that brought Sheila Brown to Saturday’s rally. “I’m here to help support immigrant families,” Brown said. “I can’t even fathom having my children torn from me just because I’m looking for a better life for…


BG getting closer to building community solar project

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The future is getting brighter for the proposed community solar project in Bowling Green. On Thursday, the Wood County Commissioners entered an agreement with the city to allow 50 acres of county land to be studied as a potential site for a solar field. The Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities has also agreed to allow 20 acres of its neighboring land to be part of the project. The 70 acres sit on the north side of East Gypsy Lane Road, between Interstate 75 and Wood Lane facilities. The property is currently leased for farming. “This is meant to be a community project,” said Daryl Stockburger, assistant director of Bowling Green Public Utilities. “Everybody is talking about doing their best to make this succeed.” The next step will now be to get the approval from the city’s Board of Public Utilities and then from City Council. Both of those entities have already shown strong support for solar power, by backing the city’s solar field on Carter and Newton roads. That field, at 165 acres, is the largest solar field in Ohio. Bowling Green gets a portion of the power generated at that solar field – enough to supply nearly 5 percent of the city’s energy needs. This new project, on East Gypsy Lane, would be different in that it would be a community solar field, which means city residents and businesses could sign up to be a part of the project and get electricity from the kilowatts generated at the solar field, according to Bowling Green Public Utilities Director Brian O’Connell. All of the energy created at the proposed site could be used to power Bowling Green. The community field could produce up to 10 megawatts, which is about half of the power generated at the Carter Road site. The panels would likely rotate with the sun during the day to maximize the energy generated. The “community solar” concept is a growing trend across the nation, according to O’Connell. Bowling Green residents and businesses could sign up…


BG sewer treatment plant now smelling much sweeter

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The plant that treats Bowling Green’s sewage isn’t accustomed to getting compliments from its neighbors about smells emitted from the site. But recently, the plant superintendent got some thank you notes about the lack of foul odors. That was welcome news to Doug Clark, superintendent of the Water Pollution Control Plant on Dunbridge Road. And that means that the recent investments made by the city in odor control are working. In the past, the wastewater plant made several attempts to sweeten the smells emitted. It uses an aerobic digestion process with bacteria that helps consume the waste. To lower the ammonia content, the wastewater is run through filters layered with large rocks, then smaller porous rocks, then root material. That process gets rid of some odors, but “quite frankly, not the most offensive ones,” Clark said in 2016. The complaints continued – primarily from neighboring businesses and Bowling Green State University. So Clark and Brian O’Connell, director of public utilities for the city, visited the wastewater plant in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, which uses activated carbon to take out all the remaining odors that aren’t stopped by the aerobic digestion process. “It’s the belts and suspenders part of the equipment that takes care of the odors that get through the biofilter,” O’Connell said after their visit. “We’re hopeful it will benefit us the same way.” The Bowling Green facility staff believed the two likely sources of the stench were the septage receiving station and the biofilter that removes the bacteria from the waste and turns it into a harmless solid. A misting odor neutralizer was added to the biofilter’s exhaust fan in 2016, but it had limited success. The septage station had no odor control. “The odors can be quite foul,” O’Connell said. “We’ve tried to get this problem licked in the past,” but the fixes always proved to be temporary. The Pennsylvania plant installed a carbon filter system to treat the exhaust air for odors. That change ended all odor complaints, including from the Holiday Inn located right…


