Music

Berlin Philharmonic concertmaster will be guest soloist with BGSU orchestra

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The Bowling Green State University Philharmonia will welcome violinist Noah Bendix-Balgley, concertmaster of the Berlin Philharmonic, for a return guest appearance Nov. 14. The program will feature two well-known pieces by Tchaikovsky, his Symphony No. 5 and Violin Concerto. The 8 p.m. performance will take place in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. A pre-concert talk on the music of Tchaikovsky will be held at 7:15 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall. Bendix-Balgley was appointed the Berlin Philharmonic’s concertmaster in 2014. He gave his first performance with the Bowling Green Philharmonia in 2015. Currently on a North American tour with the Berlin orchestra, he is making a side trip to Bowling Green to perform at BGSU. “We are absolutely thrilled to have Noah visiting Bowling Green to perform with the University’s orchestra, the BG Philharmonia. As one of America’s great violinists, having reached the pinnacle position of concertmaster of the world-renowned Berlin Philharmonic, he is an exceptional representative of the best our country has to offer in the classical music scene,” said Philharmonia conductor Dr. Emily Freeman-Brown, Professor of Creative Arts Excellence and BGSU director of orchestral activities. The opportunity for BGSU students to work with Bendix-Balgley is of great value, said Dr. William Mathis, interim dean of the College of Musical Arts. “Music students in the CMA have multiple opportunities to work with professional musicians throughout their degrees, but to have someone of Mr. Bendix-Balgley’s stature is a special treat to be sure,” Mathis said. “The impact of rehearsing, interacting and performing with a world-class artist is significant, motivating and inspiring — our students will never forget this experience. I daresay that the audience will never forget this concert, either.” Bendix-Balgley has built an international reputation as a violinist, appearing as a soloist with leading orchestras and in festivals winning top prizes in competitions in Europe and the United States. From 2011-15, he was concertmaster of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. His debut recital in Pittsburgh, in which he performed his own cadenzas to the Beethoven Violin Concerto, was named “Best Classical Concert of 2012” by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. He also performed his own version of “The Star-Spangled Banner” for the Pittsburgh Pirates on opening day in 2013 in front of 39,000 fans. As a chamber musician, he has toured North America with the Miro String Quartet and, from 2008-11, was first violinist with the Munich-based Athlos Quartet, which won a special prize at the 2009 Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Competition, in Berlin, and performed throughout Europe. An eclectic musician, Bendix-Balgley has a special interest in klezmer music and has played with klezmer groups and taught klezmer violin at workshops throughout Europe. Last June he premiered his own Klezmer Violin Concerto with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Born in Asheville, N.C., he began playing violin at…


‘Gondoliers’ provides a comic & tuneful respite from dirty politics

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Maybe “The Gondoliers” is just what we need about now. With a political campaign rolling like a torrent of sludge to a messy conclusion, a frothy piece of social satire from another time is a welcomed diversion. The venerable team of Gilbert and Sullivan reminds us that being a doofus is just part of the human condition. Doesn’t matter if you’re royalty or gondolier, you are at heart a fool. But in the world of Gilbert and Sullivan even fools can spin off a tangle of intricate rhyme that precisely delineates the absurd world they inhabit. “The Gondoliers or the King of Barataria” was the team’s last hit back in the last decade of the 19th century. And Bowling Green State University Opera Theatre whips up a production that is true to the absurdist spirit of the original. The show is on stage tonight (Nov. 4) at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. on Kobacker Hall on campus. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $20. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or at www.bgsu.edu/arts. The tale is a subversive fancy, so convoluted and contrived that when the character Luiz (Aaron Hill) repeats the story to Princess Casilda (Alissa Plenzler) she’s just as incredulous as the audience, though not nearly as amused. Casilda is the daughter of down-and-out royalty who married her off as a baby to a prince. When the prince’s family became Methodists “of the most bigoted and persecuting type,” the baby prince is whisked away by the Grand Inquisitor (Brett Pond) to Venice where he was placed with the family of a gondolier who had a son the same age. The father drank so much he forgot which boy was which, so now no one knows, except that stock figure in Gilbert and Sullivan operettas, the nurse. The entire play takes place waiting for the nurse’s arrival in the scene to settle the matter. The prince’s father has died in a revolt, so now the prince, whichever gondolier he is, is the king of Barataria. Those gondeliers Marco (Mark Tenorio) and Guiseppe (Luke Serrano) are the heartthrobs of a gaggle of farm girls, who refuse to select beaus until the handsome gondoliers decide whom to wed. The lucky girls are Gianetta (Hannah Stroth) and Tessa (Amanda Williams). But that makes prince a bigamist. The plot revels in its own complications. No plot turn is without a detour. The cast seems to enjoy navigating through all these ridiculous turns. Serrano and Tenorio bounce off each other nicely, at times acting as one, yet with contrasting voices. Tenorio’s voice seems perfectly matched to the ardent aria“take a pair of sparkling eyes.” Casila’s parents the Duke of Plaza-Toro (Ben…


