Music

BG foundation gives grants to community groups

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Community organizations were given grants earlier this week to bring music, sports, reading and more to Bowling Green. The grants, from the Bowling Green Community Foundation, are intended to help the very young to the very old, and everyone in between. The annual grant program began after the 1993 BG Leadership class started the foundation in order to help local groups serve the community, explained Cal Bowers, president of the foundation. “What you’re doing speaks to the vibrancy of our community. You’re at the core of it,” said Bowling Green Mayor Dick Edwards. This year’s grants total $29,000 for 14 different projects. “That’s an impact to this community,” Bowers said. Following is a list of all the projects awarded grants. BG Area Community Bands – $2,250 for a community band festival. “This is our 10th year as a community band. We feel we have become a staple in the community,” said Ardy Gonyer. “We’re very grateful for the support of Bowling Green.” Thom Headley explained the grant will help the band put on a concert with a guest conductor on May 6. BG City Schools – $1,000 for One Book BG literacy program. Two third grade teachers, Jeni Niekamp and Jonelle Semancik explained the grant will help the schools purchase books for every pre-kindergarten through fifth grade student. The reading program unites families and the community around one common book. “It’s created to promote a love of learning,” Semancik said. BG Parks and Recreation Department – $5,000 for the natural obstacle course. Ivan Kovacevic, of the parks and rec department, said the outdoor obstacle course behind the community center has already been the site of the Zombie Mud Run last fall. BG Parks and Recreation Department – $5,000 for waterpark splashpad creature. The splashpad additions help complete the area for the youngest pool users. “They are both really true community projects,” Kovacevic said of the pool and obstacle course. BG Youth Hockey Association – $1,100 for rink system upgrade. The hockey program involves 315 kids, ages 5 to 15, said Jennifer Bowers. “It’s a really big asset for the community,” she said. “It’s a team of people volunteering a lot of hours. The problem is we don’t have enough equipment.” The grant will help replace orange cones…


Cornel West sings the praises of Dr. King at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Martin Luther King Jr. is no Santa Claus. Cornel West, an activist and philosopher, told his audience at Bowling Green State University Thursday night,  to resist efforts “to defang him,” to make King some lovable figure, a benign old man with a bag of toys on his back. “Don’t Santa-Clausify, my brother,” West said. “In a celebrity-scented culture, so obsessed with feeling comfortable … we just want to hear something that makes us feel good. If that’s the case you got the wrong Negro with Martin Luther King Jr. He wanted you to feel empowered, challenged, so you can straighten your back up.” As beloved as the civil rights leader is today, he was not in his time, West said. Right before his death, 72 percent of Americans disapproved of King, and that included 55 percent of African-Americans. FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover considered him “the most dangerous man in American.” King was a “love warrior,” West said. “Justice is what love looks like in public.” He fought against systematic racism, and also opposed the Vietnam War and militarism. He believed “poverty was a form of tyranny.” The indifference to humanity that led to dropping bombs in Vietnam was tied to the indifference to the poor in this country, whether they are poor blacks in the inner city, or Latinos in barrios or impoverished white in Appalachia. “There’s a connection between militarism on one hand and the indifference to the plight of our poor brothers and sisters on the other,” he said. That lesson has not been learned. Not when the U.S. has launched 512 drone strikes in the past year and dropped 26,171 bombs in the last year. West, who said he was breakdancing in 2008 when Barack Obama was elected president, has called the former president to task for not reining in the military industrial complex. The casualties – 750,000 in seven years – from those conflicts, mostly in majority Muslim nations, are what gave rise to “the gangsters and thugs” of ISIS. “They have gangsters and thugs in all traditions,” he said. If such a death toll had been experienced in America, the Ku Klux Klan would be on the frontlines. Africans Americans have shown another way. “We’re not a people of revenge, but a people…