Perrysburg thirsty for answers – touring BG water plant

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The water deal with Toledo is seemingly sunk, so it looks like Plan B for communities searching for quality water may be Bowling Green. Perrysburg city officials are touring the Bowling Green water treatment plant on Wednesday. “We’ve tried to answer questions for them,” Bowling Green Public Utilities Director Brian O’Connell said Monday evening to the city’s utilities board. “I’m not sure where it’s going to go,” O’Connell said. “They are in an information gathering phase.” Concerns about water quality, quantity and costs had resulted in a possible regional water system with Toledo in the center. However, that plan – called the Toledo Area Water Authority – was torpedoed by Toledo officials who weren’t happy with the terms. An earlier study conducted by the Wood County Economic Development Commission had identified Bowling Green as the top option for a regional water source. However, O’Connell said Bowling Green didn’t pursue any talks about expanding its customer base. “We didn’t want to look like we wanted to torpedo the TAWA,” O’Connell said. Bowling Green already sells water wholesale to Grand Rapids, Tontogany and Waterville. O’Connell has heard that with TAWA being sunk, Bowling Green water is being studied as an option by Perrysburg, Maumee and the Northwestern Water and Sewer District. For decades, those entities have purchased water from Toledo. However, the status quo was disrupted in the past few years by several concerns about Toledo water quality and cost. Toledo has been ordered to make many water system improvements, with the costs being passed on to customers who already pay large surcharges. Complaints from communities have shown growing dissatisfaction over the rates and the water quality since the Toledo system went through the algal bloom crisis of 2014. The TAWA agreement focused on providing economic savings and environmentally safe water. The proposal called for a redundant water supply source, so the 2014 water crisis would not be repeated. And it called for transparency in the pricing structure. In the last decade, water rates from Toledo doubled the rate…


ODOT paves way for road, bridge work in Wood County

By JAN LARSON McLAUGLIN BG Independent News   Summertime – the season of vacations, longer days, and often long delays or detours due to road construction. “Orange barrels. Everybody’s favorite,” said Phil Senn, area engineer for the Ohio Department of Transportation District 2, as he told the Wood County commissioners Tuesday about projects planned in the county. “We’ve got a lot going on,” Senn said. Following is a list of ODOT bridge projects in Wood County this year: Waterville bridge replacement at Ohio 64 and Ohio 65, costing $14 million, with a completion date of September 2020. A 45-day closure of the bridge began on June 18 for construction of a roundabout on the Wood County side. Wooster Street over Interstate 75, in Bowling Green, with plans to convert the intersections to roundabouts, costing $9.6 million. The project, which includes redecking the bridge over I-75, and sanitary sewer and waterline work, will be completed November 2019. Ohio 281 over I-75, south of Bowling Green, involving a bridge deck replacement, costing $1.1 million. The bridge is open now, and all work should be completed next month. Ohio 579 bridge replacements over Dry Creek and Cedar Creek, costing $1.6 million, to be completed this October. CSX railroad bridge by the Ohio Turnpike will be demolished, costing $2.2 million, to be completed June 2019. Road resurfacing projects in Wood County this year include: U.S. 20 paving from East Boundary Street to Lime City Road, costing $3.4 million, to be completed in August; a new traffic signal at Thompson Road; sidewalk extension from Holiday Inn to Heartland driveway. The Route 20 paving work is complete except for land striping. Ohio 25 paving from Jefferson Street to south of Roachton Road, costing $3.4 million. The paving is complete, but striping must be finished. Ohio 199 paving from Ohio 105 to Niederhouse Road, costing $664,000, to be complete in October. Route 579 paving from Ohio 51 to Ottawa County line, costing $1.6 million, to be done in October. ODOT is planning the following intersection construction work in Wood County: Left turn…