BGSU arts events through Nov. 16

Through Nov. 21 – “The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramer,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group, continues through Nov. 21 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit is a purported recreation by the Poyais Group of outsider artist Kranmer’s (1867-1977) private lifework, a tent version of the town where she lived, with each tent representing someone who had died. Discovered by a team of anthropologists after her death but then lost in a fire, the installation was remade by the Poyais Group (Jesse Ball, Thordis Bjornsdottir, Olivia Robinson and Jesse Stiles) based on notes by one of the original anthropologists. Gallery Hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Nov. 22 – “Criminal Justice?” an exhibit by activist artists Carol Jacobson and Andrea Bowers, investigates the attitudes and biases embedded in the U.S. criminal justice system. Jacobson is an award-winning social documentary artist whose works in video and photography address issues of women’s criminalization and censorship. See story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/artist-documents-the-cycle-of-abuse-suffered-by-female-inmates/. Bowers’ video “#sweetjane” and drawings explore the 2012 Steubenville, Ohio rape case and the citizens whose activism resulted in two rape convictions. The drawings reproduce the text messages sent among the teenage witnesses to the assault on an underage young woman. “Criminal Justice?” is on view in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Gallery Hours are 11 a.m. – 4p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Nov. 2 – The Faculty Artist Series features the BGSU woodwind faculty in an 8 p.m.performance in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 3 – The International Film Series continues with the 2015 film “Le Dernier Loup (Wolf Totem),” directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud. Life is tenuous for humans and animals in the wonderfully filmed Mongolian steppe. The story presents a stark view of the region 50 years ago, during China’s Cultural Revolution, focusing on Beijing student who goes to live among nomadic herdsmen in 1967. The modern world imperils the ecosystem form the south, while wolves, who hold spiritual meaning for the indigenous people, threaten from the North. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. Free Nov. 3-5 – The 16th annual Winter Wheat festival of writing celebrates writers and readers alike. Created in 2001 and produced by the Mid-American Review on the BGSU campus, the event will host writing workshops, question-and-answer sessions with authors, a book fair of literary journals and presses and an open mic opportunity. Most events will be located in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Winter Wheat is open to the public. A donation is suggested, but events are free for all participants. Nov. 4 – The Bowling Green Opera Theater presents Gilbert and Sullivan’s “The Gondoliers.” This classic opera marks the 12th comic…