BGSU Arts Calendar through Feb. 1

Jan. 18 – The Faculty Artist Series features Conor Nelson on flute. Nelson has appeared as a soloist with the Minnesota Orchestra, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Flint Symphony, among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19 – The 59th annual Honor Band and Directors Clinic will feature the BGSU Wind Symphony in performance at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19 – Poet Bruce Weigl will read from his work as part of the Creative Writing Program’s Visiting Writer Series. Weigl is author of “The Circle of Hanah” and more than a dozen books of poetry, including “The Abundance of Nothing”(2012) and “Song of Napalm”(1988), both of which were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 20 – The Brown Bag Music Series will feature a musical theatre extravaganza by students and faculty from the College of Musical Arts. The program will begin at 11:45 a.m. in the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free Jan. 21 – The 59th annual Honor Band and Directors Clinic will feature all Ohio Honor Bands. The concert will begin at 3:30 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 25 – The Faculty Artist Series presents pianist Robert Satterlee. He has appeared on the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts in Chicago, San Francisco’s Old First Concert Series and the Schubert club in St. Paul, Minn., among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 26 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Sam Adams and Dan Gualtieri. They will present their work at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 26 – BGSU’s Jazz Lab Band I will perform with guest artist and saxophonist Loren Stillman. Stillman has received praise in such publications as The New York Times, Downbeat magazine, Jazziz and Jazz Times and on National Public Radio,marking him as an innovative voice of modern jazz. His original recordings have received critical acclaim from The New York Times and four star recognition in BBC Jazz Review, Jazz Man magazine and Downbeat. The performance will…


Benefit to raise funds for Standing Rock Water Protectors

By ELENA ENRIQUEZ Join us on Saturday, Jan 21, from noon until closing for BG Standing With Standing Rock at Howard’s Club H to raise money to bring vital supplies to the Water Protectors who are risking their lives in sub zero temperature so that we all may share a healthy planet. The fight for clean water and life is far from over! Acoustic Stage Matt Ingles noon-12:30 April Freed 12:30-1 Jimmy Lambert 1-1:30 Sarah Connelly 1:30-2 Adamantium Experiment 2-2:30 Justin Payne 3-4 Main Stage Cadillac Jukebox 4-4:45 Getting Out Alive 5-5:45 2nd Mile Society 6-6:45 Moths In The Attic 7-7:45 Wood N Strings 8-8:45 Weak Little Ears 9-9:45 Awesome Job 10-10:45 Split Second 11-11:30 Daniken 12-12:45 Musical interludes between acts on the acoustic stage performed by; Matt Cordy, Barry Johnson ,Boo Lee Crosser, Bruce Lilly, and Zack Wilson. There will also be a silent auction, bake sale and food. $5 entry All proceeds from the event go directly into support for either firewood, or to supplies for the Medic Healer council. Let’s come together, the day after the inauguration, in solidarity as a positive, progressive community. Share passions and ideas, speak from your heart of how to transform this reality and how to grow as a community. We are creating a better, more inclusive and caring world for each other. Stand in support of a healthier planet and those who are peacefully protecting this dream. Mni Wiconi! Water is life! (Related story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/local-woman-joins-effort-to-stop-pipeline-at-standing-rock/)