Talking trash – county commissioners get tour of landfill

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   It wasn’t that long ago that landfills were unregulated piles of garbage. And in Wood County, nearly every town and township had one. Items that weren’t dumped were often burned in backyards. As the Wood County Commissioners toured the county landfill last month, they were reminded how those days were long gone. “It’s just not a hole in the ground anymore,” said Ken Vollmar, head of landfill operations, as he drove the commissioners on their annual tour of the facility that opened west of Bowling Green in 1972. The bottom of the landfill has an EPA-approved liner, and once an area is full, it gets an EPA-approved cover. Methane gas is monitored with a series of wells, and leachate is captured so it doesn’t move off site. Wood County is fortunate to have its own landfill, Vollmar said. “You can keep prices competitive,” he said. If the county didn’t have its own facility, the private landfills would be able to bump up their prices. “We keep them in check for Wood County citizens.” For a period of nearly 15 years, the Wood County Landfill averaged about 35,000 tons a year taken in. Then Henry County closed its facility, and for three years, Wood County Landfill took in about 48,000 tons a year. Last year, that tonnage jumped to 58,000. But Wood County doesn’t need to worry about outgrowing its landfill space anytime soon, Vollmar said. The current footprint being used is 43 acres, reaching almost 100 feet high. That footprint is expected to last another six to seven years. In addition to that area, the county also owns 80 acres to the west, 80 acres to the north, and another 40 acres to the northeast. The landfill is in the process of getting a permit from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency to expand to the north acreage. That will give the county another 100 to 132 years of landfill space. As Vollmar drove the commissioners on their tour, he pointed out a major improvement at the landfill….


BG Council split on anti-discrimination language in charter preamble

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Updating the seemingly hum-drum Bowling Green City Charter has stirred some concerns – including some that have been dormant for years. A question debated by City Council last week focused on whether or not non-discrimination wording should be inserted into the preamble of the city charter. Unlike the charter changes that must be voted on by the public, the preamble can be decided by council, explained Council President Mike Aspacher. But council is far from united on whether such language belongs in the introduction. When it came down to a vote, the decision was split. Voting in favor of adding non-discrimination verbiage to the preamble were council members Daniel Gordon, Bill Herald, Sandy Rowland and John Zanfardino. Voting against were Aspacher, Bruce Jeffers and Greg Robinette. Council member Bill Herald cautioned that, if included, the language should be brief and flow well with the rest of the preamble. Anything lengthy could dwarf the rest of the introduction, he said. Others argued that Bowling Green has long prided itself in having a clean charter – that focuses solely on the mechanisms of city government. Jeffers said the preamble currently stresses the importance of “home rule,” which has been whittled away in recent years. Additional wording could take away from the “home rule” emphasis, he said. Aspacher said that while he likely would personally agree with non-discrimination language, he is not inclined to support the change. “It’s not an issue-based charter,” he said. The city has worked hard to make sure the charter does not stray from its focus on the structure of the government and how it functions. Aspacher also pointed out that in recent years, Bowling Green voters have rejected efforts to inject other items in the charter – such as the anti-pipeline amendment last year. “I will not be supporting this,” he said about changing the preamble. Gordon said the wordy might be tricky, but “social equity and social justice” can be included in the preamble. Herald suggested that the non-discrimination language would not have to…


Democrat Zack Space says as auditor he’d look to limit the role of money in politics

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Donald Trump got one thing right, Democrat Zack Space believes. Space, who is running for state auditor, said the president’s assertion during the campaign that the political system “was rigged” resonated with many voters. Space doesn’t agree with Trump on much but he agrees with him on that. “The system has been rigged by money and political greed,” Space said during a recent campaign stop in Bowling Green. “The money manifests itself by political contributions, all of which are legal, and improper influence on policy. And political greed manifests itself through gerrymandering. Politicians drawing their own lines.” That allows politicians to select their voters, instead of voters selecting their candidates. As auditor he’ll have a say in addressing that. The auditor will have a place on the panel that will redraw state legislative districts, and possibly on the one that redraws congressional districts. Space, though, has mixed feelings about Issue 1, the constitutional amendment calling for the redrawing of congressional districts, which passed in May. While it is a step in the right direction, he said, it still will allow for gerrymandering by the Republican state legislature. All they have to do is lure a third of Democrats with “extremely safe” seats, and the status quo is maintained. “So the potential for gerrymandering still exists.” This kind of political chicanery “causes people to lose in politics and the institution of government and in democracy itself,” Space said. “When they lose faith in democracy they naturally turn to authoritarianism.” The influence of money in politics is seen in the two controversies roiling state government – for-profit charter schools and pay-day lending. The current a state auditor Republican Dave Yost, who is running for attorney general, could have brought the ECOT scandal to a head by declaring the books unauditable. Then it would be up to a judge to decide whether that was a proper use of public funds. Instead the Democrat said, the charter school company continued to received state money, costing local school district millions of dollars. Earlier this…