BGSU arts events calendar through Nov. 9

At the galleries – “The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramer,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group, continues through Nov. 21 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit, a collaboration with the New Music Festival, claims to be a recreation by the Poyais Group of outsider artist Kranmer’s (1867-1977) private lifework, a tent version of the town where she lived, with each tent representing someone who had died. Discovered by a team of anthropologists after her death but then lost in a fire, the installation was remade by the Poyais Group (Jesse Ball, Thordis Bjornsdottir, Olivia Robinson and Jesse Stiles) based on notes by one of the original anthropologists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Oct. 27–Creative writing M.F.A. students will read from their work at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Oct. 27–The International Film Series continues with the 2012 German film “Oh Boy (A Coffee in Berlin),” directed by Jan Ole Gerster. A young man in the dreamy process of losing everything he has wanders through Berlin to the accompaniment of comedic mood music. His contemporary angst plays out on the black-and-white background of a city with a dark past. It’s never been so difficult to get a cup of coffee in a huge city. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater in Hanna Hall. Free Oct. 27 – A performance of “Evelyn in Purgatory,” an award-winning dark comedy by Topher Payne, will begin at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theater located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Tickets can be purchased form the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171, or visit www.bgsu.edu/arts. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $20. (See story at http://bgindependentmedia.org/bgsu-cast-delivers-heavenly-performance-of-evelyn-in-purgatory/) Oct. 28–The exhibition “Criminal Justice?” opens in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center with a 5:30 p.m. ARTalk by Carol Jacobsen in the gallery. A Stamps School of Art & Design faculty member at the University of Michigan, Jacobson is known for video and photography that addresses issues of women’s criminalization and censorship. Curated by BGSU Galleries Director Jacqueline Nathan, “Criminal Justice?” features activist artists Jacobson and Andrea Bowers, whose work investigates the attitudes and biases embedded in the U.S. justice system. A reception will follow the ARTalk. The exhibit runs through Nov. 20 in the Wankelman Gallery. Free Oct. 28–A performance of “Evelyn in Purgatory,” by Topher Payne, will begin at 8 p.m.in the Eva Marie Saint Theater at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171, or visitwww.bgsu.edu/arts. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance…


‘Tis the season for music of our time

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The New Music Festival at Bowling Green State University is a fall ritual. Just before Halloween, BGSU becomes the center of the contemporary music universe. Maybe that’s why this year’s event started on a macabre note – the opening of “The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramner.” The art installation transforms the Bryan Gallery in the School of Art into a village of the dead. The conceit of the work by the Poyais Group is that folk artist Mary Elizabeth Kramner created these tents as a recreation of her German village, each structure representing how a former inhabitant died. The viewer wanders about this village of the dead in darkness. The tents illuminate at odd intervals, and small organs set among the tents emit mournful chords. The viewer is suspended between life and death, between reality and fantasy. The mystery seeps into the bones. Yet festival, hosted by the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music,  celebrates the music of living composers. Presenting the expected is not in the festival’s mission statement. In another seasonal coincidence, this year’s featured composer is Dai Fujikura, who told the audience at the Composer Talk, that he was influenced early on by the musical scores of horror films. He was about 10, and growing up in Osaka, Japan. This was the music he loved to listen to. He was also drawn to composition because he was a mischievous piano student. He said if he didn’t like a measure of music, even by Beethoven, he would change it. And why did Haydn have a measure of rest? He would just ignore it, much to the displeasure of his piano teacher.  “She was right,” he concedes now. The Composer Talk is a staple of the festival, its keynote address. But every featured guest composer presents it in a different way. Sometimes they delve deep into the intricacies of their scores; sometimes they wax philosophical; and sometimes, as was the case with Frederic Rzewski 10 years ago, they perform. Fujikura’s talk was actually an interview with Kurt Doles, the executive director of the MidAmerican Center. The composer told Doles, and the audience, that he didn’t like watching the horror films, but loved listening to the music. His favorite score is “Alien 3” by Elliot Goldenthal. He liked the way the music mixed in at one point with the sound effects of a human being eaten. He speculated that he loved those scores because the composers stretched instruments to their limits and beyond, mined them for new sounds. Fujikura employs this ever-expanding language of extended techniques in his own music. He explores those sounds in close collaboration with the artists who commission him to write music. He played a recording of a Skype conversation he had with flutist Claire Chase. In it they discuss the…