Bobcat musicians selected for honor bands

From BOWLING GREEN BOBCAT  BANDS Seven Bowling Green Middle School band members  were selected to perform in the Ohio Music Education Association District One Middle School Honor Band 2017.  They include:  Culley Foos (bassoon), Sasha Zengel (Clarinet), Cyrus Koogan (Horn), Simon Metzger (Percussion), James Eddington (Trombone), Colin Crawford (Trumpet), and Nolan Miller (Trumpet).  Selected as first chair players for their sections were Culley Foos, Simon Metzger, James Eddington, and Colin Crawford.   These students prepared and recorded audition materials and were chosen among students from six counties in northwest Ohio.   Dr. Lisa Martin, currently a member of the BGSU music faculty, will be rehearsing and conducting the Middle School Honors Band.     The following students from the Bowling Green High School Bands were selected for the OMEA High School Honor Band 2017:  Saralynn George (flute), Megan Eddington (clarinet), Elana Cable (alto saxophone), Allan Landgraf (bari saxophone), Joseph Kalmar (horn), Frances Zengel (percussion), Joey Craig (percussion).  In addition, Saralynn George and Joey Craig were selected as first chair players.     These students will represent Bowling Green at the Ohio Music Educators Association Honors Festival on Sunday, February 12th at the Stranahan theater in Toledo.  The middle school concert will begin at 2:30pm and the high school concert will begin at7:00pm.  Both concerts are free and open to the public. Nine students from Bowling Green high school were selected to perform in the BGSU Honors Bands on January 18th, 19th, and 20th.  They include Natalie Avery (alto saxophone), Kerica Bucks (trombone), Elana Cable (alto saxophone), Joey Craig (percussion), Saralynn George (flute), Alex Munson (trumpet), Mary Shilling (flute), Skye Sloane (percussion), and Frances Zengel (percussion).  They will be performing with students throughout the state of Ohio.  


Michael Daugherty’s American musical landmark center of Toledo celebration

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Hearst Castle in California has an organ. Composer Michael Daugherty told an audience at the Toledo Museum of Art he’s never heard it. He does know that it was used to accompany the showing of the silent films that William Randolph Heart’s mistress Marion Davies starred in. Hearst would round up his guests into the theater to watch the films, and he had people who would go and rouse anyone who dozed off. That’s the kind of detail Daugherty as a lover of American culture savors. Scott Boberg, the museum’s manager of programs and public engagement, said the composer’s work is “a comprehensive exploration of American culture and geography.” He’s written works inspired by Route 66 and the Brooklyn Bridge, Superman and Elvis Presley, the paintings of Grant Wood and Georgia O’Keefe, and the Detroit Industry murals of Diego. “You get a sense of America.” Daugherty said he’s been to the Hearst Castle at least 10 times. He’s fascinated by the structure, with its enormous Neptune pool as well as the glittering Hollywood era it represents. When he received a commission to write a concerto for organ and orchestra he decided this would be the right occasion to celebrate Hearst, his castle, and Orson Welles’ classic film “Citizen Kane,” an acerbic portrait of the media mogul. The Toledo Symphony Orchestra is playing the concerto this weekend on a program that includes another American work inspired by a castle “Xanadu” by Charles Griffes and a masterwork for orchestra Bela Bartok’s Concerto for Orchestra. The Toledo Museum of Art programmed the “Citizen Kane Experience” around the orchestra’s performance of Daugherty’s piece (Friday and again Saturday night at 8). It started on Thursday night with a screening of “Citizen Kane” and included “Once Upon a Cocktail” reception before Friday night’s performance. Daugherty was on hand for the reception, where guests sipped cocktails – the Hearst Cocktail, Bee’s Knees and Highball – fashionable from Hearst’s time. Not that Hearst’s guests would have imbibed heavily in them. Daugherty said the tycoon restricted his guest to one drink a night. Errol Flynn was tossed from the castle for bringing his own booze. Hearst was a collector. He was so acquisitive, some of his purchases were never uncrated. Some of the objects he bought have…