Voters to decide 2 county levies in fall – though 1 is still in limbo

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Wood County voters will decide the fate of two county-wide levies this fall. The county commissioners heard from both groups last week. One levy is a reduced renewal levy – dropped from the current 2.95-mills to 2.45 mills for Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities. The other is still a mystery. A request had been made for an increase from a 1-mill to a 1.3-mill levy for Wood County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services. The commissioners seem to be on board with the Wood Lane request. But they have expressed reservations about the increased levy request from ADAMHS. During the presentation by Wood Lane officials, Superintendent Brent Baer talked about the “dynamic growth in services” that the board is seeing. And Martha Woelke, of the board, said great deliberation went into the levy request. “We did everything we can to maximize state and federal money,” she told the commissioners. The board has been able to reduce its levy collections some years, but feels that 2.45 mills is the lowest it can go for the renewal. When people with developmental disabilities waive their right to institutional care, they are picked up by community based services – like Wood Lane. That agency then identifies their needs and develops plans to meet them, Baer said. The waivers allow for federal funding, but the community agency must still pick up 40 percent of the costs, said finance officer Steve Foster. “Our commitments are for the life of an individual,” Baer said. Demands are growing as the population here is increasing. “Wood County is one of the few counties in Ohio that’s growing,” Baer said. About five years ago, there were 226 consumers on waivers. Now there are 425. Baer expects that number to double again in the next five years. The board may need to be back in five years, asking for a greater levy, but this should do for now, Baer said. It’s not often that a county board approaches the county commissioners about lowering a levy request….


BGSU & OSU heads: Higher education a wise investment

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Several decades ago, college was affordable for a few, and a dream for all the others. A few decades later, college was the place kids were expected to go to start their futures. Now, the pendulum has swung back again, with college costs and job prospects leading to a push in the trades. But BGSU President Rodney Rogers and OSU President Michael Drake held a public conversation Wednesday evening about the lasting value of higher education. “Higher education is a value to young people, a value to our communities, a value to our state,” said State Senator Randy Gardner, R-Bowling Green, who moderated the conversation. A college degree makes a person more employable, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate for someone with a master’s degree is 2.2 percent; a bachelor’s degree is 2.5 percent; an associate’s degree is 3.4 percent; and a high school education, 6.8 percent. And more than 80 percent of the country’s top 100 jobs require a bachelor’s degree. “There’s real value there,” said Gardner, who both Rogers and Drake called a strong advocate for higher education. A college degree also results in bigger paychecks. It offers a better annual return for investment (average 13.7 percent) than the stock market (average 10 percent), Drake said. “It’s really about the best investment a person can make in their future,” the OSU president said. Over a lifetime, that investment averages more than $1 million more in earnings, he added. The perks go beyond the paychecks, Drake said. People with college educations are more likely to rank themselves as happy, are healthier, live longer, and are more engaged in their communities, Drake said. Drake asked those in the audience to envision a map of the U.S. – then put their fingers on a couple areas of great innovation, like Silicon Valley, Boston, or the Research Triangle. “Under your fingers are great universities,” he said. Rogers noted the BGSU alumni who are doing great things in their communities. “That is a part of…