Kantorski-Pope Duo to help church dedicate new grand piano

On Sunday, Nov. 6 at 3 p.m., the community is invited to a rare concert event in which the congregation of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church will dedicate their new Steinway grand piano. Featuring the renowned Kantorski-Pope Piano Duo, the concert will be held in the sanctuary of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, 871 East Boundary Street, Perrysburg.   Formed in 1988 by pianists Valrie Kantorski and Ann Almond Pope, the Duo is a Steinway Artist Ensemble and has been three-time winner of First Prize in the Graves Duo-Piano Competition. The two-piano ensemble was awarded the Virginia E. Schrader Residency in the performing arts from the Toledo Museum of Art in conjunction with the national touring exhibition entitled Impressionism.  In addition, the duo was selected for membership in the Touring Artists Program of the Ohio Arts Council.   Prior to 1998, Pope was an adjunct instructor of piano and piano pedagogy in the College of Musical Arts at Bowling Green State University (Ohio) and instructor of piano in the Creative Arts Program.  Kantorski is the principal keyboardist of the Toledo Symphony, performing as orchestral, chamber, and solo pianist. The recital will feature familiar music from a variety of sources, including classical, ballet and film scores.  Included are works by Bernstein, Brahms, Debussy and a work based upon the themes from The Wizard of Oz. This is the second of the 2016-17 St. Tim’s Discovers season.. Tim’s Discovers is dedicated to bringing classical music to communities throughout Northwest Ohio. Doors open at 2:30 p.m.  St. Timothy’s is fully accessible with plenty of convenient parking. Information on all upcoming events in the series is available at www.saint-timothy.net.


Pat Martino swings through musical matrix as guest artist at BGSU festival

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jazz guitarist Pat Martino has his own perspective on music. Within a couple minutes of his telephone interview with BG Independent, he’s talking about the ancient Chinese text the I Ching, the Book of Changes. Martino’s mind has a mathematical turn. He sees the guitar, he said, “as a matrix.” “I teach it accordingly and hope through that I can open up other windows,” he said. “The guitar strings are six in number, and it’s horizontal and vertical in terms of its properties.” There’s the strings across and the fret bar down. “You literally have a matrix,” he said. The I Ching, he explained, is made up of hexagrams of six broken or unbroken lines, each with 64 variations. “The I Ching is a psychologically study, a spiritual study,” he said. “The guitar is a musical study, but it’s the same matrix.” And the performer is “a witness” in the middle of this complex of dualities – minor-major, loud-soft, fast-slow — looking back to the beginning and forward the end. Martino will share his views on music and all the areas of life it opens up as the featured artist at this year’s Orchard Jazz Festival at Bowling Green State University. He’ll perform Saturday, Oct. 15, at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre on campus and give a master class earlier that day at 2:30 p.m. in the Conrad Room in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. The fusion group Marbin will perform and teach on Friday. See the full festival schedule at: http://www.bgsu.edu/musical-arts/events/orchard-guitar-festival.html. The son of a singer and guitarist, Martino entered that musical matrix as a youngster growing up in in the fertile Philadelphia music scene. There he rubbed shoulders with jazz legend John Coltrane and worked with pop stars Bobby Darin and Frankie Avalon.  He first went on the road with former schoolmate organist Charles Earland, planting the guitarist firmly in soul jazz. He moved to Harlem to immerse himself more in that scene. His reputation was such that he signed with Prestige as a 20-year-old where he was a pioneer in jazz-rock fusion. But by 1976, Martino, then in his early 30s, was experiencing seizures that eventually required surgery in 1980. The surgery severely impaired his memory. He taught himself to play guitar again, emerging back on the scene in 1987, only to take another hiatus to care for his ailing parents. He relaunched his career in 1994. In the past two decades he’s toured, recorded and taught, picking up honors along the way, including Grammy nominations and a Downbeat Reader’s Poll win as top guitarist in 2004. Martino, 72, is back touring with the venerable organ trio formation.  Part of it, he said, is practical. It’s easier and less expensive to travel with three people, and that means more…