David Jackson professes his love of polka every Sunday morning

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When I arrive in David Jackson’s office in Williams Hall on the Bowling Green State campus, he’s busy doing what he’s been doing so much of since the campaign started. He’s on the telephone talking to a reporter. In this instance, he responding to questions about Meryl Streep’s impassioned speech at the Golden Globes the night before. Jackson, who teaches political science, has become the go-to expert for the national media on the impact of celebrity endorsements in politics. He’s found they don’t matter much, and often hurt. Even after the election he’s still getting calls. That’s not what prompted this visit from BG Independent News, though. I want to talk polka. For almost six years, Jackson has hosted the Sunday Morning Polka Show 10a.m. to noon, on WXUT, 88.3, and available for streaming on Mixcloud at https://www.mixcloud.com/discover/sunday-morning-polka/. While the show includes all styles of polka as well as some related pop music, at its heart is the Polish-American polka that Jackson grew up listening to in southern Saginaw County, Michigan. His parents, especially his mother (maiden name Lazowski), listened to it. Every year it was the focal point of the festival hosted by the Catholic Church he attended. ”There wasn’t a period in my life that I didn’t listen to polka,” Jackson said. Sure, he admits, maybe for some time as a teenager, he looked down on the music as corny. Then he came to appreciate its variety and complexity. “It’s about more than drinking beer and dancing.” And he demonstrates that in the stream of consciousness show in which he decides on the fly which of the 25,000 polka songs stored on his computer he’ll play. Maybe he’ll play “Midnight in Moscow,” formerly a Soviet radio network theme after a New from Poland story about American troops arriving in Poland. Or he’ll do a keyword search to string together related songs. They can be brand new, or vintage vinyl, scratches and all. Polish-American polka is, Jackson asserts, “as distinctive an American style of music as bluegrass, blues, jazz or Cajun music in the sense that it has a non-US origin that combines with other influences in the US to become this hybrid.” But, he said, “it’s the one that gets made fun of, which I don’t like.”…


BGSU Arts Events, through Jan. 25

Jan. 11—The Faculty Artist Series begins the semester with a performance by cellist Brian Snow. Snow has earned a reputation as a gifted and versatile performer in chamber music, orchestral and solo settings after spending the past decade performing and teaching in the New York City area. His recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 12—The reading series hosted by the Creative Writing Program and the Mid-American Review begins with BGSU graduate students Nick Heeb and Roseanna Boswell. They will present their work at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 18—The Faculty Artist Series features Conor Nelson on flute. Nelson has appeared as a soloist with the Minnesota Orchestra, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Flint Symphony, among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19—The 59th annual Honor Band and Directors Clinic will feature the BGSU Wind Symphony in performance at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall. Free Jan. 19—Poet Bruce Weigl will read from his work as part of the Creative Writing Program’s Visiting Writer Series. Weigl is the author of “The Circle of Hanh”and more than a dozen other books of poetry, including “The Abundance of Nothing”(2012) and “Song of Napalm”(1988), both of which were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 20—The Brown Bag Music Series will feature a musical theatre extravaganza by students and faculty from the College of Musical Arts. The program will begin at 11:45 a.m. in the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free. Jan. 21—The 59th annual Honor Band and Directors Clinic will feature all Ohio Honor Bands. The concert will begin at 3:30 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 25—The Faculty Artist Series presents pianist Robert Satterlee. He has appeared on the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts in Chicago, San Francisco’s Old First Concert Series and the Schubert club in St. Paul, Minn., among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free


Perrysburg teen expresses passion for doing good by bringing pop star Kesha to Stroh Center

  By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Coming from a family of music fans and people who believe in making the world a better place, Maya Dayal’s early jump into charity work shouldn’t be surprising. The 18-year-old Perrysburg woman founded Bands4Change this year, and the non-profit’s first endeavor is to bring pop star Kesha to Bowling Green State University’s Stroh Center for a benefit concert Jan. 27. Tickets are now on sale from Ticketmaster or the BGSU box office. Contact 1-800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. Tickets are $45 to $65. Her mother, Anisha Dayal, took Maya and her sister to Lollapalooza several years ago, and it occurred to Maya that “music can bring big groups of people together, so why not utilize this to benefit others.” Her family has been involved in environmental activism and her mother has fought for human rights. “All that passion has helped create this company,” Dayal said. The Kesha concert will raise money for Humane Society International, the National Eating Disorder Association and the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. These were causes selected by Kesha. Dayal said she wants the performers to decide what causes their performances will assist. “We wanted them to have a more personal connection with the concert and company,” she said. “We wanted them to be more passionate about the event.” But before any of this could happen, Bands4Change had to find an artist to perform. Being a start-up, and one founded by a teenager, meant the company had little credibility with performers. She and her mother, who needed to be involved because Maya was too young to legally sign off on some details, started trying to contact artists. “It was essentially trial and error,” Dayal said. Then they reached out to Kesha’s management, and “Kesha took a chance on us and said ‘yes.’” Kesha emerged on the pop scene with her debut recording “Animal.” Back then she went by the name Ke$ha. She’s since returned to the original spelling of her name. She continues to record as well as write for other top acts. This summer she had a global tour with her band The Creepies. Bands4Change is running a contest to find an opening act for the Stroh show. Bands interested should visit https://www.facebook.com/Bands4Change/ and post an EPK link to the band’s best track of no more…


