Sports

Moosbrugger comes home to roost as new Falcon athletic director

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bob Moosbrugger knew what he wanted in a career when he was a student at Bowling Green State University. He wanted to be an athletic director. He wanted it so much that after two years playing baseball, and winning the award as the top freshman, he decided he needed to concentrate on his studies. He left the team. On Tuesday, Moosbrugger became an athletic director, and he was returning to the Falcon roost to realize that goal. BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey introduced the 1994 graduate as the university’s new athletic director. He’ll start on July 18. The announcement comes just five weeks after Chris Kingston announced he was leaving to go into the private sector. “It was quick. It was fast,” Moosbrugger said. “It’s been a whirlwind tour.” Mazey said that the search was conducted by Turnkey Search. She said she learned that when an athletic director position opens up, a lot of people are interested. That one of those was a BGSU graduate was a plus. “It’s always great to bring a Falcon home and into the Falcon family.” Mazey noted as a former athlete, Moosbrugger “knows that role of student athlete and how important that is to this university. … I was impressed by his passion for his alma mater.” She said at previous institutions, she has worked with athletic directors who were graduates of those schools and found them to be effective at working with the entire university community from students to alumni. “They were very, very good fundraisers.” “It’s truly a great day to be a Falcon,” Moosbrugger told those gathered for the press conference in the Stroh Center. “I’m coming home.” Moosbrugger, a Celina High School graduate, has been the assistant director of athletics/chief operating officer at San Diego State. He rose to that position having started there in 2000 as the assistant director for the Aztec Athletic Foundation. He emphasized that the story BGSU has to tell goes beyond wins and losses. “We have great student athletes who are developing academically and socially.” He noted that BGSU student athletes have an average GPA of 3.2. BGSU, though, is not alone in having student athletes, or even coaches, whose story gets told in the pages of the police blotter. “It happens everywhere,” he said. Still “we have to represent Bowling Green State University in a first class way from the athletic director to the head coaches to the student athletes,” he said. “You’ll have to be held accountable for your actions.” He added, “with social media, you’re under a microscope.” Every university wants to recruit athletes, coaches and administrators “of high character.” “If you’re going to be disciplined in life, you’ll be disciplined on the playing fields,” he said. In a time when increasing attention in placed on…


BGSU taps alum Moosbrugger as AD

Bowling Green State University will hire Bob Moosbrugger, a 1994 BGSU graduate, as its new athletic director. The university will hold a news conference today (May 17) to make the formal announcement. Moosbrugger is deputy director of athletics and chief operating officer at San Diego State University where he’s been since 2000. He played baseball at BGSU. He is a graduate of Celina High School. Moosbrugger takes over for Chris Kingston who left the position in April.


BGSU Student Recreation Center recognized as outstanding by national association

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS When the Student Recreation Center reopened on Aug. 14, 2014, after a year of renovations, students were delighted with the fresh new spaces, sunny lobby, new equipment and additional facilities. Now the building has been recognized with the National Intramural Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) Outstanding Sports Facilities Award. The award was presented jointly to BGSU Recreation and Wellness and Toledo architects The Collaborative Inc. at the NIRSA Annual Conference and Recreational Sports Expo in Kissimmee, Fla., earlier this month. The NIRSA Outstanding Sports Facilities Awards recognize the innovative designs of new, renovated or expanded collegiate recreational facilities of NIRSA member institutions. Increasingly, research is linking robust recreational programs, facilities and services with student success and satisfaction in higher education. State-of-the art facilities have demonstrated their capacity to greatly enhance the overall student experience, thereby boosting recruitment and improving retention. The annual awards honor facilities that demonstrate excellence in a number of critical areas, including architectural design, functionality and how well the facility meets its intended purpose. Winning facilities exemplify the institution’s commitment to providing the higher education experience desired and valued by students and are considered a standard by which other collegiate recreational facilities should be measured, and from which others can benefit. BGSU’s Recreation Center is featured on the NIRSA website. Students and community members alike are benefiting as a result of the $14.8 million renovation, which was guided in part by their input. In addition to the facility award, BGSU took two, third-place NIRSA awards, in the Student Digital Publication and the Website Design categories. Preparations for the renovation of the Student Recreation Center in 2013 prompted a project to document the history of the center and the University through artifacts, stories and other documents. That project, a digital timeline, was recognized in the Student Digital Publication award. When the Recreation and Wellness staff was going through the building’s basement in preparation for work to begin, they discovered boxes in a storage room. “We found funny pictures of staff from the past, artifacts from anniversary celebrations, old T-shirts, complete photo albums, and other items including meeting minutes, event agendas, programs, and numerous random documents and images,” wrote graduate student Erica Pax, the researcher and designer of the presentation. “After having a good laugh, Recreation and Wellness marketing staff and students decided to create something that would provide a long-term place where stories about the history of the department could be cataloged for readers to enjoy for years to come, and on which we can build as new research is uncovered and history is continuously created. The target audience includes current BGSU students, faculty and staff, and community members and is also designed for alumni as a place where they can contribute to our ever-growing history and remember their time at BGSU…


