Sports

BGSU lacrosse honored at sport’s national home

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Mickey Cochrane, retired Bowling Green State University professor and coach, is a member of four halls of fame. (That’s not including the Baseball Hall of Fame where his namesake the legendary Detroit Tigers catcher is enshrined.) The 86-year-old added another honor when a pillar at the entrance of the headquarters of US Lacrosse was dedicated to the BGSU lacrosse program that he started. He and about 65 players along with families and fans traveled down to Maryland to mark the 50th anniversary of the team’s founding. For once, Cochrane was taken by surprise when the pillar was unveiled. Each of the 20 pillars along the perimeter of the field at the headquarters honors a college program, but BGSU is the first to be formally dedicated. Receiving this Legacy Honor is especially notable, Cochrane said, because BGSU no longer fields a varsity team, the program lasted from 1965-1979, when financial retrenchment forced the shuttering of several programs. Cochrane arrived in BGSU in 1964 from Johns Hopkins where he was recruited to coach both lacrosse and soccer. The soccer stadium now bears his name. At that time, both sports were little known in the Midwest. BGSU president at the time, William Jerome, came from Syracuse, New York, Cochrane said. Upstate New York has been a hot bed of lacrosse since before the arrival of Europeans. Jerome gave Cochrane 10 out-of-state scholarships and sent him east to find players, especially if they could play two sports. Many players, he said, competed in soccer in the fall and lacrosse in the spring, though some had a mix of other sports, including football. Football legend Jim Brown played lacrosse in high school and at Syracuse. When Cochrane traveled, he recruited students for the university not just players for the team, and if a young woman was interested in attending BGSU, he spoke to her as well. In these days of one-sport specialization, a few things are missed. Playing more than one sport, Cochrane said, allows a player to fully develop as an athlete and a person. Also, focusing on one sport, always moving the body’s muscles in the same ways, poses greater dangers of injury. The prevalence of torn ACLs among women soccer players is a notable example. During his tenure, the BGSU team won a…


BG school district hires new athletic director

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Jonas Smith served as athletic director for Dayton Public Schools, where he oversaw seven high schools and a $3.6 million renovation of the district’s Welcome Stadium. But something was missing. Smith is hoping to find that missing piece at Bowling Green City School District. “The last several years, I’ve missed being around kids,” Smith said. Tuesday evening, Bowling Green’s board of education hired Smith as the district’s new athletic director. Smith said he was attracted to the “very welcoming” community, the good schools, and the potential to build relationships. Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci said he was attracted to Smith’s 20 years of experience overseeing a large program, his reputation in the state, his winning record at Dayton, and his success securing corporate sponsorships for the renovated stadium. “It’s what he brings to the table,” Scruci said. Smith will receive an annual salary of $90,000. “I’m a firm believer that you get what you pay for,” Scruci said. Smith was accompanied to Tuesday’s school board meeting by his wife, LaDonna, and their two sons, ages 15 and 11. He was also joined by a former school superintendent and mentor, who flew up from South Carolina to be present for his hiring. Smith knows time to prepare for his new job is ticking away, with fall sports starting on Aug. 1. His philosophy for school athletics is “7-12,” he said. The head coaches at the high school level should have a hand in their sports from seventh grade on up. The fundamentals should be stressed at the middle school level, so the athletes will be ready for high school, he said. But he also believes athletics takes a back seat to academics, Smith said. “They are students first, athletes second,” he said. “We’re going to do what’s best for children.” Smith said he will be accessible to parents. “I have an open door policy for parents.” But he also believes in following the chain of command, he added. The new athletic director said he sees a lot of opportunity for the district. “It’s not going to happen overnight, but we’re going to move this district ahead and do what’s right for children.” Also the meeting, the school board hired Eddie Powers to take over as head coach of…