Holiday week perfect time to feast on Toledo Museum’s treasures

By DAVID  DUPONT BG Independent News As the gaiety of Christmas Day fades, and we enter that phase of holiday denouement, the Toledo Museum of Art throws it doors open to welcome  visitors with a whole slate of activities leading up to New Year’s Day. Now that the gifts are unwrapped and the meals eaten, a visit to the museum is in order. It’s a great place to take out of town visitors, and share with them one of the treasures of Northwest Ohio. For those locals who have never visited, it’s a great time to acquaint them with this grand institution. The museum has a wonderful holiday feel, and it tends to attract enough people to give it a warm social buzz, without being hectic. There’s more to do than look. There’s a full schedule of activities from life drawing to game playing for all ages. (See http://bgindependentmedia.org/toledo-museum-offers-great-art-escape-over-holidays/) For the past few years, my wife and I have gone to the museum on New Year’s Day. Museums are just one of those spaces – along with baseball parks and libraries – where all I have to do is step inside and my spirits are lifted. That’s true whether it’s the first time I visit, or the Toledo Museum, a place that by now almost feels like home. I started going to museums when I was in college. I was a student at UMass in Amherst, but took lessons from a jazz trombonist at Berklee College of Music in Boston, a two-or-more-hour bus ride away. It seemed a shame just to go to the lesson and head home, so I’d go to the Museum of Fine Arts. I even had a student membership. It was convenient, only a few blocks from Berklee, and I could check my horn and satchel of music, which usually by that time also had a few newly purchased jazz albums. I’d spend a couple hours, just wandering the galleries, fixating on one or two at each visit. I’ve loved museums ever since. What’s the attraction? Museums plunge you into the texture of your times. Yes there are celebrations of kings and warriors, historic and mythological. There are also celebrations of common folks, who operate windmills, fight in wars, haul goods and grow food. And the paintings can evoke the particular…


Beyond the angelic hosts: A personal Christmas soundtrack

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When I was growing up I remember our family having five Christmas records – a compilation of the standard pop tunes, organ and chimes of sacred tunes, pre-Rudolph Burl Ives, the Chipmunks and a ”A Christmas  Carol” performed by Lionel Barrymore. Besides that it was carols around the piano with my mother accompanying my talented older brothers, with me elbowing my way in as I could and my father in his chair tapping with both feet.  There were the pop tunes bleeding from the radio, though this was before the time of wall-to-wall holiday music from Thanksgiving to Christmas. And then there was music at church. A full-blown French Midnight Mass with “Il Est Ne, Le Divin Infant” (“He Is Born, The Holy Child”) and the climax “Minuit Chretiens (“O Holy Night”) sung with reedy ardor by a tenor who worked summers at the local amusement park, and probably in one of the factories nearly the church otherwise. I loved the music, every year, seemingly having a favorite hymn. By high school I scoured a collection of international carols for oddities, and studied the notes about origins of tunes. Years later when Linda and I bought a piano – our first was a freebee old upright that weighed about as much as Santa’s sleigh fully packed – the first music we bought was that same “The International Book of Christmas Carols.” Now we have three copies, one each for piano players in the family, Linda and son Phil, who declared at age 8 “it’s never too early for Christmas music,” and one for trombone – my days of reading over the pianist’s shoulder without my putting them in danger of injury from my slide are long gone. As a high schooler, my friends and I would schlep from church to church playing for services. One particular night I and three trombone playing buddies did our part for Christian ecumenicalism by playing Bach chorales as a prelude to Midnight Mass. My background, though, is in jazz. When I started reviewing jazz recordings for Cadence magazine. I took on the job of doing an annual survey of Christmas releases. Now I recall the days when jazz Christmas recordings were a novelty. Stan Kenton issued one, and Columbia put out a couple…