David Bixler’s Hughes Project started as a gift from his mother

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News David Bixler can thank his mother for inspiring his Hughes Project. His mother, a retired English teacher, sent him a copy of Langston Hughes’ poem “Mother to Son.” “Well, son, I’ll tell you,” the poem begins. “Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.” That poem inspired Bixler. He responded as a jazz saxophonist and composer would: by writing a song. From that first piece has grown into The Hughes Project, seven pieces with more to come for a nine-piece ensemble. All based on poems written by the man of letters considered a leading figures of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and 1930s. Last week Bixler gave a lecture about the project, accompanying his remarks with performances of two pieces from the project. Later that night he presented a recital featuring the seven movements he’s completed so far. He’d long been interested in writing music inspired by Hughes that blended a jazz quintet and a string quartet. He finally carved out the time to write the piece last year. He was on leave from his position as director of jazz studies at Bowling Green State University, and his family had relocated back to New York City. They were living, he quipped, in “the squalor” of renovating their new home. He started writing in June, 2015 and first heard what he’d written this May. Bixler, who received a grant from the Institute for the Study of Culture and Society at BGSU, brought in musicians from New York City for the performance. They included trumpeter Russell Johnson, who grew up in the same Wisconsin town as Bixler and has his mother as a teacher. The jazz contingent also featured Jon Cowherd, piano, Gregg August, bass, and Fabio Rojas, drums. The quintet was joined by the Semiosis Quartet – Natalie Calma and Nicole Parks, violin, Oliver Chang, viola, and Kett Lee, cello. In composing the pieces, Bixler made some key decisions up front. As with the initial “Mother and Son,” he did not set the poem to music to be sung nor did he have a narrator reading against a musical backdrop. Also, though Hughes was often called a “jazz poet,” and he wrote many works inspired by the music of African-Americans, Bixler avoided those. Instead, he said, he focused “on his work that dealt with our common humanity and the emotions therein and trying to find the musicality and lyricism that’s imbued in his work.” Bixler started that search as is his wont by improvising on the poems, each of which he’d memorized. Through the improvisation he teased out the melodic, rhythmic and harmonic ideas and basic elements of structure that he worked into the composition. He eschewed any reference to the jazz popular at the time, adopting a harmonic and melodic vocabulary that bridges…


Grammy nominee Hunter Hayes to perform at Stroh, Oct. 15

Hailed as a “country-rock-blues guitar hero in the making” by the Los Angeles Times, five-time Grammy nominee Hunter Hayes is a singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who roared onto the music scene with his Platinum-selling, No. 1 self-titled debut album and chart-topping sophomore album “Storyline,” on Atlantic/Warner Music Nashville. He will perform at the Bowling Green State University Stroh Center Saturday, Oct. 15. Doors at 7 p.m. With three No. 1 singles already under his belt (including the multi-Platinum smash “Wanted,” “Somebody’s Heartbreak,” and “I Want Crazy”), Hayes delved into unprecedented territory with the innovative rollout of new music via streaming and digital platforms in 2015, culminating in the release of a special, three-disc collection (seven acoustic, seven studio and seven live songs) dubbed The 21 Project. Ticket prices are: $43 for Floor Seats (General Admission); $35 for Lower Bowl; and $29 for Upper Bowl Purchase tickets online, by calling 1-800-745-3000, or by visiting the Stroh Center Ticket Office.