BG Curling Club proud of teams at national championships

Submitted by BG Curling Club On May 10-15, Ice Line Arena in West Chester, Pennsylvania, hosted the United States Curling Association’s Arena National Curling Championships, which included both a men’s and a women’s team from the Bowling Green Curling Club, located in northwest Ohio. The men’s team finished 2-2, in a three-way tie for ninth place among a field of 20 teams from across the U.S., while the women’s team finished 2-4, in tenth place among 18 teams, after a tie-breaker. Both teams just missed advancing to the quarter-final rounds. “The Bowling Green Curling Club is very proud of both our teams and how they performed at Arena Nationals,” said Shannon Orr, club president. “As we move forward with our new dedicated curling facility, which will be opening this fall, we look forward to sending even more local curlers to regional, national, and international competitions. We hope more folks will come to the new club and try one of our learn-to- curls.” The move to a dedicated ice facility will mean, however, that the club will be unable to participate in this event again, which is reserved for curlers from arena-based clubs that share ice with skaters and hockey. The women’s team, consisting of Elizabeth Spencer of Toledo, Angie Jones of Sylvania, Beth Landers of Bowling Green, and Jen Henkel of Perrysburg, lost to San Francisco Bay III (11-2), lost to Lansing (8-1), lost to Palmetto-South Carolina (7-6), won against Dakota-Minnesota, (6-2, with alternate Jennifer Williams of Norwalk), and won against Kansas City (7-5). A second place result for their division in the team draw shot challenge, and sixth place DSC result overall, allowed the women’s team to go to a tie-breaker game, to resolve a three-way tie for third place in their division, and try to advance to the quarter-final round. A re-match with Kansas City did not go in their favor, however, ending with a 10-3 loss. “The women’s team had a great time bonding with each other, other teams, and representing our club,” said women’s team skip, Elizabeth Spencer. “We were also able to gain valuable experience by playing at a national level against teams from as far away as San Francisco. We won some games, and we lost some, but the experience was amazing, and we are excited for all the…


OPINION: Stay true to Muhammad Ali’s radicalism

By DALTON ANTHONY JONES On this day in history. There is so much chatter going on around the passing of this monumental icon of black liberation, anti-imperialism, spiritual freedom and resistance to state violence that I find myself playing spectator to the outpouring of collective grief. I am always curious about, and to be quite honest deeply suspicious of, mass expressions of praise and sympathy for radical figures who, if they were fighting for the principles we claim to honor in them today, would be banished and ridiculed by civil society. MLK, Malcolm, Arthur Ashe, the Panthers, Muhammad Ali….one is left with the impression that they would be welcomed with open arms and flowers if they were to return to us. Has our society really become that more progressive? Has a critique of U.S. intervention abroad really become the emotional norm? Have black people really developed a more radical critique about their position vis-a-vis, the American war machine, the American police state, the American system of finance capitalism and the exploitation of our communities? Please don’t get me wrong, we still have our warriors of social justice, people who are devoting themselves to preserving and furthering the legacy of those who fought to expose the hypocrisies of nationalism and make this world a more safe and just place to be. But taken as a whole, I see more faux sentimentalism than genuine identification in these mourning rituals, these pageants of lamentation and nostalgia. I have a narrative of identification with Ali, of the family huddled around the radio listening to his bouts before the days of internet and cable, of my grandfather meeting Ali and bringing me back his autograph on the conference program….and, of course, so much more. He meant a lot to us. But I hope to honor his passing by being a voice that is willing to accept sanctions to defend and speak my truth. Today, I want to make a recommitment to say “no” to racist oppression, to say  “no” to patriarchal oppression, to say “no” to the apparatus of state violence, to say “no” to the bigotry of gender and queer phobia, to say “no” to the exploitation of our land, animals and air for the accumulation of a surplus profit that will end up in the hands of a…


Moosbrugger comes home to roost as new Falcon athletic director

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bob Moosbrugger knew what he wanted in a career when he was a student at Bowling Green State University. He wanted to be an athletic director. He wanted it so much that after two years playing baseball, and winning the award as the top freshman, he decided he needed to concentrate on his studies. He left the team. On Tuesday, Moosbrugger became an athletic director, and he was returning to the Falcon roost to realize that goal. BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey introduced the 1994 graduate as the university’s new athletic director. He’ll start on July 18. The announcement comes just five weeks after Chris Kingston announced he was leaving to go into the private sector. “It was quick. It was fast,” Moosbrugger said. “It’s been a whirlwind tour.” Mazey said that the search was conducted by Turnkey Search. She said she learned that when an athletic director position opens up, a lot of people are interested. That one of those was a BGSU graduate was a plus. “It’s always great to bring a Falcon home and into the Falcon family.” Mazey noted as a former athlete, Moosbrugger “knows that role of student athlete and how important that is to this university. … I was impressed by his passion for his alma mater.” She said at previous institutions, she has worked with athletic directors who were graduates of those schools and found them to be effective at working with the entire university community from students to alumni. “They were very, very good fundraisers.” “It’s truly a great day to be a Falcon,” Moosbrugger told those gathered for the press conference in the Stroh Center. “I’m coming home.” Moosbrugger, a Celina High School graduate, has been the assistant director of athletics/chief operating officer at San Diego State. He rose to that position having started there in 2000 as the assistant director for the Aztec Athletic Foundation. He emphasized that the story BGSU has to tell goes beyond wins and losses. “We have great student athletes who are developing academically and socially.” He noted that BGSU student athletes have an average GPA of 3.2. BGSU, though, is not alone in having student athletes, or even coaches, whose story gets told in the pages of the police blotter. “It happens everywhere,” he…