Toledo Museum offers Great Art Escape over holidays

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART The Great Art Escape, a week of free performances, art activities and after-hours flashlight tours, returns to the Toledo Museum of Art Dec. 27-Jan. 1. Sponsored in part by Taylor Cadillac, the week of special events has become a holiday tradition for bringing together family, friends and holiday guests. Explore the galleries with the debut of the Toledo Museum of Art’s new app. During the Great Art Escape visitors are invited to play a treasure hunt throughout the galleries. Three temporary exhibitions organized by the Museum’s curators are sure to delight visitors of all ages. Gabriel Dawe: Plexus no. 35, on view in the Great Gallery, is an ethereal indoor rainbow created especially for the space it occupies. Mexican-born artist Gabriel Dawe’s textile installations have been seen in galleries around the world, most recently as part of an exhibition at the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C. The installation in the Great Gallery is sponsored in part by the TMA Ambassadors, a group of volunteer fundraisers. The Libbey Dolls: Fashioning the Story in Gallery 18 features 78 fashion figures depicting French styles from 1493 to 1915. The Libbey Dolls, formerly known as the Doucet Dolls, were the product of the World War I aid effort. Purchased in 1917 by Toledo Museum of Art founder Edward Drummond Libbey, the dolls’ clothing was created by Jacques Doucet. Art by great French artists like Nicolas Lancret and Louis-Léopold Boilly, as well as drawings and engravings from late 19th-century fashion publications, inspired his creations. Shakespeare’s Characters: Playing the Part in Gallery 6 marks the 400-year anniversary of the great playwright’s death. The exhibition explores The Bard’s band of characters, from the comedic to the tragic. Approximately 30 paintings, prints, sculptures and photographs bring the beloved writer’s works to life. Here’s a list of other free activities planned during the Great Art Escape: Make a Puppet, Tell a Story! Dec. 27 and 29: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Family Center Dec. 30: 3:30-8 p.m., Family Center Make a puppet in the Family Center and perform your own improvisational theater with it in the Cloister Gallery. Ask Me Hours Dec. 27-30: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Main Museum Dec. 31-Jan. 1: Noon to 4 p.m., Main Museum Look for docents wearing a red “Ask Me” button…