GRUBS highlight originals, crowd favorites on new CD “If You Think That Way”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even watching the Grande Royale Ukulelists of the Black Swamp set up for a show can be entertaining. The four members banter among themselves, the convivial jibes are a preview for what’s to come. They tune up with quirky bits of music. And after playing their first set, Geoff Howes, Sheri Wells-Jensen, Jason Wells-Jensen and Anne Kidder are unable to turn it off. In the back of Grounds for Thought amidst their fans, the band becomes a tangle of hands, bodies contorted so they can all play one ukulele. It’s a regular routine that says much about the teamwork and humor of the band. GRUBS, as the band is more familiarly known, was at Grounds Tuesday night is unveil their second recording, “If You Think That Way.” The quartet brings together four avocational musicians with varied musical backgrounds including classical voice training, old-time jams, musical theater and church bands. These disparate backgrounds are leavened by the band’s adoption of the ukulele, a fairly recent musical adaptation by all four members. Not that the ukulele is in anyway a limitation. On stage they display 11 different types of ukes, from the bass that Jason Wells-Jensen uses to lay down the foundation to Kidder’s “baby,” the sopranissimo. There’s a resonator ukulele and several tenors in different shapes as well. That does not include the four instruments that get pulled out for the audience participation segment of the program. These provide a full, uke-chestral backing for the GRUBS solo and harmony vocals. The dozen-song set captured on “If You Think That Way” distills all the musical qualities of the band minus the between-song repartee. Not that the recording stints on the humor. Even without Jason Wells-Jensen spoken introduction of an Eastern European wedding ballad, the balalaika-like take on the standard “Yes Sir, That’s My Baby” is still a hoot. And Howes’ rhyming “auto loans” and “traffic cones” with “kidney stones,” always brings a smile, no matter how often you hear it. “If You Think That Way” comes less than a year after “Uke Tide,” the GRUBS’ debut CD. That featured Christmas music and showcased the quartet’s ability to twist even the hoariest standard into a distinctly GRUBS number. The CD, Jason Wells-Jensen said, was also done in a Christmas rush. The band recorded “Uke Tide” at Stone Soup Studios in three days, so it would be ready for delivery to stockings by Dec. 25. This time “we did less in more time,” he said. The Christmas CD seemed like an obvious way to get a foothold in the market. People will buy the random Christmas CD, Sheri Wells-Jensen said. As soon as that one was in Santa’s bag, the GRUBS were anxious to return to Eric Sills’ studio in Maumee to work on the next recording. This…


New Music Festival showcases contemporary music at BGSU, Oct. 19-22

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The 37th Annual Bowling Green New Music Festival will showcase the work of more than 30 guest composers and performers Oct. 19-22. The four-day international festival includes concerts, lectures and an art exhibition. This year’s featured guests include composer Dai Fujikura and the Spektral Quartet (See related stories at: http://bgindependentmedia.org/musical-specters-come-to-life-in-string-quartet-concert-on-campus/ and http://bgindependentmedia.org/music-of-now-intersects-with-classics-in-spektral-quartet-concert/) Organized by the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music (MACCM), the College of Musical Arts and the Fine Arts Center Galleries at BGSU, the festival supports the creation of new work and engages both the University and city communities in the process of music appreciation and awareness. Most festival events are free and open to the public. FESTIVAL SCHEDULE Wednesday, Oct. 19 7 p.m., Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery, School of Art Exhibition opening: “The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramner,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group. Thursday, Oct. 20 1 p.m., Bryan Recital Hall Composer Talk: Dai Fujikura 3pm, Bryan Recital Hall Concert 1: chamber works by Dai Fujikura, Peter Eötvös, Marissa DiPronio, and Chin-Ting Chan. 7:30 p.m., Kobacker Hall Concert 2: Ensemble works by Roger Zare, Takuma Itoh, Dai Fujikura, Christopher Dietz and Jason Eckardt. 9:30 p.m., Clazel Theatre (127 N. Main St., downtown Bowling Green) Concert 3: Works by Dai Fujikura, Anthony Donofrio, Dan VanHassel, Alex Temple, Mario Diaz de Leon, and Matt Marks. Friday, Oct. 21 10:30 a.m., Bryan Recital Hall Concert 4: Chamber works by Steven Stucky, Dai Fujikura, Mary Kouyoumdjian, Girard Kratz, Eliza Brown and Joe Dangerfield. 2:30 p.m., Kobacker Hall Concert 5: Works by James Romig, Chun-Wai Wong, Robert Morris, Marilyn Shrude and Dai Fujikura. 8 p.m., Kobacker Hall Concert 6: Spektral Quartet. Music by Samuel Adams, George Lewis, Mikel Kuehn, and Dai Fujikura. Saturday, Oct. 22 10:30 a.m., Conrad Choral Room, Wolfe Center for the Arts Panel Discussion to be announced 2:30 p.m., Bryan Recital Hall Concert 7: Electroacoustic works by Ravi Kittappa, Daniel Pappas, C.R. Kasprzyk, Mara Gibson, Dan VanHassel, and Mario Diaz de Leon. 8pm, Kobacker Hall Concert 8: Orchestral and wind ensemble works by Dai Fujikura, Jonathan Newman, John Mackey, Emily Custer, and Leonard Slatkin.   (Programs subject to change.) Locations: The Moore Musical Arts Center houses Bryan Recital Hall and Kobacker Hall. Saturday concert can be purchased at: www.bgsu.edu/arts. Online tickets will be available up to midnight the night before the concert. To purchase tickets in person or by phone, please call 419-372-8171 or visit the Arts Box Office, located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts, Monday-Friday, noon-5 p.m. The College of Musical Arts Box Office will be open two hours prior to the performance. For a complete schedule of events, visit www.bgsu.edu/newmusic or contact the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music at 419-372-2685. DAI FUJIKURA Although Dai Fujikura was born in Osaka, he has now spent more than 20 years in the UK where he studied composition…