BGSU taps alum Moosbrugger as AD

Bowling Green State University will hire Bob Moosbrugger, a 1994 BGSU graduate, as its new athletic director. The university will hold a news conference today (May 17) to make the formal announcement. Moosbrugger is deputy director of athletics and chief operating officer at San Diego State University where he’s been since 2000. He played baseball at BGSU. He is a graduate of Celina High School. Moosbrugger takes over for Chris Kingston who left the position in April.


BGSU Student Recreation Center recognized as outstanding by national association

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS When the Student Recreation Center reopened on Aug. 14, 2014, after a year of renovations, students were delighted with the fresh new spaces, sunny lobby, new equipment and additional facilities. Now the building has been recognized with the National Intramural Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) Outstanding Sports Facilities Award. The award was presented jointly to BGSU Recreation and Wellness and Toledo architects The Collaborative Inc. at the NIRSA Annual Conference and Recreational Sports Expo in Kissimmee, Fla., earlier this month. The NIRSA Outstanding Sports Facilities Awards recognize the innovative designs of new, renovated or expanded collegiate recreational facilities of NIRSA member institutions. Increasingly, research is linking robust recreational programs, facilities and services with student success and satisfaction in higher education. State-of-the art facilities have demonstrated their capacity to greatly enhance the overall student experience, thereby boosting recruitment and improving retention. The annual awards honor facilities that demonstrate excellence in a number of critical areas, including architectural design, functionality and how well the facility meets its intended purpose. Winning facilities exemplify the institution’s commitment to providing the higher education experience desired and valued by students and are considered a standard by which other collegiate recreational facilities should be measured, and from which others can benefit. BGSU’s Recreation Center is featured on the NIRSA website. Students and community members alike are benefiting as a result of the $14.8 million renovation, which was guided in part by their input. In addition to the facility award, BGSU took two, third-place NIRSA awards, in the Student Digital Publication and the Website Design categories. Preparations for the renovation of the Student Recreation Center in 2013 prompted a project to document the history of the center and the University through artifacts, stories and other documents. That project, a digital timeline, was recognized in the Student Digital Publication award. When the Recreation and Wellness staff was going through the building’s basement in preparation for work to begin, they discovered boxes in a storage room. “We found funny pictures of staff from the past, artifacts from anniversary celebrations, old T-shirts, complete photo albums, and other items including meeting minutes, event agendas, programs, and numerous random documents and images,” wrote graduate student Erica Pax, the researcher and designer of the presentation. “After having a good laugh, Recreation and Wellness…


BGSU athletic director Kingston takes private sector job

By BG INDEPENDENT NEWS Bowling Green State University’s athletic director Christopher Kingston is leaving to take a job in the private sector. The university announced this morning that Kingston will leave May 10 to take a job with Learfield Sports, a firm that works with top college sports programs on marketing and multimedia rights. In a letter to the BGSU community, Kingston said he would be a vice president at the company which he has “admired from afar during my professional, collegiate career.” In her letter to faculty and staff, BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey said: “I greatly appreciate the energy and enthusiasm Chris brought to BGSU athletics. Under his guidance, our student athletes found great success in the classroom and on our fields and courts.” Kingston was named athletic director in 2013. He came here from North Carolina State University. In his letter, Kingston writes: “This career change is an opportunity for me to continue serving in the collegiate space and positively impact the resources and opportunities for Student-Athletes, nation-wide. During my time serving as your director of athletics, we have experienced record-setting revenue growth across new and existing mediums, competed at the highest levels and won championships, and most importantly, graduated young men and women at rates that far exceed the national average.” Mazey indicated that plans for filling the post are being finalized. Below is Kingston’s letter to the BGSU community: Dear Falcons: Honor the Past, Create the Future, Make History Now! Those words serve as the motivation for me everyday, to give Bowling Green State University my absolute very best. My time here has come to a close and I am so incredibly pleased with the upward trajectory of this institution. I cannot imagine a more exciting time to be a Falcon. I have made a decision to accept a Vice President position with Learfield Sports, a leadership organization I have admired from afar during my professional, collegiate career. With that, I wanted to reach out to Falcons everywhere with this heartfelt message. Bowling Green State University is a truly special place and this is one of the most innovative and transformational times in Falcon History. That excitement starts with leadership, and I continue to be impressed with the energy, vision and guidance of President Mary Ellen Mazey. “Onward and Upward”…