Proposed BG city charter changes hit some rocky roads

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   It will be up to Bowling Green voters to decide the fate of city charter updates. But before that can happen, City Council has to iron out some wrinkles in the proposed charter changes. Some of the wrinkles are relatively small – but others reveal a big divide. Council’s Committee of the Whole met prior to the council meeting Monday evening to go over all the charter changes that would go on the November ballot for voters to decide. Some slid through rather easily. But one hit a roadblock that was insurmountable Monday evening. The biggest divide was over a charter change that would add the description of the planning department. However, the language put before council was drastically cut from what had been proposed by the charter review committee. Jeff Crawford, co-chair of the committee, said the intent was to have a more detailed description of the planning department. Council President Mike Aspacher said the recommendation from the committee had been turned over the City Attorney Mike Marsh to prepare it for legislation. Marsh trimmed the language to be consistent with the other city departments in the charter, and to take out specifics. “We don’t want to limit what the job is,” Marsh said. But some council members objected to the language being watered down. By defining the position, the city is making a commitment, council member John Zanfardino said. “It addresses issues in Bowling Green that need to be spelled out,” he said. “It was included by the group for a reason. We’ve talked about housing for the 13 years I’ve been on council.” The city “flirts with” regulations, but never goes further, Zanfardino said. Les Barber, a member of the charter review commission, admonished council for taking out the detailed definition of the planning department. “I was really disappointed,” he said upon seeing the change. “Critical language had been stripped away. Frankly, I had expected better from this city government.” Barber accused council of “bureaucratic defensive resistance to change.” The city charter has had…


BG checks on Nexus pipeline construction under river

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green and EPA officials met Monday with the Nexus pipeline construction team at the drilling site for the Maumee River crossing. Mayor Dick Edwards promised the Bowling Green community he would make sure experts were watching when the river crossing was done – to make sure it went smoothly. The natural gas pipeline runs very close to the city’s water treatment plant, which gets its water from the Maumee River. “According to the engineering staff, there are no surprises or impediments to date, and the project is proceeding in keeping with the planned schedule,” Edwards reported to City Council Monday evening. The first stage of the river crossing, which is well underway, involves drilling a small diameter pilot hole along a designated directional path. Monday’s briefing from Nexus specifically dealt with the horizontal-directional drilling technology, the project timeline, plus safety and compliance. Attending the meeting with Nexus personnel was the mayor, City Council President Mike Aspacher, BG water treatment plant superintendent Mike Fields, Ohio EPA Director Craig Butler, and Ohio Regional EPA Director Shannon Nabors. Edwards said he is satisfied with the attention to safety on the project. He said all of the 39 conditions outlined by FERC in response to Bowling Green concerns, were being addressed. “It’s something I keep close at hand,” the mayor said about the 39 conditions the pipeline must meet. “The questions raised by Bowling Green are being addressed.” The pipeline construction is under constant monitoring by the Ohio EPA, plus a FERC on-site compliance officer. The mayor said Fields is keeping a close eye on the Bowling Green water intake, located just upriver from the pipeline river crossing. “I know that he is monitoring the situation very, very carefully,” he said of Fields. Aspacher shared the mayor’s relief about the project. “I was very impressed with the degree of oversight,” he said. “It was clear our concerns were being heard.” Edwards said he discussed with EPA officials the environmental damage caused elsewhere in Ohio by the Rover pipeline construction. “The…


BG women protest separation of children and parents seeking asylum

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The Bowling Green women piled into an SUV Thursday afternoon and headed for Detroit to be part of a national protest against a U.S. policy they called inhumane. The numbers aren’t exact, but it’s been estimated that nearly 2,000 children have been separated from their parents at the U.S. border with Mexico in the last six weeks. The Trump administration has said it is simply following the law. But opponents say there is no law requiring that children be taken from parents who are seeking asylum in the U.S. “This is immoral,” said Janet Parks as the Bowling Green women headed up Interstate 75 in Tom Baer’s BG Airport Shuttle. Parks was joined by Joan Callecod, Beatriz Maya, Debra Nicholson, Sandy Rowland and Amanda Schackow – a retired educator, accountant, realtor, retail manager, writer and community advocate. “I’m ashamed of what our country is doing by separating families,” Rowland said. For some, the protest was personal. “I know several people who came here as asylum cases,” Schackow said. “Thinking about their children being taken away is really horrific.” As the SUV continued north, the women talked about tango classes, knitting, travels and food. But the conversation kept circling back to the injustice of children being separated from their parents. “I keep thinking about the trauma the children are going through,” Callecod said. “These are people. These are not animals,” Nicholson said. Maya, originally from Argentina, finds it hard to fathom the harm caused by the separations. “It is unbelievable that somebody can do this. It’s the most horrific thing,” Maya said. These families seeking asylum in the U.S. have made great sacrifices getting here – many trying to escape life-threatening situations, she said. “I went through a dictatorship in Argentina. It is already frightening to be an immigrant,” Maya said. “Do you know what it is to lose your kids to foster care and never know what happened to them?” The Bowling Green women joined about 300 other protesters outside the gates of the immigration detention center…