Piano concert, job coaching all on tap at public library

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY The library’s popular “Job Coach,” HR expert Frank Day, will be available Wednesday, October 5 starting at 9:30 am to provide advice on polishing your resume, exploring online job sites, or filling out an online application. Please call ahead, 419-352-5050,  to make an appointment for your half-hour session with Mr. Day. “Tablet and Smartphone Classes,” presented in partnership with the Wood County Committee on Aging and the BGSU School of Media and Communications, will be held Tuesday, October 4 and 11 at 6:15 pm in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room. These classes are structured to suit your needs and to help you to get the most from your phone or mobile device. Registration is required. For details and to register call the Senior Center at 419-353-5661. A popular concert series which showcases graduate students in piano studies at BGSU’s College of Musical Arts returns to the WCDPL Atrium on Monday October 3 at 7 pm. The program features three centuries of keyboard classics from composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, Liszt, and Chopin. WCDPL’s full programming calendar, including youth programs and scheduling and selections for its popular book discussion groups during the month of October may be seen on line at wcdpl.org/calendar. These events are free and open to all. For more details about these and other programs for adults at WCDPL, call the library at 419-352-5050.


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, Sept. 28 – Oct. 12

From BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications  At the Galleries –“Face It: Reimagining Contemporary Portraits” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. “Face It” explores an expanded definition of photographic portraiture. Curated by BGSU art faculty Lynn Whitney and Andrew Hershberger and BGSU Galleries Director Jacqueline Nathan, the exhibit features photos by 27 renowned artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free. Sept. 29 – Award-winning author and book critic John Freeman will read from his works as a part of the Visiting Writer Series. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 29 – TheInternational Film Series continues with “Abrazos (Embraces),” directed by Luis Argueta. A group of children travel from Minnesota to Guatemala to meet their grandparents for the first time. The film documents their pilgrimage, exploring family, heritage and immigration. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 29 – BGSU composition students will present their works at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 30 – TheBGSU Wind Symphony will be in concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. On the program are “Skating on the Sheyenne,” by Ross Lee Finney; “Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum,” by Olivier Messiaen, and “First Symphony for Band” by William Bolcom. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu/arts. Sept. 30, Oct. 1 &2 – Elsewhere performances continue with “boom,” written by Peter Sinn Nachtrieb and directed by Katelyn Carle. All performances will begin at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Oct. 2 – The University and Concert Bands will perform a joint concert, featuring works by Ticheli, Bernstein, Grainger, Sousa and more. The performance begins at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu/arts Oct. 2 – Pianist Thomas Rosenkranz and violinist Maria Sampen will present a recital at 3 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., in Toledo. Free Oct. 2 – A master class with violinist Hal Grossman will take place at 3 p.m. in the Choral Rehearsal Hall located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 2 – The Guest Artist Series features violinist Hall Grossman in performance at 8 p.m. in Bryan…