Community lifts voices in First Presbyterian “Messiah” sing-along

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The season’s first snowstorm couldn’t stop music lovers from gathering Sunday to sing-along to holiday music for the ages. A sing-along performance of G. F. Handel’s “Messiah” drew a few dozen to the First Presbyterian Church to listen and sing-along on the choruses. They were joined by the church’s chancel choir, soloists, organ and an 11-piece orchestra. Inside they all found the warmth of the festive atmosphere, and beloved strains of music. As musicologist Christopher Williams, who was singing in the choir, noted in his introductory remarks, “Messiah” is associated with both the Christmas and Easter season. That means its strains, especially the climatic “Hallelujah” chorus, are familiar both to listeners and to singers. The sing-along is intended to bring those two groups together in a spirit of harmony and in literal harmony. The Rev. Gary Saunders, the church’s co-pastor, said that the event fit well into the church’s belief in fostering community and creativity. Josh Wang, the church’s choir director, credited co-pastor Mary Jane Saunders with first suggesting the church stage the performance. She had attended such performances in the past and felt it would work in Bowling Green. Wang, in his first year in his position, was already contemplating a program for the Christmas season, and this fit the bill. “It’s so popular, really beloved music,” he said. So many people have sung it and having them sing the choruses “makes it a more meaningful experience for everyone.” Also, the sing-along makes the event more casual than the usual concert presentation. Not that the soloists, choir and orchestra were casual about preparation. “It was wonderful to be part of something this big,” said Nancy Hess, a member of choir. She enjoyed the challenge of preparing the music. “Obviously we strive for accuracy, and as good a performance as we can,” Wang said. The performance included almost all of the oratorio’s first section, and “The Trumpet Will Sound” and the “Hallelujah” chorus from the final section. Among the soloists was professional singer Diane McEwen-Martin, whose families has long ties to the church. “I was baptized here.” She sang the mezzo-soprano solos. She has performed “Messiah” before, but not all that many times. She explained that she started her career as a mezzo-soprano before shifting up the vocal register…


Library sets holiday hours; Ukulele Club meets, Dec. 18

Submitted by WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY WCDPL (Bowling Green and Walbridge libraries and the Bookmobile) will be closed in observance of Christmas from Friday, December 23 through Monday December 26. Regular hours resume on Tuesday, December 27. The library will also be closed system-wide to observe the New Year’s holiday on Sunday, January 1 and Monday, January 2, 2017. Regular hours resume Tuesday, January 3. Enjoy the holidays with family and friends. Sunday, December 18 at 3 pm: Calling all ukulele enthusiasts looking for a friendly and helpful group to play ukulele with. Look no further–to participate in our Ukulele Club’s jam session, all you need is a ukulele and sense of adventure. Song books and music provided at the jam. RSVP appreciated (419-352-5050), but not required. 1st Floor Meeting Room. For more information, contact WCDPL at 419-352-5104.


BGSU students musical mastery on display in 50th Competition in Musical performance

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When musicians stepped onto the stage of Kobacker Hall late last week to perform in the annual Competition in Musical Performance, there was not much of an audience. A panel of five judges from outside BGSU sat in the center of the hall. Maybe a few more people, friends and fellow musicians, sat toward the back. The stage was starkly lit, and the only company performers had on stage was an accompanist and maybe a page turner for the accompanist. The performers themselves had no pages to turn, no sheets of music to hide behind. They and their practicing over the past few months stood exposed. Every year for the last 50 years, Bowling Green State University undergraduate and graduate students have stepped forward to exhibit their musical mastery. This year 69 student musicians competed for four awards, two each for undergraduate and graduate. They performed Wednesday through Friday with eight finalists returning on Saturday. “This is definitely the ultimate test of everything they need to achieve artistically,” said Nermis Mieses, BGSU professor of oboe who coordinated this year’s event. Each undergraduate performer must play up to 15 minutes of music for their instrument or voice and band or orchestra.  Each graduate student can play up to 20 minutes. The music must be memorized. The competition is open to all instrumentalists and vocalists. This tests the student’s discipline and artistry, as well as “how they handle themselves when they are performing,” Mieses said. Saxophonist Piyaphon Asawakarnjanakit said the most important thing about a competition is it forces the musician “to work more and more.” The first-year graduate student from Thailand said he knew he would participate as soon as he heard about the competition. After his Thursday afternoon performance he conceded he made a few mistakes, still “I’m happy to play my music.” Flutist Aldulfulyne Padmore, another first-year graduate student, came away happy with her performance. “I think I did very well,” she said. “It’s the best I’ve played the piece.” She said she decided to play the concerto by Otar Gordelli because she had studied it before.  She knew she wanted to participate in the competition as a way of adjusting to the greater demands of graduate study. Using a familiar piece allowed her to focus on the…