BGSU athletic director Kingston takes private sector job

By BG INDEPENDENT NEWS Bowling Green State University’s athletic director Christopher Kingston is leaving to take a job in the private sector. The university announced this morning that Kingston will leave May 10 to take a job with Learfield Sports, a firm that works with top college sports programs on marketing and multimedia rights. In a letter to the BGSU community, Kingston said he would be a vice president at the company which he has “admired from afar during my professional, collegiate career.” In her letter to faculty and staff, BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey said: “I greatly appreciate the energy and enthusiasm Chris brought to BGSU athletics. Under his guidance, our student athletes found great success in the classroom and on our fields and courts.” Kingston was named athletic director in 2013. He came here from North Carolina State University. In his letter, Kingston writes: “This career change is an opportunity for me to continue serving in the collegiate space and positively impact the resources and opportunities for Student-Athletes, nation-wide. During my time serving as your director of athletics, we have experienced record-setting revenue growth across new and existing mediums, competed at the highest levels and won championships, and most importantly, graduated young men and women at rates that far exceed the national average.” Mazey indicated that plans for filling the post are being finalized. Below is Kingston’s letter to the BGSU community: Dear Falcons: Honor the Past, Create the Future, Make History Now! Those words serve as the motivation for me everyday, to give Bowling Green State University my absolute very best. My time here has come to a close and I am so incredibly pleased with the upward trajectory of this institution. I cannot imagine a more exciting time to be a Falcon. I have made a decision to accept a Vice President position with Learfield Sports, a leadership organization I have admired from afar during my professional, collegiate career. With that, I wanted to reach out to Falcons everywhere with this heartfelt message. Bowling Green State University is a truly special place and this is one of the most innovative and transformational times in Falcon History. That excitement starts with leadership, and I continue to be impressed with the energy, vision and guidance of President Mary Ellen Mazey. “Onward and Upward” are the three words that come to mind when I think about the incredible opportunity afforded to me by our President, and I will be forever grateful for being able to serve BGSU. Thank you President Mazey. This career change is an opportunity for me to continue serving in the collegiate space and positively impact the resources and opportunities for Student-Athletes, nation-wide. During my time serving as your director of athletics, we have experienced record-setting revenue growth across new and existing mediums, competed at the…