GRÜBS ready to unveil new recording

From GRÜBS The Grande Royale Ükulelists of the Black Swamp, a.k.a. the GRÜBS, will celebrate the release of their new CD if you think that way on Tuesday, October 4, at Grounds for Thought coffeehouse, 174 S. Main St. in Bowling Green, from 7:30 to 9:00 pm. The band will play some of their tunes and CDs will be available for purchase and autographs. The quartet of ükulele players and vocalists are Sheri Wells-Jensen, Jason Wells-Jensen, Anne Kidder, and Geoff Howes. “If you think that way”includes five original songs and seven cover versions ranging from folk (John Prine’s “Paradise”) to 1920s musical (Brecht and Weill’s “Mack the Knife,” sung in German) to classical (Pachelbel’s Canon in D, but done in C) to rock (Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4”). Recording and releasing “if you think that way”  has involved the talents of many collaborators, most of them local: The CD was recorded at Stone Soup Recording Studios in Maumee by Eric Sills, who also assisted the group with production and arrangements. A guest artist, Dave Fogle of Perrysburg, who runs Dave’s Drum Depot in Toledo, sat in on drums for the original song “Sweet Rebecca.” The cover photograph and album design are by Ashley Donaldson of Findlay. Kate Kamphuis of Bowling Green contributed additional photography. Phil Klum of Phillip Klum Mastering in New York City mastered the recording. For the past three and a half years, the GRÜBS have been entertaining in Northwest Ohio, performing at the Black Swamp Arts Festival, the Downtown BG Art Walk, the BG Farmer’s Market, the Stones Throw Tavern, the Hump Day Revue, Coffee Amici in Findlay, the Sunset Bistro, Leisure Time Winery in Napoleon, National Train Day in Toledo, the Relay for Life, Rhythm on the River in Grand Rapids, the Ohio Chautauqua in Rossford, the Wood County District Public Library, the Wood County Historical Museum, Fremont’s Got Talent, on WTOL Channel 11 and Fox Toledo’s “Daybreak,” on WBGU televsion and WBGU-FM radio, and at many benefits, fairs, and private parties. In 2015, the quartet released Uke Tide, an album of Christmas music, which will also be available for purchase at the CD release event. Both CDs will also be on sale at Finders Records in Bowling Green, as well as on line at CD Baby, iTunes, and amazon.com. For more information, notes, schedules, and links to music videos, go to www.grubsmusic.com.


Carl Allen spreads the love of jazz in Bowling Green

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jazz drummer and producer Carl Allen told some of those war stories young jazz payers love to hear during his visit to Bowling Green State University. Anecdotes about being in the studio with their musical heroes. About being back stage with a legend like Art Blakey – and getting a life lesson. And the students came ready to play for him, so he could share some of the knowledge he’s accumulated over the years. On Thursday night those in the two big bands, even got the chance to perform with his inimitable beat getting them in the groove. But the stories, the notes, even the groove, was not the main lesson Allen had to share “It’s about love,” he told the students. That’s what he and all the other visiting artists who come to campus are about, the musician said. They love the music, and they want to share that love with students. Whatever criticism he had of their playing, he told those in a master class for jazz combos, was delivered in that spirit. The same spirit in which Blakey brought him up short when Allen was 23 and complained about a drum set provided on a gig. “Do you play the drums or do the drums play you?” Blakey, who’d used the same set, asked him. The way the young musicians can reciprocate is by asking questions. That’s what Allen did when he first arrived on the scene in New York while still a student at William Patterson College in New Jersey. An older drummer told him they let him into the fraternity of jazz drummers because he clearly loved the music. He showed it by being a pest. He constantly asked questions of drumming greats like Philly Joe Jones and Max Roach. He urged students to have that same kind of curiosity. Allen has been on campus since Thursday. In addition to his work in campus, he stopped by the high school to work with the jazz students there Friday morning. He’ll play with the jazz faculty band Friday and Saturday night starting at 7:30 p.m. at DeGage Jazz Café, 301 River Road, Maumee. Then on Sunday he will participate in the 3 p.m. memorial concert for Roger Schupp in Bryan Recital Hall on campus. A native of Milwaukee, Allen grew up with music in the house. He loved funk acts like Kool and the Gang and the Ohio Players. Then his older brother, the trumpet player Eddie Allen, pointed out that a lot of the harmonic underpinnings of those acts came from jazz. So Carl Allen shifted course in that direction, and it’s taken him around the world. He always assumed he’d have a career in music. That’s meant being more than a performer at the highest level, but also…