New sheriff’s deputy in town for courthouse security

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Rob Eaton walked into a mess this morning on his first day on the job as director of security for the Wood County Courthouse Complex. “I walked in and there are alarms going off everywhere. I thought – Holy Toledo,” Eaton said this morning. The phones were down because of a system-wide problem with the phone lines, causing the alarms to blare at the courthouse. “It was baptism by fire,” Wood County Sheriff Mark Wasylyshyn said as he introduced Eaton to the county commissioners this morning. The phones were back in service by 8:20 a.m. Eaton has been with the sheriff’s office for 26 years, starting on the corrections staff, moving to road patrol, serving on the Special Response Team, and most recently in the civil division. He also served 14 years in the Army National Guard. Eaton will receive an annual salary of $65,894. He has no plans to change operations in courthouse security, set up under his predecessor Becky Ewing. “I’m looking forward to this challenge of working with everyone,” he said. Since October, the security at the courthouse complex has been divided. The sheriff’s office is in charge of the grounds, buildings and entrances. The court constables, led by Ron Dicus, are in charge of the courtrooms and adult probation. The primary challenge of the job is clear, Eaton said. “Making sure everyone is safe,” from the public to county employees, he said. At the same time, citizens must feel the courthouse complex is a public facility, Wasylyshyn said. “There’s a tough balance between making everyone feel welcome” and making sure they are save, the sheriff said. Also during his meeting with the county commissioners, Wasylyshyn reported that security staff members are now offering fingerprinting in the atrium at the request of the judges. He also mentioned that the security staff is trying to be more visible in the courthouse and county office building. The commissioners acknowledged seeing the staff throughout the complex.


Voter purge instructions expected from the state

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The strict voter purging process used in Ohio was given the stamp of approval by the U.S. Supreme Court earlier this week. The Wood County Board of Elections – like the rest of the state – has been on hold since the legitimacy of the voter purging has been debated in the courts. But soon, people will again be dropped from the voter rolls if they don’t meet state requirements. The local board of elections will be charged with making the cuts. Carol DeJong, one of the directors at the Wood County Board of Elections, said her opinion on the court ruling was irrelevant. “We are Switzerland here at the board of elections,” she said on Wednesday. “We will of course have to wait till we get instructions from the state,” DeJong said. But since the process of reviewing voting rolls is customary in January and February, she didn’t expect any voters would be purged prior to the general election this fall. The National Voter Registration Act prohibits dropping voters too close to an election, she said. “I don’t expect that we will hear anything new until the beginning of 2019,” she said. The last time Wood County did any purging of voter names was in 2015. That year more than 3,400 registered voters in Wood County were purged from the voting rolls following a directive from the Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted. However, in 2016 a federal appeals court found that Ohio’s process for maintaining its voter rolls violated federal law. A judge ruled that Ohio voters who were improperly removed from registration lists could cast ballots in the 2016 presidential election. But since those names had already been purged, the ruling meant if a person showed up at the polls and was not on the official list, they would be allowed to vote by a provisional ballot. A provisional ballot is a paper ballot that is held in a sealed envelope with the voter’s identification. If the identification information was verified by the elections…