Scholar puts feminist spin on issues of sports & fitness

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Scholar Pirkko Markula’s talk Monday at Bowling Green State University on “Women’s Empowerment Through Sport and Exercise: Rhetoric or Reality?” revolved around pole dancing, or pole fitness, as it has come to be called. The exercise, popularized in strip clubs, has become a popular form of fitness training for women. Markula opened her talk with positive comments about the activity by one of her students and testimonials from those who participate in pole workouts. The student reported that it helped build her self-confidence as someone who had “overwhelming dissatisfaction with my own body.” This led Markula, who is a professor at the University of Alberta, to wonder: “Pole fitness may be an avenue by which women can develop and maintain positive body image as a result of an environment that emphasizes body acceptance and the body’s abilities.” Still the exercise, with its emphasis on shaping the woman’s body in a stereotypical form that appeals to men, is problematic. At the conclusion of the lecture, Leda Hayes, a graduate student in American Culture Studies, asked the speaker if the popularity of pole fitness could lessen the stigma on those working in the sex industry. Markula said she, contrary to what some believe, considers the sex industry harmful to women, and she wondered why women would choose the particular form of exercise to do. There are other forms of pole exercise, including one practiced in China, that are not sexualized and provide the same benefits. Pole fitness, like female sports and fitness in general, is fraught with issues about social expectations and norms, about empowerment and submission to social stereotypes. Pole fitness “reflects the multi-meanings of feminism for today’s active women,” she said. In her talk, Markula explored the theoretical responses to sports and fitness. Liberal feminists, she said, advocate for inclusion in sports. “Women are liberated when barriers are lifted.” They advocated for Title IX that opened up participation of women in school sports. They pushed for greater inclusion of women in the Olympics. Nearly half the athletes at the last Olympics were women. However less than 3 percent of the media coverage was about women. “Equality,” Markula said, “has not been achieved.” Critical feminists, Markula said, contend that liberal feminism fails because it does not challenge the underlying structure. Women may be tennis players, swimmers, soccer players, boxers or weight lifters, but the media coverage still emphasizes their personal lives, their mates and how they deal with motherhood, not their athletic accomplishments. And the emphasis remains on those who are white and middle class and possess “the thin, toned sexy femininity attractive to men” as opposed doing those with more muscular physiques. Liberal feminists, Markula said, were accused of doing too little to challenge the social structures “that keep male dominance in place.” Post-feminism…


Tackling Injustice: Sports as an Arena of Social Change will be focus of Women’s History month on campus

This year, Bowling Green State University will celebrate Women’s History Month with the theme “Tackling Injustice: Sports as an Arena of Social Change.” The Women’s Center and the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, along with a number of campus departments and organizations, have created a slate of programming that explores the role of athletics — and athletes — in positive social change. Numerous special events throughout the month of March are designed to inspire audiences to recognize and celebrate women who have challenged injustice both on and off “the field.” All events are free and open to the public. The first of the two keynote events is “The Toledo Troopers: An Evening with the Winningest Team in Pro-Football History,” featuring the remarkably diverse team of northwest Ohio women who overcame sexism and skepticism to accumulate the best win-loss record in professional football history, in a time before Title IX. Moderated by Tamara Jarrett, executive director of the Women’s Football Foundation, an all-star panel of Toledo Troopers — Linda Jefferson, Verna Henderson, Olivia Flores, Gloria Jimenez, Terry May, Eunice White and Mitchi Collette — escorted by current BGSU Falcon football players, will share their stories and memories. The event begins at 7 p.m. March 23 in 202B Bowen-Thompson Student Union. The second keynote presentation, on March 28, will explore “Women’s Empowerment Through Sport and Exercise: Rhetoric or Reality?” Dr. Pirkko Markula, a physical education and recreation faculty member at the University of Alberta (Canada) and a scholar specializing in socio-cultural studies of physical activity, will discuss her research on feminist empowerment rhetoric, and what terms such as “empowerment,” “choice” and “liberation” mean for today’s female athletes and physically active women. Her presentation is also the keynote address for annual Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Research Symposium. It begins at 2 p.m. March 28 in 308 Bowen-Thompson Student Union (a photo of Dr. Markula is attached to this email). Also from the University of Alberta, Dr. Jim Denison, another prolific and highly respected sport sociologist, will take part in a Sport and Social Justice panel on “Race, Religion, and Social Justice in Sport, from 1-2:15 p.m. March 31 in 207 Union. Also on the panel, from BGSU, are Dr.Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, higher education and student affairs; and Dr. Nancy Spencer, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies. Denison will be on campus along with other internationally recognized scholars and BGSU faculty from a variety of disciplines committed to social justice to participate in the Social Justice through Sport and Exercise Psychology Symposium April 1-2 in 201 Union. The guest faculty will give talks and visit classes and student groups the week of March 28-April 1. Among the topics of the symposium are Sport and the Construction of Gendered Identities and Social Justice in Sport: LGBT Inclusion. For more information, contact Dr….