Scholar puts feminist spin on issues of sports & fitness

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Scholar Pirkko Markula’s talk Monday at Bowling Green State University on “Women’s Empowerment Through Sport and Exercise: Rhetoric or Reality?” revolved around pole dancing, or pole fitness, as it has come to be called. The exercise, popularized in strip clubs, has become a popular form of fitness training for women. Markula opened her talk with positive comments about the activity by one of her students and testimonials from those who participate in pole workouts. The student reported that it helped build her self-confidence as someone who had “overwhelming dissatisfaction with my own body.” This led Markula, who is a professor at the University of Alberta, to wonder: “Pole fitness may be an avenue by which women can develop and maintain positive body image as a result of an environment that emphasizes body acceptance and the body’s abilities.” Still the exercise, with its emphasis on shaping the woman’s body in a stereotypical form that appeals to men, is problematic. At the conclusion of the lecture, Leda Hayes, a graduate student in American Culture Studies, asked the speaker if the popularity of pole fitness could lessen the stigma on those working in the sex industry. Markula said she, contrary to what some believe, considers the sex industry harmful to women, and she wondered why women would choose the particular form of exercise to do. There are other forms of pole exercise, including one practiced in China, that are not sexualized and provide the same benefits. Pole fitness, like female sports and fitness in general, is fraught with issues about social expectations and norms, about empowerment and submission to social stereotypes. Pole fitness “reflects the multi-meanings of feminism for today’s active women,” she said. In her talk, Markula explored the theoretical responses to sports and fitness. Liberal feminists, she said, advocate for inclusion in sports. “Women are liberated when barriers are lifted.” They advocated for Title IX that opened up participation of women in school sports. They pushed for greater inclusion of women in the Olympics. Nearly half the athletes at the last Olympics were women. However less than 3 percent of the media coverage was about women. “Equality,” Markula said, “has not been achieved.” Critical feminists, Markula said, contend that liberal feminism fails because it does not challenge the underlying structure….


Tackling Injustice: Sports as an Arena of Social Change will be focus of Women’s History month on campus

This year, Bowling Green State University will celebrate Women’s History Month with the theme “Tackling Injustice: Sports as an Arena of Social Change.” The Women’s Center and the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, along with a number of campus departments and organizations, have created a slate of programming that explores the role of athletics — and athletes — in positive social change. Numerous special events throughout the month of March are designed to inspire audiences to recognize and celebrate women who have challenged injustice both on and off “the field.” All events are free and open to the public. The first of the two keynote events is “The Toledo Troopers: An Evening with the Winningest Team in Pro-Football History,” featuring the remarkably diverse team of northwest Ohio women who overcame sexism and skepticism to accumulate the best win-loss record in professional football history, in a time before Title IX. Moderated by Tamara Jarrett, executive director of the Women’s Football Foundation, an all-star panel of Toledo Troopers — Linda Jefferson, Verna Henderson, Olivia Flores, Gloria Jimenez, Terry May, Eunice White and Mitchi Collette — escorted by current BGSU Falcon football players, will share their stories and memories. The event begins at 7 p.m. March 23 in 202B Bowen-Thompson Student Union. The second keynote presentation, on March 28, will explore “Women’s Empowerment Through Sport and Exercise: Rhetoric or Reality?” Dr. Pirkko Markula, a physical education and recreation faculty member at the University of Alberta (Canada) and a scholar specializing in socio-cultural studies of physical activity, will discuss her research on feminist empowerment rhetoric, and what terms such as “empowerment,” “choice” and “liberation” mean for today’s female athletes and physically active women. Her presentation is also the keynote address for annual Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Research Symposium. It begins at 2 p.m. March 28 in 308 Bowen-Thompson Student Union (a photo of Dr. Markula is attached to this email). Also from the University of Alberta, Dr. Jim Denison, another prolific and highly respected sport sociologist, will take part in a Sport and Social Justice panel on “Race, Religion, and Social Justice in Sport, from 1-2:15 p.m. March 31 in 207 Union. Also on the panel, from BGSU, are Dr.Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, higher education and student affairs; and Dr. Nancy Spencer, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure…